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CAMBODIA COUNTRY PROGRAM

END-YEAR REPORT

“The lasting benefits that we create don’t come because we do good deeds, but because we
do good work – work that is focused on our mission to create value.”

FISCAL YEAR 2009


END-YEAR REPORT
FISCAL YEAR 2009

Writing and Compiling: Program/Project/Field staff


Editing and Modifying: Uon Vichetr, Chhouk Chantha, and Paddy Noble

Layout designed: Uon Vichetr


Photos: CWS Staff

Copies of this report are available at


Church World Service – Cambodia

Office: 69z, Street 450, Toul Tumpong II, Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Phone: (855) 23 217 786, Fax: (855) 23 216 014
E-mail: info@cwscambodia.org, Website: www.cwscambodia.org
© Copyright 2009, Church World Service Cambodia (CWS Cambodia)

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any
means, without prior permission from CWS-C. Any person who does any unauthorized act in relation to
this publication may be liable to criminal prosecution and civil claims of damages.

Second published, 2009

Published by Church World Service Cambodia


This book is not for sale through commercial channels.
Acknowledgements

This document was compiled from extensive reports provided by partner NGOs, CWS
Cambodia field staff, project officers and managers, as well as field visits by the three members
of the Funding, Monitoring, Evaluation and Reporting unit: Mr. Uon Vichetr (Reporting and
Proposal Development Officer); Mr. Heng Kun (Monitoring and Evaluation Officer); and Ms.
Pong Pagna Vattey (Data Management Officer).

The FMER unit of Church World Service Cambodia would like to express our deep appreciation
to all CNGOs Partners, as well as our field staff, program officers and managers, Director for
Programming and Country Representative for their valuable contributions and assistance in
compiling and reviewing this report.

We are especially grateful to the residents of the villages where CWS Cambodia and our
partners work who were eager to discuss the challenges and opportunities they face, and the
effectiveness and constraints of our work. Their valuable feedback has been the primary source
of direction for our programming as well as this report.

i
ABBREVIATIONS
Acronym Full names

ADOVIR Association for Development and Our Villager’s Rights


AIDS Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome
BTB Battambang Province
BTM Banteay Meanchey Province
CAT Capacity Assessment Tool
CBDRM Community Based Disaster Risk Management
CBFA Community Based First Aid
CBO Community Based Organization
CC Commune Council/Concilor
CCC Cooperation Committee for Cambodia
CCDM Commune Committee for Disaster Management
CD Community Development
CDF Community Development Facilitator
CDP Commune Development Plan
CDW Community Development Worker
CFEDA Cambodian Family Economic Development Association
CIDC Cooperation for Indigenous People and Development in Cambodia
CSF Children Support Foundation
CHART Creative, Holistic, Action Research for Relationship Transformation
CNGO Cambodian Non-governmental Organization
Com Dev Community Development
CRC Cambodian Red Cross
CWS Church World Service
DAP Direct Aid Project
DCA Dan Church Aid
DCDM District Committee for Disaster Management
DIPECHO Disaster Preparedness of European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office
DSP Direct Services Program
DYMB Dhammayietra Mongkol Borei
DYBTM Dhammayietra Banteay Meanchey
DYBTB Dhammayietra Battambang
ECHO European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office
EED Evangelischer Entwicklungsdienst
ERP Emergency Response and Preparedness
FMER Funding, Monitoring, Evaluation and Reporting
FY Fiscal Year or financial year
GPP Good Principle Project
HC Health Center
HIV Human Immunodeficiency Virus
HVCA Hazard, vulnerability and Capacity Assessment
ICA Initiatives for Change Association
ICD Integrated Community Development
ICDP Integrated Community Development Programme
IDP Internally Displaced People
INGO International Non-profit Organization
KCDA Khmer Community Development Association
KCC Kampuchea Christian Council
KM Kilometer
KNTO Kumnit Thmey Organization
KORCD Khmer Organization for Rural Community Development
KPT Kompong Thom province
LCP Local Capacity for Peace
LWF Lutheran World Federation
ii
MCH Mother and Child Health
M&E Monitoring and Evaluation

MEDICAM Medical Cambodia (Umbrella organization for public health NGOs in


Cambodia)
MoH Ministry of Health
MoEY Ministry of Education Youth and Sports
MoU Memorandum of Understanding
MRD Ministry of Rural Development
NCCA National Council of Churches in Australia
NCCC The NGOs Code Compliance Committee
NCDM National Committee for Disaster Management
NGO Non Government Organization
OMC Oddar Meanchey Province
OD Operational District/Organization Development
OPA Old People Association
Pc Project Coordinator/ Program Coordinator
PDoA Provincial Department of Agriculture
PDoE Provincial Department of Education
PDoH Provincial Department of Health
PCDM Provincial Committee for Disaster Management
PDRD Provincial Department of Rural Development
PLHA People living with HIV/AIDS
PFT Provincial Facilitation Team
PRA Participatory Rural Appraisal
PROCOCOM Provincial Coordination Committee
PM Project Manager/Program Manager
PO Program Officer
POG Program Oversight Group
PP Partnership Program/Project
PRA Participatory Rural Appraisal
PRC Provincial Red Cross
PVH Preah Vihear Province
RCV Red Cross Volunteer
SHG Self Help Group
SMCH Support Mother and Child Health/Support Maternal Child Health
SMT Senior Management Team
SRI Integrated System of Rice Intensification
STD Sexually Transmitted Diseases
SvR Svay Rieng province
TBA Traditional Birth Attendant
US$ United States Dollar
VBCD Village-Based Community Development
VBNK Vityeasthan Bondosbandal Neakkrupkrong (an institute for managers
of organizations working for the development of Cambodia)
VC Village Chief
VCPM Village Committee for Program Management
VDC Village Development Committee
VDV Village Disaster Volunteer
VHV Village Health Volunteer
VL Village Leader
VLA Village Livestock Agent
VP Vulnerable People
WATSAN Water and Sanitation
WCA Working Capital Assistance
WFP World Food Programme
WSUG Water and Sanitation User Group

iii
Table of Contents

Page
Acknowledgements ………………………………………………………………………………………..…i
Abbreviation or Acronym……………………………………………………………………………………ii
Table of Contents……………………………………………………………………………………………iv

Direct Services Program


1.1 Direct Services Office…………………………………………………………..……………..1
1.2 KPT Village Based Community Development Project……………………………………15
1.3 PvH Village Based Community Development Project……………………………………25
1.4 SvR Water and Sanitation Cooperation Project…………………………………………..34

Partnership Program

2.1 Partnership Office………………………………………………………………….…………42


2.2 BTB/BTM Partnership Project…………………………………………………….…….…..49
2.3 KPT Partnership Project………………………………………………………….……….…61

Phnom Penh Central Office

3 FMER, Finance, Administration, and Human Resource Management………….…….69

Appendices

Appendix I : Summary of Finances…………………………………………….……………….86


Appendix II : Annual Outputs/Log-frame………………………………………………………108
Appendix III : CWS/Cambodia Personnel List…………………………………………………204

Annexes

Annex A : Organizational Chart……………………………………………………207


Annex B : Geographical Implementation Areas………………………………… 208
Annex B : Target Villages ………………………………………………………… 209

iv
DIRECT SERVICES PROGRAM
 KOMPONG THOM VILLAGE BASED COMMUNITY
DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

 PREAH VIHEAR VILLAGE BASED COMMUNITY


DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

 SVAY RIENG WATSAN COOPERATION PROJECT

 EMERGENCY RESPONSE

 PEACE

CHURCH WORLD SERVICE - CAMBODIA


1.1. DIRECT SERVICES PROGRAM

Introduction

The Direct Service Program office was established in 2006 to solve coordination and
communication problems faced by the Community Development Program and Strategic Support
Unit. The solution was to merge these two groups at our central office in Phnom Penh, and as a
result we have been able to streamline and strengthen the provision of technical and managerial
support in the field. Our aim of delivering the most effective and sustainable solutions to meet
the most urgent needs faced by rural Cambodians, especially those isolated in poverty, has
been enhanced.

During this reporting period, as usual, the DSP office still plays a very important role in
supporting and mentoring to the Kompong Thom and Preah Vihear Provincial Village Based
Community Development Projects, and the Svay Rieng Water and Sanitation Cooperation
Project to ensure that they can achieve, on-time, their prioritized work plans. Technical and
managerial support is the core and important duties implemented by the Office staff to enable
projects to have a success rate to date. Health, peace, income generation and agriculture
officers regularly visit the field as well as assist the Project staff to conduct research, training and
other workshops providing ongoing mentoring and coaching from time to time.

CWS C AMBODIA ’ S D IRECT S ERVICES T ARGET A REAS

Direct Services Program 1


In addition, during the current tensions at the Thai-Cambodia border concerning the world
heritage Preah Vihear Temple and related border areas have also put the CWS staff, who are
members of the CWS Security Committee, to assess and work closely with authorities to
maintain an update on the current security problems that have arisen since the conflict. The
CWS Security Committee have consulted with the local authorities to gain reliable information
thus visiting areas of high risk before making a final decision in consultation with other
committee members before allowing staff to return to the work areas they have previously been
working in.

The current situation related to the Thai-Cambodia boarder near the Preah Vihear Temple has
reignited a long disputed section of the border between the two countries which has now
escalated to the northwest province which has displaced over 500 families with the numbers
continuing to rise. According to the Cambodian provincial authorities, over 520 families (1,660
individuals) are currently taking shelter in a camp for displaced persons in Sra-Em village, about
20 kilometers from Preah Vihear. The displaced people include 277 families from Prasat Village
whose houses were burned to the ground, and another 243 families from Kor Mouy and Svay
Chum Villages, many of whom were vendors from a market burned to the ground in the initial
fighting; also there are military movements on both sides of the border and the populations of
two villages in Banteay Meanchey, Banteay Ampil District are also affected and fleeing their
villages to safety.

CWS staff on the ground report that their rapid assessment of the situation (as of April 13th 2009)
for the most affected displaced families reveals an urgent needs action plan for the worst
affected displaced families, which include emergency shelter, food, non-food relief items,
hygiene promotion, latrines and health services. In coordination with other organizations and
government authorities, through the Provincial National Disaster Management Authority and
Cambodian Red Cross, CWS has today submitted a request for approximately US$ 22,453 from
the ACT Rapid Response Fund to support a two month response supporting 520 of the most
vulnerable IDP families with food packages, kitchen sets, tents, water containers, mats,
mosquito-nets as well as ceramic water filters.

A LONG THE WAY TO GO K AONG Y AONG VILLAGE , 3 HOURS 16KM TRAVELED BY M OTORBIKE

Direct Services Program 2


Our Objective: To improve communities' capacity for peace building, emergency response, and
disaster risk management, and facilitate their ability to define their development direction in a
participatory and democratic manner.

Major Accomplishments and Changes

Emergency Response in Sra-Em Village

The tension between Thailand and Cambodia


over a disputed area of Preah Vihear temple
and other areas along the border has
overshadowed us for almost one year. Many
people living along the border suffer from this
potential armed conflict situation escaping
from the military to find safety in other areas.
Three villages (Svay Chrum, Kor Mouy,
Prasat) located near Preah Vihear temple
evacuated to Sra-Em IDP camp which is
about 20km far from the disputed hot spot
area of conflict due to sporadic military
conflict since April 3rd 2009.

CWS Cambodia took immediate action to


respond to this conflicting situation to provide relief assistance to the IDPs. For the accuracy and
timely response to this emergency a rapid assessment was done between April 20 and May 08
to find out the most needed people requiring assistance. The assessment team met with local
the authorities to gather statistics of IDPs visiting and interviewing each individual IDP family to
verify numbers and to find out the gap from the previous assistance provided by other agencies
and the government. The assessment took quite longer than expected as the numbers provided
by local authorities did not match with the actual number of people living in the camp. The team
had to ensure that no one suffered from this distribution by ensuring adequate and efficient
statistics and findings.

To complicate the situation it was also obvious that many people were not able to return to their
homeland within the oncoming future during the conflict therefore the government is in a process
of setting a new resettlement villages for IDPs. Also after making an assessment, in cooperation
with government authorities, 338 families were identified as the most in need for assistance
providing them with an ‘Assistance Card’ before distribution of support to the most vulnerable to
avoid duplication when support is provided. The number of IDPs is lower from the first
assessment as the people in Svay Chrum village returned home after few weeks after the April
3rd 2009 conflict.

On May 19, 2009, CWS Cambodia from the funding support from Action by Churches Together
(ACT) - International distributed emergency aid to 338 families. The families received this aid
based upon their actual size, history of previous assistance and current needs: 306 tents, 3,755
canned fish, 341 ceramic water purifiers, 450 mosquito nets, 338 mats, 676 pieces of soap, 338
packs of detergent, 527 each Sarongs and scarves, and 283 blankets. The distribution was held
in Sra-Em pagoda located about 700 meters from the camp, under the support of Mr. Ros Heng,
Action District Governor, Mr. Hem Thon, Head of District Sub Branch and the Provincial Branch
of Cambodian Red Cross and Commune Chief.

Direct Services Program 3


Peace building is a fundamental principle of all CWS Cambodia’s work therefore Mr. Hong
Reaksmey, CWS ERP found new ways with his team to ensure transparency and help curb risk
of misuse when providing help and assistance. A presentation of the exact nature and quantity
of help was presented banners that explained the distribution and numbers of items that
respective families received This was to enable everyone to see how the distribution was made
to ensure a fair and responsible manner allowing people to see who and what they were
receiving according to their individual needs. Mr. Ros Heng was proud of the CWS Cambodia’s
commitment and spirit of cooperation with the authorities as well as the process that allowed him
to be accountable to his people.

Mr. Chan Sovan Chai, 40, said: “At the beginning, I do not expect too much support from CWS.
On May 8 when I received the distribution card, which indicates clearly the different items that
my family will get, I was very happy because I knew what I am going to get. I think that CWS is
very thoughtful to provide us with the clothes and a water filter”. He also said that the fact that
CWS listed the items in the distributing card was significantly reducing jealously among people
and they learned what it meant to be equitable, honest and transparent when giving aid relief to
each family.

Chai’s family of 6 members received 15 cans of canned fish, one plastic sheet, 2 mosquito nets,
one sleeping mat, one ceramic water filter, two pieces of body soap and one pack (0.9kg) of
detergent. His wife, Ms. Moeut Thy, 35, also shared her appreciation with how CWS responded
to her family and other IDPs: “Our clothes were completely destroyed in fire. During the fighting
on April 03, because we were in a hurry. I could only take two sets of clothes with me while my
husband could take 3 sets. I have only two sets of clothes and it is very difficult as I had to
change quite often because of the rain and dirt. Now with two more Sarongs, I now feel relief as
I can change my clothes as needed. I want to thank CWS for giving our family the basic needs
at the right time”.
Direct Services Program 4
Chhai and his wife Thy have 2 sons and 1
daughter. They lived in Prasat Village for 6 years
as a tour guide to Thai tourists at Preah Vihear
Temple he could earn about 2,000 Riel (USD 0.5)
per day. Unfortunately, due to border tension
especially after June 2008 and after the fighting on
October 15th 2008, and the conflict again in April
3rd, 2009, he could not earn anything to support his
family. “I have to depend on relief the government
provided”, said Chai. Alike all IDPs in the camp,
Chhai’s family faced severe problems concerning
health, unclean water, mosquitoes, insufficient
sleeping material, insufficient food supplies,
adequate schooling for the children and clothing. In the story of Chhai and his wife reflects the
common problems that all IDPs endured since April to May 2009.

Ms. Tith Chantha, 34, who lives with a 3 year daughter and her soldier husband at Prasat
village, located just in front of the Preah Vihear temple, moved to the camp on the same day of
the conflict. She is now living with her daughter in the IDP camp. Her husband visits her and her
daughter 1-2 times a month as he is placed at the front line at the temple. Sometimes, she goes
with her daughter to the border to visit her husband 2-3 days so that she can cook for her
husband and his comrades.

Ms. Tith Chantha’s family house was burnt down and destroyed by the DK of Thai soldiers on
the April 3rd and she was not able to take any property out of the house saving only her daughter
and some clothing. She expresses her sincere thanks to CWS for the various kinds of
assistance and the transparency of providing equitable distribution to the people in need.
Chantha mentioned that “These assistances are very helpful to me and the rest of the IDP
especially mosquito nets, mats and plastic sheet. I can see the qualities of those items are also
very good”. At that moment few people who are waiting for their name called said together that
all the items are good commenting on the good quality of the items given to each family.

Ms. Chantha and the people we spoke with also commented that the water filter is very good
given that the water in the camp is currently contaminated with high lime content making the
water unfit for use. According to the discussion with 6 IDP and the district and commune
authority, rice and other food items are needed as most of the IDP people depend on assistance
from the government.

Peace Building Efforts

Peace either at community or national level cannot exist without someone’s effort. There must
be the contributory cause that eventually brings about peace. The people are the most important
element in a peace building process. Therefore, peace building is about the people and their
potential to be a peace builder and enlarge their influence. Effective peace programs need to
enlarge the influence of both individual key people and other people involved in the process. In
the CWS principles and context we regard our staff and Commune Councils as key people for
the reason that they are in a position to influence people in leadership and decision making.
Individual villagers and VDCs are considered “more people” and “key people” contribute to the
changes that need to be made in the community to bring about peace.

Direct Services Program 5


The following peace related actives: Peace Training for Community Peace Volunteers, Village
Leaders and Village Development Committee, sending people to participate in Dhammayietra
Peace Walk, conducting LCP training and assessment practice for CWS Cambodia staff, and
assisting commune councilors to understand the concepts of Local Capacity for Peace can and
have contributed to the peace building process in Choam Ksant district. Therefore it is expected
that positive change in an individual can impact the change at family and at community level.

 At staff level

Local Capacity and LCP assessment practice


The concept of “Local Capacity for Peace and Do No Harm” grows out of the lesson and insight
that, for development to be effective and successful, the development agencies need to take
both develop activities and resource transferring, as well as, the people’s relationship, into their
consideration when they implement activities1. In other words development assistance and
resource transferring in community development work gradually becomes part of the context and
reality of the community enabling the community to take responsibility to be able to use their
local traditions, understanding and methods of developing their own capacity building projects
and development process. It builds upon a sense of trust and cooperation among the people
and allows the agencies and government and the affected communities to show trust and
transparency in their work.

This process is to enable and equip CWS project staff that their contribution to improve long
term community relationships, through the way we implement Community Development and
Water Sanitation Projects, CWS Cambodia’s Peace Program Coordinator and Program Officer
for Peace, and Community Development by conducting a six day training on LCP assessment
practice to 22 staff from the Preah Vihear, Kompong Thom and Svay Reing projects.

1
Do No Harm: How Aid Can Support Paece – Or War: Mary B. Anderson
Direct Services Program 6
The main objectives of our training program is to enable staff to experiment and practice the
LCP tools2 to analyze the development activities that are implemented in our Preah Vihear
project. The staffs involved in this project were divided into three different groups and conducted
a participatory analysis process based on three examples: Water Well Construction, Home
Gardening Agricultural Activities, and Provisions for School Materials for Poor Students. It took
us two days to conduct the analysis project with participants using the LCP tools to analyze their
respective communities among 111 people (68 females) living in three different villages.

On the second day the participants presented their findings to the community analyzing together
to identify the areas of the community that may need improvements in the future with 86 people
(48 women). The participants were able then to consolidate their findings and working with the
community to find ways of implementing
their findings to enable a practical and
sustainable process for community
development. Miss Samreth Amara, CDW
said: “while leading discussion with the
people in Choam Ksant, my mind goes to
the villages in Kompong Thom where I
come from, and consider what can I do to
change ways to enable me to help my
village for a better future”; while Mr. Bun
Sakhan, CDW of Preah Vihear stressed:
“using LCP assessment tools to analyze
and help us understand the weaknesses
and opportunity to improve and ensure a
better future.”

At the end of the LCP training the thoughts, experiments, theoretical and practical learning’s
doesn’t just finished at the end of the training program, the follow up is just as important, both
Amara and Sakhan have integrated the LCP concepts in every possible ways they can in their
work and communities. Throughout their work in CWS Cambodia they also have to ensure the
people and key people are involved in process of decision making.

The knowledge and concepts gained in the LCP training alongside that of other workshops and
training provided by VBNK for Community Development Worker, Commune Councils and Village
Development Committees from nine different provinces also shared the LCP concepts.
Emphasizing that development intervention must be inclusive which means that they need to
look into the area beyond responding to people’s needs for example, building solidarity amongst
people and trust building relationship projects. Amara noticed that all participants showed their
interest in the concepts that she raised and addressed in her insight for the needs of her own
village and community.

Building Peace in Our life training to CWS Staff

CWS staff held a three-day training course on “Building Peace in Our life” in attendance of 24
staff (12 women): Field & Support Staff; House Keeping staff (cleaner); Driver; Office and
Financial Affairs Director; from 19-21 May 2009 Preah Sihanouk province. The objectives were
to help CWS staff understand the theories and issues surrounding various forms

2
LCP analysis tools are : Timeline, Ten seed to priority conflict , Power level :to identify different people with different power level,
Trust mapping to see whom people trust and whom people don’t , Community relationship mapping: illustrate the quality of
relationship between people and other institutions , Venn diagram : to help staff to connection among different people to community

Direct Services Program 7


of conflict, an unenviable part of human life, and focus on how we can find practical and
constructive forms of dealing with conflict. Another contributing factor to this workshop was
designed to help staff reflect on their own values, behaviors, and attitudes toward conflict in daily
life both on the personal and organizational value based context thus building self confidence in
order to become part of the wider peace building context. Contextualizing this concept in the
staffs’ families, community and overall Cambodian society as a whole enabling both personal
reflection and attitude change among the staff and the people they are in contact with everyday.

The staff who participated in this training program showed profound interest in the course and
expressed that it was very helpful for both their personal and professional life expressing that the
topics discussed were related to real life experiences. Mr. Mat Sary a Cambodian Muslim staff
who works as a security guard expressed that he felt very honored and happy when Josephine
Barbour (CWS Cambodia Country Representative) called out participants according to their faith
identities, allowing all participants identity with respect and sensitivity making him feel included
and important to the group when he identified himself as a Muslim. For him, as the only Muslim
who experienced prejudice and stereotypes made by other people, he saw that other
participants of the training program showed their respect to his identity. “It made me very happy
and I took pride on my identity” he said.

Miss Pon Pagna Vattey, CWS Data


Management Officer also expresses her
thoughts on this training program:

“I used to read peace documents produced


by CWS and I thought peace work was just
for the conducting of a workshop or training.
My thought was wrong when I had the
chance to attend the workshop. I saw many
of the works related to the peace projects that
CWS had provided alongside organizing
workshops or training to CWS staff.

In reference to the training content, I used to


hear from the staff about prejudice but unfortunately I didn’t understand about this. In
conclusion I learnt and understood its meaning – to pass judgment about people or other
situations without having solid evidence and normally having the wrong judgment”.

For Vattey this wasn’t just about learning but also putting her understanding and learning gained
into practice in her own personal life. In her personal time she also shares her learning and
understanding as she also noticed there were prejudices and stereotypes among friends using
this opportunity to challenge and correct misunderstandings in a respectful tone. Her friends are
impressed with Vattey maturity and ability to be more analytical matters of peoples identities.

 Peace training provides to CNGOs Partnership Staff

Peace building training provided to CNGOs Partnership Staff


The Program Officer for Peace and Community Development work with the Direct Service
Program Manager, Peace Coordinator and Program Coordinator organized and conducted a
three-day training program on “How we see conflict” for 22 Cambodian NGO staff (10 women)
from four CNGOs. Two CNGOs from Battambang Province and two CNGOs from Banteay
Meanchey Province, some of these CNGOs work closely in post conflict communities with a
mixture of Cambodian people from diverse backgrounds: former refugees, former Khmer
Rouges Families, and migrants who migrated from different provinces.

Direct Services Program 8


In the diversity of the population also saw a high level of various discriminations, stereotypes
and prejudices amongst the people leaving cause for a deep sense of mistrust amongst the
community. This training was organized for those staffs in which they work directly with the
people in diversely populated communities of people who found themselves living together for
various reasons. The objectives for the Peace Building Trainings was to assist participants to:
(1) discuss the importance of communication and networking, (2) discuss about the flow of
communications and information in our daily life, (3) reflect on their own values, behavior, and
attitude in responding to daily conflicts and an organizational values in our daily life, (4)
appreciate and respect the values of others and their identities in dealing with conflict and
challenges that arise, and (5) Build self confidence to carry their responsibility and commitment
to peace building within the NGOs they work in and society at large.

The participants expressed that the training and content of the training provided them with a
sense of deep interest and found it useful for them and the community illustrating how this can
be part of their daily lives, experiences and context. Josephine Barbour (CWSC Country
Representative) illustrated the concepts of reintegration and reconciliation and explained that
reconciliation is very important for Cambodia society. The explanations lead the participants to
express their interest to learn more about reconciliation to further their knowledge in this field
and to improve their capacity to work with people with different backgrounds and identities when
conflicting situations may arise from time to time.

 Training at Community level

LCP Training provide to CCs, VLs and VDCs

The Local Capacity for Peace, using the ‘DO No Harm Tools’ illustrated by Mary Anderson,
helped people who work closely in the field of development helped them analyze how their
resources can also affect the existing confliction and heighten the tensions already existing in
the community. After having some understanding of how resources are delivered into the
community it will eventually affect the community we work in therefore we had to assess and
create ways of how these resources maintain a minimal or nonexistent negative impact.

Direct Services Program 9


In cooperation and support from the project staff to promote peace in the community as well as
improve staff capacity we held five courses of
a three-day training on Local Capacity for
Peace:

From 14-16 January, to 18 Commune


Councilor (two women) from four
communes (Tuek Kraham, Yeang, Choam
Khsant and Rumdaoh Srae) at Choam
Khsant District, Preah Vihear Province.
From 19-21 January, to 22 VDCs and
CPVs (10 women) at Sraeung Commune,
Kompong Thom Province.
From 28-30 April, to 19 CCs, VLs, VDCs,
CPVs, and police (five women) at Tipo
Commune, Kompong Thom Province.
From 25-27 May, to 29 VLs, CDFs, WSUGs (10 women) at Doung Commune, Svay Rieng
Province.
From 29-31 May, to 31 VLs, CDFs and USUGs in Bos Mon Commune, Svay Rieng
Province.

CWS believes that the Commune Councilors and Local Authorities, who are responsible for their
communities and have access to the villages, see that the training at the commune level will
significantly improve their work if they follow what they have learnt and discussed.

Vorn Sarom, Tuek Kraham commune councilor said:

“The course is very helpful for me. After the training I used the LCP concepts to solve land
conflict between some people in my commune. I want to improve relationships amongst them. I
meet them individually and separately, study their needs and demands and then I brought them
to talk to each other. I asked them to think about the consequents that they will get if they used
violent conflict. In my observation, they normally choose to solve conflict in peaceful and
understanding manner”.

Mr. Phy Chhorn, village leader of Bos Mon village:

“When I look back at what I have done in the past, I see that I have already applied some of the
concepts in my work. However, sometimes I know that I put pressure the conflicting parties to
accept my idea without studying their needs. The new Knowledge is like the light that shows me
the way.”

Direct Services Program 10


 Peace Building through Dhammayietra Peace walk

CWS Cambodia is very active in


supporting the Dhammayietra Peace
Walk every year by providing a small
grant to support some of necessary
cost for the walk. This year CWS
Cambodia granted $1000 USD to
publish the teachings of the Buddha
leaflets and distributed them to the
participants of the peace walk. During
this 19th peace walk, which lasted for
16 days, and journeying through 10
districts, 53 schools, 29 Pagodas
covering 176 square kilometers. The
participation of the CWS Staff was
(one woman); 22 community people
(13 women) from the Kompong Thom,
Preah Vihear and Battambang
projects joined and were divided into two small groups. One group had two CWS staff and eight
community people walked from 17-19 March and another group walked from 19-23.

Joining the walk did not simply mean to literally walk but to walk with a purpose and discipline.
The daily tasks started with chanting the Dharma text, and a ‘Loving Kindness Meditation’,
followed by domestic help and cleaning the venues that the participants were billeted in before
commencing the walk. The walk normally started at 5:30 am for two hours taking a break for
breakfast. At this point, our team met people along the road and exchanged conversation. We
then continued walking until 10:30 or 11 o’clock and we stopped for lunch and stayed overnight
at the nearest Pagoda en route to our final destination. Each day was similar in process and
preparation with the monks sharing a sermon among the people usually in large numbers of
about 200 people. Our team would also take time to listen to the sermons and reflect on what
was being said among the people.

The following two quotes are from people who found this walk challenging and help understand
the stereotypes and perceptions that they had about other people. Mr. Pan Sophean,
Community Peace Volunteer of Ou Khsan village said:

“I used to hear about the stereotype and prejudice against people in Prey Veng province that
they are beggar. However, when I met them, they are so friendly and even invited me to lunch at
their home. Furthermore, I saw that people are industrious and they planted a lot of trees along
the roads. Related with Dhammayietra, I have never known or heard it before. Now I know about
the Buddha teaching on five precepts.”

Similarly, Mrs. In Yeng, Commune Councilor of Rom Das Sre commune said: “I keep asking
myself since the time I left from Choam Khsant- what is it? What are they doing? Having directly
being involved in the walk, now I know what Dhhmayietra is and what they are trying to do.
Along the way we walked and passed people I saw that people planted many trees along the
way. I also saw that people’ houses built with old fashion and I was interested in seeing their
houses.”

Direct Services Program 11


When Mrs. In Yeng returned home she and two other people from Svay Village, who
participated in the walk, shared what they had learnt from the five day walk in Prey Veng. They
also chose to share about the Buddhas teachings on the five precepts3 by emphasizing that if
people followed these teachings they can live happily in this life. In addition they talked about
sanitation, domestic violence and tree planting to 150 people (79 women) and 30 students.

In conclusion, sending the people to join Dhammayietra peace walk was very beneficial. It
helped them change their perspective and address the deeper issues of having stereotypes that
are perceived of other people in this case the stereotypes of people from Prey Veng province.

Major Challenges

 The border and ancient Preah Vihear temple4 tensions caused the CWS Preah Vihear
Project to postpone many activities including the Peace Training to the CPV, VDC and VL in
Yeang commune. Since CPV in Yeang commune was formed in 2008, we hadn’t met them
in a formal gathering regarding their role and responsibilities and to provide adequate
training given the conflict between the Cambodian and Thai dispute of the Preah Vihear
temple. Therefore our staff have met informally on an individual bases to give informal
training and discussions explaining certain roles and responsibilities. In response to this the
peace Staff and have asked the Project staff to meet informally to given an orientation on of
their roles and responsibilities in the community. We hope to conduct the formal training
process in the next semester.

 ERP Program, BTB-BMC Partnership Project and CNGO partners have done a consultative
plan for CBDRM Project activities. However, due to the delay of the Project launch and
Cambodian-Thai prolonged conflict, all the activities were delayed. There was little flexibility
in changing the plan as those activities were in succession from each other. Nonetheless
both the dates and times were changed from the 1st to the 15th of August 2008 and the dates
made in our proposal on the single form from to DIPECHO were also changed accordingly.
However we maintained the content, concept and action plan in its original form as we only
had to change dates to deal with the constraints caused by the conflict.

 We lacked a guideline to implement the integration of DRR plan into CDP/CIP is also a
challenge we had to face. CWS’s CBDRM model is implementing a new initiative in the
establishment of the linkages of village disaster management mechanism to commune
development planning mechanism. There was no documentation or methods illustrated to
help us find ways of sharing the best practices on the initiative of DRR integration into a
Commune Development Plan.

 Most of TBAs are illiterate and they are not able to read the lessons that provided concerning
child birth and health. Nonetheless although they could not read their ability to process and
grasp the understanding of the lessons through pictures and illustrations gave them the
tools, and also with the help of asking literate relatives to gain a clearer meaning and
understanding. They are also able with the help of literate relatives put together a report
form system to send to HC and CWS Cambodia separately. Also another challenge is due

3
Buddha teaching on five precepts is: abstain from killing, abstain from taking property without being given, abstain from having
sexual misconduct, abstain from taking drug and alcohols and abstain from telling lie.
4
The 11th-century Hindu temple, which sits on Cambodia's northern border with Thailand, was awarded to Cambodia in 1962 by the
World Court. Last year the UN's cultural body UNESCO added Preah Vihear to its World Heritage List, a move that rankled Thai
nationalists who still contest the ownership of the site.

Direct Services Program 12


to heavy flooding during the rainy season the TBAs are faced with inadequate transportation
to help pregnant women to deliver their babies at the nearest health clinic. To counter this
problem the TBAs requested the health clinic to provide delivery kits unfortunately given that
the TBAs have no legal status through the ministry of health and in situations where delivery
is eminent and there are no official midwives available, there has to be communications
made to help the TBAs work in restricting systems. For example the midwives have to work
with the TBA over the phone to help in delivering babies even when they have to travel in
remote areas on the boats.

