You are on page 1of 10

Ling170D | Intro to Linguistics with Dr.

Getty | Fall 2009

Week 4 | The –Emes: Organizing Seemingly Messy Language Behavior

C O R R E C T E D V E R S I O N !

Cleaning up from last week … 
 
Sonorants vs. Obstruents  [m, n, ŋ, l, r, w, j, I, all vowels]     vs.  [p, b, t, d, k, g] 
 
Sonorant:     Free flow of air out of the head (if only through the nose) combined with voicing 
Obstruent:    Mouth is closed off and velum is raised, blocking the flow of air out the nose 
 
Continuants vs. Non‐Continuents: [f, v, θ, ð, s, z, ʃ, Ʒ, h, l, r, w, j, all vowels]    vs.  [p, b, t, d, k, g, m, n, ŋ]
 
Continuant:    Uninterrupted flow of air out of the mouth, with or without voicing 
Non‐Continuant:  Mouth is closed off, with or without flow of air out through the nose 
 

Part I: Phonemics
 
Consider these words: 
 
Steak – Take – Truck – Twin – Water – Witness  
 
Speaker of English have a sense – captured pretty well by our spelling system – that the sounds suggested by 
the letter <t> are more or less the same. If you ask people how many different ‘sounds’ they hear in these 
words when cued by the letter <t>, they will generally tell you they hear one, at most two.  
 
Now that you’ve been focussing on articulatory phonetics for weeks, you know enough to know that the 
reality is more complex. 
 
The sounds – or to use a term we’ll start using more and more – the segments corresponding to <t> in these 
words are very different little beasts, phonetically speaking 
 
Spelling Narrow Phonetic Transcription Segment Corresponding to <t>
Steak [stejk] [t ] Voiceless alveolar stop

Take [t h ejk] h
[t ] Aspirated voiceless alveolar stop

Truck  [ʈrək] [ʈ ] Voiceless retroflex stop

Twin [t w w I n] w
[t ] Voicless labialized alveolar stop

Water [wɑɾr] [ɾ ] Voiced alveolar flap

Witness [wi ɂ tnəs] [ɂ t ] Voiceless glottalized unreleased alveolar stop 

Ling 170D | Intro to Linguistics with Dr. Getty | Fall 2009 | Week 5 part 1 | Page 1 of 10 
 
How could millions of otherwise intelligent people not notice these glaring articulatory differences?  
 
Because the different sounds are all physical manifestations – made with the meat in our heads – of a sort of 
idealized, underlying, mental construct called a phoneme.  
 
The Superhero Paradigm 
 
Think of phonemes and their phonetic realizations as being like the identities of a certain superhero: 
 

 
 
This is Superman. He wears satin tights, appears when people are in danger and shows characteristics that are 
adapted to those contexts: he can stop bullets, melt steel with his eyeballs, and fly around.  
 

 
 
This is Clark Kent, a socially awkward reporter with the Daily Planet. He can type really fast, and his copy isn’t 
half bad, but he’s never around when all the really exciting stuff happens, like supervillains trying to blow up 
Metropolis.  
 
To someone who just got off the bus in Metropolis, there’s no reason at all to think that these two individuals 
are connected to each other. But when you sit down and start to do some analysis, the pieces start coming 
together. 
 
• The two of them have a similar build, hair color, and eye color.  
• Their voices and accents are arrestingly similar.  
• You never see them both in the same place at the same time:  
o Clark Kent disappears just before Superman appears, and vice‐versa. 
o You never see Superman working at Clark Kent’s desk at the Daily Planet. 
o You never see Clark Kent flying through the air or melting steel with his eyeballs.  
 

Ling 170D | Intro to Linguistics with Dr. Getty | Fall 2009 | Week 5 part 1 | Page 2 of 10 
So after a great deal of analysis, you figure out that “Superman” and “Clark Kent” don’t really exist 
independently. They are just different public faces of a more mysterious individual – a refugee from the planet 
Krypton named Kal‐El, son of the late Mr. Jor‐El, also of Krypton.  
 

 
 
We never really see Kal‐El just as himself because he spends all his time in settings where he is compelled to 
show one manifestation or another.  
 
Phonemes and Their Allophones 
 
The phonetic segments we pronounce when cued by the letter <t> in steak – take – truck – twin – water – 
witness are like Superman and Clark Kent. They are different manifestations of a more mysterious, more 
abstract underlying entity, a phoneme.  
 
When writing this stuff down, we enclose phonemes in forward‐leaning slashes, and we represent them with 
symbols that suggest their underlying characteristics.  
 
For the segments we’re dealing with here, we’ll use this: /t/.  
 
But we could really use any symbol, even something like /☺/, because a phoneme is not a sound; it is a purely 
mental construct. It lives in the head of an English speaker as an abstract representation of something that is 
realized as different phonetic segments in different settings.  
 
 
  Phoneme:                                 /t/ 
 
 
 
  Phonetic  [t]      [th]      [ʈ]         [ɾ]          … 
  realizations:
 
 

Ling 170D | Intro to Linguistics with Dr. Getty | Fall 2009 | Week 5 part 1 | Page 3 of 10 
Once you’ve figured out Kal‐El’s secret, you can predict with a high degree of accuracy when you’re likely to 
see his Superman persona (burning buildings, people falling from skyscrapers, etc.) and when you’re likely to 
see his Clark Kent persona (working at the Daily Planet, running errands for Lois Lane, riding the bus).  
 
Likewise, you can express rules that predict which phonetic realizations of a particular phoneme you find in 
which settings. Here’s a simplified version for /t/: 
 
Narrow Phonetic  Phonetic Realization of the 
Spelling Transcription Phoneme /t/ Context

Preceded at the start of a syllable 
Steak [stejk] [t ] Voiceless alveolar stop
by [s]

h
h [t ] Aspirated voiceless  At the beginning of a syllable 
Take [t ejk] when followed a vowel
alveolar stop

Followed by a retroflex 
Truck  [ʈrək] [ʈ ] Voiceless retroflex stop
approximant [r]

w
w [t ] Voicless labialized  Followed by a labiovelar 
Twin [t w I n] approximant [w]
alveolar stop

Between two vowels or a vowel 
Water [wɑɾr] [ɾ ] Voiced alveolar flap and an approximant, the leftmost 
of which is stressed

[ɂ t ] Voiceless glottalized 
[wi ɂ tnəs]
At the end of a syllable, followed 
Witness
unreleased alveolar stop by a nasal 

 
We’re going to use a new term – allophones – to talk about varying phonetic realizations of a given phoneme. 
The root of the term is the Greek word allos, meaning ‘different.’ You also see this root in the biological term 
allele, which describes different physical manifestations of the same gene.  
 
Except for the alternations you see going on in take, steak, and witness, which we’ll talk about soon, it’s easy 
to see what’s going on here. The phonetic realization of /t/ is adapting – or assimilating, as we say more often 
– to its phonetic environment: becoming retroflex in anticipating of a following retroflex consonant in truck, 
taking on the rounded lips of a following labiovelar approximant in twin, taking on the voicing of surrounding 
vowel segments in water.  
 
See Hudson pp. 48f. for other common patterns of allophonic variation in North American English.  
 
 
 
 
 
Ling 170D | Intro to Linguistics with Dr. Getty | Fall 2009 | Week 5 part 1 | Page 4 of 10 
And Then There’s This 
 
English speakers not trained in linguistics are blissfully unaware of all the different, exotic sounds they produce 
with virtually 100% accuracy in the appropriate phonetic environments. 
 
Speakers of certain other languages produce these same sounds, but for them, phonetic environment doesn’t 
predict which ones they realize where. Instead, it’s meaning. Here’s Hindi: 
 
Alveolar vs. Retroflex:   [tɑ:l]   ‘pond’    [ʈɑ:l]   ‘postpone’ 
Unaspirated vs. Aspirated:  [tɑn]   ‘tune’     [thɑn]  ‘piece of cloth’ 
 
So in each pair of Hindi examples, the only way to predict which segment will appear is to know what the 
conversation is about. Are you talking about ponds or about postponing something? Are you talking about 
tunes or pieces of cloth?  
 
We call these sets minimal pairs: Two words with distinct meanings in a given language that differ only with 
respect to a single phonetic feature.  
 
Minimal pairs show us which differences between the phonetic segments you find in a given language are 
meaning‐bearing and which can be predicted by environment.  
 
When a given phonetic difference is meaning‐bearing, we call it phonemic or contrastive. When it’s not, we 
say that the various phonetic segments are in complementary distribution.  
 
In Hindi, the segments [t] and [ʈ] correspond to distinct phonemes, which we might as well represent as /t/ 
and /ʈ/. The examples with [t] and [th] show us that Hindi has a third phoneme, which we might as well 
represent as /th/.  
 