Lessons Learned

 The Involvement of the Ministry of Planning and NCDM in training deliveries to disaster
management committee structures and to the district and provincial facilitator team is an
outstanding initiative. The MoP is the owner of local planning process and has designed the
process having a clear understanding in the steps needed to enable DRR to be integrated
into that process. More importantly, MoP and NCDM together have an enormous influence to
CCDM, DCDM, PCDM and PFT/DFT to communicate and enable the mainstreaming
process.

 Since government plays long term role in the social development, disaster risk reduction
measures are difficult to sustain, when NGOs do not collaborate with authorities at all level
(via Disaster Management Committees). Otherwise, the plan does not belong to or is not
owned by the government, so that budget may not be allocated because it is not inside the
government development plans. Moreover, commune council, who is at the same time inside
the CCDM, can help mobilize resources from communities when they are involved in the
process. This is also a learning curve to both NGOs and Government authorities in that we
are sharing information, training and concepts to help us work in the community that benefits
all parties among the NGO and Government integrated process.

 In working with the Village Volunteer of the Red Cross at district level we found that that
there needs to be a clear guideline and process so that CWS and other NGOs do not enter a
village and copy the same system doubling up on the work already established by the Red
Cross. According to the Red Cross guidelines they selected a Village Volunteer to assist in
disaster management systems and committees nonetheless some villages do not have
these systems. Therefore CWS works with the Red Cross to process the same system in
villages that may not have these volunteers. This ensures that there is no establishment of
duplicated multilayer’s and parallel systems arising from other NGOs using a similar system.
This also enables Red Cross Cambodia to work more effectively and become accountable to
the people involved in disaster management.

 Vulnerable communities need agricultural related disaster risk reduction measures to ensure
fertile and practical sustainability for the people at risk.

 Engaging and participation of all stakeholders from all factions of the community ie NGO,
Government, Leaders and concerned communities provides people to gain responsibility in
order to achieve a sustainable project implantation.

 Providing both conceptual and practical hardware support to the communities is important
because their capacity have been built through project implementation through a step by
step process such as bookkeeping, budget planning, community planning, follow up
processes to monitor activities, and develop guidelines for the specific project etc.

Direct Services Program 13


Issues Not addressed

Concerning the conflicting problems between the Cambodian-Thai border communities are
facing declining opportunities to generate income at farms in Thailand. The border tension also
created immense demands in communities for the limited resources offered by CWS and other
support provided by NGOs and the Government. The prolonged Cambodian-Thai border
conflict also has limited CWS and CNGO partner’s to intervene and provide support to the
communities. For example KNTO’s target focus in Ampil Commune, Banteay Ampil District in
Oddor Mean Chey Province is located in the disputed area, especially Chup Korki Leach and
Chup Korki Koeuth villages. Field based operation was suspended from 14 October until 07
November 2008. As a result of the gun fire conflict, most of villagers had left the villages living in
scattered areas amongst the hills and neighboring forest areas.

Having seen the capacities and abilities of CCs in solving conflict successfully using the
concepts and guidance they learned through training courses provided by CWS Cambodia,
Choam Ksant district governor was very impressed. He approached CWS Cambodia to provide
the same training to all village leaders in 26 villages of six communes in Choam ksant district in
which CWS is currently working in only 18 villages of four communes. CWS Cambodia has
provided training to VDCs, CPVs and VLs in 12 villages and is going to conduct another course
next year for six remaining villages of Yeang commune. But sadly, CWS Cambodia isn’t able to
respond his request to conduct a training course on “Understanding conflict and building peace
in our lives” within eight different villages that are presently not in our prioritized target. However,
next year we will take this concern into consideration.

Future Plans

 Conduct project monitoring, report writing training to Community Peace Volunteers and
provide training to project staff on STI, HIV/AIDS, MCH, health activities implementation
guideline and WatSan Manual.
 Draft quarterly newsletters
 Conduct training courses to strengthening capacities field staff regarding micro business.
 Coordination with project field staff to conduct refresher training on SHG book keeping,
reflection workshop on SHG activities, and coordinate project staff to conduct training on
community tree nursery and animal raising.
 Monthly follow up field activities to each project and provide coaching field staff of the food
security and income generating activities.
 Assist staff to organize World AIDS Day and World Water Day, provide refresher training
course to VHVs on MCH, STIs and HIV/AIDS, and to coordinate with HC and VHVs on
WatSan education to school and communities
 Attend network meeting with MEDICAM, Watsan Sectoral Working Group meeting, SMCH
Quarterly Coordination Meeting and attend VHV and TBA quarterly meeting at HC
 Finalize all outstanding of program implementation policy/guideline
 Continue to provide Echo training on CBDRM concept to
 RCV exchange visit and Public Awareness and education by RCV/VDC
 CCDM full member meetings and commune development planning follow up
 RCVs Commune Coordination Meeting
 National, provincial or district coordination meeting with stakeholders (on-going process)
 Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction Forum, provincial DRR Action Plan development and to
host Cambodia Disaster Risk Reduction forum
 Support local leaders to mobilize local resources and implement small-scale mitigation
project based on village DRM plans.
 Coordinate with technical provincial departments or specialized NGO to provide technical
support and /or organize training to villagers on mitigation non structural initiatives in
accordance with the village DRM plans and commune development plans

Direct Services Program 14


1.2. KOMPONG THOM VILLAGE
BASED COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

Introduction

The CWS Cambodia Village Based Community Development Project in Kompong Thom is a
development of work that we began in 1993 following the signing of the Paris Peace Agreement
in 1991. Initially we focused on humanitarian relief, specifically, the re-integration and
mobilization of repatriated refugees from camps along the Cambodian-Thai border. As the
needs of the people evolved our work shifted to Community Development in order to effectively
respond to the changes that were happening during the resettlement of families alongside that of
the families who had remained during and post civil conflict. Over time the VBCD model took on
a new approach which is now our four year VBCD Project in which implemented in Kompong
Thom from July 2007.

Currently, as this report is being written, during the VBCD project we noted that the Commune
Councils and VDCs are working more cohesively together if we compare this to our earlier work.
Both the Commune Councils and VDCs work together to develop their respective communes
and villages, by discussing, brainstorming and working on community development initiatives
which involves the participation of the villages addressing the basic needs for their community.
Over time more people have both learnt and became involved in the process of development
and are able to participate in the project cycle that they have implemented. Also this project
provides training with the content related to development work in order to strengthen the
capacity of local development agents like VDCs, SHGs, CPVs, RCVs, VHVs, TBAs, Rice banks
and NFE groups, gaining confidence and the capacity required to manage development
activities.
KPT Village Based Community Development Project 15
The VBCD works on a rate of 6 to 10 absolute poor families per CDW therefore the project has
selected 50 absolute poor households to build their capacity to bring themselves out of poverty.
Each family produced their own household’s development plans and practical expectations
participating in training courses, awareness raising events, village meetings, and village
development activities. They are beginning to reconnect with their society and raise their
concerns. Many of them were given access to social and technical support to create working
opportunities in both farming and non farming activities.

There are VDCs in eight target villages enabling them to manage and lead the development of
their communities. Most of the VDC members have carried their responsibilities, and the major
roles and duties required from them, conducting regular monthly meetings, village development
plans, and also developing a simple project proposal implementing activity plans and problem
solving with satisfactory results. In the Beng and Choam Boeng villages they were able to raise
funds from external agencies mobilizing local resources to achieve their development program
with the participation of the local community.

Unfortunately some VDCs in 4 villages continue to have limited capacity to mobilize and manage
local resources. Some VDCs have failed to manage regular community meetings, while in other
areas some members did not take on their responsibilities of the role and duties required from
them. Therefore the VDCs that have not being able to work for various reasons are still heavily
reliant on external assistance for the development of their villages. They also require full support
from CDWs to make project proposals and motivate the people to participate in their
development activities.

In the VBCD project in Kompong Thom we continue to maintain important cooperation and
relationships with the Local Health Authorities which have also improved the health services in
the target villages that we work in. The local Health Authorities monitors and support local
health structures at village level equipping the health clinic staff with technical support so that
they are able to provide adequate services to the community. The services covered are basic
health care, family planning, vaccination to children and pregnant mothers, safe delivery of
children and an awareness of malaria and dengue fever.

Finally as part of our overall activities we also provide training and technical support to 12 Self
Help Groups in which they are able to create their own income initiatives to support 195
members of the group. Over time the SHG members could also borrow and take out loans to
help improve their small business initiatives using the profits for better housing, education for the
children, agriculture, furniture for the home and other material for the home, and contribute to
the village development activities. We will discuss this further in our report.

Major Accomplishments and Changes

Objective 1: Develop community capacity to engage with government institutions and


CBOs to define their development direction and manage their affairs in a participatory
and democratic manner.

Strengthened solidarity among community to respond residents’ needs

An important aspect of our capacity building initiatives during the fiscal year of 2008 was our
community based project to help facilitate the electoral process to elect Village Development
Committees and Community Based Organizations in 12 target villages. We have seen that
villagers tend to vote for popular people who are already active in the community and show a

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 16


common sense of support with the people’s knowledge and reputation in the community. Other
qualities that the community looks for is the peoples sense of having a positive attitude,
willingness to work and provide a sense of mutual understanding, possessing adequate
education, and having wider experience and understanding of what is needed in their respective
communities.

As a follow up these elections the VDCs and CBOs are provided essential trainings programs
and tools in key areas: village development, administration, financial management, simple
proposal and grant writing skills, and community planning. These key programs and tools are
designed to ensure that the key people involved with the work of VDC and CBOs are given a
clear sense of understanding their roles and responsibilities in the community. One of the key
task that the VDCs and CBOs are requested to work on is a needs assessment of the
community identifying problems within the community whilst maintaining a consultative process
with the community to help them identify what they see should be included in their village
development plan; this also enables an participatory approach to happen among the whole
community to build the needs and interest of the people.

The VDCs, Village Leaders, Local Authorities and CBOs work together to administer the
development activities and to seek solutions concerning various social conflicts that arise from
time to time. It is both a learned and shared approach based on their community’s experiences
and concerns by actively responding to the real issues of the people. This has improved the
feelings of trust, bringing restorative justice among community members, as well as mutual
understanding providing help and assistance to each other. We have seen 60% of residents in
the targeted villages strengthen their solidarity and mutual respect and understanding towards
themselves and others in the villages. This is seen through the successful execution of the
SHGs, Rice banks, NFE classes, and other CBOs working together.

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 17


In addition communities have also worked in solidarity when members have struggled with
various disasters in their homes and villages: house fires, food shortages, sicknesses and other
problems. For example the VDCs and residents of Boeng Khvaek village organized a meeting
to raise funds to help a family that endured a case of serious illness and the loss of their
property from a house fire.

In Mr. Pork Ban’s family there are eight children. They live in Trapeang Trom village, Tipou
commune. Mr. Ban, 42, suffered a serious illness that his family needed money urgently to
transport him to the Kompong Thom Provincial hospital to receive proper care. Nonetheless due
to the poor living conditions and suffering hunger his family wasn’t able to send him to the
provincial hospital. Without the support and help among the community members he would not
have been able to get adequate health care to ensure his survival. The VDC members and
village leaders held a fundraising activity meeting with all the villagers to draw their attention to
Mr. Pork Ban’s problem asking them to donate whatever money they could give at the time.
Subsequently the community was able to put together a contribution of 310,000 Riel (US$ 78)
which was enough for the family to get him adequate health treatment. Mr. Ban recalls he
would have died if his family didn’t have this cash donation: “My family and I thanked VDCs and
the village leader for their kindness and help.”

The residents of Beng village, Sraeung commune are repeatedly challenged with long term
droughts almost on a yearly basis having to struggle with a continuous lack of food supplies and
other resources. Even though there is a water dam constructed by the Khmer Rouge in the
earlier period of conflict in Cambodia near these villages, it does not serve its benefit as the
water flows away from the rice field. Therefore the village has to rely on the rain water to
compensate for the need of water for the rice fields unfortunately droughts are regular forcing
the villages to find alternative ways to solve this problem. CWS was able to help build a sense of
solidarity among the village enabling the construction of a dam; throughout this year the villagers
worked for 4 months building a new dam (845 meters long) with a small water gate. The work in
itself would have been very difficult to achieve nonetheless with the help of 79 families finding
solutions to their drought problems. Mr. Dol Dorn, VDC member said: “If CWS Cambodia didn’t
build a sense of solidarity among villagers in advance, building mutual help amongst the
villages, it will not have been possible to achieve building a very good dam in the duration of 4
months. We can do all things if we do it together!”

The villages have also developed stronger relationships between VDCs and Local Authorities
through community participation, contributing to the development of activities, according to the
needs of the villages from time to time. As a result many local initiatives have been successfully
implemented including the construction of roads, bridges, culverts, village meeting halls, water
gates, reading shelters and dams. The relationships between the VDCs and Local Authorities
have also influenced and strengthen the cooperation from the community to the Commune
Councils. An example of the relationships developed with the VCDs, Local Authorities and
Commune Councils became evident in the building of an 8 meter bridge that was repaired with
the participation of villages in Sraeung Commune where it involved the work and cooperation of
all people to achieve this task.

Improvement of Economic conditions among the absolute poor families

Despite recent improvements in the economic growth and reduction in the numbers of people
living in absolute poverty, Cambodia remains one of the poorest countries in South-East Asia,
with extreme cases of poverty in the rural areas. The Cambodian government, NGOs and other
support systems are not responding enough to provide social services, health care and
adequate sanitation to those most affected. Women, children, the disabled, elderly people, and
ethnic minority groups are particularly affected by the extremity of absolute poverty. Women, for

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 18


example have significantly lower educational levels with high illiteracy rates and lack of access
to public services in comparison to men.

People, who are landless, living with disabilities, and women who are heads of their household
are not always reached by the social services provided to them. Many humanitarian based
activities provided by NGOs are usually struggling to provide adequate support to these
communities to meet the basics needs of providing daily food for children. Due to the short term
response from the NGO community and government it is not enough to curb the hunger and
problems of the most vulnerable and absolute poor families. Also at most times these absolute
poor families would not participate in the activities proposed by NGOs, in the development of
their communities, as they stressed that the NGO projects would not provide them with their
immediate needs, which was food as they were suffering from hunger and starvation. Therefore
CWS Cambodia’s assessment and experiences with the absolute poor by living and building
relationships with them, gave them ways to help find practical ways to meet their immediate
needs focusing on 334 absolute poor families in our target villages.

As we focused on the above situation we also did a PRA and realized that most of the absolute
poor could not improve their living conditions just from farming. Also the employment and
income generation opportunities were not always the best system, given that many of the people
lacked any kind of skills, knowledge and education, to develop any concept or ideas for small
business projects for an income generation. Nonetheless over a period of time and with
continuous support of CWS in both training and raising awareness, of how the absolute poor
households could find practical solutions, they were able to create an annual development plan
for 2009. Within a 6 month period the absolute poor families applied their learning’s, training
and awareness raising, and capacity building activities provided by our VBCD project enabling
the families to become more proactive in taking control of local and household development
work. As a result the families produced their own development plans and putting them into
action helping families to participate in community meetings and community development
activities. For example, three absolute poor families in Beng village in Sraeung commune
produced 9 household development plan activities: well construction, home gardening,
household latrine, chicken shelter, sanitation and cleaning household compound, planting of fruit
trees, water filters, small businesses, and participate in non-formal education classes.

Mrs. Phuong Torn, 38, married with six children


living in a small thatched house in Beng village
said: “Before 2009, my family faced food
shortages from 8-10 months every year. My
family borrowed money from the neighbors and
worked on their rice fields in exchange. The
Project supported my family to raise chickens and
begin home-grown vegetables.” After Torn and
her husband attended a chicken raising program
conducted by CWS staff in their village she
expressed that;

“When my family received six chickens, crop


seeds such as long beans, water melon, eggplant and pumpkin seeds. Now we have more than
23 chickens and some remain left over from the sales that we make. Our garden produces
vegetables for domestic consumption as well as selling to neighbors and the surplus vegetables
are sold in the market. Our daily profit from home-grown vegetables is from 1,000-2,000 Riels
(US$ 0.25-0.50). For the last two months, we earned 110,000 Riels (US$ 27.5) from selling the
chickens.” My family no longer worries about food shortage now.

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 19


An example of Mrs. Phuong Ton’s success in developing a small income for her family is
credited to the SHG programs that we have been working with providing training and technical
support enabling the members of the SHG to find practical ways of making a small income for
their families.

Objective 2: Improve access to basic social services and amenities and improve overall
food security of vulnerable people.

The reduction of maternal and infant mortality

“Each day almost five women die in Cambodia due to pregnancy related complications. Each
year this amounts to around 1,800 women dying giving life in Cambodia.”1

From 2008 the VBCD Project in collaboration with the Provincial Department of Health and
District Authorities provided basic health care, and safe delivery of pregnancy training to 23
TBAs and 25 VHVs, improving their capacity to ensure they can provide adequate health
services in their respective communities. The training and refresher training programs provided
to 23 TBAs enable them to work in a professional manner to educate expected mothers and
families ensuring the preparation of sufficient transport are available to go for regular checkups
throughout their pregnancy term at their local health clinic.

The VHVs also improved their services in close coordination with the Health Clinic staff by
providing training and advice to their communities focusing on poor hygiene, sanitation, and
nutrition. The services emphasized the importance of raising an awareness of hygiene matters
amongst pregnant women and children and this is important when doing family planning, also
addressing the need to have access to clear information about the safe deliveries of their
children when giving birth. This project also collaborates with commune health clinics to provide
vaccination in all target villages for children under the age of 5 to prevent illnesses that affect
children, and also protect expecting mothers from tetanus, lack of iron and ensure the proper
vitamins required during their pregnancy.

“My people have been participating in the Support


Maternal Child Health activities since 2008 and have
gained a lot of knowledge about health care,
especially feeding with a variety of vegetables for
better nutrition for pregnant women and under-five
year old children. Now they go to health clinics
benefiting from the enormous advice provided to
ensure the safe delivery of children and adequate
care for their new born babies.” Ms. Cheng Srey Ni
explains.

CWS Cambodia also works in collaboration with the UN World Food Program, through its
Mother and Child Health Project in the target villages of the Kompong Thom and Preah Vihear
provinces. The Project focuses on providing food supplements for children between 6 to 24
months and their mothers, pregnant women, and lactating mother. In the first stages of this
project the UN WFP provided training programs for CWS staff which subsequently enabled the
staff to share and work closely with the VHV. The training provided focused on child growth
monitoring, use of weight and age charts to help mothers and families understand how to

1
http://www.unicef.org/eapro/media_10039.html
KPT Village Based Community Development Project 20
prepare supplementary food, nutrition and child care education given from the UN WFP. The
support and transport of food aid to all the target communes is given on a monthly basis with the
VHVs being responsible for the distribution, education, monitoring and supervision of the food
aid given.

In conclusion we have observed that 60% of children in the program gained weight normally with
the remaining 40% were under weight due to chronic illnesses. The child mortality rate and risk
of problems occurring during child birth was also was also reduced. The SMCH program has
shown that the advice, skills and knowledge to ensure both mother and child health care are
maintained, using sufficient food preparation practices. This also helps people understand and
become aware of how to take care of their children by monitoring the growth rate, nutrition and
providing important health care from time to time.

Mrs. Chhoen Savorn, 20, lives in Sraeung village comments: “I was pale, weak, and always sick;
I participated in SMCH activities since 2008 and have gained a lot of knowledge on how to take
care of my child. Now my child is healthy and grown. I apply my knowledge to daily life by
maintaining a home garden with green vegetables, sweet potato, cassava, corn and bananas.”

Greater Acceptance and use of Health Services and Preventative Measures

“Expenditure on health care is one of the main reasons people are pushed into poverty- they
have to sell off assets to pay for services”2

Poor health comes at a high price in Cambodia. On average Cambodians spend $33 per person
each year to treat illnesses if we compare this with the government health expenditure of just $2
per person. People often pay unqualified pharmacist, untrained natural healers, or freelancing
government health workers to help deal with illnesses that arise from time to time which in most
cases are either too expensive and destroys the homes and lives of the community.

Prior to the 1995 Health Sector Reform, the government policy was to have a clinic in each
commune, a hospital in each district capital and a provincial hospital in each provincial capital
(Ministry of Health, 1995). However, the system provided did not meet the essential health
needs of the populations, as most clinics at commune levels were non-existent or had been
demolished and staffs were poorly skilled and motivated to keep the clinic running. Over time
CWS Cambodia began its collaboration with commune health clinics to support and strengthen
the existing health system, and establishing an effective community health network in the village.

The networking process included TBA and VHV


providing health awareness of the basic health services
for the community working in collaboration with local
health authorities and commune health clinics and the
provincial health department. The meetings organized
by the provincial health department are regularly
attended by the Project staff using this opportunity to
share concerns and finding ways of solving problems in
a consultative process in our target areas.

The other reasons for this consultative process is so


that CWS Cambodia can raise issues and draw the awareness and attention to the local,
commune and provincial authorities ensuring the efforts to provide effective health services from
both the Government and NGO community.

2
Indu Bhushan, Principal Project Economist, ADB Mekong Department.

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 21


Self Help Groups

The VBCD Project also provides capacity


building for the SHG committees focusing on
the training of their roles and responsibilities,
management, recording and monitoring, and
book keeping. This enables the SHGs to
create a saving mechanism to develop a small
loans system for an income generation project
either on agricultural or non agricultural small
business development. Furthermore the
participation within the SHGs helps to increase
both solidarity and trust when implementing
other community development work within their
respective villages.

Currently we have a total of 12 SHGs with 195 members established from mid 2008. Within the
SHGs 10 the 12 groups are operating smoothly since 2009 as most of the members now
understand the concept of the SHG system. Following the bylaws and policies developed by
each group has improved the daily living conditions of the members of the group minimizing food
shortages, purchasing rice seeds and agriculture tools, renovations, and sending their children
to school. The success of the SHGs came from the capacity building training and commitment
of the members which has resulted in an increase of capital earned within the group enabling
them to extend their services to help other poor families in their communities. About 90% of the
poor families, who are SHG members, now access to the loans provided in the SHGs to help run
and develop local income generation activities to improve their standard of living. Therefore the
dependence that the poor family had on moneylenders has significantly decreased.

Based on staff’s observation during this reporting period almost all SHG members had doubled
their profits through efficient business practices. With improved self-confidence to manage a
successful business, members are regularly taking out loans from the SHGs with a 90%
repayment rate thus increasing retained profits and continued savings among the 12 groups.
Some members of the SHGs are now using their own resources from accumulated capital to
expand the membership of the SHGs without financial assistance.

To ensure both the success and monitoring of the SHG system CWS field staff regularly
conducts a self assessment process as a tool to help evaluate and gage the process of this
project. To evaluate and assess the SHGs progress and monitoring 4 groups are made up of
the following: (group 1) made up of VDCs; (group 2) SHG members; (group 3) SHG Committee
members; (group 4) CWS field Staff. In these groupings we have developed a score system
from levels 1 to 4 (lowest, medium, improved, and advanced) with each group rating 3 on the
chart indicating signs of improvement throughout their growth. We did not expect this
improvement given that CWS does not provide any financial capital to assist the groups to date
but it has shown the importance of how each SHG needs to work together to achieve the best
results.

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 22


Major Challenges

Natural disasters (flooding, droughts, and torrential rain) continue to affect the target areas that
we work putting many villages in need of regular emergency relief. At the same time the
Government Disaster Management structure continues to find ways to strengthen both human
and capacity building resources to meet the needs of the people. The challenge is to implement
an annual disaster risk management action plan, with disaster alleviation projects, to be
integrated into the village development plans. Responding to this challenge, the project works
with communities, local and national authorities including VDCs, commune councilors, district
and provincial authorities, CRC, DCDM, CCDM, and to organize, train, plan, implement
community based disaster management plans in a participatory and precautionary manner.

Three Community Development Workers from the VBCD resigned leaving the responsibility to
the remaining CDWs increasing the work load putting them in a situation where some
components of the disaster management plan were not developed in the time expected. In
response, the VBCD project with the help and support from the Program and Human Resource
Manager, new staff were recruited to meet and follow up the needs of the disaster management
project.

The Project also faces the challenge of adequate services not reaching the most vulnerable and
poorest of families both from the NGO community and Government Services and the services
provided by the VDCs and CBOs. There is also the continuous struggle and fight for survival to
get food that the absolute poor are living from hand – to – mouth without the initiate to
participate fully in their community. As the need for survival is eminent the CWS project staffs
try to motivate the absolute poor families to participate in the life of the community by conducting
home visits and finding ways of making developments plans to provide the immediate basics
need for the people affected by this problem.

Issues not addressed

From mid 2007 CWS Cambodia selected two remote rural communes, Sraeung and Tipou, to
build its VBDC project. Sraeung is amongst one of the remote rural communes of Prasat
Sambuor where the road to this commune is difficult for vehicles to travel on and gain access. It
is also difficult for the people of this commune to gain access to services provided from the
Government and NGOs leaving the residents isolated from adequate resources. Fortunately
last year the roads were repaired with the improvements of various rural infrastructures of roads,
bridges, culverts and village roads providing accessibility to schools, health centers, clean water
and other social services have improved.

In this sense CWS uses a very different approach in community development work by helping
the poor create projects to ensure that their needs for the future will be sustained in a community
and participatory manner empowering the people. CWS Cambodia is the first humanitarian
organization to select target communities to work on this process of community development.
Unfortunately the negative impact has been the influence of outside parties that either overlap
the same idea or system, the lack of coordination among various agencies and the government
which causes competition among the overall community. It therefore causes problems rather
than solves problems for the community. CWS Cambodia will be organized a coordination
meeting to deal with the issues.

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 23


Future Plan

 Organize four coordination meeting with CC members in Sraeung and Tipou communes and
District Authority and relevant department in Prasat Sambuor and Santuk districts
 Support CCs to develop 12 annual village development plans and implement development
activities in target communes.
 Organize LCP training to Commune Councilors in target communes.
 Organize training on Accountability/Anti-Corruption to CCs, VLs, VDCs
 Provide awareness raising on Gender and related law to community members
 Organize Peace event in four target villages of Tipou commune
 Support materials for formation of one prayer group
 Conduct two quarterly meetings with VLs, VDCs, and CCs from 12 target villages
 Conduct annual VDC workshop with VDCs, VLs, CCs, and government agencies
 Conduct a training on leading and managing to VDCs, VLs, and CCs in eight target villages
of Sraeung commune.
 Conduct trainings on ToT to 12 CCs and key persons and VP guideline to VLS and VDCs
 Conduct a training on VP guideline to VLs and VDCs
 Conduct semester meeting for literacy teachers and VLs from eight target villages
 Support District Department of Education to monitor six literacy classes and distribute
literacy materials to those classes.
 Support materials and monitor the implementation of VP household development plan of 50
absolute poor families in 12 target villages
 Conduct a training on home-grown organic vegetables to 15 key farmers, IFM to 12 demo
farmers
 Provide hens to VP families in 12 target villages, crop seeds to 34 VP families and other
malnourished families, and fruit nurseries and materials to two target villages
 Provide training on micro-business to target beneficiaries from 12 target villages
 Provide office supplies to six SHG committees and capital assistance to four SHGs in two
target communes
 Support VHVs and TBAs to conduct primary health care awareness in 12 target villages
 Support HCs to organize quarterly meeting with 25 VHVs and 23 TBAs
 Support construction materials for open well, upgraded/ Apron construction, household
latrines, and household water filters
 Conduct a training on CBDRR and planning to 26 RCVs
 Support First Aid kits to 26 RCVs in 12 target villages
 Conduct two quarterly meetings for CCDM on CBDRR in two target communes
 Support RCV, VDC, and VLs to implement micro mitigation project

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 24


1.3. PREAH VIHEAR VILLAGE
BASED COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

Introduction

CWS Cambodia began its Village Based Community Development pilot project in Preah Vihear
and Kompong Thom Province from July 2007 divided into 2 stages to simplify monitoring and
support. The target communes in Preah Vihear VBCD Project operates in 4 remote rural
locations: Choam Khsant, Rumdaoh Srae, Tuek Kraham, and Yeang in Choam Khsant District.
We are now working on stage 2 of our project focusing on ‘Strengthening Livelihood’ currently
we in the last 6 months of our 2 years of working in this province. Subsequently with the high
degree of commitment from our staff positive changes have become evident in the community
through networking and local capacity building programs alongside that of local peace building
initiatives. To help us achieve the success of our work in this district we draw on the work and
concepts of ‘Do No Harm’1 as the foundation of all projects implement by CWS Cambodia.

T HE P REAH V IHEAR VBCD P ROJECT ’ S T ARGET M AP

Preah Vihear is located in the North of Cambodia bordering Thailand and Laos from the North,
Stung Treng to the East, Kompong Thom, Siem Reap to the South and Oddar Meanchey to the
West. The area of the province is 15,000 square kilometers. The topography is undulating
forested uplands and lowlands for much of its area, with the Dangrek Mountains to the North
along the Thai Border. Preah Vihear is classified as a rural province.2 Sources also indicates
that the mortality rate among children of the Preah Vihear Province indicates that over 2,700

1
Do No Harm: how aid can support peace or war, by Mary Anderson
2
www.maff.gov.kh

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 25


children under the age of 5 years died prematurely, and 270 infants died under the age of 1 from
the year 2000 onwards.3 From the period that CWS Cambodia worked on the VBCD Project in
Choam Khsant District we found that both the mothers and children’s health have improved; the
people also have access to safe water as well as participate actively in the projects proposed to
help develop their respective communities.

Many of the achievements that we have accomplished in the two year services that we have
provided included the construction of bridges, bringing communities together, constructing
community halls where the local people can participate in discussions, bringing people of
different religions and other community groups, together. The VDC are the local grass root
development agents the lead their own development initiatives of the community in consultation
and collaboration with CWS Cambodia. Over time the VDCs have gained a deep sense of
confidence regarding their accomplishments enabling them to work directly with the people in
leading their respective development projects.

In conclusion to-date there are no clear signs of the conflicting tensions ending in a peaceful
manner between Thailand and Cambodia in the vicinity of the Preah Vihear temple as the two
countries continue to discuss this issue and find solutions to solve this problem. It is in this
context that I would like share that the CWS staff have worked under unpredictable and
unsecure situations where the risk of a full scale conflict may arise at any time. However the
CWS Security Team closely monitors the situation in Preah Vihear and makes recommendations
to ensure the staffs safety and wellbeing is their priority. From April 4th to May 25th 2009 the
CWS office in Choam Ksant closed for almost two months due to the tensions arising between
the Thai and Cambodian border.4 There will be more detailed explanation under major
challenges.

Major Accomplishments and Changes

Objective 1: Develop community capacity to engage with government institutions and


CBOs to define their development direction and manage their affairs in a participatory
and democratic manner.

Support local initiatives

CWS Cambodia’s Com Dev Model is currently in the second stage and it is expected that the
Communities role and responsibilities in this project will increase from 40 to 70% while the
decrease of initiatives by staff is from 60 to 30%. This means that the community is
progressively taking on a larger degree of work and initiatives in their community keeping them
empowered. It also illustrates and reflects the work that CWS staff does in building
relationships, mentoring, training and planning, project proposal development and grant writing,
mobilizing and implantation of resources when needed from the Choam Khsant District.
Currently 11 community projects (5 community meeting halls; 3 newly constructed bridges and
bridge repairs, and the repairing of water dikes) proposed in the fiscal 2008 fiscal year were
completed 3 of the initiatives set (2 bridge construction and a bridge repairs).

The completion of the projects set out by the community from the Construction Committee, VDC,
and villagers illustrate their ability to develop their own initiatives and mobilize resources needed

3
(Sources: Estimates calculated from CDHS 2000 & NIS 2004).
4
The tension started from 15 July 2008 one week after UNSECO World Heritage Committee registered Preah Vihear temple in the
world heritage list. Since then at least 3 bouts of conflict arose leaving casualties on both sides of the border with the latest conflict
rd
on April 3 2009.

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 26


to complete goals and objectives whilst assigning tasks and responsibilities to each other.
Another important aspect of these local initiatives is their confidence to communicate to the
government institutions seeking permission from the forestry department to cut wood needed to
build bridges and the meeting halls. With practical experience and local initiatives CWS
Cambodia believes that this will help improve self confidence and show encouragement to their
communities.

M R . P ICH P HOURITH , P REAH V IHEAR P ROJECT M ANAGER ROD FOR J OSEPHINE B ARBOUR , CWS C AMBODIA C OUNTRY
R EPRESENTATIVE W ITH A MEETING APPOINTMENT W ITH K ONG Y AONG RESIDENTS W HICH IS FAR THAN THEIR REACH 16KM
ALONG MUDDY ROAD 3 HOURS TRAVELED .

Community Meeting Hall Construction

In Cambodia the Buddhist Monastery or Wat is the


center of many Khmer people’s lives where they can
meet to organize religious ceremonies, discuss
development ideas and meet both formally and
informally. Nonetheless for many communities that
live further away from the local Wat they would
normally meet under the shade of trees or under
people’s houses.5 At times meeting under the shade
of trees or people’s houses would not always work
given that it would rain, disturb the house owner and
there may not be enough mats for people to sit on.

5
Traditional Cambodian House are raised on stilts leaving a large shaded space below for people to gather

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 27


Nonetheless over time and experience the idea of constructing community meeting halls, salas,
would help solve their problem enabling a sufficient place to gather.

With the support of CWS Cambodia we provided partial financial support to construct 4 new
community meeting halls and the repairs of an existing hall. Two community halls in Yeang and
Kong Yaong 9 x 9 sqm2; Veal Thum and Veal Pou sized 7 x 5 and 7 x 6 sqm2. To complete the
construction also required the joint efforts of the Construction Committee, VDCs and villages to
mobilize resources either in donations, money and labor contribution. Given that the peoples
living conditions varied from each other their contribution also varied and differed. In Veal Thum
residents donated trees that they had originally planned for future construction of their own
houses while in Kong Yaong and Kampeanh worked together to get permission from the forestry
department to get wooden materials for their project and transport them to the construction site.

In other cases the villages from Veal Pou used leftover wooden materials from their previous
bridge construction. Due to the different contributions that had been collected from the
community members CWS Cambodia provided a grant to meet the difference of funds that they
were not able to collect. Finally at the completion of construction in April the communities have
used the community halls at least 10 times for different purposes, village meetings, health
awareness, and the gathering of mothers to meet for various issues. In addition the meeting
halls are also used as shelters for sellers who move around the province to sell their goods in
Chaom Khsant District.

Dike Repairs

Two dike water reservoirs in Ou Khsan


Village of Tuek Kraham and in Choam Antil
Village of Yeang Commune were partially
destroyed due to lack of proper maintenance
and years of abandonment since 1994, in Ou
Khsan, and 1996 in Ou Kaek and Choam
Antil Villages. These reservoirs cannot
maintain water for the use of the villages
during the dry season which affects the
health of people and animals. In response to
the water problems the VDCs and villagers
worked together to repair the dikes of 15 x 4
x 0.6 meters in diameter; CWS Cambodia
provides 27 bags of cement, 1,500 pieces of
bricks and 10 liters of petrol, while the
community members contributed their labor
and soil to help repair the damages.

It took about one week to complete the dike repairs with the community members participating in
various ways of construction whilst the elderly women helped to cook food for the laborers. Prior
to the repairs of the dike, the water was leaking, leaving the level of water low and shallow.
Subsequently in completion of the repairs the water level is now suitable for fish to reproduce
and serve the needs of the community.

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 28


Teuk Kraham, Outup and Konkok bridge constructions

The successful construction of Teuk Kraham, Otup and Konkok bridges is another major
accomplishment achieved by the community giving them a sense of pride and self-confidence
throughout the completion process. CWS was able to contribute some of the cost needed to
complete the construction of the bridges. It was also made clear that the support from CWS in
conjunction with the contribution of the community was fair and ensured that community use
their local initiatives to gather the resources needed.

During the construction of the Teuk Kraham, Outup and Konkok bridges, CWS Cambodia
granted different amounts of support to each bridge project based on the sizes and availability of
resources. The construction of the Konkok bridge 30 x 4 x 5 meters meant the Construction
Committee could only gather the resources needed at about $2000 USD whilst CWS Cambodia
supplemented $180 USD to complete the construction process. During the construction of the
Outup Bridge sizes 22 x 3 x 4 meters the resources gathered by the Construction Committee
was about $500 USD whilst CWS Cambodia granted $286 to complete the construction. The
grants provided were used to purchase additional construction material, gasoline, transport and
food.

Mr. Sam Lourn a Teuk Kraham resident expressed his satisfaction of having a bridge, “I am now
a sixty year old man and all my life I have swum across this river for almost 50 years. Now we
have a bridge I feel very happy with it here.” Similarly Mr. Nget Sak from Rumdaoh Srae
Commune Councilor also from the bridge construction committee stressed: “Before having this
bridge, women who brought food for their husbands who ploughed their rice fields on the other
side of the river would wait for their husbands to swim across the river to take their meal. The
women were frightened to walk across a temporary unsafe crossing made by loose timber. In
one they would recall a child falling into the water. Now we have a secure and safe bridge.”

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 29


The comments made by the community reflects the hardships that each members struggled with
concerning the crossing of one side of the river to the other and how their feelings have changed
for the better now that they have a new bridge.

The successful construction of Outup bridge enabled the Construction Committee to pave the
way for 40 villagers in Chat Taing and Trapeang Thum Village to work together to build one
more bridge without the support of CWS. The Ou Russey Bridge is 17m in length, 3m width and
3.5m in height using the leftover construction material from the Outup bridge to help in their new
bridge construction project.

In conclusion to the construction of new bridges the VDC also developed the initiative to repair a
bridge that was 30 meters in length, 3 meters in width and 5 meters in height as it was
deteriorating with 4 of the 12 pillars partially damaged. The wooden materials used for the
bridge flooring was also deteriorating making it difficult for people to cross. Without any repairs
done the condition of the bridge would continue to deteriorate making it unfit for use. Therefore
with a grant supported by CWS Cambodia of $165 USD to buy construction material whilst 160
families in Veal Pou raised a little over $150 USD they were able to begin repairing the bridge.
The men of the village were responsible for the repairs made, which took about one week to
complete, whilst the women came together to cook and prepare food for the workers. During the
inauguration ceremony of the bridge everyone expressed their joy and happiness for this
collaborative achievement.

Water and Sanitation

The percentage of households not having access to safe drinking water in Preah Vihear
Province was 39% slightly higher than the national average of 34% in 2004. With the growing
figures we realized that there needs to be more done to curb the risks of unsafe water and
sanitation problems, and access to safe drinking water in this province to reduce levels of child
sicknesses and malnutrition to combat the low life expectancy of children.

The Chaom Khsant is one amongst seven districts of the province characterized by streams.
Although the rain falls are frequent it is not producing enough water for the standard of people in
this province. The access to rivers and streams to gather water is about 1 kilometer away from
the villages where people have to gather water to meet their needs for 6 months, enduring poor
road conditions, and unclean water. Some residents of the village had to dig a water saving
hole to store rain water for the dry season (March, April, May) but it is still not enough to meet
their needs throughout this period.

In response to the needs of the community CWS Cambodia provided 12 villages with 16 open
wells and 9 hand pump wells supporting the installation and construction of these wells. In
some villages it was not possible to dig wells as it was blocked by stone and rock requiring a
drilling machine and installing hand pumps for the people to access water.

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 30


The 24 wells have provided to 230 households with adequate water also the Choam Khsant
High School received a hand pump well benefiting approximately 200 students (70 girls) and 9
teachers. This has enabled the people to enjoy the services offered by the wells and hand
pump wells nonetheless we see that the community needs to gain ownership of their resources
and ensure that it meets everyone’s needs. CWS Cambodia also sought the help and support
of the villagers to contribute whatever they could to the Water and Sanitation Project by
providing labor, resources, and practical ways of giving support. Over time the community has
enjoyed the services of providing adequate water supplies for their basic needs.

Now that the community can have access to


adequate water from the wells they are now
growing vegetables without waiting for rainy
season as was customary to do before. Mr.
Roeurn Ros in Chhugn sub-village of Ou Khsan
stressed: “I became proud at the same time the
hand pump was completed. If we compare
March to May the month we would start our
planting we would not have the benefits we
have now. Now I have already harvested two
hundred fruit trees which I consume and sell the
surplus to my neighbors…”

Some villagers are now beginning to grow


vegetables and other fruit trees using water from the wells. The International Tropical Timber
Organization that works to protect the forest and wildlife in Preah Vihear also distributed 750 fruit
trees; mangoes, jack fruit, and lemons trees to 47 Chhugn households. The objective of this is
to minimize villagers logging trees and trapping wildlife. Water from the provided wells is
enough for watering the distributed fruit-trees in dry season some villagers commented on.

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 31


Major Challenges

In reflection to the concluding observations and concerns made in the introduction of this report,
the Cambodian-Thai tensions along the border continue to escalate into armed conflict and the
military standoff between the two countries has caused the greatest concern for staff’s safety
and wellbeing.

When CWS staffs return back to work at the end of the conflict, when it is safe to do so, they
have to work in difficult circumstances and under pressure to complete the delayed activities
they had plan to develop their previous projects. At times the CWS projects are not achieved in
time span given during the dry season as many of the villagers have to tend to their farms and
rice fields to meet seasonal needs of rice planting and harvesting. Therefore both the border
conflict and meeting the needs of the community on a rice planting seasonal system have
brought many delays where both the staff and the community have to find alternative ways of
reaching their project goals.

Lessons Learned

Through the border conflict between Cambodia and Thailand we learnt that helping the VCD
improve their self confidence and gain a sense of pride, when mobilizing people and resources,
to help in their development projects is important. Given that at times CWS could not always be
available to help the communities from time to time the sense of confidence and pride from VCD
to ensure the initiatives and goals of their community is achieved.

In some villages the VCD help coordinate work done with the forestry department to try and
meet their needs when they needed wooden materials for their construction projects. It provides
them with a know-how process when approaching the forestry department for help. Another
lesson learned that we drew from this incident was to gain trust from other people, we need to
be honest, sincere and follow-up our commitments. The sense of trust that the VDC have gained
from working with the Forestry Office will help them in future projects.

Issues Not addressed

Farmers in Choam Ksant district traditionally raise their livestock by setting them free to eat
grass and forest leaves in the mountainous areas near their villages. They let the livestock live
freely like wild animals until they need them to assist their farming works. In the rainy season
this year, they went to get their livestock back as usual unfortunately some farmers had lost their
livestock due to various diseases. In comparison the increase of cattle death has risen with the
owners unsure about what has been happening. Even though villagers struggle with the death
of their cattle CWS Cambodia does not have the staff in this field of expertise to help the villages
understand the proper care needed for their livestock. Although we hope that we are able to
help find solutions to this problem.

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 32


Future Plans

 Follow up SMCH project


 Work with health center to conduct TBA refresher course
 Conduct refresher course on CBDRR and HVCA to RCVs
 Conduct fish raising training
 Organize world literature Day
 Organize world Aids Day
 Training on Report writing for Community Peace Volunteer
 Follow up VP and their household plan
 Conduct village planning for FY’ 2010
 Conduct training on Communitarian and Facilitation to VDCs
 Work with beneficiaries to make platform around hand pump and open wells
 Conduct quarterly meeting with CCs and VDCs
 Conduct VDC annual workshop
 Initiate home-grown organic vegetable gardens
 Work with PDAs to conduct training on animal health

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 33


1.4. SVAY RIENG WATER
AND SANITATION COOPERATION PROJECT

Introduction

The lack of clean water and sanitation is costing Cambodia around half a billion dollars every
year in poor health with a loss of tourists, a study has found. In a discussion titled, “Water is
Medicine,” Jaehyang So, manager of the World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Program, said that
a study commissioned by the organization on the economic impacts caused by the lack of water
and sanitation shows that Cambodia, Indonesia, the Philippines and Vietnam lose around $9
billon USD every year. All of a sudden, the lack of sanitation became not a problem of the poor
person that doesn’t have access to sanitation, but it became a real constraint to economic
growth in the country, she told an audience of health experts and policymakers on August 3rd
2009 in Washington.

In Cambodia the conceptual understanding, knowledge and access to sanitation and clean
water is limited with less than 30% of the rural population having adequate latrines. People who
have advocated for safe water and sanitation have enhanced their understanding of this issue
due to the raising of awareness campaigns to ensure people understand the issues that arise
from poor water and sanitation problems. Church World Service Cambodia started working
Svay Rieng in 1992, with a focus to help the absolute poor and vulnerable people through an
integrated community development project. The Project was successfully handed over to
community based organizations, communities and provincial authorities in May 2005. By FY06
in partnership with the Provincial Department of Rural Development, CWS started a new
initiative: the Water and Sanitation Cooperation Project, or WatSan. The WatSan initiative
focused on the access to quality drinking water, environmental sanitation, health and hygiene
development, wastewater use, use of household water filters, safe water storage with
awareness to water-related diseases and other issues.

SVR WatSan Cooperation Project 34


This new imitative made possible under funding support from NCCA/AusAID and UMCOR since
the beginning of project. With long-term vision is to fulfill the basic needs of the Cambodian
people, provide for sustainable livelihoods, strengthen civil society and to be established as a
Water Expertise and Training Centre (WET Centre), which is now on the process with CAWST.

However, Act for Peace (former NCCA) phased out their support at the end of June 2009 which
leaving project encounters with major challenges of funding shortfall after June 2009. Given to
this funding crisis, the WatSan project is going to shutdown at the end of October 2009, if no
other funding support to continue this excellent program.

During this reporting period the WatSan Project distributed 902 bio-sand water filters to 882
households, 2 Primary Schools, 1 kindergarten, 4 Police Stations, and 1 pagoda. In total the
direct beneficiaries amounted to 4,185 people (1,936 women) and 2,529 children (1,027 girls).
In addition, 27 training courses were held on the effective use of bio-sand water filters,
maintenance and repairs, latrine use, hygiene and sanitation practices with 762 participants (285
women). Moreover in cooperation with the DSP staff the Project we also conducted training
programs on leading and managing rural organizations, roles and responsibilities, and local
capacity for peace building initiatives to CCs, VLs, CDFs and WSUGs.

Major Accomplishments and Changes

Overall Objective: To expand the coverage of improved water and sanitation facilities to the
under-served population of Romeas Haek and Rumduol District, Svay Rieng Province, and to
improve health and hygiene practices related to water-borne diseases and sanitation.

Bio-sand water filter construction and installation

“Water and Sanitation has been identified as one of the major causes of the high diarrhea
incidences in Cambodia… In particular the sanitation situation is very poor. Cambodia has in
fact been classified as one of the countries in the world with the lowest sanitation coverage in
the rural areas…”1

UNICEF estimates that only 16% of rural Cambodians have access to adequate sanitation and
65% to safe water. In urban areas the situation is much better nonetheless 80% of the
Cambodian population resides in the rural countryside where much of the problems to adequate
water and proper sanitation exist. Many rural households lack basic sanitation facilities and the
awareness of good hygiene practices is limited. There is often no toilets or soap for washing
hands at home or in school. Children are more likely than adults to touch unclean surfaces and
are therefore particularly vulnerable to unhealthy environments.

1
UNICEF Cambodia Project Officer Hilda Winarta

SVR WatSan Cooperation Project 35


CWS Cambodia provided 902 filters to 20 Svay Rieng villages for people to use in 882
households, schools, pagodas, police stations and commune halls. The effort is part of a Water
and Sanitation Co-operation Project by CWS Cambodia benefiting the poorest of the poor and
most vulnerable in the remote areas. The community actively participates in each step of the
process when constructing and installing water filters, either contributing in money donations,
labor and other resources that might be needed.

We have seen that through the monitoring and home visits by the CDFs and CWS Project Staff
606 families have kept the filters in good working conditions cleaning them when necessary as
well as putting them in the appropriate areas of their houses and villages. The community is
satisfied with the water filters enabling them to drink safe and clean water as they see the
differences between filtered water and unfiltered water from the wells, hand pumps and local
ponds.

The community is no longer worried about bacteria and waterborne


diseases from unsafe water and confidence with their water filters to
ensure safe and healthy water. People have noticed a decline in health
problems since the installation of water filters for their communities. Long
Bora, 11 years, studies in 4th grade at Sra Mor Primary School shares his
experience with using filtered water in his school and at home: “before I
always drank water from the hand pump without boiling it or purifying it. I
usually had typhoid confirmed by the health clinic. I would take sick leave
from school to cure my typhoid. With this sickness my parents spent a lot of money for medicine
and care. Since CWS provided education on using clean and safe water, hygiene and sanitation,
as well as equipping water filters for our school myself, my schoolmates, and teachers are now
able to access safe purified water….I am now becoming healthier…”

SVR WatSan Cooperation Project 36


Daung Commune Health Clinic

Daung Commune Health Clinic was built in 1999


at Romeas Haek district about 40 kilometers from
Svay Rieng provincial town. The clinic provides
health care services to 2,538 families (11,999
people including 6,274 women) in 22 villages of
Daung commune. The Health Clinic has a
director and 11 health staff (six women)
responsible for the daily running of the clinic:
midwives, nurses, administration staff, and
tuberculoses researchers.

Mr. Toeuk Yi, Director of Daung Commune


Health Clinic recalls: “The Clinic encountered many problems from 1999 to 2005 as we didn’t
have enough staff, poor road conditions making it difficult to travel and transport patients to the
district hospital or provincial hospital. The patients were suffering from infectious diseases,
diarrhea, scabies, typhoid, stomach aches etc. The Clinic also formed a Village Health Volunteer
to work in each village raising awareness regarding basic health care, general hygiene and
sanitation, but people were not interested failing to participate in the events or immunizations
campaigns for the community.

It is very different now from 2005 the year that CWS Cambodia ran its WatSan Project. Even
though I didn’t know what CWS Cambodia was doing at the time from my view point I was
wondering why the water-borne diseases have decreased since then. We had an official
meeting to gather the information about why the health problems were decreasing informing us
of the work that CWS was doing to help us. CWS Cambodia helped us reduce the health
problems arising. In 2005, 2,087 patients (345 children) sought our consultation and treatment
from water-borne diseases, nonetheless due to the positive impact of the CWS Cambodia’s
Svay Rieng WatSan Project, in 2009 we now have only 535 patients (92 children) showing a
significant decrease in health problems.”

Household Latrine construction

According to the World Food Program the percentage of households not having access to
sanitary toilets was 91% and not having access to safe drinking water within a 150 meter radius
is 2% in the year 2004.2 Amongst these households, members and particularly children are
exposed to poor hygiene and sanitation conditions which will increase the risks of infections
including diarrhea and malnutrition increasing the risk of child deaths.

If we compare this to the national level a higher percentage of households in this province did
not have sanitary and adequate latrines. Therefore the need to promote sanitation in Svay
Rieng, to reduce the risks of child deaths, and to reduce existing levels of child mortality and
malnutrition, is important and should take priority within the community. CWS Cambodia’s
WatSan Project provides education and raising awareness to the community members to ensure
that they can understand the common problems that are affected breaking the habit of disposing
human waste in the forest, rice fields and backyard gardens of their homes. We explain that
maintaining good health and sanitary practices is very important for the community especially for
the poor. It enables the community to see that this is an important preventative measure against
chronic health problems emphasizing the need to save money.

2
http://www.foodsecurityatlas.org/khm/country/provincial-Profile/Svay-Rieng,

SVR WatSan Cooperation Project 37


Currently the construction and monitoring of 170 latrines in 23 villages of 5 communes the CWS
staff are beginning to see the impact it has had on the community. When asked how useful the
latrines are for them all the people said the latrines have helped them and their families in many
ways. For example it was said that the latrines are helpful for women and young girls who are
normally uncomfortable defecating during the daytime in an open space where other people may
see them. This also reduced the contamination of germs particularly for children who would
usually play barefoot outside. Also during the rainy season when there is a flooding of water
around the houses and the fields, where people would defecate, the risk again, of germs and the
contamination of their main drinking water sources would also be a problem. Therefore the
latrines contributed to the reduction of diarrhea and other sicknesses. Finally an issue of safety
for women was important as snake bites and cases of rape were evident in the remote rural
areas. Recently a complaint was filed to the court regarding an incident where she was raped
by her neighbor during the night whilst defecating in her backyard. Therefore it was easy to see
how important the construction of the latrines alongside that of what it meant to curb much of the
health problems arising in the community.

Building Capacities to community members

The WatSan project conducted 6 different training courses and 2 raising awareness programs to
ensure that people understood the role and responsibilities of the Water and Sanitation User
Groups (WSUGs): leading and managing rural organization, home-grown organic vegetables,
local capacity for peace, latrine and bio-sand water filter use and maintenances, general hygiene
and sanitation. In attendance to these training and raising awareness programs 2,395 people
(1,078 women) including bio-sand water filter and latrine beneficiaries, WSUG members, VLs,
CDFs, teachers and school children attended.

SVR WatSan Cooperation Project 38


One amongst the LCP training participants, Mr. Phy Chhorn, Sra Mor Village Leader in Bos Mon
Commune, said: “I am the primary person who is in-charge in finding solutions among minor
conflict problems. I made judgments based upon my knowledge and understanding what is right
or wrong. I realized I sometimes make mistakes due to putting pressure on the disputing parties
to halt the conflict without consideration of both parties needs. I am really excited with my
present today as it made me more confidence, with more creative ideas, and I look at the deep
root causes of the conflict such as their attitude, experiences and values. LCP training is a
necessary weapon that can assist me to improve my work, he added.”

Mrs. Eang Sanon, WSUG Leader in Thmei Village impressed commented:


“when I was first invited to the LCP training, I kept asking myself why I
needed to study peace while my responsibility is to educate people on
sanitation. The result came up after a three-day training that I attended. I
realized peace building is not for one person’s responsibility but everybody.
The way I work with people can either bring peace or conflict.”

Similar to Sanon, Mrs. Leuk Srei Tauch, WSUG Leader at Kompong Thna
Village in Daung Commune, attended a training on Leading and Managing Rural Organization,
Village Development Planning and Proposal Writing and Role and Responsibility commenting on
the following: “the trainings I attended is very important to me as I am a leader in my village, so I
need to know more on how to plan in the development of my village, write proposals, etc. We
need to do many things to help develop our village starting from the development of a proper
road infrastructure. I therefore found this training helpful in improving my knowledge to write and
get money to do so. I will discuss with VLs to develop and submit proposals on community road,
water gate, small canal, bio-sand water filter, new hand pump wells…”

Major Challenges

Unfortunately a CDW (Education and Training) staff resigned in January so the project was
understaffed and we were not able to achieve the plans of education and training. Originally we
planned to provide training programs to 1,000 villagers, since we have only one CDW
responsible for training and education we were only able to work with 119 villagers.

SVR WatSan Cooperation Project 39


Another issue that arose is the distribution of bio-sand water filters. In previous meetings it was
understood that the recipients of the bio-sand water filters would facilitate the construction of the
filters, with CWS providing technical support, and other resources that might be needed. It was
also agreed that a list of names be made, according to a criteria set out, identifying who would
qualify for a bio-sand water filter. Unfortunately when the time came for constructing the bio-
sand water filters not all people on the list would participate leaving other members of the
villages, whose name were not on the list, would wait in the hope that there would an opportunity
for them to receive a bio-sand water filter. They would ask the Project Staff if it was possible for
them to gain a bio-sand water filter if the recipient on the list did not show up during the time
construction.

We are also challenged with the finding an adequate sand supplier given that the sand used is
of a specialized quality in comparison to the common sand used for construction. At times the
sand supplier did not have enough stock needed and could not produce what was needed
especially throughout the rainy season. In response to this problem CWS needed to do another
contract with a new supplier in Kompong Speu Province which is 170KM from project side
therefore it took time from the signing of the contract until the sand had arrived for us to use in
construction.

Lessons Learned

With the specialize fine sand experience we learned in that in our future work we have to assess
the ability of the supplier, as well as their warehouses to ensure that they can produce the
material needed on time especially in the rainy season.

The Commune Development Facilitator at the time would make house to house visits and invite
people to join their discussions and plans vebally. Unfortunately many people could not join
given that they live from hand to mouth each day. The reality of living for their basic needs was
daily where the finding of food was more important for survival then participating in the work of
the community. Therefore the participation and receiving of gifts to improve their health
standards were not always received by the absolute poor people. Nonetheless when the
absolute poor saw their neighbors receiving help it also caused room for jealousies to erupt
within the community causing people to blame each other for not ensuring that clear information
and invitations were given to the people. We then realized that the Project needed to change
how they would share information to the village and make sure invitations and proof of
invitations were distributed throughout the community to avoid misunderstandings and conflict
within the community.

Issues Not addressed

There are 23 poor households who are the beneficiaries of the WatSan Project who were
affected by a storm that destroyed their houses. The WatSan Project was only offering water
and sanitation facilities leaving the affected families with no other support during the storm. In
another case 10 target villages in Tras Commune also struggled with a lack of water from a
drought during the rainy season simply because the in parts of Svay Rieng there were not
enough rain to meet the water needs of the people.

SVR WatSan Cooperation Project 40


Future Plans

 Organize staff meeting regarding beneficiaries data collection


 Arrange meeting with Provincial Department of Planning and/or Office to get the statistics
 Arrange meeting with PDRD on the coordination and inform the activities plan for FY’10
 Arrange meeting with Provincial Executive Committee on other NGOs’ activities in target
areas.
 Conduct coordination meeting with two district governors to inform the activities plan of FY’10
 Arrange meeting with Commune Councils, Village Leaders, WSUGs or Village Development
Committee to inform the activities plan for FY’10
 Conduct rapid/needs assessment by meeting with focus group people such as CCs, VLs,
WSUGs/VDCs, CBOs, elders, teachers.
 Select new beneficiaries and check the FY’09 beneficiaries
 Educating selected beneficiaries on bio-sand filter use, maintenance and sanitation
 Conduct market survey and choose supplier for construction materials
 Construct and install 1,000 Bio-sand water filter for 1,000 household in 15 villages

SVR WatSan Cooperation Project 41


PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
 BATTAMBANG & BANTEAY MEANCHEY
PARTNERSHIP PROJECT
 KOMPONG THOM PARTNERSHIP PROJECT

CHURCH WORLD SERVICE - CAMBODIA


2.1. PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM

INTRODUCTION

After decades of conflict, social dislocation and destruction of both economic and social capital,
International and Cambodian NGOs are working cooperatively to alleviate poverty. CWS is one
of the many NGOs that began working with the Cambodian NGO networks in Kompong Thom in
1996 to contribute to the process of poverty reduction eminent in this province at the time.
However, without efficient capacity building initiatives on institutional development many CNGOs
could not effectively implement their development programs or handle organizational
management systems to reduce oppression, injustice and inequities.

The CWS Partnership Program provides overall leadership and management to the Partnership
Program Offices in Battambang, Banteay Meanchey, Oddar Meanchy, and Kompong Thom
Partnership Projects to assist 6 holistic partners (KCDA, ADOVIR, CFEDA, KNTO, KORCD and
CIDC), and 53 small grant and non-funding partners countrywide. In addition, at the Program
level, the PP works at maintaining good relationships nationally and internationally with
stakeholders, donor agencies and as well as networking with CCC-GPP, NGO Forum and other
related program meetings and workshops.

CWS C AMBODIA ’ S P ARTNERSHIP P ROGRAM ’ S T ARGET A REAS

Partnership Program 42
The CWS Partnership Program Manager is a member of GPP working group working in close
cooperation with the GPP team to review NGO Applications for the ‘Voluntary Certificates’ which
assists the capacity development of the CNGOs that apply for this certificate. CFED was the
first partner that received guidance and support to revise its financial policy, staff policy, salary
scale guideline and ensure all related documents are were available when CFED needed to
apply for the Voluntary Certificate.

The PP continues to strengthen the capacity of its partners through varied approaches which
included training, coaching and mentoring to strengthen their organizational development and
programs. We also provide full or partial grant support as well as technical support to ensure
our partners are able to achieve the goals and objectives that they set out for themselves, which
in-turn, enables them help in the eradication of extreme poverty and hunger, promote gender
equality and empowerment of women, reduce child mortality and improve maternal health,
combat malaria, and meet the nine year universal standard of basic education.1

MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND CHANGES

Objective 1: Strengthen the capacity of holistic CNGO partners and small project fund
recipients to facilitate programs that will effectively and sustainably improve the living
conditions of the most vulnerable.

Small Grant of CWS Cambodia enabled CFC to outreach more community people to be
aware Gender equity and crimes

Women farmers are responsible for producing over half of the world’s food and grow between 60
and 80 percent of the food in most developing countries. In nearly all of Africa and parts of Asia
including Cambodia, this figure is closer to 90 percent. Women are also involved in post-harvest
activities, such as threshing, cleaning, transporting, marketing, storing and processing food
crops. Additionally, they play a critical role in livestock management with activities that include
tending, caring for, feeding and milking the animals, as well as processing and marketing
livestock products. Women are a repository of knowledge about the preservation of seeds and
other genetic resource of the food they process from its origin. Women farmers are uniquely
gifted to be true custodians of our world’s natural resources2.

Despite their critical roles, women farmers receive little recognition working with few or no
resources. Domestic violence, abuse, trafficking and discrimination against women and girls is
also occurring a problem in Cambodia. Incidences of sex slavery are particularly high in
Cambodia. It is estimated that there are close to 80, 000 to 100, 000 sex slaves and prostitutes
in the country. Stated differently, 1 in 150 people are sex slaves or prostitutes. Sex trafficking of
women and girls, including ethnic Vietnamese, is prevalent. The majority the women and girls
end up in and around the urban areas of Phnom Penh, Siem Reap, and Sihanoukville where the
demand is high.

As we move into 2009, Cambodia remains a major receiving, sending and transit country for
human trafficking. According to the most recent UNAIP report, many factors have contributed to
the rise human trafficking in Cambodia. These include poverty, socio-economic imbalances
between rural areas and urban centers, increased tourism, lack of unemployment, education,
and safe migration; poverty being the most significant cause of trafficking. In a recent survey of
trafficked victims who escaped from Thailand, conducted by the International Organization of
Migration, 62 per cent reported that the original reason they left their homes was to find jobs to
help support their family.3

1
The nine year universal basic education is to encourage children (both the boy and girl child) remain in school to meet their basic
education needs.
2
http://www.developments.org.uk/articles/feeding-the-world/
3
http://ssfcambodia.org/index.php?page=country-context
Partnership Program 43
In 2008, CWS Cambodia provided small grants to CFC organizing an International Children’s
Day on 01 June in Prey Chhor, Kompong Cham province celebrating the 99th International
Women’s Day on 09 March with at least 945 participants including 615 residents (375 women),
290 schoolchildren, 38 local authorities from Boeng Nai and Kor Communes of Srey Santhor
district participated. The events celebrated aims was to increase the awareness of gender
equity, violence, exploitation, abuse and discrimination against women and children, including
commercial sexual exploitation, trafficking and child labor.

Mrs Yan Poeun, commented on the Women’s Day that: “This celebration is
very important to me and all participants as it provided us a lot of knowledge
related to women’s rights and those illegal forms of violence, exploitation
and abuse against women and children. I have received more knowledge
learning about the critical position of the women within their families and
society. It is also a way to make the men who participated to stop abusing
their wives which is a common problem.”

The Charity Foundation for the Children became a small grant and non-funding partner of CWS
Cambodia in February 2008, six years after its official launching as a local NGO. CFC aims to
assist children who are in situations of exploitation, preventing of exploitation, and improve the
health care for children. Their Projects include peer education, the formation of children’s clubs
and support for vulnerable families to prevent the conditions that allow child labor to exists,
violence against children, sexual abuse and trafficking to thrive. CFCs approach is community-
based care including fostering and kinship, in which CFC train poor women to build sustainable
livelihood through providing and updating vocational-skills trainings.

The vocational-skills such as sewing, weaving, poultries raising or home vegetable gardening
are available to help women build an income for themselves. Once they are trained and are able
to establish a solid business system enabling the women to care and help look after other
vulnerable children within their communities. So far CFC has 246 foster-mothers [Phnom Penh
and Srey Santhor and Prey Chhor districts of Kompong Cham province] and 435 orphans and
other vulnerable children.

Partnership Program 44
Cambodian NGOs trust on CWS Cambodia’s Consultancy Services on Organization
Development Assessment

CWS Cambodia has recognized good governance was the most major challenges that
Cambodian NGOs attempt to overcome. MyVillage is a new non-funding partner that serves
many ethnic minority groups in the North-East Mondulkiri and Stung Treng provinces, Cambodia
and Vietnam shared boarder. MVI programs focus on, Indigenous People’s Rights, Land
Registration Project, Community Forestry, and Natural Resource Management. MVI stresses on
the ownership and the participation of community members in a proactive approach to protect
indigenous people’s land and natural resources within their communities. To enable this concept
to happen there also needs to be effective capacity building projects for the local people to help
them develop their ideas and thoughts for their project in a participatory manner.

MVI was originally formed from the Strey Deumbei Santepheap and Pakrethan Women for
Peace and Environment in 1997 educating indigenous communities in the forest regions
conerning Forestry Law concerning their rights and obligations to the authorities. MVI was then
established and officially registered with the Royal Government of Cambodia through the
Ministry of Interior in January 25, 2007. During the transition from the earliest project MVI
suffered a period of incompetent management, leadership problems, no clear goals and
objectives, and unclear management and organizational structures.