On the Flip Side 
 
I had a roommate in my sophomore year, Evis (short for Evripides), who was a native speaker of Greek.  
One day, he came to my room and said what sounded like “Michael, come here. I want to show you my new 
shits.”  
 
I had already taken Introduction to Linguistics, so I had an idea of what was going on, but it was nonetheless 
with some apprehension that I went into his room.  
 
There on his bed were some new sheets.  
 
“Oh,” I said, “You mean new sheets."  
 
“That’s what I said,” he replied. “Shits.” 
 
I tried to teach Evis, but we didn’t get very far.  
 

Ling 170D | Intro to Linguistics with Dr. Getty | Fall 2009 | Week 5 part 1 | Page 5 of 10 
I would say, ‘Repeat after me: sheets, shits, sheets, shits.’  
 
Evis would say, ‘Shits, shits, shits, shits.’ 
 
The reason this story is funny is that for English speakers, sheets and shits are very different things, and the 
distinction between the two words rests on a single difference in sound: tense versus lax, /i/ vs /І/. 
 
For Evis and other speakers of Greek (to simplify a bit), the two sounds appear predictably in different 
phonetic environments: [І] appears when it’s followed by one or more consonants within its syllable (like in 
sh__ts), while [i] appears when it’s the last sound in its syllable.  
 
Since the difference between /i/ vs /І/ is not meaning‐bearing in Greek, speakers are not conditioned to listen 
for the difference, and without training or a knack for other languages, they have a difficult time hearing it.  
 
For us English speakers, the difference is as clear as night and day. Having fresh sheets is a cause for 
celebration, but fresh shits? Opinions may differ on that one.  
 
Back to the Superhero Metaphor 
 
When differences between segments are contrastive, like [i] vs. [I] in English, or [t] vs. [th] in Hindi, it’s like 
discovering that Clark Kent and Superman really are different beings, like walking into the Daily Planet and 
seeing the two of them chatting at the water cooler. If they appear in the same environment, they have to be 
separate people. They are who they appear to be, and there is no Kal‐El. 
 
Allphonic Variation,            Phonemic distinction, 
Complementary Distribution:         Contrastive Distribution 
h
[t] vs. [t ] in English            /t/ vs. /th/ in Hindi 
[i] vs. [I] in Greek            /i/ vs. /I/ in English 
 
  Hi, Clark. 
Hello, 
Superman.

        
                     Superman            Clark Kent     
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   

Ling 170D | Intro to Linguistics with Dr. Getty | Fall 2009 | Week 5 part 1 | Page 6 of 10 
Getting Real Now 
 
Here’s an example: Czech vs. English, where the colon ‘:’ indicates the length of a vowel. [e:] is longer than [e]. 
 
Czech    English 

[bit]  ‘to be’    [bit] ‘beat’ 

[bi:t]  ‘apartment’    [bi:d] ‘bead’ 

[dɑl]  ‘balance’    [sɑt]  ‘sought’ 

[dɑ:l]  ‘distance’    [sɑ:d]  ‘sod’ 

[vest]  ‘vests’    [let] ‘late’ 

[ve:st]  ‘to lead’    [le:d] ‘layed’ 

 
How many phonemes are behind the pair of segments [i] and [i:] in Czech? Two, the same for the other two 
pairs. Why? Because the phonetic environment in which the segments appear do nothing to help you predict 
which one will appear when.  
 
How many phonemes are behind their counterparts in English? One each, because we can predict when the 
short and long versions appear: short before voiceless consonants, long before voiced. So [i] and [i:] are 
allophones are a Kal‐El‐Superman‐Clark‐Kent trio: two allphones of a common underlying phoneme.  
 
One more: English vs. Spanish 
   
Czech    English 

[deðo]  ‘finger    [si:d]  ‘seed’ 

[miðeðo]  ‘my finger’    [si:ð]  ‘seethe’ 

[perðiðɑ]  ‘lost (feminine)’    [lædr]  ‘ladder’ 

[donde]  ‘where’    [læðr]  ‘lather’ 

[deðonde]  ‘from where’    [dow]  ‘dough’ 

[ɑðemɑs]  ‘however’    [ðow]  ‘though’ 

How many phonemes are behind the segments [d] and [ð] in Spanish? Just one.  
 

Ling 170D | Intro to Linguistics with Dr. Getty | Fall 2009 | Week 5 part 1 | Page 7 of 10 
Why? Because we can express a rule that predicts which one will appear based on its phonetic environment: 
The allphone [d] occurs only if preceded by a nasal consonant or by nothing at all. The fricative allophone [ð] 
occurs everywhere else.  
 