To maintain organizational development and build a better reputation as well as bring


accountability and transparency within the organization, MVI Management team including
Provincial Project Coordinator, Project Manager, Admin and Financial Officer and Executive
Director was formed. While changing the management style, some tensions and stress was
common nonetheless at times it would escalate bringing problems in the organization. The
Partnership Program understood the problems that MVI was experiencing therefore we were
able to help them guide a practical and structural system for them to follow and monitor from
time to time to ensure the sustainability of the organizations management and daily operations.

Partnership Program 45
CWS assessment team Mr. Mot Sana, Partnership Program Manger, Mr. Kong Sedth, OD
Program Officer, Mr. Choun Moniroth, Partnership Program Assistant and Mrs. Prak Vimeany,
Partnership Project Coordinator carried out the institutional capacity assessment, MVI in
Mondulkiri, from 18-23 May by using consultative workshops for team building, organizational
diagnosis and determining preferred methods for deeper assessment. The assessment also
conducted individual staff interviews and meetings with the target community people. The
assessment team compiled all findings, MVI staff suggestions and recommendations and
presented the findings to the MVI’s Board of Directors and Management Team. Through team
building workshops, staff had the chance to express their feelings, feedback, open dialogue with
each other, understanding the importance of communication, organizational management
systems and building closer relationships among staff.

MVI’s Board of Directors, management team and staff expressed their appreciation for this
opportunity to help them see their strengths and weaknesses. The Board will present the
findings from the assessment to their staff and donors.4 MVI staff indicated that “all
recommendations are very important to enhance our organizational development and enable our
staff to have more confidence and build sound relationships among each other”. The Executive
Director added that, “I would like to say thank you to CWS team that spent their worthy time to
help us and we must join hand for a good partnership work”.

CWS Cambodia celebrated the 13/17 years of Social Change through Capacity Building to
inform its successful partnership philosophy

The CWS Square Table Meeting concept for 2009 was to bring people into a closer relationship
with their funding partners and local partners. It was also to give the chance for the local
Cambodian partners to engage and spend time with the organizations responsible for supporting
their work within Cambodia through the services of CWS.

The Square Table Meeting expressed the importance of how there was a need to have both the
funding partners and local partners understand the roles that each play and the stories that bring
light to these roles. It was also helping funding partners understand the unique story of CWS
Cambodia and the people that they engage with each day alongside the social problems faced
in Cambodian society today.

4
Refer to the report on Institutional Capacity Assessment, 18-23 May 2009

Partnership Program 46
Day one of the SQT was based on the theme
‘Partnership Model for Development: 13/17 Years
of Success’ allowing funding partners and local
partners to come together to meet and share with
each other about their work and concerns, issues
and celebrations. It was the first time that the
Partnership Program alongside the Direct Services
Program of CWS was able to bring both the
funders and local partners together in a setting
where engagement and understanding was
highlighted and important. (The details of square
table meeting are reported under organizational
development section)

MAJOR CHALLENGES
During this reporting period, Non-funding partner CFED and holistic partner KORCD have
requested CWS Cambodia to review their financial guidelines. CFED prioritized financial
guideline revision and documents preparation as demanded from its donors and while this
organization attempted to apply for GPP Voluntary Certificate. Unfortunately the Field
Accountant resigned leaving the Partnership Program Manger to adjusted his timesheet to
provide training and coaching to CFED and assisted in both organizations to review their
financial guidelines. However, the financial guideline was not fully reviewed due to the time
constraints therefore the task was handed on to the Finance Department.

There was a delay in the follow up of technical support that the Partnership Program offers to
the local partners due to the short notice given and resignation of the Partnership Program
Manager which placed a delay on commitments prepared. CWS Cambodia’s Partnership
Program received urgent requests from the Children’s Committee, Children Support Foundation
and Kampuchea Christian Councils for strategic review. Due to time constraints during and after
the Square Table Meeting, the Partnership staff could not respond to these matters. The
Partnership Program aims to look at their requests in next fiscal year.

LESSONS LEARNED
With the support of the CWS Country Representative the Partnership Program staff was able to
provide its consultancy work on the organizational development to support new non-funding
partners. This consultancy work is not only an exercise for the partnership program staff but it is
also sharpening OD skills to meet a more professional standard. It also increases the
confidence and understanding about OD work as well as using the CAT developed by CWS
Cambodia. Through consultancy work CWS Cambodia offers in the Partnership Program has
strengthened and gained a positive reputation in organizational development work.

The CWS Cambodia Square Table Meeting, Celebrating 13/17 years of Social change through
Capacity Building in Partnership, enabled us to meet with all local and funding partners bridging
the gap between the two groups of people. It was envisaged that this would strengthen
relationships and give the local partners the opportunity to meet with funding partners and their
respective organizations. We have learnt of the importance of building both personal and public
relation mechanism to improve the work that CWS does in the community but also to strengthen
relationships and allow local partners the space to share their concerns and ideas.

Partnership Program 47
ISSUES NOT ADDRESSED
During this reporting period, the Partnership Program received four proposals from CC for Youth
Conference; ICA for Youth Camp; CFC and CSF for International Children’s Day. The
Partnership did not provide fund to these partners due to the delay of the budget commitment
from the donors.

FUTURE PLANS
 Recruitment of Partnership Program Manager (replacement)
 Provide training on Monitoring and Evaluation for the partners
 Provide grants to the prioritized project partners
 Conduct Full Partnership Program Meeting
 Review Partnership Program Operating Guideline
 Continue to assist partners for the financial review and strategic plan development
 Continue to build capacity on technical aspects of financial system, strategic planning,
management system as well as organizational development to partners (CSF, KCC, CC,
ICA, and CFED)
 LID Program Officer will assist CNGO partners to review and check all relevant documents
and prepare for good applications for “voluntary certificate system” under NGO Code of
Compliance of Cooperation Committee for Cambodia (CCC).
 The Partnership Program will support CNGO partners, KORCD, ADOVIR, CFEDA and
KNTO for project evaluation start from 01 September-30 November 2009.

Partnership Program 48
2.2. BATTAM BANG & BANTEAY MEANCHEY
PARTNERSHIP PROJECT

INTRODUCTION

CWS Cambodia has deep roots in the western border provinces of Battambang and Banteay
Meanchey where in the early 90s we helped the Department of Animal Health and Production
improve vaccination of livestock (in collaboration with the Lutheran World Federation and the
American Friends Service Committee). As our work expanded, knowledge and technology from
foreign experts was gradually and carefully transferred to local residents through our Village
Livestock Agent training program. By 1998 this vital program was handed over to government
departments.

In 1999 the BTB&BTM Project shifted its focus to the institutional development of Cambodian
NGOs, a move that was in line with our countrywide commitment to for institutional development.
CWS Cambodia was quick to recognize the vast potential of the dynamic and committed
Cambodian NGOs that were emerging in the provinces despite minimal support from their
international counterparts.

TARGET AREAS OF THE BATTAMBANG AND BANTEAY MEANCHEY PROJECT

BTB&BTM Partnership Project 49


During this reporting period the BTB&BTM Project still supports ADOVIR, KCDA, CFEDA and
KNTO to implement Integrated Community Development Programs, focusing on supporting and
strengthening Self-Help Groups, basic health care education, community education, agriculture
and animal raising, support to the absolute poor, and responding to the natural disaster. The
BTB&BTM project also works to strengthen the social infrastructure, capacity building of
Commune Councils, Village Chiefs, Village Development Committee, and community based
organizations, rice banks, funeral associations1, and community ponds in 59 rural remote
villages in the north-west provinces of Battambang, Banteay Meanchey and Oddar Meanchey.

In addition, two small grant partners (DYMB & DYBTM) also support the work and
implementation of HIV and peace education in Banteay Meanchey, whilst the Parent Association
and local authorities in Kompong Lei village supported the construction of a well in the school
consist of 168 young students including 76 girls. Beside the current planned activities,
DIPECHO through Dan Church Aid granted CWS Cambodia 146,067.00 Euro to implement a
joint Community Based Disaster Risks Management. CFEDA, KCDA and KNTO were selected
as local implementing partners for the Project in 40 of their target villages.

Eight training courses regarding Community Based First Aid, Community Based Disaster Risk
Management, and Commune Development Plan was organized with 188 participants (48
women) who are RCVs, VCs, VDCs, CCDM, DCDM, PCDM, DFT and PFT attended. After the
training programs, RCVs, VDCs and VCs of the target villages were able to assist and prepare
village disaster mitigation plans for their respective villages. An estimate of at least 5,403
families (24,385 people including 7,913 women and 9,291 children) are the direct beneficiaries
of the Project while other 4,055 families (21,024 people including 6,765 women and 7,105
children) have benefited indirectly.

MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND CHANGES

Our objective: To strengthen the capacity of holistic CNGO partners and small grant
recipients so they can facilitate programs that will effectively and sustainably improve the
lives of the most vulnerable people.

Provided Emergency Relief to Vulnerable People

In the fourth quarter, through KCDA, CFEDA and ADOVIR, CWS Cambodia distributed 5,553
kilograms of white rice to 129 food shortage families, 607 household members in 12 villages of
Ta Taok, Ampil Pram Dem, Toul Pongro and Ou Sampoar Communes. Each Member received
from 7 to 10 kilograms of white rice based upon the food shortage situation of each CNGO
partner’s target villages. Global economic and financial crisis had affected the value of
agricultural products; especially between the Cambodian Thai border reducing farmers’
production. Also the poorest families lose daily labor work in the crop fields because of the
reduction of production, drought, heavy rain fall and crops destroyed by wild animal.

In May, through KNTO, CWS Cambodia distributed food and health materials to 135 displaced
families (518 people including 265 women) in Chub Korki Koeut and Chub Korki Lech villages of
Ampil Commune. 2 These families left their villages because of the confrontation between Thai
and Cambodian armies regarding the dispute of the border and the temples. In total, 7,770

1
Funeral associations are a group of people in the village who coordinate people and help families whose loved ones have died and
there is an urgent need for practical support. The coordination of people, collection of donations, food, money and other resources
helps families cope with the death of a loved one among the village members.
2
Chub Korki Lech and Chub Korki Koeut villages locates on Dong Rek Mountain, along Cam-Thai border in Ampil commune,
Banteay Ampil district, Oddar Meanchey with about 110 km to the north of Banteay Meanchey provincial town, known as Khmer

BTB&BTM Partnership Project 50


kilograms of white rice, 86 bottles of cooking oil, 172 bags of iodine salt, 430 bottles of fish
sauce, 430 cans of canned fish, 28 mosquito nets, 54 water buckets, 71 ceramic water filters
and 28 plastic tents were distributed. Food and materials were distributed to each family based
upon their needs and family. The families and village leaders thanked CWS and KNTO for their
assistance to release this support especially under circumstance and fairness on what was
distributed.

D ISTRIBUTION OF RICE TO FOOD SHORTAGE FAMILIES IN B ANTEAY T I M UOY VILLAGE ,


M ALAI D ISTRICT .

Capacity development of CNGO partners regarding SMCH, improvements and impact

The BTB&BTM Project cooperated with DS Program’s Health Officer to organize a three-day
SMCH training, March 31-April 02 to nine CNGO staff (six women) from CFEDA, KCDA, KNTO
and ADOVIR. The training was aimed at increasing and improving the capacity and ability of
CNGO staffs, especially KCDA focusing on the support of mother and child health projects. The
KCDA staff formulated a demonstration project on SMCH in Ou Nornong village, Ta Taok
Commune.

Also 5 partnership staff members were given the


chance to participate in an exposure trip to learn the
practical experiences of SMCH development by the
Kompong Thom VBCD Project, thus applying and
incorporating their gained knowledge and experiences
in their FY’10 plan. Moreover in June through KCDA,
ADOVIR and CFEDA, CWS Cambodia also distributed
health utensils; 460 mosquito nets, 210 ceramic water
filters, 150 water kettles and 180 water buckets to 936
absolute poor families (4,056 people including 1,014
women) in 13 villages of Ta Taok and Ampil Pram
Deum, Toul Pongro Communes. Each family contributed 1,000-4,000 Riels (US$ 0.25-1) for a
water filter. Prior to the distribution of resources the partnership staff also trained the villages the
benefits of preventing malaria and clean water, particularly the water filter use.

Rouge controlled areas during the civil war until the integration of Khmer Rouge troops with the Government in 1998 and now they
are in disputed areas with Thailand.

BTB&BTM Partnership Project 51


Support school children and community schools

In June, through KCDA and ADOVIR, CWS Cambodia distributed 60 used bicycles, 60 bags, 60
uniforms, and 60 kits of study implements (including six note books, one ruler, one pencil, three
pens and one eraser each) to 60 poor and poorest students (25 girls) who study from grade 4-9
in seven schools of Ta Taok and Ampil Pram Dem Communes. The students did not have the
proper resource material to go to school and the lack of adequate transportation to the local
schools. Most of the students lived very far having to walk from home to school and return
home on foot which can range from a 3 hour walk. In addition 127 students received uniforms.

D ISTRIBUTIONOF BICYCLES , SCHOOL FACILITIES AND UNIFORMS TO SCHOOL CHILDREN


IN TARGET VILLAGES OF ADOVIR IN A MPIL P RAM D EM C OMMUNE , B AVEL D ISTRICT .

The Project also supported the Parents Association, and school teachers of Kompong Lei
community school to construct water storage (20m x 30m x 3m) to store rain water for use
during the dry season or when there is a drought. Another 27 ceramic water filters were
distributed to the seven schools for safe drinking water promotion among school children.
School Principles, CCs and local authorities and parents were very happy and thanked CWS
Cambodia and its partners for their support to their children’s health.

The holistic Partners integrated CBDRM Project into their ICDP

KCDA, KNTO and CFEDA has integrated Community Based Disaster Risk Management project
into their integrated community develop program receiving, through CWS Cambodia the
financial support from Disaster Preparedness Program of European Commission’s Humanitarian
Aid Department, and a financial contribution from the CWS, 40 target villages of KCDA (13),
KNTO (15) and CFEDA (12) covered due to CWSs attention on the IDP families who left their
homes during the Cambodia Thai border and temple conflict.

Ongoing coaching and support from the Partnership and ERP staff in cooperation with the
provincial Red Cross, CNGO staff are able to assist and coach VCs, VDCs and RCVs to conduct
a two-day CBDRM follow up training to 496 selected villagers (278 women) from 34 amongst
the target villages of KCDA, KNTO and CFEDA. As results the VCs, VDCs, RCVs from the
target villages are able to ensure villages are prepared a disaster arise. The proposal was
submitted to CWS through the partnership program for further support; in addition, CFEDA had
also conducted a public awareness on DRR to 91 villagers (42 women) in two villages.

BTB&BTM Partnership Project 52


CBDRM TRAININING AT KNTO

Improved capacity of holistic partners

The BTB&BTM Partnership Program continues to assist its four holistic partners. The capacity
building process applies to all 23 staff members (12 women) of the partners by mentoring,
formation and monitoring of program planning implementation, proposal development, and
financial management and reporting, and reviewing of guidelines and organizational structure.
The Project has also worked closely with CWS Cambodia’s Emergency Response unit to build
the capacity of CFEDA, KNTO and KCDA to understand and implement CBDRM in 40 target
villages. The main objective of the Program is to increase the capacity of rural communities to
prepare themselves more effectively and efficiently of natural disasters to alleviating the impact
of disasters.

Frequent meetings, discussions and field observations, have shown that the partners have
increased their capacity in overall program implementation and organizational management
systems. They have improved their cooperation and collaboration with Commune Councils, local
authorities and government departments, and provincial Red Cross departments in health and
education. Their program achievements, which include community wells and water storing,
community school construction, have been praised by the local authorities.

Khmer Community Development Association

KCDA has five staff (two women) and implements an Integrated Community development
Program to help improve the living conditions of people in 13 target villages of Ta Taok, Sung
and Ta Sanh Communes. These communes were former Khmer Rouge strongholds which was
integrated with the government in 1998. The Program has 665 families (2,839 people including
694 women and 1,330 children) while another 852 families (3,949 people including 1,060
women and 1,608 children) who have also benefited as a result from the overall support.

Knowledge and expertise on program planning, organizational management, CD approach, Self-


help group concepts and CBDRM is provided from the CWS Cambodia staff to KCDA, improving
their financial report systems, bookkeeping, planning, facilitation of the meeting and relationship
with local authorities, CCs and HC to achieve their VMG. Mrs. Kim Ly from Ta Taok commune
BTB&BTM Partnership Project 53
chief said that she appreciates the assistances from KCDA given to her village during a meeting
in the distribution of health materials to villagers to eradicate poverty and hunger.

SHG TRAINING PARTICIPANTS IN T A T AOK C OMMUNE , S AMLOUT D ISTRICT

KCDA also helps strengthen the community based organizations, for example the Self Help
Groups developed. KCDA staff conducted a three-day training, 17-19 March, in Ta Taok village
with 28 SHG committee members (25 women) of which 10 SHGs participated and learned the
concepts and principles of SHG, bookkeeping, saving, and facilitation skills. KCDA supports
227 family members (189 women) 10 SHGs in 9 target villages of Ta Taok Commune. Each
SHG has 15-30 members and they save between 500-1000 Riels (USD 0.12-0.25) per month.
KCDA staff facilitated regular monthly meetings, where the members would monitor and discuss
bookkeeping, saving and borrowing money from the group. They also discussed the challenges
of income generation, disaster management, food shortage, health, mutual help, and solidarity.

To monitor the ongoing progress of the SHGs, KCDA organized a one day reflection workshop
with the participation of 33 SHG committee members (30 women) to share their lessons learned,
and exchange the experiences of each group regarding successes and difficulties to enable a
participatory approach to problem solving. KCDA noticed that the SHG committee members
have improved bookkeeping and group principles. Communities have remarkably increased
solidarity, and mutual assistance, particularly support to the absolute poor families when they
face a shortage of food or serious illnesses. For example in March, SHGs in Phnum Rai village
allowed Mrs. Yean Pee to borrow 20,000 Riels without interest for the transportation of a five-
year child to receive treatment at the Health Center which is far from their village 30 kilometers.
In addition, the group members contributed 10,000 Riel to support people living with HIV/AIDs,
who were faced with a food shortfall. Having seen the usefulness of SHGs in helping each other,
villagers in Steng Touch village, Kampong Lpov commune (neighbor commune of Ta Taok)
initiated forming a SHG with 27 members requesting the help of KCDA to mentor them in this
process.

BTB&BTM Partnership Project 54


Cambodia is one of the least well served countries in the world for eye care.3 Cambodia, with a
population of nearly 14 million, is one of the poorest countries in the world. Approximately 85%
of the population lives in rural areas. The prevalence of blindness in Cambodia is estimated to
be 1.2% which translates to nearly 168,000
people. The main causes of blindness and
vision impairment are refractive error,
cataracts, trachoma and glaucoma. Most of
these are avoidable or preventable4. 20
oldsters (13 women) between the ages of 50
and 80 have received the gift of sight
through cataract surgery at Battambang
Ophthalmic Care in collaboration between
BOC and KCDA. 17 of these men and
women are ethnic Por living in a village
neighboring Ou Nornong. In addition, a little
girl, 15 years old, who was blinded by shrapnel from the same mine that killed her father while
they were foraging in the forest for something to eat or sell. With money from the Mrs. Mey
Meakea Fund for vulnerable children and many motor bike jurneys back and forth to the eye
clinic Battambang Ophthalmologic Care, Van Thoeun has a new eye. Although she cannot see
better, better she is seen. She now feels confident to go to school with the other children.

Cambodia community forestry was first put into practice in 1994 in Takeo, a southern province
where forest resources have been severely depleted in the past decades (Sokh et al., 2000).
This approach of involving local people in forest conservation has proved successful. In the late
1990s the concepts of community forestry spread all over the country, in particular, the northern
parts where local people depend more on forest resources for their livelihood. While the
government of Cambodia still lacks financial and legal support on community forestry
development on a national scale, nongovernment and international organizations play a crucial
role in community forestry development. KCDA one of the NGOs cooperated with the Samlout
District Forestry Office to disseminate community forestry sub-decree to 50 (41 women)
community forestry members in Kandal village, Sung Commune. KCDA staff facilitated
communities to select a community forestry committee which comprised of five members
including two women. The purpose of the community forestry is to build the capacity of villagers
enabling them to manage local forestry in a sustainable manner. Forestry Office staff also
assisted community members to identify the boundaries of the community forestry land- 650
hectares.

Association for Development and Our Villager’s Rights5

ADOVIR has become more effective at developing project proposals, report writing, financial
reporting, management, governing, planning, monitoring and strengthening social
infrastructures, community schools and ponds, funeral associations, VDCs and VCs. Their
working relationship with government authorities from local to provincial levels have remarkably
improved more effective. With field observation, CWS staff noticed that the absolute poor and
vulnerable people and their children in those remote target villages have received more benefits
from ADOVIR.

In January, ADOVIR selected 25 families in Beng Popoul, Beng Snoul and Kop villages to
support home vegetable gardens and chicken raising projects. Farming resources were
distributed to individual families to farm for domestic consumption and income generation. The
concept and production of farming will also help other families to improve daily consumption.
Before the distribution of farming material, ADOVIR staff organized training for the families on

3
http://bjo.bmj.com/content/81/7/578.full
4 http://www.icee.org/where_we_work2/asia_pacific/cambodia_focus.asp
5
ADOVIR has five staff (2 women) and implements integrated community development in 14 post-conflict villages in Ampil Pram
Daeum Commune, Bavel District. Direct beneficiaries: 1,549 families with 7,181 individuals (2,503 women and 2,703 children).
Indirect beneficiaries: 1,292 families with 6,475 individuals (2,002 women and 2,504 children).
BTB&BTM Partnership Project 55
chicken raising and home gardening techniques. So far this project has been successful.
ADOVIR has noticed the food shortfall that was significantly decreased among the villages.
ADOVIR continues to follow up this project and monitors the progress and problems that might
arise.

Over the past 10 years disease outbreaks have


affected millions of poor households dependent on
livestock for their livelihood and food security. In order
to improve services provided by VLAs against the
current upsurge of an epidemic that seems as though
nothing could stop the foot-and-mouth disease which
devastated Cambodia livestock.6 , ADOVIR through
CWS grant had organized a two-day refresher training
and follow-up in June with ten VLAs (four women) from
ten different target villages in Ampil Pram Deum
Commune attended. The training was provided by
senior VLA trainer of DAHP BTB. In addition, ADOVIR
supported District Government Animal Health staff to
cooperate with VLAs to organize a cattle vaccination campaign against hemorrhagic septicemia.
In this reporting period, 1,170 livestock in 10 villages were vaccinated.

The strengthening of village-based funeral


associations’ capacity, ADOVIR staff conducted a two
day training on concept, management, principle,
regulation and bookkeeping to 24 Association
committee members (8 women) from eight villages.
They also organized two separated reflection
workshops for 60 Association committee members (18
women) to share experience on successful and
difficulties in leadership and management of the
associations. The committee members applied their
learning to improve bookkeeping, regulation and
solidarity in helping vulnerable people. In February,
the funeral association in Boeng Snoul village
provided Riels 50,000 to Mr. Phoeun Proeun family to celebrate funeral ceremony of his farther.
They also allowed the family to borrow a loud speaker, and cooking utensils.7

ADOVIR cooperated with HC staff to organize one


day workshop with the participation of 12 VHVs (5
women) from 11 villages sharing experiences on
health activities and gathering health information in
their villages. In addition HC staff also provided
refresher courses and training on relevant disease
prevention, dengue fever, malaria and diarrhea.
ADOVIR supported HC staff to organize monthly
immunizations for children and women in rural
remote villages in Beng Popoul, Beng Snoul, Beng
Arak and Kop. As a result, 981 children, 314
pregnant women and 345 women received
vaccination against six common diseases for children and against Tetanus. The Chief of Ampil

6 th
Caroly Benigo, 29 FAO Regional Conference for Asia and Pacific: Global and Regional Emergency Issues (Trans-boundary
Animal Diseases in the Region and at the Environmental Factors Affecting their Occurrence) Bangkok Thailand 26 – 31 Marh 2009.
7
Loud speakers are commonly used during the ceremonial process of Cambodian Funerals, memorials and other community public
events. The speakers purspose is to inform the community as to what is happening so that people are aware and can partake in the
process of mourning or remembering the loss of a family member.

BTB&BTM Partnership Project 56


Pram Deum Health Center, Mr. Soung Soda noticed that the diseases caused by water
contamination have been significantly reduced and the number of immunized children and
women has been increased. He also highlighted that HC staff could not fulfill their role properly
in the four remote villages without support from ADOVIR.

ADOVIR also supported villagers in Beng Arak by constructing a community pond (20M x 40M x
3M). The community participated actively in the project by contributing labor and fencing for the
pond. The pond stores rain water for villagers to use in the dry season. This also means the
women and children of this village do not need to travel 3 kilometers to collect water for their
families.

Kumnit Thmey (New Idea) Organization

KNTO has eight staff (three women) and implements an integrated community development
program in 15 villages in three different communes of Preah Netr Preah and Banteay Ampil
districts of Banteay Meanchey and Oddar Meanchey provinces. The direct benefits of KNTO is
1,264 families (5,798 people including 1,752 women and 2,243 children) while another 364
families (1,179 people, including 472 women and 674 children) are also influenced and received
indirect support at various levels.

KNTO has increased the capacity, ownership, commitment in program implementation and
organizational management. They have improved their strategic direction and plan, project
proposal development, report writing, planning, guidelines, program monitoring, organizational
structure, and financial reporting and management. KNTO staffs are able to work by themselves
with little assistance needed from the Project staff. Their program is more effective to help the
absolute poor and vulnerable people in marginalized and under-served communities,
particularly, Ampil Commune, Banteay Ampil district.8

So far KNTO has formed more than 31 self-help groups (391 members including 275 women) in
15 target villages (19 groups are in old target village in Banteay Meanchey). A two-day reflection
workshop was held and organized by the KNOT staff with 35 SHG committee members (20
women) from 12 SHGs in seven villages of Ampil commune participating. The main purpose of
the workshop was to enable SHG representatives to share and exchange learning and
experiences regarding the strengths and weaknesses of the group looking at bookkeeping,
mutual help, solidarity, problems and problem solving. After the workshop KNTO staff noticed
that the committee members used the experiences shared by other group representatives to
improve their groups bookkeeping. Relationship, solidarity, and mutual help in support of
vulnerable families, in case of emergencies, such as food shortages, serious illnesses and
funerals have improved. For example SHG committee members in Tbeng Thmey village, Ampil
Commune contributed labor, money and rice to assist a funeral of a vulnerable widow Mrs.Vin
Chean, who passed away in May.

KNTO assisted Ampil HC staff to conduct a training program on the 28-29 May to 16 VHVs
(eight women) from eight villages in Ampil Commune, Banteay Ampil District. The purpose was
to enable VHVs on health topics regarding malaria, dengue fever, diarrhea, and clean water to
the community. Based on the HC staff it was noted that the VHVs understanding of the topics
and use of the concepts learnt helped improve their work among their respective villages.
Similarly, KNTO continued to cooperate with HC staff and VHVs to support 25 malnourished
children aged from 1 to 6 years (12 female) of 24 absolute poor families in Tbeng and Khu Svay
villages of Bos Sbov Communes, Preah Netr Preah district. Besides the monthly progression on
nutritious food and child feeding to villagers and their parents, KNTO also provided monthly
supplement food to the parents to feed their child. VHVs and KNTO staff measures the growth of
the children every month.

8
Banteay Ampil is a post-conflicted district and is one of the five districts of Oddar Meanchey province, consists of four communes
and 46 villages, located in the north of Battambang, with a total population of 38,221 people (19,105 women).

BTB&BTM Partnership Project 57


The Celebration of the International Women’s Day, on 04 March at Ampil Chas Pagoda, Ampil
Chas village, Ampil Commune with 578 people (396 women) participants both students and
teachers, VDCs, VCs, SHG and FA committee and key villagers in eight target villages
participated. The objective was to raise awareness among communities on gender equity,
imbalance between roles of men and women in society, domestic violence and discrimination
against women. The CCs, key persons and villagers appreciated the celebration and they
emphasized that this was the first time that the celebration was organized in their area. They
shared what they learned through to their communities during the monthly SHG meeting.

CELEBRATION OF I NTERNATIONAL W OMEN ’ S D AY IN A MPIL C OMMUNE , B ANTEAY A MPIL D ISTRICT , KNTO.

Cambodian Family Economic Development Association9

CWS project staff continues supporting and building the capacity of three Management
Committee members of CFEDA regarding Organizational management and program
implementation. CFEDA maintains good relationships cooperation with the local authorities,
CCs and relevant Government Departments. They also work in close collaboration with MAG
receiving a small project grant from MAG’s funding partner. CFEDA improved organizational
guidelines, structure and program implementation. Their program and service has benefited the
vulnerable, children and particularly in isolate communities of Malai district.10

Also with the support of CWS, CFEDA supported the Parent Association, VCs and communities
in Banteay Ti Muoy village, Malai District to repair a three-room school (W9m x L18m) and also
build a two-room latrine for 65 school children (31 girls). The repairs were completed on 12
June. The school children attend class from grade one to three with a monthly supplement
salary for a volunteer teacher. Presently, the school children attend the class in a good
condition and atmosphere. In addition, CFEDA supported the communities by building a 930
meters road and a culvert for 284 persons from 80 families to travel, especially children to go to
school. Previously there was no road in the village so the people walk through the mud in the
rainy season.

9
CFEDA has five staff (4 women) and implements ICDP in 17 villages in samrong and Koub Communes, Ou Chrov District and Toul
Pongro and Ou Sampoar Communes, Malai District of BTM. The program is direct benefit to 1,925 families (8,567 people including
2,964 women and 3,015 children) and indirect to 1,547 families (9,421 people including 3,231 women and 2,319 children).
10
Malai is a former khmer Rouge-controlled district and it integrated with the government in 1998. Malai is one of the eight districts of
Banteay Meanchey province, consists of six communes and 38 villages. It is located in the western part of BTM. It has a total
population of 35,428 people (17,805 women).

BTB&BTM Partnership Project 58


A THREE - ROOM BUILDING GRANTED TO REPAIR BY C FEDA

With funding support from DAP through the recommendation of CWS, CFEDA provided support
to villagers to dig three community ponds (W30 x L20 x H3m) in three different villages (Sante
Pheap, Ou Ampil and Koh Snoul) in Malai district. The communities involved actively in the
project by contributing labor, fence and land for digging the ponds. MAG cleared mines on the
area of pond. These ponds store rain water for villagers to use in the dry season. By using
water from the pond near their houses, villagers, especially women and children spend less time
on water gathering.

CFEDA provides coaching to 14 committee members (5 women) from five different SHGs on
bookkeeping, saving and borrowing. Presently, CFEDA supports 35 SHGs in 14 villages (19
groups in target villages of Malai district and 16 groups in target villages of Ou Chrov district)
with 473 family members (255women). CFEDA staff observed that SHG committee members
have improved bookkeeping, facilitation of meeting and minute taking. Communities have
remarkably increased their relationships, solidarity and mutual help, especially when community
members face food shortfalls or serious illness. In January, communities in Banteay Ti Mouy
village contributed 135,000 Riels (US$33) and 50 kilograms of white rice to transport Mr. Kao
Yoeum to receive treatment at Banteay Meanchey Provincial hospital. CFEDA also contributed
40,000 Riel.

CFEDA provides coaching on bookkeeping to 17 committee members (four women) of three


village-based funeral associations in Banteay Ti Muoy, Ou Ampil and Ou Sa Om villages, Malai
district. Presently, CFEDA works with four funeral associations in Malai district. The objective is
to strengthen community solidarity and assistance to the poor and the poorest families. CFEDA
also provided five cooking pots, 100 plates, 50 soup bowls, 24 glasses, 12 spoons, two knifes,
four kettles to the funeral association in Banteay Ti Muoy village when it is needed. We have
seen that the communities have increased solidarity and received more assistance from the
associations. During the funeral of a child the funeral association in Ou Sa Om village
cooperated with SHG committee members to assist funeral ceremony. The association
contributed Riel 60,000 and 45 kilograms of white rice to the families.

The Commune Councilors of Toul Pongro Commune, Malai District also supported the
celebration of the International Women’s Day on 05 March at the Commune hall with the
participation of 95 (55 women) from six different target villages. The objective was to raise
awareness amongst communities on gender equity, imbalance between roles of men and
women in society, domestic violence and discrimination against women.

BTB&BTM Partnership Project 59


MAJOR CHALLENGES
At times we continue to struggle with the lack of resources both monetary and other to meet the
needs of our communities. For example many farmers have reduced production and some have
found themselves in so much debt with no choice but to sell land or other property to survive.
Therefore our response to this situation means that we distributing resources to families whilst
struggling to stay afloat in the economic crisis.

Selection of two new holistic CNGO partners was not achieved as planned. Project staff could
not meet constraints due to the implementation of DEPICHO project, which consumed much
time of CWS Cambodia’s Project staff.

LESSONS LEARNED
Exchange experience and learning through reflection workshops or exposures visits among
residents and community based organizations has seen as an effective method for community
capacity building.

In order to promote effective intervention of holistic CNGO partners, capacity building and
support should be treated fairly for both organizational development and program
implementation. Training or workshop and exchange study are essential and important to meet
the needs of the community.

ISSUES NOT ADDRESSED


Due to the border tensions from the 3rd of April 2009 between the Cambodian-Thai military in
Oddar Meanchy Province have left the local people displaced from their homes resettling 5
kilometers away from the tensions of conflict border. CWS Cambodia and KNTO conducted
assessment on the situation and respond to the emergency through distribution of food, hygiene
utensils and plastic tents to 135 families (518 people).

FUTURE PLANS
 Continue to implement DIPECHO project; support and coaching CFEDA, KNTO and KCDA
staff to assist RCVs, VDCs, VCs to implement micro project in 40 villages. Provide coaching
and support to partner staff to assist RCVs, VCs and VDCs to conduct awareness raising on
CBDRM among villagers.
 Continue to support and strengthen capacity of KCDA, KNTO, AFDOVIR and CFEDA.
 To select two new holistic CNGO partners.
 Arrange external evaluation for CFEDA, KNTO and ADOVIR.
 Building capacity CNGO partners to establish program monitoring system for their internal
organization.
 Coaching and support KCDA staff to implement demonstration project on SMCH
 Monitor and follow-up small project grants implemented by to DYMB and BTM for peace
education and HIV focused program.
 Conduct CAT of four partners; CFEDA, KNTO, KCDA & ADOVIR.
 Organize program related workshops, internship and exposure visit for partner staff.

BTB&BTM Partnership Project 60


2.3. KOMPONG THOM PARTNERSHIP PROJECT

INTRODUCTION

The Kompong Thom Partnership Project since 1996 has maintained its focus on institutional
development and programming in multi-religious and ethnic minority communities. It also
provides financial grants to CNGOs. In June 2007, three holistic partners (COWS, BFDK and
APA) phased out from the Partnership Project receiving support from other funding agencies.
This reporting period marks the second year of working with the Khmer Organization for Rural
Community Development (KORCD) and the first year that the project selected the Cooperation
for Indigenous People and Development in Cambodia (CIDC) as holistic partners.

The CWS Project staff continues to provide capacity building initiatives for institutional
development, with a focus on improving reporting skills, financial management and accounting,
and enhancing administrative capacities. With the results, staff policies, financial &
administrative guidelines of KORCD were reviewed. Furthermore, the Project Staff helped
KORCD work on conflict resolution projects, non-formal education classes, enhanced
agricultural techniques and the formation of the elderly association.

KORCD’s Integrated Community Development Program covers 10 target villages of Santuk and
Baray districts with 951 families (3,655 people including 2308 women) as direct beneficiaries
and 3,425 families (19,414 people, 9,515 women) as indirect beneficiaries. In addition, CIDC is a
holistic partner working on a Child Club pilot-project in three villages among 11 target villages of
Phan Nheum and Sala Visai communes, Prasat Balangk district. The direct beneficiaries of the
CIDC are 198 families (937 people including 535 women and 315 children) while 777 families
(4,447 people including women 2,330) are indirect.

T HE K OMPONG T HOM P ARTNERSHIP P ROJECT ' S TARGET AREA

KPT Partnership Project 61


MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND CHANGES

Objective 1: To strengthen the capacity of holistic CNGO Partners and Small Project fund
recipients to facilitate program that will effectively and sustainable improve the living
conditions of the most vulnerable.

Improvement of writing skills regarding project proposal and budgeting

CWS Project staffs continue to mentor and prepare one-on-one training for KORCD staff to
ensure they can develop and prepare basic project proposal and budgeting [written in Khmer]
with a minimum standard accepted by CWS Cambodia. Even though the capacity of KORCD
staff is improving daily, either in program implementation or administrative works there is still
much to do. Mrs. Prak Vimeany, with 10 years working experiences, is the resource person that
KORCD communicates with daily. She devotes 70 per cent of her busy time to assist KORCD,
CIDC and other small grant and non-funding partners in Kompong Thom province.

Another important aspect of this project is the management of financial matters in line with the
guidelines of CWS, KORCD requesting a financial review. A four-day workshop facilitated by the
CWS Phnom Penh Office Financial Staff was held on the 21-24 of April. The Project staff
consulted with the KORCD regarding recommendations made in order to improve their financial
affairs in the future. In addition the Partnership Staff also motivated KORCD staff improve their
capacity and for higher education to improve their work. Within this reporting period, KORCD
financial staff is in the third year of their accountancy studies with Angkor Institution in Kampong
Thom provincial town.

Resolutions of the conflict first level

The cruelties of the Khmer Rouge Regime and the subsequent years of turmoil have left deep
scars in Cambodian society. Having mostly grown up in a world of terror, many Cambodians
never experienced peace until the mid 90's of the 20th century and people have only recently
started to deal with issues like trauma and reconciliation. In this troubled environment, CWS
Cambodia has supported many efforts for peace and democracy building and we are proud to
have witnessed a lot of positive changes.

CWS Cambodia believes that in order for poverty relief to be effective, shaping a peaceful
setting in which reconciliation is possible is crucial. We therefore define “peace” in broader terms
than most other NGOs in Cambodia. Peace is not simply the end of war but rather a situation in
which people can cooperate with each other in an equal and respectful way. Issues like
corruption, trauma, restorative justice and mutual respect therefore also form important parts of
our peace efforts.

In the last five months the Conflict Resolution Team in four villages, village leaders, VDC
members, village elders, and KORCD representative have used their skills gained to help solve
six violent cases regarding domestic violence and land issues. Five cases (four domestic violent)
are successfully solved while another land grabbing issue was transferred to commune councils
as both parties faced physical harm and casualties.

KPT Partnership Project 62


According to domestic violent statistics collected by KORCD during a PRA, there were 80 per
cent of domestic violence excluding gang related violence, drug addicts and land confiscation
that also existed within those target villages. So far with strong collaboration between all
authorities from local to provincial level and KORCD, there is now five per cent of domestic
violence with a significant decrease. Domestic violence happens everywhere in Cambodia
society especially 40 per cent of population that is living with less than US$1.50 per day. When
the community struggles with their basic needs for survival, plus the repayment of debt has
increase leaving the families with stress which contributes to domestic violence.

Since CWS Cambodia and KORCD established the Conflict Resolution Committee within their
target villages. The residents are using the committee as their primary agent before they
decided to file complaints to solve disputes before the administrative police, commune councils
or courts. “I am, as well as my villagers so happy to cooperate with the Conflict Resolution
Team to solve our conflict at village level. I thank CWS and KORCD who helped to establish
local solution group as well as providing training until they can turn our problems into solutions.”
Mr. Voi Song commented.

Reduce insecure food and build better livelihood through amongst vulnerable families

The annual per capita income in Cambodia is less than US$310, making it one of the least
developed countries in Asia. Cambodia is predominantly an agrarian society. The agricultural
sector provides more than 40% of the gross national product (GNP). Agriculture is the backbone
of the economy; 80% of the total populations are involved in agriculture.

Despite this, Cambodia does not produce enough vegetables to meet the needs of the
population. It is estimated that, at present, local production meets only around 25% of total
requirements. Therefore, vegetable production falls far short of meeting optimum nutritional
needs. Based on the total vegetable production in Cambodia, the present daily per capita
consumption is about 41g, which is much lower than the 200g per capita per day recommended
by the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Information Sourced: Helen
Keller International/Cambodia (2003). Handbook for Home Gardening in Cambodia.

There is a considerable amount of fallow land around homes and in the rice fields, which can be
used for vegetable production. The production of fruits and vegetables provides the household
with direct access to important nutrients that may not be readily available or within household
economic reach. In addition, home gardening increases the diversity of foods available to
households, which in turn leads to better overall utilization of nutrients, including calories.
Vegetables and fruits often make other foods more palatable and can lead to an overall
increased food intake. With the aim of improving the overall quality of the diet, home gardens
address multiple micronutrient problems simultaneously. Equally important, home gardens have
been shown to be a source of additional income for households through the sale of a part of the
garden produce. Home gardening is especially important in overcoming seasonal unavailability
of foods while promoting household self-sufficiency.
KORCD began promoting and providing training on home-grown organic vegetables and organic
compost making to the residents, especially vulnerable families in their ten target villages since
2005. In addition, KORCD provided one-time agricultural tools; water jars and water sprinklers
and various crop seeds like cucumber, tomato, long bean, eggplant, morning glory, and garbage
to 148 vulnerable families. As they received proper technical assistance on planting and
making the compost from the KORCD staff thus all families are growing vegetable both seasons
(dry & wet). Even though in the rainy season all household members [farmer families] are very
busy with their rice field. The families have changed the way they work on their rice field by
dividing their household members into two groups differently. Housewives and their young

KPT Partnership Project 63


children stay at home and work on the garden while their husband and adults are going to the
rice field. According to PRA statistics of Vaing Khang Cheung village, 95 vulnerable families
were faced food shortage from four-six months a year. So far, only ten families amongst are
faced with food shortage only. Mr.Chea Ly, VDC in Vaing Khang Cheung village said, “Thank
you for KORCD and CWS that helped support vulnerable families to form self-help and
vegetable groups in my village”. Through participation of the groups at least five vulnerable
families are moving away from under poverty line and they are able to save enough money to
buy wood for repairing or upgrade their houses.

HOME VEGETABLE GARDEN SUPPORTED BY KORCD

Elder Association has fulfilled missing social welfare services

The prolonged chronic wars for several decades in Cambodia had drastically deteriorated its
social infrastructure, especially its culture, tradition, customs being devotedly practices by its
people. The tragedy of family and relatives separations, the loss of human rights, honor and
dignity as well as poverty of people has also left a heavy burden. All of these factors have
affected the living status of all ages, health and the living conditions, in particular the indigent
elderly without support.

KORCD is trying to respond to the problem since it was developed as holistic partner of CWS
Cambodia. So far, KORCD assisted 298 elderly (189 women) in six different pagodas in its
target villages to establish an Elder Association. Elder Association is assisted by KORCD and
has gained a well-known and reputation amongst the villagers living in each pagoda’s boundary,
as well as other communities. To be a member of the Association wasn’t decided base upon the
religion that they believe or affiliate. Even though 95 per cent of Cambodian people are
Buddhist some people are also Christian and Muslim establishing their Elder Associations to
help them curb social problems within their communities.

KPT Partnership Project 64


K ANG M EAS E LDER ASSOCIATION

Also the Kang Meas Association is actively participation in helping people who are struggling
with poverty. They are also helping the youth to prevent them from being involved in drugs and
gangsters. Therefore the formation of youth groups for help improve education, learning
traditional music. So far the club has nine children (six girls) aged 12-14 years old, from
absolute poor families to learn a course on Pin Peat music1. This club was able to open with
financial contribution from the Kang Meas Association.

Kang Meang Pagoda is one amongst the well-known associations recognized by the people.
Other pagoda committee representatives always come and discuss the way how to begin such
association. For instance, during this reporting period through KORCD, an organization called
“Development Service for Disable in Pursat (DDSP)” accompanied with 14 delegators who are
their staff and beneficiaries had conducted their first visit to learn from KORCD and Kang Meas
Elder Association on 26 February. The delegates questioned many difficulties and challenges
learning about the processes and steps that Kang Meas Association used. The Association
Committee Leader answered clearly and frankly to the team with the hope that their insights will
help others.

Separately, On 22 March, Four foreign visitors;


Mr. Rob Wayne, CWS NZ, Mr. Michael Koening,
CWS Indonesia, Mr. Jonathan Lin and his wife
from Australia, had conducted a field visit [before
square-table meeting] to see the progress of a
CNGO partner named KORCD. With
coordination from Mr. Mot Sana, Manager of
Partnership Program, all visitors had an
opportunity to meet and discuss with
beneficiaries of non-formal class, vegetable
groups, Krama (scarf) weaving group, elder
Association, and rice bank in Kang Meas village.

1
The Pin Peat orchestra or musical ensemble performs the ceremonial music of the former courts and temples of Cambodia. The
orchestra consists of approximately nine or ten instruments, mainly wind and percussion (including several varieties of xylophone
and drums), and accompanies court dances, masked plays, shadow plays, and religious ceremonies.
It is one of the most ancient Cambodian musical ensembles and is closely associated with the Angkor period. Read more at
http://en.wikipemedia.org/wiki/Pinpeat

KPT Partnership Project 65


All visitors were happy to see these activities. In addition, Rob stressed, “From my last year
visited and now, KORCD is improved so much, both in organizational Management and field
activities. I am really happy to see the progress, he added.”

New light of Indigenous Children

The Project started in February aiming at offering education-for-all opportunity Kui ethnic
children to ensure they can get better livelihood in the future. The Project focuses mainly on 6-
17 years of age children where they can meet and discuss any children’s issue including their
poor education and other social issues etc. CIDC wanted children to be involved education and
class activities as much as they can, CIDC Executive Director said.

With assistances from CWS Cambodia, CIDC was able to establish four community child clubs
in three different target villages namely Smaonh, Sochol, and Trapeang Khnong-Phan Nheum
commune, Prasat Balangk. The four clubs were divided into 25 small groups which are 315
children including 189 girls as club members. Seventy percent amongst the club members are
Kui ethnic children. The clubs are led by 25 group leaders including six girls who are the
committee members and another 20 including teachers and village leaders are the groups
advisors.

S MAONH C HILD CLUB

At just 6 months the clubs are still in the early stages of their activities. They are in the
preparatory phase therefore the majority of the activities of CIDC and partnership staffs have
made this a priority to develop a working system for the children’s club by training key people on
the role responsibilities in how to prepare child club structures. In addition, three clubs amongst
already received 804 story books, 460 reading books, 80 boxes of color pencils, eight ream of
A4 paper and various sport tools and accessories like 40 balls (foot, hand, and volley), eight
badminton’s racket.

KPT Partnership Project 66


Smaonh village leader said, “Under support from CWS and CIDC, I am delighted to see the
children in my village involved with the child club activities. They can read reading-books and
play sports. He added they change from aggressive group’s involvement to education group
now.”

Furthermore, in collaboration with Prasat Balangk district Chef, the Education district leader,
Phan Nheum commune chief, Principles of primary clustered school in Phan Nheum, and three
village leaders, in June, CIDC staff distributed 18 used bikes, 49 school uniforms and various
study materials including 300 backpacks, 2,362 note books, 2,260 pens, 1,606 pencils, 560
rulers, and 560 erasers and to 554 poorest students (girls 312) including Child club members as
well. Additionally, one community school (11m x 5 m) is being built in Andas village. This school
will serve as kindergarten and non-formal class for illiterate adults since this village has a high
illiteracy rate.

MAJOR CHALLENGES

The Non-formal class is attempted to open during this rainy season and villagers who are
illiteracy are very happy with this intended education gift but due to the rainy season and the
farmers have to spend 100 per cent of their time investing on rice field thus class is impossible
to open yet. The class will be opened after people are free from their rice growing.

KORCD’s staff provides vegetable-seeds and training on home-grown organic garden and
natural compost making skills and techniques to people in its target villages. 10 vegetable group
members, totally 148 members including 139 women are directly benefit through. In addition,
KORCD also distributed water jars and water sprinklers to water their crop yields. Even though
KORCD works very hard dealing with food shortage they struggled with some members who are
still not receiving any results from their home grown organic gardens that KORCD and CWS
Cambodia initiated.

During this reporting period, as the global economic crisis still threatened economic movement
of Cambodia especially severely people living under poverty line or 40 per cent of population
base upon their living consumption less than US$ 1.25 per day. CWS Cambodia and its partner
beneficiaries see the struggle that the villages have endured with debtbs borrowed from
moneylenders or microfinance institutions. For instance, two SHG family members in Barray
district lost their houses and lands unpaid debts with the land being confiscated from the
families.

LESSONS LEARNED

During this reporting period, the Project staff learned a lot from the Elder Association’s growth.
Kang Meas pagoda Elder Association is initiated the ideas to help their grandchildren to avoid
doing nothing to learn other skills like performing traditional music called Pin Peat. This
contributes and prevents such wonderful music from being lost as well as keeping the children
active so that they are not influence by gangsters.

ISSUES NOT ADDRESSED

There is no issue unaddressed during this reporting period.

KPT Partnership Project 67


FUTURE PLANS

 Conduct annual workshop to feedback FY’09 activities and its report


 Assist KORCD staff regarding the informal translation of internal audit was conducted by
CWS Cambodia’s Field Accountant.
 Conduct Training Needs Assessment to KORCD and CIDC
 To monitor, follow up, and mentoring partners’ activities,
 Attend Partnership Program meeting and meeting with CNGO Partners
 To monitor KORCD’s evaluation by external evaluator
 Conduct PRA training to CIDC staff and lead of practice it in their villages
 Participate the Project Monitoring training conducted Partnership Program Officer
 Attend staff retread,
 Review the strategic plan and other policies and guidelines of CIDC
 Review financial policy of KORCD

KPT Partnership Project 68


FMER, FINANCE, ADMINISTRATION AND
HUMAN RESOURCE

CHURCH WORLD SERVICE – CAMBODIA


3. PHNOM PENH CENTRAL OFFICE
FMER, FINANCE, ADMINISTRATION & HUMAN RESOURCES

Introduction

The Central Office ensures the programs and projects we and our partners implement reach the
absolute poor as efficiently and effectively as possible. To do so, staff provide a variety of
support functions, including financial management, administration, proposal development for
new funding, consolidation of program reporting for funding partners and government bodies,
publicizing impacts of program activities, monitoring data collection and collation for the
centralized information system, conducting bi-annual full program monitoring, overall
management services and technical support for the entire organization. A transfer from each
project to the central office covers the cost of these services. For this reason, we include this
report with the program reports.

The significant points during the reporting period were the amount of time required to prepare for
the Ecumenical Funding Partners meeting (“Biannual Square-table Meeting”) and review salary
scale and job descriptions of CWS Cambodia’s staffers. The preparation for these took more
time and energy of our Senior Management Team than expected.

Organizational Development
Square-table meeting with Funding Partners (CWS Cambodia celebrated the 13/17
years of Social Change through Capacity Building to inform its successful partnership
philosophy) - The CWS Square-table Meeting concept for 2009 was to bring people into a
closer relationship with their funding partners and local partners. It was also to give the chance
for the local Cambodian partners to engage and spend time with the organizations responsible
for supporting their work within Cambodia through the services of CWS.

The Square Table Meeting expressed the importance of how there was a need to have both the
funding partners and local partners understand the roles that each play and the stories that bring
light to these roles. It was also helping funding partners understand the unique story of CWS
Cambodia and the people that they engage with each day alongside the social problems faced
in Cambodian society today.

 Day one of the SQT was based on the theme ‘Partnership Model for Development: 13/17
Years of Success’ allowing funding partners and local partners to come together to meet
and share with each other about their work and concerns, issues and celebrations. It
was the first time that the Partnership Program alongside the Direct Services Program of
CWS was able to bring both the funders and local partners together in a setting where
engagement and understanding was highlighted and important.

 Day two focused on the work that CWS does with the Government in both Partnership
and Direct Services throughout the rural provinces of Cambodia focusing on the theme
‘Engaging with the Government and Living with the People’. Several highlights of this
day was to enable the participants of the meeting to gain an insight to the Direct Services
Program of CWSC in consultation with the Local Government to enable and support
various resources and mentoring of community development projects in Kompong Thom,
Battambang, Preah Vihear, Svay Rieng and other rural and remote areas of Cambodia.

Phnom Penh Central Office 69


 Day three theme: ‘When there is No Table! Future Relationship with Old Friends’
highlighted and defined the relationships that CWSC has with the funding partners
emphasizing issues of clear communications, future funding, the loss of funding support
from donors but maintaining relationships, partnership and relationships as oppose to
what it means to be just a funding organization. It was also a time to enable the story of
CWSC to be heard in context to the daily issues that are faced by the Country
Representative and Staff on all levels within the management and life of CWSC.

Throughout the SQT meeting local partner participants expressed their emotion when they saw
their organizations work displayed on banners around the meeting room;

 Ms Oudom Vansivon, Dhammayeatra Bantey Meanchey expressed her pleasure in see


the Dhammayeatra Banner celebrating the monks annual walk for peace program held
yearly.
 Mr. Kao Long, Choam Khsant district governor since 1999, who has chosen to come to
this CWSC meeting instead of a ceremony to receive a Government Gold Medal
because of the importance of this relationship expressed: “Speaking for the Choam
Khsant local authority, we fully support the CWS mission and also collaborate to support
their work. The justice and humanity mission is parallel with the Cambodian Government
in reducing poverty making CWS an important and unforgettable partner….candidly
speaking, CWS staff know the village in more detail than we ourselves do because they
work and stay overnight with the people.” He is very impressed with CWSC staff and the
way they work. They have been to and live in villages that even he has not been to (in
the ten years he has been there). He talked of a number of positive changes due to the
CWSC- District partnership. These include: knowledge improvement, material changes
and peace/conflict initiatives including family violence and support for the real poor. He
hopes that CWS continues their mission in Choam Khsant with the vulnerable and poor
people.

 Equally passionate Mr. Mey Lun, Director of Svay Rieng Provincial Department of Rural
Development comments: “Changing from Integrated Community Development to water
and sanitation in this last three years has resulted in improved hygiene and health in the
well selected targets. Increasing 16 per cent of latrine access in 2005 to 18 per cent in
2009 is also big part of CWS’s contribution. Provincial government offers profound
thanks to CWS. Your contribution with villagers is trustable because you work and stay
overnight in the community. We sincerely hope that CWS will be able to work in villages
that have already been assessed. ” He spoke of the marked improvement of poor village
people’s quality of life due to CWSC’s involvement. In hard times CWSC is sometimes
asked to come back. The results of work done in very isolated border areas (with
Vietnam) have been very worthwhile. Local people have seen new wells for schools, the
repair of old wells, latrines built and learnt about hygiene and sanitation. He said that
people are very happy about the plan for water bio-sand filters. He is very pleased with
the way in which his staff and CWSC staff both train and work together. He can see that
the village people trust CWSC staff especially if they stay in the village even on
weekends. He is very keen to continue to work together with CWSC (in contrast to some
other organizations which have been disappointing). He would like the work expanded to
2 new districts and especially one very desperate village.

 Mr. Chou Vuthy (Provincial Dept Education, Youth and Sports, Kompong Thom) talked
about the benefits brought by CWSC to post conflict areas. These included adult literacy
and a school for displaced people. PDEYS provided a teacher to train and support a
local literacy teacher. CWSC also provided encouragement in areas of health and
leadership with literacy graduates taking positions at Commune and District levels.

Phnom Penh Central Office 70


 Mr Yuong Houth (Commune Council, Choan Khsant District, Preah Vihear) also chose to
attend this CWSC meeting instead of receiving a Government Gold Medal! He has been
impressed with CWSC staff working in 3 villages in his area. CWSC’s very detailed
baseline community needs study in late 2006 supported the Commune Council’s
Development Plan. In fact it provided more information because it was based on a house
by house and stay-in-the-village approach. CWS began to support and train local village
leaders developing a close relationship, he said. “When village people see that CWSC
staff do not have a watch they see that they are like themselves so they share (issues
and problems)”, he noted. This approach is different to other NGOs. He also made a
number of suggestions for CWSC follow-up. These included more training for CC
members, including the developing of a win-win peace strategy/approach working
outside of the court system. The CWSC approach connects village leaders, the village
development committee and the village solutions committee “by giving people the same
language (understanding/ideas)” .He asked that CWSC add another area to their
programs, to help improve health and sanitation, water supply, ponds, rice banks, grain
storage and a bridge. He believes that “His Commune is better off because the CC and
CWSC go together”. There should be collaboration on funding because “one arrow can
get two birds”.

 Mrs Sophea (Watsan group, Thmey Village, Daung Commune, Romeas Hek District,
Svay Rieng) listed some of the achievements made locally as a result of CWSC
involvement. These included hand pumps, upgrading of wells, latrines and bio-sand
filters which have led to better sanitation and hygiene, less water-borne disease, bad
smells and improved home gardens and income.

 Mr Um Mech (VDC, Kompong Thom) described how he had progressed from being a
Village Health Volunteer to being a VDC member and then to being a Village Leader,
with training and support from CWSC. He is also a national representative for the
indigenous (Kuy) people who have been assisted by CWSC staff who helped to set up
the VDC, a rice bank and a school.

 All international visitors were impressed and inspired by the presentations. Ms Agneta
from CWS Vietnam asked participants; “Where does your commitment come from?” This
question allowed a time of sharing from all present. It was a very significant question
which allowed people to share their life experiences and motivations. Many CWSC staff
and others spoke from their hearts. They spoke of growing up in a poor village or
learning from the poorest of the poor through their work or recalled particular incidents
that changed their lives. It was a very moving, emotional and inspiring session.

In conclusion the CWS Country Representative reminded us of the need to spend quality time
with all partners to know and learn from each other in the search and work for common dreams
for the future.

Planning
Full month of March, each project develops an annual detailed work plan (annual logframes &
budgets) showing how the program priorities were addressed in their location, and each
supervisor develops an individual work plan together with the staff they are responsible for.
Monthly meeting was held by CWS Program Oversight Group (POG) to identify strategic issues
which are challenging the organization and develop specific action plans to deal with them.

Phnom Penh Central Office 71


In these project and program level planning exercises, CWS chooses those options which…

 Address a major need of its target group,


 It has the greatest expertise in carrying out,
 Best fits its mission, goals, and the mandates of its major stakeholders,
 It can successfully acquire the resources to carry out,
 Do not duplicate what other organization are doing,
 Are most feasible to be duplicated by, or turn over to partners in the short term,
 Are the most effective use of its resources

The annual planning process includes a review of the situation in Cambodia and the
appropriateness of the CWS goals and objectives. The lessons learned during the previous year
are use to improve the types of activities that are given priority.

Monitoring & Evaluation


During this reporting period, the Monitoring and Evaluation Officer joined assessment with ERP
team to conduct a second assessment verifying the target beneficiaries in order to ensure the
assistance can reach target communities effectively. The first assessment, ERP team collected
information through meeting with local authorities, other NGOs working within the areas,
individual interview of intended beneficiaries and etc. The second assessment, the team had
conducted a meeting with local authorities and individual intended beneficiaries to verify the list
for whose will be benefited. The ID cards with beneficial names, items and numbers of
assistance were distributed to individual family for keeping and showing during the distribution
day. More detailed report can obtain in Direct Services Office report.

Separately, after years of the establishment of monitoring and evaluation system, with
monitoring conducted several times to every project and program, on 30 April, CWS Cambodia’s
staff conducted a meeting to review and seek revision in the processes based upon the
experience we implemented so far. With the meeting the result was agreed to change the
purpose and scope of monitoring the following:

Purpose of Monitoring
The purpose of the monitoring is “to create learning opportunities and building capacity of staff,
partners, and communities to take ownership in measuring progress, effectiveness and
efficiency of the program toward improvement in decision making, accountability and project
management”.

Scope and boundary for future monitoring


Previously, CWS monitored its partners by conducting the monitor of the progress, effectiveness
and efficiencies from partnership program to partnership project; and from partnership project to
partners and to their program implementation at field as well. This practice has been found too
complicated and confused among the project team and partners. Two separated meeting were
conducted to resolve this implication; one was held on April 30, 2009 with participations of
Country Representative, Director for Programming, Direct Services Program Manager, and
Partnership Program Manager. BTB/BTM Partnership Project Manager and M&E Officer, and
another followed up meeting held on July 10 and 15 attended by Country Representative,
Director for Programming and M&E Officer. The team has reviewed and agreed on the process
that allows monitoring team to monitor only CWS project implementation that support capacity
building to partners and project/program management. As learning organization, CWS will use
the finding and recommendation/s to present and discuss in POG for solution and future lesson
learned for improvement.

Phnom Penh Central Office 72


Reporting
Adding to the reports submitted in the first semester, there were another six reports submitted
on to the following funding partners and government ministries; Semi-annual report for the first
semester, six months audit reports for EED, two CDC quarterly reports for Royal Government,
ADPlan report for Svay Rieng Water and Sanitation for NCCA/AusAID.

Website
CWS Cambodia intends to update its present website to a dynamical WebPages expecting to
ease the flow of information whilst maintenance and updates would be done by the webmaster
enabling an easy to read and navigation website system. Mr. Vichetr Uon, Reporting and
Proposal Development Officer have drafted the contents and concepts of a sufficient web page.
With the coordination from the Director for Programming, a presentation was organized to
explain the advantage vs disadvantage and development of this new website with the presence
of Country Representative. She asked all key staff of CWS Cambodia to review and contribute
to the information needed in developing this task. This is due to the fact that there need the
participation of all staff to make this happen. Three meetings conducted with key staff to seek
comment and input. It is targeted to update in the first semester of FY10.

Newsletter
CWS Cambodia seeks to produce quality newsletters having the responsibilities of this
newsletter divided among the staff concerning topics to their related work within CWS.
Newsletter has changed from monthly release to bi-monthly due to the insufficient staff time to
produce monthly. During this report period, three issues were published; in January, we stressed
about safe water in Preah Vihear and Engagement is the key for partnership, in March was
about Celebration of 13/17 years of Social Change, and in May was about Emergency
Response to IDP in Sra Em Village. www.cwscambodia.org

Proposal Development
CWS Cambodia is aware of major funding shortfall beyond June 30, 2009 as the phase out
support of Act for Peace (former NCCA) for WatSan project while highly demand from
communities asking for more support, Partnership Program shortfall due to the cash flow
problem from SED, and no funding support for Demining project. We have tried very hard with
many potential donors to obtain funding support but still not met the expectation. During the
second semester, four proposals (three revised, one new developed) were submitted to seek
multiple years funding supports as the following mentioned below;

 Through Asia/Pacific Regional Office, two proposals were submitted; the Water and
Sanitation project is submitted to Sandy River Charity Foundation, and Demining for
Development submitted to SED and DCA. Demining proposal with SED and DCA did not
get fund due to they run out the resources, while WatSan is still with SRF along with the
project from Kenya office.
 Partnership Program proposal was submitted through Regional Office to SED for funding
support FY10, this is the annual renewal of commitment.
 Food Security proposal was submitted to European Commission for the 2008 Food
Security Programme for Cambodia to seek funding support for the period of three years
cover two provinces; Preah Vihear and Oddar Meanchey. This is still waiting for the
progress.

Phnom Penh Central Office 73


Centralized Data Management system
CWS Database has been functioning almost one year since CWS Cambodia team approved on
33 data collection forms and effective use since October 2008. The data are regularly collected
especially from the Village Based Community Development and WatSan Projects about their
beneficiaries, trainings and other capacity buildings that are provided to the beneficiaries or
community people, and facilities distributed such as wells, latrines and water filers.

After six-month pilot implementation, the output from the database system was disseminated
and sought feedback from the data owners that are the Partnership project/program, Kompong
Thom, Svay Rieng and Preah Vihear Projects. Through the result we found that it has many
more tasks that needed to accomplish until the database can store enough data to use as
evidence of the report writing and project proposal development. The goal of Reporting section
of CWS Cambodia is expected that in the future the database will be able to produce accurate
statistics for preparation of at least CDC report and can be referenced for project proposal
development. As the village profile is also the major challenge for the data management. During
this reporting period, we developed its profile and collected data more than 200 indicators from
every village where we work. Each indicator is the key information for inserting into proposal and
mostly is used by Country Representative and Programming Director.

During this reporting period, CWS Cambodia also found some gaps regarding data collection of
some activities that required the Data Management Officer to travel and work with the Kompong
Thom project staff for finding the needs and to improve the database system. Through visiting,
three new data collection forms were developed to keep the track of animal vaccination, general
association and library in the village. For the future plan, there will be another database meeting
which will be joined by field staff, project and program managers to discuss their expectations,
concerns and gaps within the system. After the meeting we will create a mechanism of the
database system.

Finance
During the last six months of fiscal year 2009 the finance department managed well on financial
implementation, promoted financial transparency and resource mobilization in compliance with
financial policies and procedures. We paid high attention and responsibility in safeguarding and
maintaining of financial accounting data and systems in accounting software, on cash flow for
programs and project operations, had good cooperation with all staff level throughout the
organization.

Finance department produced the accurate financial reports and met the deadline with the
following type of report:

Monthly financial reports to project and program and department managers


Quarterly financial reports to Cambodia Development Council
Mid-year Narrative report and Mid-year financial reports
Six months audited Financial report for donor EED
Preparation of year end for Fiscal Year 2009.

However, the financial reports reflected with good variance by showing that we had good budget
planning and financial operations with good communications with donors for all financial and
funding aspects during the year. Prepared fiscal year 10 annual budgets for Phnom Penh
central office and coordination in budget preparation and reviews for all projects/programs.