How many phonemes are in the English example? Two, because the segments [d] and [ð] occur in identical 
environments.     
 
Neat minimal pairs like the ones we’ve been looking at are difficult to come by, but we can make strong claims 
about the phonemic structure of a language based on fairly short lists of words. 
 
Consider the following words in Canadian French and Japanese, where:  
 
• [Y] is a high front lax rounded vowel 
• [ts] and [tʃ] are alveolar and alveopalatal fricatives, respectively 
• [ɂ] is a glottal stop, which for no good reason is obligatory at the end of a Japanese word when it’s 
uttered in isolation   
 
Canadian French    Japanese 

[tu]  ‘all’    [tonoɂ]  ‘mansion’ 

[ts Y]  ‘you’    [ts Ynoɂ]  ‘horn’ 

[ramants Ik]  ‘romantic’    [tɑtɑmiɂ]  ‘straw floor covering’ 

[ts ire]  ‘to pull’    [hɑtʃiɂ]  ‘bowl, basin’ 

[tɛt]  ‘head’    [hɑts Yɂ]  ‘eight’ 

[tənir]  ‘hold’    [tɛɾYɂ]  ‘to shine’ 

[tɑws]  ‘cup’    [tɛsYtoɂ]  ‘test’ 

[pɑrts i]  ‘departed’    [pɑtʃiɂ]  ‘party’ (older pronunciation) 

[partɔ̃]  ‘runner’    [tʃirYɂ]  ‘to fall’ 


 
What is the phonemic structure behind [t] and [ts] in Canadian French? Does this analysis describe Japanese as 
well, or is there more going on? 
 
Answer is on the next page… 
   

Ling 170D | Intro to Linguistics with Dr. Getty | Fall 2009 | Week 5 part 1 | Page 8 of 10 
 
Canadian French: 
 
[ts] and [t] represent predictable allophones of a single phoneme: 
 
• [ts] before high front vowels 
• [t] everywhere else 
 
Japanese:  
 
[ts], [tʃ], and [t] represent predictable allophones of a single phoneme: 
 
• [ts] before the high front rounded vowel [Y] 
• [tʃ] before the high front unrounded vowel [i] 
• [t] everywhere else 
 
 
More Practice 
 
Solutions to be covered only in class! 
 
Hebrew 
 
[kɛlɛv] ‘dog’    [kɑlbim] ‘dogs’ 

[ʃɛxinɑ] ‘presence’  [miʃkan] ‘dwelling place’ 

[ʃɑvɑt] ‘stopped’  [jiʃbot] ‘was stopping’ 

[mɛlɛx] ‘king’  [mɑlkɑ] ‘queen’ 


 
Do the stop‐fricative segment pairs [k‐x] and [b‐v] reflect one phoneme each or two each? 
 
Lebanese Arabic 
 
[ɂiƷu] ‘they came’  [ktæbu] ‘his book’ 

[ʃu] ‘what’  [tɑʕu] ‘come!’ 

[ʕʊd͎u] ‘member’  [ɂʊtrʊk] ‘leave!’ 

[bʊdrʊs] ‘I study’  [kʊtʊb] ‘books’ 

[tʊʃhʊr] ‘months’  [lʊbnæn] ‘Lebanon’ 


 
Do [u] and [ʊ] represent two allophones of the same phoneme or distinct phonemes? 
 
 
Ling 170D | Intro to Linguistics with Dr. Getty | Fall 2009 | Week 5 part 1 | Page 9 of 10 
 
Polish 
 
[odrɑƷɑtʃ j] ‘to advise  [sɑƷɑ] ‘soot’ 

[noƷɛ] ‘to (a) foot’  [Ʒbɑn] ‘jug’ 

[kɑƷeɲɛ] ‘flattery’  [bɑrƷo] ‘leave!’ 

[zegɑrɛk] ‘watch’  [kɑzɑtʃ] ‘to command’ 

[zvɑni] ‘called’  [zboƷɛ] ‘Lebanon’ 

[grozɑ] ‘threat’  [jɛ̃zik] ‘language’ 


 
Do [z] and [Ʒ] represent two allophones of the same phoneme or distinct phonemes? 
   
 

Ling 170D | Intro to Linguistics with Dr. Getty | Fall 2009 | Week 5 part 1 | Page 10 of 10