The Finance department provided good cooperation to external auditors (PriceWaterHouse,


cooper), in the result, there were no major problems with the CWS Cambodia annual audit and
specific EED donor audit. In the result of this, it indicated that our financial and budget
management standard is high and efficient.

Phnom Penh Central Office 74


The Field Accounting Officer conducted the financial review CNGO KORCD financial
transactions and financial statements, and reviewed financial transactions and reports of
CFEDA. Resulting in the trust gained from both CNGOs funding donors through our financial
review reports.

The new staff, Director for Financial Affairs is fully functioning from 24 April, 2009 by providing
guidance and supports on overall financial management to finance department Phnom Penh.
This new position is responsible for all financial matters ensuring that CWS Cambodia programs
are compliance with general accounting standards, best practices, and CWS policy and also to
improve systems and ensure finance staff competence.

The Finance department counted the quarterly finance team meeting which was held at CWS
Cambodia Phnom Penh Office, it was fruitful that finance staff had opportunity to share concerns
and action taken on time and provided training on new finance staff on batch expense and bank
records.

CWS started implementing Community Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM) Project
which funded by DIPECHO through DCA for 15 months and extend two months (Aug 08 – Dec
09). This donor required us with the following DCA’s guidelines on Procurement Manual such
as finance staff attended the Procurement training that provided by DCA and we understood the
methods for procurement. Finance staff went to BTB Project on 21 July 08 to present what we
have learned on Procurement Manual of DCA & ECHO to all participants including CNGOs,
BTB, BTM & some PNH staff. The purpose of our presentation was to make sure that
procurement planning is considered and included in the project cycle and all key project staff
understands how the timeframe for procurement will affect the project and all procurement
requirements are planned for at the beginning of the project.

Administration
The Administration Office continues to provide a variety of support to CWS Cambodia programs,
including the Phnom Penh Central Office. The office is responsible for purchasing of office
supplies, equipment, vehicles, renewal of office contract, placing job advertisement and other
necessities upon request. The transportation of staff and funding partners, whether using CWS
or rental vehicles, is also under the office’s responsibility. It also contacts with government
officials in renewal of MoUs as well as requesting vehicle acquisition and license plates,
processing of visas and passport extension, logistics arrangement for external visitors, sending
reports to CWS stakeholders and providing learning opportunities through internships for local
partners for their personnel. Moreover, the office ensures that staff work comfortably, safety and
effectively and that the integrity of the organization is maintained in all operations.

Facilities, Assets and Technical Support

Office space and outsourcing: The Administration Office manages all new and renewed
contracts for office space for CWS Cambodia including contracts for consultants and
internship/volunteers. During this reporting period, three field offices in Kompong Thom, Preah
Vihear, and Svay Rieng were renewed. Please see detailed list of visitors in a table of External
Visitors.

Purchase of office equipment and supplies for projects: The AO purchased stationeries,
supplies, T-shirts, Hand gels for staff members in Phnom Penh and Projects. Office assets such
as computers, printers, filing cabinets, computer desks, laptop, office chairs were also
purchased for staff in Phnom Penh and in the provinces.

Phnom Penh Central Office 75


Regulations and Formalities: Approvals from the relevant government ministries are
necessary for vehicle acquisition and process of registering motorbikes and obtains appropriate
license plates. In addition, the Administration office is responsible to coordinate with the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation in processing visas extension.

Operations: The AO is in charge of arranging transportation for CWS staff, donors and visitors
in Cambodia, both in Phnom Penh or to the project areas in the provinces; provides logistics
support to visitors, donors, and funding partners while they are in Cambodia, and provides the
coordination of passport extension, purchase airline tickets and request for entry visas for staff
members who travel abroad. The AO is responsible for sending/printing every report, newsletter,
Christmas card, correspondence and shipment within Cambodia and abroad; arranges logistics
for workshop inside and outside CWS Cambodia office. All fixed assets in Phnom Penh office,
Kompong Thom, Svay Rieng, Battambang and Banteay Meanchey and Preah Vihear offices are
also maintained and taken care by the AO.

Local Institution Development: CWS Cambodia has provided learning opportunities through
internships to two trainees from a local partner, Cambodian Women’s Development Agency, for
office skill practice. The trainees completed a three-month short course on office skills through
working closely with Receptionist. They learned basic office skills in answering phone calls,
sending faxes, taking messages, greeting visitors, typing and copying documents for staff. To
date, 18 intern women/men have got employment elsewhere after completing their assignments
from CWS Cambodia.

Timesheet Country Representative: Time sheet for Country Representative is prepared on a


monthly basis and sent to the Representative for Asia Pacific for their monthly monitoring.
National holidays and other announcements are regularly distributed to Representative for Asia
Pacific and CWS’ funding partners.

Security: The AO fills out and sends CWS Cambodia’s security report to Representative for
Asia Pacific every quarter. In addition, AO is also responsible to update on CWS Cambodia
reporting structure for security situations.

Vehicles Insurance: The AO is responsible to renew the contract of vehicles Insurance. All
vehicle was renewed the contract of insurance in March and April 2009.

Job announcement: During this reporting period, the Administration Office placed job
advertisements in The Cambodia Daily newspaper, Bong Thom Website, Rasmei Kampuchea
Newspaper, CWS’s board, and put in CCC boxes of each NGO member for the position of
community Development Worker, Finance and Office Assistant, Program Officer for Consulting
Service and Local Institutional Development, and Reporting and Communication officer, Field
Coordinator for Village Based Community Development, Field Coordinator for Water and
Sanitation, Community Development Worker for Water and sanitation, Community Development
Worker for Agriculture, Community Development Worker for Community Health.

Information Technology
The IT Department is responsible for the daily operation of all IT infrastructures which other staff
has no access to (the Internet, Fileserver, MailServer, Wiring, Network facilities etc), including
the projects. Moreover, IT Department is also responsible of CWS/PNP inventory (computer
only) and projects. Nevertheless, IT Department is ensuring a proper Maintenance in CWS-PNP
and CWS Projects according to the IT Policy.

IT Department is also providing the technical support to each project and partners such as
computer problems, email/internet problems, network problem, virus, printer etc…

Phnom Penh Central Office 76


Computer Server Security and System Upgrade
New security setting has been applied since June to CWS Domain in order to filter the spam.
According to the feedback of incoming, spam that collecting from the user it is, appeared that the
filter is working and it a vast improvement so far.

In June, the IT Department has starting to upgrade all computers that their memories are
smaller, hard drives and CD-ROM drives had problems. In addition, during the month the
domain name, www.cwscambodia.org also renewed its name and hosting package.

Computer Maintenance and Full System Inspection in CWS/PNP Office


From the second week of June, the maintenance has taken place in Phnom Penh central office.
The purpose of the maintenance is trying to speed up the computer performance, managing
hard disk space, scanned/fixed local hard drives, cleaned up registry, and full virus scan entire
computer systems as well as external hard drives and flashes.

Moreover, during the maintenance we also inspected that the system units require upgrading or
replacing.

Network and Internet Installation for CWS/SVR, CWS/KPT, CWS/BTB and CWS/BTM
The IT Department has noticed each project about the problem with their emails. Previously,
they used dialup connection with unstable speed of 6 kbps to 12 kbps to send and receive email.
The speed is too slow caused the connection failure and lately the email wasn’t received
through.

Late 2008, with the price of internet is cheaper so CWS Cambodia decided replace dial up
connection of Svay Rieng and Kompong Thom projects and Battambang office as well to ADSL.
At the same time, the IT Department also built computer network for those projects and office as
well.

External Visitors
Table below shows details of CWS Cambodia’s external visitors from January to June:

No. Visitors’ Sex Country Agency Purposes

1 Mr. Marvin Parvez M CWS-Regional Office Square Table Meeting

2 Mr. Rob Wayne M CWS-NZ Square Table Meeting

3 Ms. Janet Cousens F NCCA Square Table Meeting

4 Mr. Michael Koening M CWS-Indonesia Square Table Meeting;


and Regional meeting
Square Table Meeting;
5 Ms. Agneta Dau Valler F CWS-VN
and Regional meeting

6 Mr. Skip Dangers M CWS-Laos Regional meeting

Documenter for Square


7 Mr. Pare Turei Patrick Consultant
Table meeting

Phnom Penh Central Office 77


Facilitator for Square
8 Mr. Jonathan Lin M Consultant
Table meeting

9 Ms. Elspeth Johnston F Visitor Visit

10 Ms. Paulette Coburn F Consultant Salary Review

11 Mr Keven M Visitor Visit

12 Ms. Dafy F Visitor Visit

Meeting with Country


13 Pastor John McConnell M CROP
Representative

14 Mr. John McConnell M Consultant Meditation & Healing

Edit the story scribe


Ms. Sophie Louise written by CWS (the film
15 F Consultant
Meredith on South Africa
Reconciliation).

Edit Mid-Year 09 report


16 Mr. Vincent Mac Isaac M Consultant and peace book
compilation

17 Ms. Susan Chilcott F Consultant Edit Job Descriptions

18 Mr. Martin Coria M SED visit

Country Context Affecting Operations


Cambodia road traffic accident cases have been remarkably decreased. In February, a
provisional number of 1,816 casualties were reported by the participating hospitals, health
centers, private clinics and traffic police departments in the 24 reporting provinces, resulting
from 670 accidents. Among them, 155 were fatalities and 526 were severely injured. 1,305
vehicles were involved in those accidents. Compared to February 2008, number of casualties
decreased by 10% and the number of accident decreased by 23%. In Phnom Penh, 471
casualties were reported, 32% decrease compared to the previous month. Among them, 101
were severely injured and 21 died. This issue according to RTAVIS report on February.

Lightning deaths have been remarkably increased. At the end of May, more than 90 people had
been killed by lightning in Cambodia, matching the death toll reported for all of 2008, according
to government officials. Lightning has claimed the lives of at least 93 Cambodian this year,
according to Ly Thuch, second vice president of the National Committee for Disaster
Management, which is the same number of people who were struck dead during all of last year.
Mr. Thuch acknowledged that the true lightning death figure for this year was likely higher than
the official total reported to the committee. Public-safety information about the dangers of
lightning strikes remain scarce despite the mounting death toll, though Mr. Thuch said that
NCDM officials have visited local authorities to tell them to warn the public about using radios
and televisions during rainstorms. And send officials to educate villagers to protect themselves
from lightning. This issue mentioned on Cambodia Daily on June 2, 2009, page 1 & 2.

Phnom Penh Central Office 78


Dengue cases have been remarkable. The total of 2,032 reported dengue cases so far this year
is higher compared to the same period last year, when there were 1,502 reported cases;
however the number of fatalities, which had reached 16 by June 2008, is much lower this year,
Dr. Ngan Chantha, the Health Ministry’s dengue program manager said. This issue mentioned
on Cambodia Daily on June 10, 2009, page 27.

Human Resource Management


The Human Resource Department is responsible for managing the implementation of
employment policies and staff development of the organization; to ensure the personnel
procedures are accurate and the organization complies with the Cambodian Labor Law. The
Human Resource Manager oversees staffing requirements to ensure the whole organization is
functioning at optimum conditions.

As the previous six month, Senior Management Team conducted a salary review which has
surveyed six different international nonprofit organizations that have similar activities and
programs to CWS Cambodia. During this reporting period, the SMT especially, worked seriously
on the case starting from re-writing their subordinate Job Descriptions with a new format
recommended by human resource specialist that contracted with CWS Cambodia as short-term
consultant. This new job description format describes about individual staffs position,
department, report to whom, job purpose, responsibility, occasional significant duties, job
specifications on education, experience and skills.

Each job description drafted group conducted meeting with the job holders, next line supervisor,
other relevant management, consultants, Human Resource Manager with the full participation of
the Country Representative. Those not reviewed in group sessions were revised by the
consultant and reviewed again by the CWS staff and management and final comments.

All 53 job descriptions had been edited, reviewed, and double checked approved by the
Program Manager and Country Representative before scoring by the Job Committee and
Consultant. Seven staff members from diverse departments and programs had been carefully
selected as a Job Committee for benchmark 14 job descriptions from lowest to highest position.
A Consultant had been providing a two-day training including the importance of clear and
complete job descriptions, how to select criteria, weight the criteria, how to score job
descriptions against the weighted criteria, select benchmark jobs, and reach consensus of the
scores. JC members were asked to individually score each benchmark job according to the
criteria and weight.

An overall orientation was provided to as many staff as possible widely communicating the
process, the possible outcomes, and management expectations. The presentation was
translated and distributed to the staff present at the orientation before the Job Description was
finalized and scored. Now we are in the process of comparing budgets of our new finalize data,
draft salary scale, draft salary policy, and reviewing by the SMT and will included in the HR
manual when approved. We expected to complete it in July 2009 and will report the concluding
results in the next mid-year report.

On 05 May, all central office staff and some other staff from the Projects of SvayReing,
Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear had been invited to joint meeting on Swine Flu which is very
sensitive new virus. The presentation presided by Mr. Khem Thann, Program Officer for Health
basing on resources and handouts received from the World Health Organization. Hands
cleansers were distributed to all staffers for cleaning their hands before meal when they had
mission to the field or other places that they don’t feel safe. Within the office, due to concerning
of using the same towel for drying the staff hands now requires us to use tissues instead.

Phnom Penh Central Office 79


Personnel
During this reporting period, Human Resource Department in cooperation with other related and
associated departments/units of CWS Cambodia recruited eight new staff members to take over
new positions and replace several staffers who did resignations, promotions and terminations.

Table below shows exact numbers of employees who were newly hired and separate:

New Employees

No Position Start date

1 Program Assistant in Partnership 01 Jan

2 Disaster Program Coordinator 02 Feb

3 Finance and Admin Assistant in SVR 12 Apr

4 Director for Financial Affair 24 Apr

5 3 CDWs in KPT 15 June

6 1 CDWs in PVH 15 June

Resignations

No Position Last Date Reason

1 CDW in SVR 16 Jan He returned to run


business with his family,
2 Finance and Admin Assistant in PVH 06 Feb Get new job

3 2 CDWs in KPT-PVH 30Apr Get new job

4 Field Accounting Officer PNH 06 May Get new job

5 Program Manager in Partnership 29 May Get new job

6 CDW in PVH 06 June Get new job

End contract
No Position Last Date Reason

1 CDW KPT 8 Feb CWS not continue the 3rd contract

Promotion
Promotion is to enable management to obtain the best available staff within the organization to
fill more senior positions and to provide staff with the opportunity to advance their career within
CWS community in accordance with the opportunity available and their own abilities.

Phnom Penh Central Office 80


Three staff was promoted in Direct Service Program while another in Partnership program
during this reporting period:

No Previous Position Promotion to Position Program From

1 Program Coordinator Deputy Program Manager Direct Service 1 Jan

2 Project Coordinator in Project Manager Direct Service 1 Jan


Svay Rieng
3 Full time Volunteer Program Assistant Partnership 1 Jan

4 Program Assistant Program Coordinator Direct Service 1 June

Staff Development
Human Resource is a key component in the functioning of an organization. In order to build
strong foundation of the organization, capacity building to sharpen skills and knowledge
development is needed. This due to one of the CWS core values is we are learning organization,
all staffers are encouraged and supported to increase their capacity based upon their actual
training needs to ensure they can perform their work effectively. Internal promotion is also a
factor that encouraged staff persons to learn strongly by themselves regarding their daily
implementation of the work as well as getting more opportunities studying at other colleges in
the country or abroad with/without full sponsorship from the CWS. So, these are taken into
considerations when necessary-each staff development plan is undertaken, looking at the
possibility to help them gain more knowledge and skills to move forward their career.

Internal CWS Training

Local Capacity for Peace Assessment


The Objective is to allow participants had opportunity to practice directly in the village regarding
to conduct LCP assessment with using LCP tools and Framework to assess/analyses to
review/improve project activities.

Sphere, Accountability
The objective of Sphere training is enabled all participation in (1) explanation of the contents and
meaning of Sphere handbook, and (2) explanation of how to use Sphere handbook and the
minimum standard in project cycle management and in general development work. 

Anti-Corruption training
Participants were able to explain on a form and other activities related to corruption.

Leading and Management Training


The objective is to increase understanding on different strategies of development and its benefit
to whom, understand the main factor to assist absolute poor in remote area, improve capacity on
management and components of management, maintains good points for manager, understand
on leadership and known about relationship between power and Influence, and avoid on 24 key
points for leader.

Meditation Workshop
On 03 March a full day workshop on meditation through Buddhist approach to heal anxiety was
conducted Mr. John McConnell to 22 CWS staffers. Meditation had been practiced, with
guidance and explanation by him with full attentions by all participants.

Phnom Penh Central Office 81


Building Peace in our Life
To off CWS staff understanding their own values, behavior, and attitude in order to address the
response to an Organization values in daily life context and build self confidence, concrete
responsibility, commitment, and also respect others’ values which be able to handle with any
challenges.

External Training
Three different external trainings had been attended by five staffers, program mangers of
Partnership and Direct Service Program, BTB& BTM project manager in, Direct Services deputy
program manager, and BTB&BTM Finance and Administrative Assistant.

External workshop or conference


During this reporting period, 10 staffers were attended workshop on Do No Harm, Gender and
Decentralization. Six from Direct Services program, three from partnership program, and one
from administrative section. The list shows in the table 3 below:

Scholarship support
CWS provides partial and financial support to staff members for their academic study, which is
relevant to their current work as well as for their future career.

3 staff members are continuing their academic study this semester, one for bachelor degree in
Finance and Banking, one for English, and one for a Master degree on Art in Development, plus
one in Business Management.

The list of scholarship support shows in the table 4 below:

Overseas workshop
6 staff from deferent sections (Project coordinator in KPT, Database Management Officer,
Executive Assistant, Program Coordinator in Direct Service, IT assistant, and report writing
Officer ) had attended a workshop in CWS Thailand on Story writing, designing and lay outing
workshop with other CWS countries.

The outcomes from the attending workshop are, logo use, how to make CWS yellow, learnt
about layout designing, how to make CWS standard power point presentations, story writing,
and communications skills and information gather from interviews.

The list of training is in the table 5 below.

Phnom Penh Central Office 82


Internal CWS Training

Table 1: Summary tables of staff who attended Internal Training Courses

1- Internal CWS Trainings/Workshops

Number of Staff
Attended
Duration
Description Location Date

BTB/BTM

KPT/PVH
(Days)

PnP

SvR
LCP Assessment Preah Vihear 6 26-31 Jan 15 3 5
Sphere, Accountability CWS KPT Office 5 23-26 Feb 24 3
Anti-Corruption training CWS KPT Office 1 27 Feb 20 3
Leading and Management
CWS KPT Office 2 12-13 Mar 18 1
Training

Meditation workshop CWS Officer 1 3 Mar 2 2 18

Building Peace in our life Preah Sihanouk 3 19-21 May 3 8 11 4


province

Table 2: Summary tables of staff who attended External Training Courses

Number of
BTB&BTM attended staff

KPT&PVH
Description Location Duration Date
(Days)

PNP

A learning Journey for SRV


Facilitator of Social VBNK 2 26-27 Mar 1 1
Change Processes
Policy Advocacy and DCA 4 21-24 Apr 1 2
Climate Change
Office Management IHQ 3 20-22 May 1

Phnom Penh Central Office 83


Table 3: Summary tables of staff who attended Workshop and Conference

Number of
attended staff

BTB&BTM
Duration

KPT&PVH
Description Location Date

PNP

SRV
Doing no Harm- Mary
Anderson reflection on Panhasastra 1.30
18 Mar 09 1
over 40 year of University hour
Humanitarian work
Gender and GAD/C Half day 26 May 09 2 2 5
Decentralization

Table 4: Summary tables of staff getting Scholarship

Number of
attended staff
Description Location Duration Date

BTB/BTM

KPT/KVH

PNP

SRV
Master of Art in
Royal University of Nov 2008
Development study 2 years 1
(outside working hour- Phnom Penh Oct 2010
M&E Officer )
Bachelor of English Oct 2007-
(outside working hour- PUC University 4 years 1
Oct 2012
Finance Assistant I )
Bachelor of Arts in
Sovanaphum Oct 2006-
Accounting (outside 4 years 1
working hour- Finance University Oct 2010
Assistant II )
Bachelor Degree of
Business Build Bright
Management(outside 4 years Jan 2009 1
University
working hour-
Receptionist)

Phnom Penh Central Office 84


Table 5: Summary tables of Staff attended Overseas Communication Training

Number of
attended staff
Description Place/Institution Duration Date

BTB/BTM

KPT/KVH
(Days)

PNP

SRV
Story writing, 28 June-01
designing and lay CWS Thailand 1.5 1 5
July
outing workshop

Implementation of Staff Policy

All staff expected to understand the contents of the National Staff Policy to apply them fully
when they deal with personnel issues.

If they could not find any significant issue written in the policy or where the set policy cannot be
implemented, staffers are encouraged to raise and consult the issue with the HR Manager or
direct with their line managers and the appropriate actions to be taken.

During this semester period, the new probation evaluation form had ready to use for
probationary staff.

Health Insurance and Accidents


The Eight newly recruitments were informed about the benefits and conditions of Health and
Accident insurance by the Human Resource Manager.

During this reporting period, one field coordinator of Kampong Thom Project “Mr. Chheang Sok
Mao” was sick of Cholecystitis, spending time in the provincial clinic for three days. The
insurance company had been contacted and followed up for covering him. The process went
smoothly and his expense was reimbursed. Now he was released and back to work as normal.

Phnom Penh Central Office 85


APPENDIX I
SUMMARY OF FINANCES AND
VARIANCE ANALYSIS

CHURCH WORLD SERVICE/CAMBODIA


FINANCIAL SUMMARY
AND VARIANCE ANALYSIS

STATEMENT OF FUND RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS


FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2009.

STATEMENT OF THE MANAGEMENT’S RESPONSIBILITIES

It is the responsibility of the management to prepare the financial statements for each financial
year, in the preparation of this, the management requires to:
Select the suitable and acceptable financial accounting format and adherently carry out
consistently in compliance with the format and our existing policies.
Prepare the financial statements on the going concern basis unless it is inappropriate to
presume that the organization will continue its operations.
Make judgments and estimations with much more reasonably and prudently

Also, the management is responsible for keeping proper accounting records accurately and
timely at any time of the financial implementation of the organization and responsible for taking
care of such steps as reasonably open to safeguard the assets of the organization and to
prevent and detect fraud and other irregularities.

BUDGET, INCOMES AND EXPENSES IN FISCAL YEAR 2009

Budget : US$ 1,584,786.24


Income : US$ 1,142,052.34
Expenses: US$ 1,364,187.83

The analysis of expenses, income and budget as reported above indicates the income is less
than budget in amount of 442,733.90 (27.94%) and the expense is also less than budget plan in
the amount of US$ 220,598.41 equivalent 13.92%.

The financial report of incomes and expenses of fiscal year 2009 can be viewed as below:

Opening fund balance : US$ 321,515.47


Incomes/Donations and transfers: US$ 1,142,052.34
Total funds available : US$ 1,463,567.81
Closing fund balance : US$ 99,379.98

The following records below are tracked only income and expenditure from financial statements
of each financial fiscal year:

Description 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009


Income 1,585,334 1,442,603 1,069,122 1,330,339 1,142,052
Expenses 1,320,897 1,532,500 1,408,888 1,275,764 1,364,188
Closing balance 264,437 (89,897) (339,766) 54,576 (222,136)
Note: Over spent ( )

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 86


STATEMENT OF FUND RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS
FOR THE SIX MONTHS ENDED 30 JUNE 2009

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 87


Church World Service – Cambodia Program
Balance Sheet
As at 30 June 2009

30 June 2009 30 June 2008


Note US$ US$
ASSETS
Amounts receivable 4 5,287 2,527
Cash on hand 5 68,822 18,701
Cash at banks 6 755,834 876,228

TOTAL ASSETS 829,943 897,456

LIABILITIES
Amounts payable 7 730,563 575,941

TOTAL LIABILITIES 730,563 575,941

ASSETS LESS LIABILITIES 99,380 321,515

REPRESENTED BY:

FUND BALANCES/(DEFICIT) OF CWS


PROGRAMS
Svay Rieng Watsan Program 8 1,437 (56,425)
Ecumenical Partnership - (21,782)
Kompong Thom Community Development Project 9 47,836 147,737
Kompong Thom Partnership 10 11,374 4,426
Banteay Meanchey Demining Project 11 266 193,344
BTB/BTM Local Institution Development Project 12 31,226 61,817
Phnom Penh Central Office 13 (1,654) (7,542)
Preah Vihear Community Development Project 14 (3,256) -
DIPECHO Program 15 4,016 -
Emergency Response Program Appeal (NYERP) 16 3,515 -
Emergency Response Program Appeal (ACT) 17 4,620 -
ADPC Program - (60)

TOTAL FUND BALANCE 99,380 321,515

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 88


CHURCH WORLD SERVICE – CAMBODIA PROGRAM
STATEMENT OF FUND RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2009

30 June 2009 30 June 2009


Note US$ US$

OPENING FUND BALANCE 321,515 266,940

Add - Incoming amounts


Svay Rieng Watsan Program 8 148,955 112,386
Ecumenical Partnership - -
Kompong Thom Community Development Project 9 194,876 568,393
Kompong Thom Partnership 10 60,431 73,188
Banteay Meanchey Demining Project 11 - 77,505
BTB / BTM Local Institution Development Project 12 234,250 235,357
Phnom Penh Central Office 13 231,735 230,374
Preah Vihear Community Development Project 14 146,980 -
DIPECHO Program 15 93,942 -
Emergency Response Program Appeal (NYERP) 16 8,450 -
Emergency Response Program Appeal (ACT) 17 22,433 -
ADPC Program - 33,137

Total incoming amounts 1,142,052 1,330,340

Total funds available 1,463,567 1,597,280

Less - Outgoing amounts


Svay Rieng Watsan Program 8 161,323 175,959
Ecumenical Partnership - 21,782
Kompong Thom Community Development Project 9 211,681 415,118
Kompong Thom Partnership 10 84,042 67,745
Banteay Meanchey Demining Project 11 40,009 37,450
BTB / BTM Local Institution Development Project 12 235,567 246,488
Phnom Penh Central Office 13 317,975 305,327
Preah Vihear Community Development Project 14 200,916 -
DIPECHO Program 15 89,926 -
Emergency Response Program Appeal (NYERP) 16 4,935 -
Emergency Response Program Appeal (ACT) 17 17,813 -
ADPC Program - 5,896

Total outgoing amounts 1,364,187 1,275,765

Less: Fund Reserve - -

CLOSING FUND BALANCE 99,380 321,515

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 89


CHURCH WORLD SERVICE – CAMBODIA PROGRAM
SUMMARY OF FUND RECEIPTS BY SOURCE AND DISBURSEMENTS BY PROGRAM CATEGORY
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2009

Natural
Chart Emergency Women's Resource Learning Office
Program Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisat'n Costs
Total Total Community Commune Cambodian
Amount Amount Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
US$0FY08 US$0FY09 Organisat'n Support Organisat'n Production Generation
12 months 12 months US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$

Opening balance 266,940 321,515

Add - Incoming amounts:

CWSW/New York (SED) 302,128 134,022


CWS Tool of Hope - -
CWS ODD 65,298 87,057
CWS Agent Reimbursement 23,244 24,793
Christian World Service/NZ 37,766 59,507
EED 446,965 308,921 **
ICCO 69,050 78,840
UMCOR 49,975 49,976
NCC/Australia 144,637 131,289
ADPC 33,138 -
DIPECHO - 93,942
World Food Program - 2,281
Peace Tour Australia - 3,949
ERP Appeal NYERP - 8,450
ERP Appeal ACTER - 22,433
SHG Repayment WCA 9,222 4,065
C. D discretionary funds 5,954 -
Income others 1,862 10,130
Mey Meakea memorial funds 875 -
Interest-bank account and deposits 15,705 1,297
Disposal general equipments 1,146 2,103
Admin costs recovered CWS 123,375 118,997

Total income 1,330,340 1,142,052

** EED funding income for July - September 2009 was not recorded as income account, was recorded in fund held in trust account in FY09 it will be reversed to funding income account in July FY10 because this
funding income for the FY10 activities.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 90


CHURCH WORLD SERVICE – CAMBODIA PROGRAM
SUMMARY OF FUND RECEIPTS BY SOURCE AND DISBURSEMENTS BY PROGRAM CATEGORY
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2009

Natural
Chart Emergency Women's Resource Learning Office
Program Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisat’ n Costs
Total Total Community Commune Cambodian
Non-
Amount Amount Based Council Gov'tal Food Income
US$0FY08 US$0FY09 Organisat'n Support Organisat'n Production Generation
12 months 12 months US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$

Less - Outgoing amounts


Personnel - expatriate 21,558 24,807 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 24,807
Personnel - national 493,090 542,659 - 55,659 9,328 94,335 20,454 23,502 81,902 43,597 6 28,780 6,104 - 78 178,914
Technical support 36,259 38,815 - 2,542 - 200 - - 3,291 - - 6,099 - - - 26,683
CWS staff development 39,522 10,062 - 705 40 1,433 82 87 364 123 - 3,384 14 - - 3,830
CWS organisational development 33,370 32,716 - 5,797 681 1,352 1,066 2,035 7,699 1,574 - 7,397 942 - 399 3,774
Education and training for civil
society 61,410 97,054 - 8,170 407 23,026 2,038 1,406 11,408 44,351 - 5,526 722 - - -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc 908 16,970 - 1,878 - - 95 - 3,410 11,587 - - - - - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving
out - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Community Watsan construction 50,498 47,643 - - - - - - 47,643 - - - - - - -
Grants and contributions 192,211 189,828 - 5,746 934 110,318 2,457 1,060 8,916 43,164 22 11,627 235 - - 5,349
Emergency response 139 20,157 - - - - - - - 20,157 - - - - - -
General office costs 174,040 178,339 - 15,664 2,149 30,708 5,107 5,265 22,503 20,379 3 11,428 982 - 83 64,068
Vehicles and fixed assets 49,385 46,140 - 4,674 728 6,762 1,538 1,570 10,053 6,727 1 3,074 442 - 21 10,550
-
1,152,390 1,245,190 - 100,835 14,267 268,134 32,837 34,925 197,189 191,659 32 77,315 9,441 - 581 317,975

Administration charge 123,375 118,997 - 15,125 2,140 40,220 4,925 5,240 29,578 8,664 5 11,597 1,416 - 87 -

Total expenditure 1,275,765 1,364,187 - 115,960 16,407 308,354 37,762 40,165 226,767 200,323 37 88,912 10,857 - 668 317,975

Less - Fund Reserve - - 0% 9% 1% 23% 3% 3% 17% 15% 0% 7% 1% 0% 0% 23%

Closing balance 321,515 99,380

** EED funding income for July - September 2009 was not recorded as income account, was recorded in fund held in trust account in FY09 it will be reversed to funding income account in July FY10 because this
funding income which is for the FY10 activities.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 91


CHURCH WORLD SERVICE – CAMBODIA PROGRAM
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2009

Natural Learning
KOMPONG THOM VBCD Chart Emergency Women's Resource Organ Support
PROJECT Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management isation Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Amount Organisat 'n Support Organisat 'n Produc tion Generation
USD-FY08 USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
12 months 12 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD
(2)
Opening (deficit)/balance (5,538) 64,641

Add - Incoming amounts

CWSW/New York (SED) 102,791 -


UMCOR 24,988 24,988
ICCO - -
NCC/Australia - -
EED 436,511 163,322
World Food Program - 900
Disposal vehicle motorbike - 1,578
SHG repayment WCA 119 98
C. D discretionary funds 185 -
Disposal general equipment 1,115 -
Income others - 3,573
Interest on bank account EED 2,684 417

Total Income 568,393 194,876

Less - Outgoing amounts


Personnel - expatriate - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Personnel - national 178,996 85,946 - 24,837 4,215 - 8,407 9,080 18,389 9,508 - 11,072 416 - 22 -
Technical support 2,030 3,052 - 1,294 - - - - 51 - - 1,707 - - - -
CWS staff development 29,372 2,168 - 656 34 - 65 63 269 88 - 986 7 - - -
CWS organisational development 17,387 9,120 - 2,350 234 - 417 688 1,790 552 - 2,522 455 - 112 -
Education and training for civil society 25,154 10,379 - 2,989 48 - 1,103 686 2,384 967 - 1,787 415 - - -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc 908 1,274 - 1,274 - - - - - - - - - - - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving out - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Community Watsan construction - 8,914 - - - - - - 8,914 - - - - - - -
Grants and contributions 35,683 15,705 - 2,485 749 - 1,927 971 1,464 4,536 - 3,567 6 - - -
Emergency response 17 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
General office costs 52,704 38,220 - 10,147 1,650 - 3,433 3,155 9,890 4,560 - 4,995 367 - 23 -
Vehicles & fixed assets 18,721 9,293 - 2,467 400 - 834 767 2,403 1,108 - 1,219 89 - 6 -

360,972 184,071 - 48,499 7,330 - 16,186 15,410 45,554 21,319 - 27,855 1,755 - 163 -

Administration charge 54,146 27,610 - 7,275 1,099 - 2,428 2,312 6,833 3,198 - 4,178 263 - 24 -

Total expenditure 415,118 211,681 - 55,774 8,429 - 18,614 17,722 52,387 24,517 - 32,033 2,018 - 187 -

Less Fund Reserve - - 0% 26% 4% 0% 9% 8% 25% 12% 0% 15% 1% 0% 0% 0%

Closing balance 147,737 47,836

(2)
The different balance between the closing fund balance for fiscal year 2008 and the opening fund balance for the fiscal year 2009 was due to the opening fund balance of Community Development Program for the fiscal year 2009 excluded an
adjustment of amounting to US$116,883 or 70% carried forward from the fiscal year 2008 which is allocated to the opening balance of this Program. The program’s incoming and outgoing amounts for the current fiscal year 2009 were included in the
Community Development Program’s incoming and outgoing amounting to US$33,787 in the proportion of 70% by category, based on the internal funding plan allocation of Church World Service – Cambodia program.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 92


KOMPONG THOM VILLAGE BASED COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT
Annual Financial Variance Explanation FY09

1. National Personnel was under spent by $7,306.76 (-10.28%) as the first is salary adjustment
is not spent due to the review and updated scale is not finished yet. Second, the income
from Forte Insurance refund on health and accident insurance of three CDWs who end the
contract with CWS. And third the some planning amount for provident fund sharing from
CWS is not spent due to the new staff replacement started in mid June 2009.

2. Technical Support was under spent by $ 603.50 (-31.81%) as the consultation fee for
Community Development model less than budget planned due to the consultant shorten her
trip in the project.

3. CWS organizational development was over spent by $ 1,538.62 (25.01%) as the unplanned
meeting and workshop but priority needed for project staff such as Job Description writing,
Community Led Total Sanitation course, Food Security guideline and proposal; and
organizational restructure.

4. Education and training for civil society was under spent by $4,883.59 (-39.64%) as first the
training on Compost Fertilizer is not needed from community. Second, awareness raising on
HIV/AID and STD, Avian influenza and primary health care were postponed due to the VHVs
still have not feel confident to conducted it yet. Third, the expenditure for VHVs and TBAs
meeting were less than budgeted due to one HC has fund to support this activity. Fourth the
quarterly meeting of CCDM for CBDRR was conduct only one time due to restructure of
Government on CBDRR.

5. Community Watsan Construction was over spent by $1,728.74 (24.06%) as the high
interested and priority need from communities on community open wells, well aprons, water
filters, and household latrine construction.

6. Grants and Contributions were under spent by $1,137.28 (-8.22%) as first is late request
from CCs to implement development activities. Second, grant support to open literacy class
was less then budget planned due to the contribution literacy books from PDE&P. Third, the
Working Capital Assistance to SHGs were not provided due to the SHG is not ready for
outside capital yet.

7. Office cost was over spent by $4,514.76 (16.08%) as first the actual need on internet
network installation. Second the actual needed on transport, meals and accommodation for
orientation of new project staff. And third the audit fee is planned to charge from PVH only.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 93


CHURCH WORLD SERVICE – CAMBODIA PROGRAM
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2009
Natural
PREAH VIHEAR VBCD Chart Emergency Women's Resource Learning Support
PROJECT Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisation Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Amount Organisat 'n Support Organisat 'n Production Generation
USD-FY08 USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
12 months 12 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD
(7)
Opening balance - 50,680

Add - Incoming amounts


CWSW/New York (SED) - -
CWS Tool of Hope - -
Christian Aid - -
NCC/Australia - -
EED - 145,599
ICCO - -
UMCOR - -
SHG repayment WCA - -
World Food Program - 1,381
Disposal general equipment - -
Other (disposal general equipment) - -
Interest on bank account EED - -

Total Income - 146,980

Less - Outgoing amounts


Personnel - expatriate - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Personnel - National - 98,942 - 23,118 5,113 - 10,006 11,317 20,980 10,186 - 12,672 5,517 - 33 -
Technical support - 3,886 - 1,248 - - - - 76 - - 2,562 - - - -
CWS staff development - 1,545 - 38 6 - 13 20 46 13 - 1,402 7 - - -
CWS organisational development - 13,497 - 3,416 447 - 649 1,347 2,502 1,019 - 3,463 487 - 167 -
Education and training for civil society - 9,967 - 2,503 359 - 695 455 2,699 608 - 2,469 179 - - -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc - 604 - 604 - - - - - - - - - - - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving out - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Community Watsan construction - 9,835 - - - - - - 9,835 - - - - - - -
Grants and contributions - 12,094 - 3,050 185 - 530 89 2,863 291 - 4,857 229 - - -
Emergency response - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
General office costs - 16,786 - 3,854 499 - 1,266 1,520 3,694 1,324 - 4,031 563 - 35 -
Vehicles & fixed assets - 7,554 - 1,700 328 - 605 659 2,036 612 - 1,265 340 - 9 -

- 174,710 - 39,531 6,937 - 13,764 15,407 44,731 14,053 - 32,721 7,322 - 244 -

Administration charge - 26,206 - 5,929 1,041 - 2,064 2,311 6,710 2,108 - 4,908 1,098 - 37 -

Total expenditure - 200,916 - 45,460 7,978 - 15,828 17,718 51,441 16,161 - 37,629 8,420 - 281 -

Less Fund Reserve - - 0% 23% 4% 0% 8% 9% 26% 8% 0% 19% 4% 0% 0% 0%

Closing deficit - (3,256)

(7)
The opening fund balance for fiscal year 2009 amounting to US$50,680 or 60% of fund balance allocation from Phnom Penh Central to Preah Vihear Program, based on the internal fund allocation plan of Church World Service – Cambodia
Program.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 94


PREAH VIHEAR VILLAGE BASED COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT
Annual Financial Variance Explanation FY09

1- National Personal is under spent by USD 9,820.99 (-13.00%) as the first is salary
adjustment is not spent due to the review and updated scale is not finished yet, second
the 2 new CDW and one field coordinator are not in placed as planned due to the
screening process is take time for the right qualification.

2- Technical Support is under spent by USD 1,002.50 (-44.56%) as the consultant fee for
Community Development model less than budget planned due to the consultant shorten
her trip in the project.

3- CWS Organizational Development is under spent by USD 3,652.74 (-24.34%) as Com


Dev reflection workshop is not conducted as planned due to the project priority on Food
Security proposal. The workshop will be conduct in August 09.

4- Education & Training for Civil Society is under spent by USD 10,056.99 (-64.44%) as first
the commune council has their own fund for quarterly meeting. Second, the training on
bookkeeping to SHG committees is not done due to only 2 SHGs formed. Third, the
white ribbon campaign; project Management training is not done due to Cambodian-Thai
border tension. Fourth, the meeting with CCDM is not done due to PCDM (government)
not form CCDM in CWS target areas yet. Fifth, the International children day, the
education on nutrition and the annual VDC workshop expenditure is less than budget
plan due to the project shorten the course from two days to one day and third, the
farming day is not done due to the farmers are busy in their rice field.

5- Support for partners & counterparts is under spent by USD 539.83 (-47.19%) as first
grant support for Education Officer to attend Literacy meeting in Phnom Penh is not done
regularly due to due to the schedule from the Government department and second, the
monthly stipend for literacy teachers is less than budget plan due to the literacy class has
just opened in February.

6- Community WatSan Construction is under spent by USD 3,900.66 (-28.40%) as the new
open well construction, upgrade well apron and latrine construction is not done due to
Cambodia-Thai border tension.

7- Grants and Contributions are under spent by USD 10,533.70 (-58.13%) as first the
Commune Development Plan (CDP) is already conducted in June 08. The second is late
proposal for dame rehabilitation from Commune Council. Third, office supply for SHG is
not done due to only 2 SHGs formed. Fourth, the reserved fund for emergency response
is not spent due to there wasn’t drought or flood affected. Fifth, materials for Literacy
class are not spent due to the literacy class has just opened in February.

8- Office Costs is under spent by USD 4218.28 (-33.61%) because; firstly, most of office
cost is not expensed with a reason of Cambodia-Thai border tension and the office was
closed. And, secondly, the audit fee is charged from KPT instead of PVH.

9- Vehicles and Other Fixed Assets was under spent by USD 3,230.00 (-37.09%) with
various seasons such as: the photocopy costed less than budget planned and the project
hadn’t purchased two motorbikes as a result of transferring from other project instead.

10- Internal transfers is under spent by USD 5,822.91 (-25.11%) as this line item dependent
on overall expenditures

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 95


CHURCH WORLD SERVICE – CAMBODIA PROGRAM
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2009
Natural
SVAY RIENG WATSAN Chart Emergency Women' Resource Learning Suppo
PROGRAM Program Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace s Equity Management Organisation Offic
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Amount Organisatn Support Organisat 'n Production Generation
US$0FY08 US$0FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
12 months 12 months US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$

Opening balance 7,148 13,805(1)

ADD - Incoming amounts


UMCOR 24,988 24,988
NCC/Australia 67,132 121,932
ICCO - -
CWS Tools of Hope - -
CWSW/New York (SED) 19,335 -
SHG Repayment WCA 853 77
C. D discretionary funds 78 -
Disposal vehicle motorbike - 525
Other income - 1,433

Total incomes 112,386 148,955

LESS - Outgoing amounts


Personnel – expatriate - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Personnel – national 56,964 61,663 - 7,704 - - 2,014 3,105 41,260 2,350 - 5,036 171 - 23 -
Technical support 870 4,994 - - - - - - 3,164 - - 1,830 - - - -
CWS staff development 1,368 1,022 - 11 - - 3 4 5 3 - 996 - - - -
CWS organisational development 5,695 4,962 - 31 - - - - 3,399 - - 1,412 - - 120 -
Education and training for civil society 10,932 11,116 - 2,678 - - 240 265 6,325 210 - 1,270 128 - - -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc - 3,410 - - - - - - 3,410 - - - - - - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving out - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Community Watsan construction 50,498 28,894 - - - - - - 28,894 - - - - - - -
Grants and contributions 2,090 3,431 - 211 - - - - 17 - - 3,203 - - - -
Emergency response 7 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
General office costs 17,848 13,826 - 1,663 - - 394 590 8,252 448 - 2,402 52 - 25 -
Vehicles & fixed assets 6,736 6,963 - 507 - - 97 145 5,495 110 - 590 13 - 6 -

153,008 140,281 - 12,805 - - 2,748 4,109 100,221 3,121 - 16,739 364 - 174 -

Administration charge 22,951 21,042 - 1,921 - - 412 616 15,033 468 - 2,511 55 - 26 -

Total expenditure 175,959 161,323 - 14,726 - - 3,160 4,725 115,254 3,589 - 19,250 419 - 200 -

Less Fund Reserve - - 0% 9% 0% 0% 2% 3% 71% 2% 0% 12% 0% 0% 0% 0%

Closing (deficit)/balance (56,425) 1,437

(1)
The different balance between the closing fund balance for fiscal year 2008 and the opening fund balance for the fiscal year 2009 was due to the opening fund balance of Community Development Program for the fiscal year 2009 excluded an
adjustment of amounting to US$34,030 or 30% carried forward from the fiscal year 2008. The program’s incoming and outgoing amounts during the fiscal year 2009 were included in the Community Development Program’s incoming and outgoing
amounting to US$36,200 in the proportion of 30% by category, based on the internal funding plan allocation of Church World Service – Cambodia program.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 96


Svay Rieng WatSan Project
Annual Financial Variance Explanation FY09

1- National Personnel cost is under spent by USD 5,548.66 (-12.76%) as the first is the salary
adjustment is not spent due to the review and updated scale is not finished yet. Second,
new Finance and Office Assistant started with CWS in the middle of January on the
temporary contract which is CWS not paid for her 13th month salary and third, the intern is
not in placed due to unqualified.

2- Technical support is under spent by USD 3,040.00 (- 49.43%) as the cost for WatSan
manual translation is outstanding to complete, the product expects to complete in the first
semester of FY10.

3- CWS Organizational Development is under spent by USD 501.06 (-12.75%) as the staff
retreat is moved to September, 2009 next fiscal year.

4- Education and Training for civil society was under spent by USD 2,422.16 (-23.33%) as the
expenditure on some training is less than budget planned due to Project staff focus on data
collection to prepare annual work plan and budget for FY 2010.

5- Community WatSan Construction is under spent by USD 852.85 (-2.87%) as the


construction of Bio-Sand water filter and household latrines is paid less than budget
planned due to the project focus on data collection to prepare annual work plan and budget
for FY 2010.

6- Grants and contribution was under spent by USD 148.51 (-41.25%) as the crop seed cost
of home gardening for vulnerable families is less than planned due to some is locally
available for sharing to each other in the community. .

7- Office Cost is over spent by USD 520.29 (7.16%) as the Vehicle Motorbike Operating,
Office Accommodation, Office Per Diem and Office E-mail cost is more than budget plan
due to the project need to bring back the construction mold to the office during the rainy
season.

8- Internal transfer was under spent by USD 523.88 (-3.43 %) as this line item depends on
overall expenditures.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 97


CHURCH WORLD SERVICE – CAMBODIA PROGRAM
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2009

Natural
BTB & BTM PARTNERSHIP Chart Emergency Women's Resource Learning Support
PROJECT Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisation Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Amount Organisat 'n Support Organisat 'n Production Generation
USD-FY08 USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
12 months 12 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD
(5)
Opening balance 72,948 32,543

Add - Incoming amounts


Christian World Service/NZ 30,000 266
CWSW/New York (SED) 132,008 134,022
NCCA - 9,357
ICCO 60,828 78,840
EED 3,110 -
Peace Tour - 3,949
CD. discretionary funds 696 -
SHG repayment WCA 8,250 2,700
Other income 465 5,116

Total Income 235,357 234,250

Less - Outgoing amounts


Personnel - expatriate - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Personnel - National 74,643 72,967 - - - 71,102 27 - 1,273 559 6 - - - - -
Technical support 350 120 - - - 120 - - - - - - - - - -
CWS staff development 1,499 1,317 - - - 1,253 1 - 44 19 - - - - - -
CWS organisational development 477 360 - - - 349 - - 8 3 - - - - - -
Education and training for civil society 10,030 13,121 - - - 13,121 - - - - - - - - - -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc - 95 - - - - 95 - - - - - - - - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving out - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Community Watsan construction - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Grants and contributions 95,615 87,982 - - - 81,381 - - 4,572 2,007 22 - - - - -
Emergency response - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
General office costs 25,870 24,063 - - - 23,086 14 - 667 293 3 - - - - -
Vehicles & fixed assets 5,854 4,816 - - - 4,642 2 - 119 52 1 - - - - -

214,338 204,841 - - - 195,054 139 - 6,683 2,933 32 - - - - -

Administration charge 32,150 30,726 - - - 29,258 21 - 1,002 440 5 - - - - -

Total expenditure 246,488 235,567 - - - 224,312 160 - 7,685 3,373 37 - - - - -

Less Fund Reserve - - 0% 0% 0% 95% 0.07% 0% 3% 1% 0.03% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

Closing balance 61,817 31,226

(5)
The difference between opening fund balance for fiscal year 2009 and closing fund balance for fiscal year 2008 was due to the opening fund balance of the Partnership Program amounting to US$29,274 or 60% carried forward from the fiscal year
2008 which is allocated to the opening fund balance of this Program. The Program’s incoming and outgoing amounts for the current fiscal year 2009 was included Partnership Program’s incoming and outgoing in the proportion of 60% by category,
based on the internal fund allocation plan of Church World Service – Cambodia Program.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 98


BATTAMBANG & BANTEAY MEANCHEY PARTNERSHIP PROJECT
Annual Financial Variance Explanation FY09

1. Personnel National cost is under spent by USD 3,879.84 (-6.79%). The main reason is that
budget allocated for staff salary adjustment was not used as planned due to the review and
updated scale is not finished yet.

2. Staff Development cost is under spent by USD 2,550.17 (-68.62%) as budget allocated for
external staff training was not used as planned. However, staff attended training and workshops,
organized by CWS regarding with CBDRM and commune development planning; meditation,
healing and peace building, which was more cost effective and fully coordinate program wide.

3. Education and training for civil society cost is under spent by USD 5,885.22 (-67.60%). The
main reason is that training on Local Capacity for Peace and program related to workshop for
CNGO partner staffs were not organized as planned, because project and partners were busy in
implementation of CBDRM project (DIPECHO). In addition, budget allocated for support partner
staffs to attend training on Participatory Program Monitoring with Partnership Program Office
was not used as planned. The training is rescheduled in FY 2010.

4. Grant and contribution cost is under spent by USD 17,273.37 (-16.73%). The main reason is
that budget of small project grant and contribution was spent less than budget allocated because
cost of school pond digging, school facilities, bicycles and health materials for vulnerable school
children and families were less than estimated budget. Moreover, budget allocated for Support
Mother Child Health in KCDA target village (contribution from Peace Tour visitors) was not yet
used. However, project and partner staff spent time to learn SMCH experience from Direct
Service Program and prepared detailed plan/budget for its implementation in FY 2010. In
addition, funding support to CFEDA was less than budget allocated because they required time
to restructure their organization and they also implemented program with a part of grant received
from DAP.

5. Office cost is under spent by USD 3,096.09 (-16.02%). The main reason is that part of some
items of Office expenses such as Office telephone, rent, stationary, electricity, computer, printer
repair and maintenance, vehicle fuel and operation cost were charged to DIPECHO budget.
Moreover, they were also saved.

6. Administrative charge is under spent by USD 5,201.06 (-17.57%) as this line item is
dependent on overall expenditures.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 99


CHURCH WORLD SERVICE – CAMBODIA PROGRAM
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2009

Natural
KOMPONG THOM Chart Emergency Women's Resource Learning Support
PARTNERSHIP PROJECT Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisation Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Amount Organisat 'n Support Organisat 'n Production Generation
USD-FY08 USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
12 months 12 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD

Opening (deficit)/balance (1,017) 34,985(3)

Add - Incoming amounts


EED 7,345 -
ICCO 7,766 -
Christian World Service/NZ 8,222 59,241
CWSW/New York (SED) 47,994 -
CD. discretionary funds 464 -
Other income & SHG repayment 1,397 1,190

Total Income 73,188 60,431

Less - Outgoing amounts


Personnel - expatriate - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Personnel - National 23,679 23,233 - - - 23,233 - - - - - - - - - -
Technical support 234 80 - - - 80 - - - - - - - - - -
CWS staff development 456 180 - - - 180 - - - - - - - - - -
CWS organisational development 1,634 1,003 - - - 1,003 - - - - - - - - - -
Education and training for civil
society 6,347 9,905 - - - 9,905 - - - - - - - - - -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving
out - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Community Watsan construction - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Grants and contributions 15,294 28,937 - - - 28,937 - - - - - - - - - -
Emergency response 115 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
General office costs 9,537 7,622 - - - 7,622 - - - - - - - - - -
Vehicles & fixed assets 1,613 2,120 - - - 2,120 - - - - - - - - - -

58,909 73,080 - - - 73,080 - - - - - - - - - -

Administration charge 8,836 10,962 - - - 10,962 - - - - - - - - - -

Total expenditure 67,745 84,042 - - - 84,042 - - - - - - - - - -

Less Fund Reserve - - 0% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

Closing balance 4,426 11,374

(3)
The different balance between the closing fund balance for fiscal year 2008 and the opening fund balance for the fiscal year 2009 was due to the opening fund balance of Partnership Program amounting to US$30,559 or 40% carried forward from
the fiscal year 2008 which is allocated to the opening balance of this Program. The program’s incoming and outgoing amounts for the current fiscal year 2009 were included in the Partnership Program’s incoming and outgoing amounts in the
proportion of 40% by category, based on the internal funding plan allocation of Church World Service – Cambodia program.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 100


KOMPONG THOM PARTNERSHIP PROJECT
Annual Financial Variance Explanation FY09

1. National Personnel is under spent $ 968.27 (-8.74%) as the salary adjustment is not
spent due to the review and updated scale is not finished yet.

2. CWS Organizational Development is over spent by $ 138.65 (18.56%) as the Partnership


Project Coordinator attended the in house meeting/workshop in this month more times
than budget plan.

3. Education and training for Civil Society is under spent by $ 394.32 (-11.49%) as the
Partnership KPT and Partnership Program postponed two training courses on Project
Monitoring and Human Resources& staff management in this year.

4. Office cost is under spent by $ 254.85 (-9.59%) as the partnership KPT saved from
spending for the cartridge, office equipment and fuels during this year.

5. Internal transfers is under spent by $231.05 (-3.31%) as this line item is dependent on
overall expenditures.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 101


CHURCH WORLD SERVICE – CAMBODIA PROGRAM
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2009

Natural
BANTEAY MEANCHEY EMINING Chart Emergency Women's Resource Learning Support
PROJECT Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisation Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Amount Organisat 'n SupportOrganisat 'n Production Generation
USD-FY08 USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
12 months 12 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD

Opening balance 153,289 40,275(4)

Add - Incoming amounts


Christian Aid - -
NCC/Australia 77,505 -
EED - -
Interest on bank account EED - -

Total Income 77,505 -

Less - Outgoing amounts


Personnel - expatriate - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Personnel - national - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Technical support - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
CWS staff development - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
CWS organisational development - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Education and training for civil society - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving out - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Community Watsan construction - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Grants and contributions 35,000 35,000 - - - - - - - 35,000 - - - - - -
Emergency response - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
General office costs - 2,559 - - - - - - - 2,559 - - - - - -
Vehicles & fixed assets - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

35,000 37,559 - - - - - - - 37,559 - - - - - -

Administration charge 2,450 2,450 - - - - - - - 2,450 - - - - - -

Total expenditure 37,450 40,009 - - - - - - - 40,009 - - - - - -

Less Fund Reserve - - 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

Closing balance 193,344 266

(4)
The difference between opening fund balance for fiscal year 2009 and closing fund balance of fiscal year 2008 was due to allocation of fund balance amounting to US$153,069 to such programs: Phnom Penh Central, Svay Rieng, Direct Service
Program and Kampong Thom Services.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 102


CHURCH WORLD SERVICE – CAMBODIA PROGRAM
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2009

Natural
Chart Emergency Women's Resource Learning Support
DIPECHO PROJECT Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisation Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Amount Organisat 'n Support Organisat 'n Production Generation
USD-FY08 USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
12 months 12 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD

Opening balance - -

Add - Incoming amounts


DIPECHO - 93,942

Total Income - 93,942

Less - Outgoing amounts


Personnel - expatriate - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Personnel - National - 20,994 - - - - - - - 20,994 - - - - - -
Technical support - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
CWS staff development - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
CWS organisational development - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Education and training for civil
society - 42,566 - - - - - - - 42,566 - - - - - -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc - 11,587 - - - - - - - 11,587 - - - - - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving
out - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Community Watsan construction - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Grants and contributions - 1,330 - - - - - - - 1,330 - - - - - -
Emergency response - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
General office costs - 8,604 - - - - - - - 8,604 - - - - - -
Vehicles & fixed assets - 4,845 - - - - - - - 4,845 - - - - - -

- 89,926 - - - - - - - 89,926 - - - - - -

Administration charge - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Total expenditure - 89,926 - - - - - - - 89,926 - - - - - -

Less Fund Reserve - - 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

Closing balance - 4,016

DIPECHO project was started in fiscal year 2009.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 103


CHURCH WORLD SERVICE – CAMBODIA PROGRAM
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2009

Natural
ACTION BY CHURCHES Chart Emergency Women's Resource Learning Support
TOGETHER PROJECT Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisation Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Amount Organisat 'n Support Organisat 'n Production Generation
USD-FY08 USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
12 months 12 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD

Opening balance - -

Add - Incoming amounts


CWSW/New York (SED) - -
NCC/Australia - -
Act ERP Appeal - 22,433

Total Income - 22,433

Less - Outgoing amounts


Personnel - expatriate - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Personnel - national - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Technical support - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
CWS staff development - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
CWS organisational development - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Education and training for civil society - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving out - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Community Watsan construction - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Grants and contributions - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Emergency response - 15,222 - - - - - - - 15,222 - - - - - -
General office costs - 2,591 - - - - - - - 2,591 - - - - - -
Vehicles & fixed assets - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- 17,813 - - - - - - - 17,813 - - - - - -

Administration charge - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Total expenditure - 17,813 - - - - - - - 17,813 - - - - - -

Less Fund Reserve - - 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

Closing balance - 4,620

Action by Churches Together Project was started in the fiscal year 2009.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 104


CHURCH WORLD SERVICE – CAMBODIA PROGRAM
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2009

Natural
EMERGENCY RESPONSE Chart Emergency Women's Resource Learning Support
PROGRAM Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisation Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Amount Organisat 'n Support Organisat 'n Production Generation
USD-FY08 USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
12 months 12 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD

Opening balance - -

Add - Incoming amounts


CWSW/New York (SED) - -
NCC/Australia - -
NYERP Appeal - 8,450

Total Income - 8,450

Less - Outgoing amounts


Personnel - expatriate - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Personnel - national - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Technical support - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
CWS staff development - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
CWS organisational development - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Education and training for civil
society - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving
out - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Community Watsan Construction - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Grants and contributions - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Emergency response - 4,935 - - - - - - - 4,935 - - - - - -
General office costs - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Vehicles & fixed assets - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- 4,935 - - - - - - - 4,935 - - - - - -

Administration charge - -

Total expenditure - 4,935 - - - - - - - 4,935 - - - - - -

Less Fund Reserve - 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

Closing balance - 3,515

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 105


CHURCH WORLD SERVICE – CAMBODIA PROGRAM
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2009
Natural Learning
PHNOM PENH CENTRAL Chart Emergency Women's Resource Organisa Support
OFFICE Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management tion Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Amount Organisat 'n Support Organisat 'n Production Generation
USD-FY08 USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
12 months 12 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD
(6)
Opening balance 67,411 84,586

Add - Incoming amounts


CWSW/New York (SED) - -
ICCO - -
CWS ODD 65,298 87,057
CWS agent reimbursement 23,244 24,793
C. D discretionary funds 4,530 -
Income others - 8
Mey Meakea memorial funds 875 -
Interest on general bank account 13,021 880
Other (Dis- general equipment, admin) 26 -
Disposal vehicle 5 -
Admin costs recovered CWS 123,375 118,997

Total Income 230,374 231,735

Less - Outgoing amounts :


Personnel - expatriate 21,558 24,807 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 24,807
Personnel - national 150,142 178,914 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 178,914
Technical support 30,289 26,683 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 26,683
CWS staff development 6,827 3,830 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3,830
CWS organisational development 8,176 3,774 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3,774
Education and training for civil society - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving out - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Community Watsan construction - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Grants and contributions 4,860 5,349 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 5,349
Emergency response - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
General office costs 67,014 64,068 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 64,068
Vehicles & fixed assets 16,461 10,550 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 10,550

305,327 317,975 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 317,975

Administration charge - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Total expenditure 305,327 317,975 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 317,975

Less Fund Reserve - - 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100%

Closing deficit (7,542) (1,654)

(6)
The different balance between closing fund balance for year 2008 and opening fund balance for fiscal year 2009 was due to opening balance of fund balance amounting to US$ 92,128 carried forward from fiscal year 2008 which is allocated to the
opening fund balance of this Program, based on the internal fund allocation plan of Church World Service – Cambodia Program.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 106


PHNOM PENH CENTRAL OFFICE
Annual Financial Variance Explanation FY09

1. Expatriate personnel costs are under spent by USD1,908.89 (-7.15%) as the major under
spent of USD2,000 for home leave was not taken because of country representative’s schedule
was too quite tight so that she could not have time for her home leave in this year.

2. National personnel costs is under spent by USD7,677.47 (-4.11%) as the first is salary
adjustment USD5,946 is not spent due to the review and updated scale is not finished yet, and
secondly, USD1,500 for staff contingency as the recruitment was not made because we have
staff volunteer for help, and USD100 under line national staff maternity leave was not claimed by
Admin Assistant in June 2009 as she was on maternity leave.

3. Technical support is overspent by USD9,553.27 (55.77%). These overspent were specifically


for the consultancy fees USD6,868 for proposal development for EU and another of $2,685 for
consultant who did the job evaluation and salary review for CWS Cambodia, this over spent
happened due to the consultant fee rate per day was higher than what we had budgeted.

4. CWS organizational development is under spent by USD5,989.67 (-61.34%) as some


activities were not happened such as senior management team (SMT) retreat USD1,156 and
USD2,700 for workshop/conference and for regional meeting USD2,134 also not spent as we
have sent only one staff to attend instead of two staff.

5. Grant and contribution is over spent by USD 653.00 (13.92%) as some gifts given to orphan
and price of food for Christmas ceremony was more expensive than we had planned.

6. Office support costs are under spent by USD 9,777.06 (-13.24%). The major under spent as
we saved from office building repair, fuel for vehicle consumed because most of staff took bus
and taxi instead of using CWS vehicles, some printing and photocopy, vehicle, office
equipments and office electricity were minimized in usage, meals and celebration, office
telephone and CD phones less used this was the high commitment of staff willing to save cost,
and the audit fee was less charged because some cost related auditor travels were not occurred
so much during the auditing period. (Office telephone and CD phones were less used. This is
the high commitment of staff willing to save cost and the audit feel was less changed because
some cost related auditor travels were not much occurred during report period.)

7. Vehicles and other fixed assets is over spent by USD3,519 (50.06%) because the
requirement to have three new desktop computers one for cash accountant and one for HR
Assistant, and one new for IT comp-domain controller back-up due to the down time of our main
server (crush).

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 107


APPENDIX II
ANNUAL OUTPUTS/ LOGFRAMES

CHURCH WORLD SERVICE/CAMBODIA


Church World Service Cambodia
Logical Framework Report FY09
Project Name: Direct Services Program

Narrative Summary Objectively Verifiable Indicators Actual Output Variances/ Explanation


Overall Objective:
To enhance the communities' capacity to define their development direction and access to their basic needs, basic social services;
sustainable livelihood opportunities and food security.

Theme 1: Capacity Building for Development Planning


OBJECTIVE
Enhance networking with NGO and engage with government institutions to define their development direction and manage their affairs in a
a participatory and democratic manner

Output 1.1:
Enhance program coordination with ▪ 6 meetings with Medicam ▪ 6 times network meeting ▪ According to request made
NGO and relevant Ministries and availibility time
▪ 6 meting with watsan working ▪ 6 times on WatSan working group ▪ According to request made
group meeting and availibility time
▪ 2 formal meeting with district ▪ There are several informal
▪ 2 networking meetings GAD ▪ 1 time on GAD network quarterly ▪ According to request made
meeting and availibility time
▪ 1 meeting on district strategic
plan organized by Provincial
office attended

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation


1.1.1 Medicam Monthly Meeting ▪ Program Officer for Health ▪ Attended 6 meetings (4 meetings) ▪ Meeting was attended
according to request made
and availability
1.1.2 Watsan Sectoral Working Group ▪ Program Officer for Health ▪ Attended 6 WatSan WG meetings ▪ Same as 1.1.1
Meeting

108
1.1.3 MCH Q Coordination Meeting PO & PM ▪ Attended 3 SMCH Coordination ▪ Meeting held on Sept 15, 08;
meetings Feb 6 & May 22, 09
1.1.4 Other meetings/national events/ PO & PC ▪ 4 times(18,11,9 Dec & 27 Nov 08) ▪ Meeting related to Health
workshop ▪ 3 times(9 Jan; 7 Apr; 26 Jun 09)
1.1.5 GAD networking meeting ▪ Program Coordinator for Peace ▪ Attend GAD networking one time
on quarterly achievement & plan
Other meeting/workshop ▪ PM and PO ▪ Attended international event on ▪ According to request made
Sanitation impact, organized by
World Bank and MRD.
▪ Attended International Day of
sanitation organized by MRD
▪ Attended Pesticide impact work-
shop organized by NGO forum
▪ Attended small and Micro Business
experience sharing, organized by
NGO forum
▪ Attended meeting organized by
CCSP

Theme 2: Meeting Basic Need and Building Self-reliant, Sustainable Livelihoods


OBJECTIVE
Improve access to basic social service and amenities and improve overall food security of vulnerable people.

Output 2.1
Improve overall community health ▪ 18 project staff knowledge on prim- ▪ 15 field staff (6 women) that 7 from ▪ All staff members are able
status and individual health condition ary health care, dengue fever, KPT and 8 from PVH trained on to transfer their knowledge
malaria and avian-influenza Dengue Fever, Malaria, Primary to target communities
prevention. Health Care and Diarrhea
▪ 17 proejct staff (7 women) trained
on water cycle and water borned
diseases
▪ 8 CNGO partner (1 KNTO, 1
CFEDA, 2 CDOVIR & 4 KCDA)

109
and 1 proejct staff trained on Basic
Nutrition and Nutritional Outcome
Measurement(SMCH)
▪ 18 project stafff (7 women) trained
on CLTS
▪ 6 proejct staff and 9 CNGO staff
trained on Low Cost Sanitation
Training

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation


2.1.1 Provide training on dengue fever ▪ Program Officer for Health, budget, ▪ Provide training on Primary Health
malaria, avian-influenza materials Care, Malaria, Dengue fever, and
prevention, and primary health Diarrhea prevention to 15 staff
care to 18 staff ▪ Provide training on water cycle and
water borned diseases to 17 staff
▪ Trained to 8 CWS Partners on
Basic Nutrition and Nutritional
Outcome Measurement (SMCH)
▪ Trained to 18 (7F) project staff on
CLTS
▪ Trained to 6 CWS staff
and 9 NGO staff on Low Cost
Sanitation Training

Output 2.5
Improve agricultural productions, food ▪ 18 trained staffs are able to monitor ▪ 19 staff (6 women) that 10 from
security and household income among and assist SHG committees on PVH, 9 from KTP trained on
vulnerable people, self-help/interest book keeping and group manage- SHG concept and book keeping
group in target communities ment ▪ 19 CNGO partners staff trained on
SHG concept, bookkeeping and
micro-business

110
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
2.5.30 Provide training on Bookkeeping ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Provide a-3 day training on SHG
to 19 staff concept and book keeping to 19
project field staffs (6 women)
▪ Cooperate with partnership project ▪ All CNGO staffs interested
in BTB to provide a-5 day training and request for next training
on SHG concept and micro- and commit to apply in their
business management to 19 area
CNGO staffs (9 women)
Theme 3: Strengthening Civil Society
OBJECTIVE
Strengthen target community understanding and practice of peace building and restorative justice
Output 3.2:
Key persons in the community VLs, ▪ 19 project staff trained in Account- ▪ 28 project and program staff and ▪ Training provided in Feb 09
WSUG, CDF, CCs, old persons and ability (Anti-corruption) 5 CNGO partners staff trained on by program staff
monks play an important role in Anti-corruption
peace building, conflict resolution ▪ 19 project staff trained on Gender / ▪ Not done ▪ Plan and move it to FY 010
and use the LCP methodology in Women equality
their community ▪ 4 project staff have ability to condu- ▪ 23 project and program staff (7
ct LCP assessment practice women) trained on LCP assessm-
ment
▪ 18 staff (SMT, POG and core staff ▪ Participants interested and
trained on Peace Building and suggested to have it in every
Reconciliation 6 months
▪ 13 participants (5 women) from ▪ Cambodian Youth feel happy
KPT and BTB-BTM and 11 (4 CPV and have opportunity to learn
from KPT and PVH, 3 NGO staff and share to other
and 6 CWS youth staff) attended
Youth and Reconciliation Confere-
nce in Siem Reap.
▪ 24 CWS staff (5 KPT, 2 PVH, 4
SVR, 3 BTB-BTM & 10 PNP) (12
women) trained on Building Peace

111
in Our Lives.
▪ 22 CNGO partners staff trained on ▪ Training provided in June 09
How We See Conflict. by program staff
▪ 40 people (17 women) comprising ▪ The training are divided
of CPV, VL and VDC trained on into two batches.
" Understanding Conflict and Peace ▪ It was very helpful for them
in our lives" to know that peace start
from them individually.
▪ 32 participants (13 women) in ▪ The training finished in 3
Timor Leste (10 CWS TL, 6 NGO modules as committed to
partner staff and 16 youth) trained support CWS Timor Leste
on Module III of Peace Building and
Restorative
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
3.1.9 Provide training course on ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace, ▪ Not done ▪ Postponed because of
gender to 19 CWS staff conflict schedule
3.1.10Training course on Accountability ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace, ▪ Provide training on Anti-corruption
to 19 CWS staffs to 28 project and program staff and
5 CNGO staff-KPT (12 women)
3.1.11Workshop on Trauma and ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace, ▪ Postponed because conflict ▪ It will be done next semester
Restorative Justice for 4 CWS schdule with participants
staff in Kirirum Resort (4 days) ▪ Direct Service has translated and " Long night Journey into Day"
dub movie that can be used for is a movie illustrating the
trauma and restorative justices reconciliation process in
workshop in the future South Africa and the work
of Truth and Reconciliation
Committee.
3.1.12Lead all field staff to conduct ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace, ▪ Provide training on LCP to 23 ▪ 111 people ( 68 women)
LCP Assessment project and program staff (7 from 3 villages participated
women) (KPT, PvH, SvR, PNH) in conducting LCP assess-
received 6 days training on LCP ment with CWS staff.
assessment ▪ 86 people ( 48 women)
participated in the presentat-

112
tion of LCP assessment
practice.
▪ Coordinate with CDRI to conduct
Reconciliation workshop to 18 staff
(SMT, POG and Core team)
▪ Support 13 participants ( 5 women) ▪ Youth have opportunity to
(2 CPV from KPT, 2 CPV from PVH, learn from youth inside and
3 CNGOs staff from KORD and , outside country on
CIDC, and 6 CWS youth staff) to reconciliation process.
join Youth and Reconciliation
conference which organized by
Youth For Peace Organization
▪ Provided 3 day training on Building
Peace in Our Life to 24 CWS staff.
▪ Provide 3 day training on How to
See Conflict to 22 CNGO partners
staff
▪ Provide 3 day training to 5 new
CWS staff, 2 women (KPT, SvR)
LCP introduction.
▪ Supported 19 people ( 8 women)-
BTB partnership project (8 FACs,
1 ADOVIR CNGO partner staff,
6 PVH and 4 KPT staff) participat-
ed in 7 days on Peace Walk (19th
Dhammayietra ) in Prey Veng
province.
▪ With support from CWS Country
Representative, 32 participants (13
women) of Timor Leste including 10
CWS TL staff, 6 NGO partners and
16 youth provided Module III of
Peace Building and Restorative
Justice training

113
Output 4.1
Red Cross Volunteers (RCVs) are ▪ 19 staff trained on CBDRR and ▪ 18 staff (6 women), 9 from KPT
actively functioning, commune and planning and 10 from PVH trained on
village disaster preparedness plans CBDRR
developed and implemented in ▪ 19 staff trained on community first ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
target communities aid
▪ 19 staff trained on Sphere and ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
Accountability (ERP)

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation


4.1.8 Provide training on CBDRR to ▪ Budget, materials, ▪ Provide a three-day training on
18 staff Program Coordinator and Assistant CBDRR to 18 staff (6 women), 10
of ERP from PVH and 8 from KPT project
4.1.9 Coordinate with CRC to provide ▪ Budget, materials, ERP Program ▪ Not done ▪ The project prioritize to the
training on First Aid to 19 staff other task and this is not the
urgent needed
4.1.10 Provide training on Sphere ▪ Budget, materials, ERP Program ▪ Not done ▪ Planned next semester
and Accountability to 19 staff

Theme 5b: Program Development, Management and Supervision


OBJECTIVE
Effective and efficient program management and functioning; enhance community development planning and practice
Output 5.1b
Field staff and field operation ▪ Monthly project monitoring on: ▪ 7 visit by Program Manager and
appropriately monitored and 12 project management Deputy Program Manager
supported 12 project implementation activities
6 staff performance

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation


5.1.1bField visit of Program Manager ▪ PM, PO, PC ▪ Regular field monitoring from
to monitor project management Program Office and rarely from
Program Manager as time constraint
▪ 7 visit by Program Manager and

114
Deputy Program Manager
5.1.2bField visit of Program staff to ▪ Program staff conducted 15 regular
project implementation and field monitoring in purpose of
quality program implementation of
Health, SHG, Food production,
WatSan etc……
▪ 12 regular visit by Program staff
in purpose of quality program
implementation of Health, IGA, Agri,
animal raising and WatSan, etc…
▪ Program Manager conducted 2 one ▪ The one day meeting was
day meeting on Most Significant improved knowledge of
Change meeting with all project project staff on MSC concept
staff of PVH, KPT and SVR. and how to apply MSC in the
communities.
▪ Program Manager conducted 6 ▪ Coaching and advice was
times of field monitoring to projects, given to project manager
which 2 times in SVR, one time in on staff performance and
KPT and 3 times in PVH project implementation.

Output 5.2b
Improved design, planning, manage- ▪ On the job training & formal training/
ent and monitoring capabilities of capacity building of staff on:
project staff ▪ 1 VBCD/Com Dev reflection ▪ Commuity Development Reflection
Workshop conducted with 29 staff
▪ 19 project staff (9 KPT, 10 PVH) ▪ 10 PVH and 8 KPT staff trained
staff trained in leading and manag- on Leading and Managing Rural
ing rural organization Organization (5 women)

▪ 19 project staff (9 KPT and 10 PVH) ▪ Not done due to time constraint ▪ Through coaching and ment-
staff trained in PM &E and border tensions oring by program and project
staff cound understand
PM&E concept and applied
in their field works.

115
▪ 19 project staff (9 KPT, 10 PVH)
are able to facilitate training to
communities
▪ 4 exposure visits ▪ Not done as staff learn from each
other in the field
▪ 4 on the job trainings ▪ Not done as staff learn from each
other in the field
▪ 4 tools development ▪ Not done as the program revised
CAT instead

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation


5.2.1bOrganize VBCD reflection ▪ PM,Pm and PCs ▪ Integrated VBCD reflection activities ▪ As the content of VBCD and
during Com Dev model reflection Com Dev model are similar.
Therefore, VBCD and
Com Dev model reflection
will be discussed in
the same workshop
5.2.2bOrganize annual reflection on ▪ PM,Pm and PCs ▪ 27 staff attended a 3-day CWS ▪ The workshop help staff
CWS CD model Com Dev model reflection workshop to reflect on their positive
(9 PVH, 9 KPT, 9 Prog. Office achievements and the
and one M and E Officer) area they need to
improve more
5.2.3bProvide Leading and Managing ▪ Pcs, field Staff, Pm, budget, ▪ Conducted one training on Leading ▪ With knowledge , staff
Rural Organization Training materials and Managing Rual Organization can support VDC, VL
19 project staff (9 KPT and 10 for 18 staff (5 women) and CC in their managing
PVH) their work
5.2.4bProvide Participatory Monitoring ▪ Pcs, field Staff, Pm, budget, ▪ Not done, only coaching
and evaluation training course materials
to 19 project staff (9 KPT and
10 PVH)
5.2.5bProvide on the job training to KPT ▪ PM,POs, Pm ▪ Program staff conduct on the Job ▪ Integrated plan of Program
and project staff training to project staff during field office and project
visit and meeting

116
▪ Program Manager and Program
staff conducted three day meeting
with all project, PVH, KPT and PVH
staff to integrate FY09 planning of
program and project.
5.2.6bDevelop tool development for ▪ PO,Pm,Pc ▪ Develop 3 tools: VP monitoring ▪ The other tool will develop
implementation (4tools) book, database forms, and SMCH next semester
forms.
5.2.7bOrganize exposure visit for KPT ▪ Pm,PCs ▪ Only 2 internal exposure visit in ▪ The external exposure visit
and PVH staff (4 times) the target village area, SHG and will be done in next semester.
VDC activities.
Conducted Low Cost Sanitation Budget, materials, Program Officer ▪ Coordinate with CAWST to provide ▪ Unplanned, but it's necessary
training to CWS and other NGO for Health training to project staff and other for staff capacity
staff NGO staff on Low Cost Sanitation enhancement to support their
which is 6 CWS (2 from KPT, 2 work quality
from PVH and 2 from SVR) and 9
other NGO staff
Conduct Community Led Total Budget, materials ▪ Coordinate with MRD to provide ▪ Unplanned, but it's necessary
Sanitation Training to CWS field Training on Community Led Total for staff capacity
staff Sanitation to 25 staff (10 PVH, enhancement to support their
9KPT and 6 SVR) work quality

Output 5.3b
Effective exit strategies, phase-out/ ▪ Develop Food Security and VP ▪ Developed and reviewed with Will be submit to POG for
hand over guidelines/ tools, baselines Guidelines participation from project staff approval
survey instrument…developed, trialed ▪ Review guidelines of: in kind and ▪ In-kind and in cash credit guideline ▪ Will submit to POG for
and introduced in cash credit guideline, Health reviewed and send to project to use official approval
Activity Implementation Guideline, ▪ Health Activities implementation
ERP contingency plan, ERP guideline was presented to POG
Guidelines, Village Phasing Out ▪ ERP contingency plan developed
Guidelines, WatSan Guideline, and ▪ The ERP guideline drafted
WatSan Manual ▪ Phase out plan for SVR is in placed
and implement from October 08

117
▪ WatSan guideline reviewed
▪ WatSan manual drafted

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation


5.3.1bDevelop food security guideline ▪ PO,PC ▪ Reviewed Food security guideline ▪ Will be in valid after POC
on June 30th 2009 as plan approval
5.3.2bDevelop VP family guideline ▪ PO,PC ▪ Program staff develop VP ▪ The VP guideline will finish
monitoring book to link with VP monitor in next
5.3.3bReview in-kind and cash credit ▪ PO,PC ▪ Reviewed in kind and in cash credit ▪ Send to project to use and
guideline guideline will be submit to POG for
official approval
5.3.4bReview Health activity ▪ PO,PC ▪ Reviewed health Activity ▪ Have been submitted to POG
Implementation guideline Implementation guideline on member for the approval
30 July 08 and presented to and will be finalized next
POG on 31 July 08 semester
5.3.5bReview ERP contingency plan ▪ PO,PC ▪ Reviewed ERP contingency plan ▪ Achieved as planned
and presented to POG
5.3.6bReview ERP guideline ▪ PO,PC ▪ Draft ERP guideline but need ▪ This guideline will be in valid
approval from POG after POG approval
5.3.7bReview CWS Peace manual ▪ PO,Pm ▪ Reviewed Peace Training Manual
5.3.8bDevelop village phasing out ▪ Developed phase out plan after ▪ Planned was approved and
2 consultation meeting with PM, implemented in Oct 08 until
PC and PO and 1 meeting with CR Jun. 09
DP
5.3.9bReview water and sanitation ▪ Reviewed WatSan guideline and it ▪ Will present to POG
guideline will be finalized in early next next semester
semester
5.3.10Review water and sanitation ▪ WatSam manual developed with ▪ Will present to POG
manual expert consultant next semester

118
Church World Service Cambodia
Logical Framework Report FY09
Project Name: The Kompong Thom VBCD Project

Narrative Summary Objectively Verifiable Indicators Actual Output Variances/Remarks


Overall Objective:
To develop the communities' capacity to define their development direction and improve them to meet their basic need; access to basic social
services; sustainable livelihood opportunities and food security.

Theme 1: Capacity Building for Development Planning


OBJECTIVE
Develop community capacity to engage with Government institutions and CBOs to define their development direction and manage their affairs
in aparticipatory and democratic manner.
Output 1.1:
Enhance program coordination with ▪ At least 2 coordination meetings ▪ 8 coordination meetings with ▪ Over planned
sectoral forums (PROCOCOM) with PDRD, PDOH, PDoEY, PDRD, PDoH, PDoA, and
provincial departments (PDRD, PDoWA, PDoA are conducted. PDoE were conducted
PDoA, PDoE, PDoH), district
authorities and CCs ▪ 2 coordination meetings with district ▪ Two meetings with district ▪ Achieved as planned
authorities and concerning officers of Prasat Sambour
government office are conducted and Santuk were organized
▪ 2 coordination meeting with CC ▪ Four quarterly meetings were ▪ Over planned
are conducted (2 meeting in each conducted
commune)
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks

1.1.1 Attend coordination meetings ▪ Project Manager, Project Coordin- ▪ Organized one coordination ▪ PDRD and UNICEF agreed to
with PDRD, PDoA, PDoE, ators, Program Manager with PDRD and UNICEF to allow community people from
PDoH discuss collaboration of CWS target areas, Ti Pou
WatSan activities commune, to join the training
on water storage and hand
washing with their beneficiaries

119
▪ Program Officer for Health and ▪ Program Officer for Health and ▪ PDoH agreed to provide two
Project Coordinator Project Coordinator meet with trainers to support project's
PDoH to discuss refresher activities
training courses to VHVs and
TBAs
. Project Manager and Office . Meeting with PDoH on MoU
Assistant for coordination health activities
. Project Manager . Project Manager meet with . PDRD agreed to provide two
PDRD two time to discuss on officers from province and
VDC re-election in five target district to assessment VDC
villages, two communes candidates in both communes
. Deputy Program Manager for DS . Deputy Program Manager and . PCDM agreed with CWS
and Project Manager Project Manager meet with and recomment for direct
PCDM to discuss on establish coordinate and discuss with
CCDM in CWS target area DCDM in both districts
. Project Coordinator . Project Coordinator joined . All participants agreed to apply
coordinator meeting on integration process to target
commune integration planning area
organized by PLAU/Excom
▪ Project Coordinator ▪ Project Coordinator meet with ▪ PDoA agreed to provide one
PDoA one time to discuss on trainer to discus on the topic
Integrated Farm Management and conducted the training
Training to demo farmers
▪ Program Manager and Project ▪ Program Manager and Project ▪ PDoE provided two district
Manager Manager meet with PDoE education officers from Prasat
Officers on supporting and Sambour and Santuk district
monitoring NFE classes in six to cooperate and support
target villages, two communes the project.
1.1.2 Organize semester meetings ▪ Project Manager, Project Coordinators▪ Project Manager meet with two ▪ District governor understand
with district authorities and Program Officers, budget, vehicle district governors of Prasat CWS program and willing to
agriculture, education, rural Sambour and Santuk on CWS integrate in Commune
development office and OD/HC program and community development plan
development plan

120
1.1.3 Organize quarterly meetings with ▪ Project Manager, Project Coordinators▪ Project organized two quarterly
commune councils for Program Officers, budget, vehicle meetings with participation of
2 communes 11 CC members, police officer,
and key commune officers to
discuss on collaboration and
how to implement activities
. Project organized two time . CCDM members understand
quarterly meeting with DCDM on their role and responsible
member with participation of and support RCVs to prepare
31 CCDM members and 13 and implement disaster
RCV members to discuss on preparedness plan
role and workplan for CCDMs
and RCVs

Output 1.2:
Strengthen leadership among local ▪ 43 VDCs, VLs & CCs attend 2 times ▪ 57 VDCs, VLs, and CCs from More than expected as
partners and community structure meeting 12 target villages attended two interested from community
to better understand and implement VDC/CC quarterly meetings people
community development principles ▪ 13 VDPs developed by VDCs and VL ▪ Annual village development ▪ Achieved as planned
and processes planning in 13 target villages
were developed
▪ 63 VDCs & CCs attend annual plan- ▪ 56 VDCs, CCs, VLs and other ▪ 89% of project plan achieved
ning workshop relevant district government Less number of participants
officers (14 women) attended but reach number of workshop
the annual planning workshop
▪ 43 VDCs, VLs & CCs (40%women) ▪ 36 VDCs and CCs (6 woman) ▪ Achieved 84 % of project plan.
trained in leading and managing from 10 target villages of both as some VDCs and VLs
rural organization communes attended the training absented and not attended the
on leading and managing rural course as planned.
organization
▪ 43 VDCs, VLs & CCs (40% women) ▪ Not achieved as planned ▪ Need resourse from program
trained in Participatory Monitoring staff and they postpone the
and Evaluation (PM&E) training due to busy with
emergency response activities

121
at Phreah Vihea province
▪ 43 VDCs, VLs & CCs (40% women) ▪ 146 peoples (105 women) in 12 ▪ CD concept was a subject
trained in CD concept target villages received regular requiring more conceptualizing.
coaching on CD concept from Based on knowledge of VDCs
project staff during community VLs, and for more efficiency,
meeting project staff provided them
regular coaching
▪ 43 VDCs, VLs & CCs (40%women) ▪ 23 VDCs, VLs, and CCs ▪ Achieved 50 % of project plan.
trained in planning & proposal (6 women) attended the training Not reach the number of
writing on planning and proposal trainees due to not included
writing VDCs, VLs, and CCs received
individual coaching by CDWs
at village level.

Variances/Remarks
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities
1.2.1 Conduct 2 semester meetings ▪ Pcs, field Staff, Pm, budget, ▪ Four quarterly meetings were ▪ More than planned, because
with VDCs, VLs and CCs materials conducted with 57 participants conducted per quaterly as
(2times/commune/year) including VDCs, VLs and CCs more interested from VDCs,
to present achievement and VLs, and CCs
next planning
1.2.2 Encourage VDCs & VLs in devel- ▪ Pcs, field staff, , materials ▪ Project field staff, VDCs, and ▪ Achieved as planned
oping VDPs in 13 villages VLs worked together to organize
13 village general meetings to
set up annual VDPs
1.2.3 Encourage VDCs in 13 villages ▪ Pcs, field Staff, Pm,materials ▪ See 1.2.4
to integrate VPD into commune
development plans
1.2.4 Organize annual VDC workshop ▪ Pcs, field Staff, Pm, budget, materials ▪ Organize the annual VDC ▪ Workshop present the village
to present achievement and next workshop with 56 participants achievement and annual plan
planning to VLs CCs and (14 women) included VDCs, 2009; and to integrate VDP
relevant stakeholders VLs, CCs, District Department into commune development
of Education Officers, PDRD, plans
PDoW officer, HC staff and

122
project staff
1.2.5 Provide training course on ▪ Program Manager, budget, materials ▪ 36 VDCs, VLs, and CCs ( 6 ▪ Less than planned due to
Leading and Managing Rural women) from 10 villages of fewer key selected people
Organization to 43 VDCs, VLs two target communes attended absent during training time.
and CCs (2courses) training on Leading and Most of them go to outside
managing rural organization village for earn individual
income.
1.2.6 Provide training course on CD ▪ Pcs, field Staff, Pm, budget, materials ▪ Provide orientation to villagers ▪ CD concept was a subject
concept to 43 VDCs, VLs, CCs and regular coaching to VDC requiring more conceptualizing
(2 courses) CD concept to 146 people Based on knowledge of VDCs
(105 women) in 12 target VLs, and for more efficiency,
villages of two communes project staff provided them
regular coaching
1.2.7 Provide training course on ▪ Pcs, field Staff, Pm, budget, materials ▪ Not acieved as planned ▪ The resourse program staff
PM & E to 43 VDCS, VL and busy with urgent assessment
CCs (2courses) IDPs in Phreah Vihear camp
during training schedule
planned.
1.2.8 Provide training course on ▪ Pcs, field Staff, Pm, budget, materials ▪ One training course on planning ▪ Less than planned due to not
Planning and Proposal writing to and proposal writing with 23 conduct training in second
VDCs, VLs and CCs (2courses) participants semester.
1.2.9 Support local initiatives ▪ Materials, budget, Pcs, field staff ▪ Project provided supports to ▪ Based on annual village
(community meeting hall, bridge, local initiatives such as one development plans
community road, culverts…) water pump machine, two
community hall and one
community latrine etc.
1.2.10 Provide training in gender to ▪ Materials, budget, Pcs, field staff ▪ Two training courses on Gender ▪ Achieved as planned
VDCs, VLs, CCs & CPVs and Domestic Violence were
provided to 69 peoples (38
women) in Sroeung commune
1.2.11 Assist 2 commune councils to ▪ PO/PC/CDW ▪ Not done ▪ The commune development
develop commune development plan was already developed
plans by commune councils in June
2008 and will be conducted

123
in July 2009 for next year
1.2.12 Support budget and materials for ▪ PC/CDW, budget, materials ▪ Not done ▪ Refer to 1.2.11
CCs to implement commune
development plans

Output 1.3:
Vulnerable families better able to plan ▪ 130 VP families trained to understand▪ 146 community peoples (105 ▪ Over expectation
and manage household resources, on Com dev Concept women) including absolute poor
leading to improvement in overall living families attended the orientation
conditions training on CD concept
▪ 30 VP families in 12 villages are able ▪ 50 absolute poor families were ▪ Over expectation
to develop their household plans and developed household plan
implemented

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks

1.3.1 Orientation meeting on CD ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, staff ▪ See 1.2.6 ▪


concept to vulnerable and
communities
1.3.2 Coordinate with VDC to select ▪ Materials, staff ▪ With coordination of VDC and ▪ Higher than expected as more
65 families for training in house- field staff, 72 families were interested from community
planning and family assessment selected from 12 target villages people

1.3.3 Provide 2 training courses on ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, staff ▪ The training course on family ▪ More than planned because
family assessment & household assessment and household of interested from communities
planning to 42 vulnerable families and household planning were
conducted to 72 absolute poor
families
1.3.4 Cooperate with VDCs to assist ▪ PC, staff, budget ▪ With coordination of VDC and ▪ Achieved as planned
36 VP families to develop their field staff, 50 absolute poor
household planning families were supported on
household development
planning
1.3.5 Support and monitor 30 VP ▪ PO/Pc/CDW, materials, budget, ▪ Project staff provided regular ▪ Most absolute poor families

124
families to implement household supports and monitor to 50 interested in improving their
plan absolute poor family to families living status and
implement their household actively involved with project
development plans activity
1.3.6 Support and encourage 12 ▪ PO/PC/CDW, budget ▪ Refer to 1.3.5 ▪ Refer to 1.3.5
vulnerable families to implement
household plan
Output 1.4:
Improve literacy and numeracy ▪ 11 trained literacy teacher (30% ▪ 8 literacy teachers were ▪ Not achieved as planed due to
among 9 target communities women) are able to facilitate success complete the training 3 literacy teacher candidates
literacy class on pedagogy of Non-Formal abandoned the class
Education training
▪ 100 literacy students (50% women) ▪ 124 literacy students (94 ▪ Over expectation
are able to read, write and calculate women) enrolled in six classes
are able to read, write and
numeracy
▪ 6 literacy classes consist of 120 ▪ 6 literacy classes with 124 ▪ Women are more interesting
students(50%women) functioned students (76% women) are in literacy class than men
well well functioned
▪ 200 people(120 students) participated▪ 450 community peoples and ▪ Over expectation
in International Day of Literacy 183 students participated in
International Day of Literacy
▪ 12 community mobile libraries ▪ 5 community mobile ▪ Less than planned due to
established and functioned, libraries established with project planned to establish
benefited to 240 readers 125 readers library in village with NFE
class

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks


1.4.1 Coordinate with VDC and literacy ▪ CDW, materials ▪ Support the graduated literacy ▪ Achieved as planned
teachers to identify and register teacher to coordinate with VDC
literacy students for 6 classes to select 124 students (94
women) to attend the NFE in 6
classes

125
1.4.2 Coordinate with District NFE ▪ Pc/CDW, budget ▪ District Education officer had ▪ Achieved as planned
officer to monitor 6 classes two time to monitor six literacy
classes
1.4.3 Provide school materials for ▪ CDW, Pc, budget, materials ▪ Provide school materials to ▪ Achieved as planned
running 6 literacy classes consist 124 NFE students (94 women)
of 120 students (50%women) in 6 classes
1.4.4 Support stipend to 6 literacy ▪ CDW, Pc, budget ▪ Provide monthly stipend to 6 ▪ Achieved as planned
teachers to process 6 literacy literacy teachers from July 08
classes on a monthly basis.
1.4.5 Cooperate with PDoE to provide ▪ CDW, Pc, budget, materials ▪ Not done
incentive to 30 literacy students
who have high score from 1 to 5
(6 literacy classes and 3 times/
class)
1.4.6 Cooperate with District ▪ CDW, Pc/PO, budget, materials ▪ 23 literacy teachers, VLs, and ▪ Achieved as planned
Education Office conduct CCs from 8 target villages
meeting with literacy attended two time meeting to
teachers (2 times/year) discuss issue and find solution
to improve the classes
1.4.7 Cooperate with District ▪ CDW, Pc/PO, budget, materials ▪ Cooperated with District ▪ Over expectation
Education Office to organize Department of Education to
International Literacy Day with organize an International
200 participants (120students) Literacy Day
1.4.8 Enhance 12 mobile libraries ▪ CDW, Pc/PO, budget, materials ▪ 5 mobile libraries established ▪ Less than plan, because
and provide education books to and functioned with 125 readers mobile libraries established in
those libraries for 240 readers in five villages 5 villages which open literacy
class
1.4.9 Support District Education ▪ Pc, budget ▪ Support the district education ▪ Based on the invitation from
officer to attend monthly meeting officer to attend the monthly Phnom Penh department
on NFE in Phnom Penh coordination meeting on NFE at
Phnom Penh 9 times

126
Theme 2: Meeting Basic Need and Building Self-reliant, Sustainable Livelihoods
OBJECTIVE
Improve access to basic social services and amenities and improve overall food security of vulnerable people

Output 2.1
Improve overall community health ▪ 26 TBAs trained in education & coun- ▪ 23 TBAs were trained on Pre
status and individual health selling on pre & post natal care to the and Post Natal Care and
condition communities Counseling
▪ 390 people from 13 villages received ▪ 433 people (323 women) from ▪ Over planned
awareness on birth spacing, mother 7 target villages attended awar-
and child health care eness raising on mother and
child health care
▪ 26 VHVs trained in education on prim ▪ 20 VHVs (9 women) from 12 ▪ 5 VHVs migrated other
ry health care, avian, influenza, deng- target villages were trained on places for their income
ue fever and HIV/ AIDS to the dengue dever, malaria, primary
communities health care, diarrhea &
pneumonia.
▪ 520 people from 13 villages received ▪ Not done ▪ As the HIV/AIDS & STD training
awareness of HIV/ AIDS and sexual is still not provided to VHVs yet,
transmitted diseases prevention the awareness raising will
move to next year
▪ 520 people form 13 villages received ▪ 525 people (414 women) in ▪ Achieved as planned
awareness of dengue fever, malaria Sraeung commune received
prevention awareness of dengue fever,
malaria prevention from VHVs
and HC staff
▪ 520 people from 13 villages received ▪ Not done ▪ As the avian influenza training
awareness of avian influenza is still not provide to VHVs yet,
prevention project had discussed with HC
and move to next year
▪ 200 people in Ti Po commune ▪ 197 peoples (138 women) in
participated in International World Ti Pou commune attended
AIDS Day International World AIDS Day

127
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks
2.1.1 Cooperate with HC staff to ▪ Program Officer for Health, budget, ▪ In cooperation with OD and HC ▪ There are only 23 TBAs in 12
provide refresher course to 26 materials staff, the program staff provided target villages
TBAs a training course to 23 TBAs on
pre and post natal care and
counseling on 22-24 Sept 08.
2.1.2 Support trained TBAs from 12 ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Support TBAs in 3 target ▪ More than expected as
villages to provide awareness on villages to organize and provide interest increased
birth spacing, mother and child awareness raising on mother
health to 390 people & child health to 433 community
(30 people/ village) peoples (323 women)
2.1.3 Cooperate with HC staff to ▪ Program Officer for Health, CDW ▪ In cooperation with OD and HC ▪ 4 VHVs migrate to other villages
provide refresher training to 26 materials, budget staff, the program staff provide for earning income
VHVs on HIV/AIDS, dengue fever a training on dengue fever,
malaria and primary health care malaria, primary health care
diarrhea and pneumonia
2.1.4 Support VHVs in providing ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Not done ▪ As the training on HIV/AIDS &
awareness on HIV/AIDS & STD STD did not provide to VHVs
to 520 people from 12 villages yet, So the project move to
implement next year
2.1.5 Support VHVs in providing ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Support VHVs to provide ▪ Based on capacity of VHVs in
awareness on primary health awareness raising on primary some target villages, the project
care to 520 people from12 health care to community plan to collaborate with HC staff
villages and VHVs on this awareness
in next year
2.1.6 Support VHVs in educating mala- ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ 525 people (414 women) in ▪ Achieved as planned
ria and dengue fever prevention Sraeung commune reveived
to 520 people in 12 villages awareness on malaria and
dengue fever prevention
2.1.7 Support VHVs to educate on ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Not done ▪ As the training on avian-
avian -influenza prevention to influenza prevention did not
520 people in 12 villages provide to VHVs yet, the project
move to implement in next year

128
2.1.8 Cooperate with HC/OD to orga- ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Organized an International ▪ Achieved as planned
nize International World AIDS World AIDS day with 197
Day with participation from 200 participants (138 women) from
people from 4 villages target villages of Ti Pou
commune
2.1.9 Cooperate with HC/OD to orga- ▪ Pc, CDW, budget, materials ▪ Organized twice meetings with ▪ Less than planned due to
nize 3 times meeting for VHVs HC/ OD to discuss issues and HC taff busy with their original
find soluation planned.
2.1.10 Cooperate with HC/OD organize ▪ Pc, CDW, budget, materials ▪ 23 TBAs from 12 target villages ▪ Less than planned due to HC
quarterly meeting for TBAs attended one time meeting to staff busy with their original
discussed issue and plan planned.
to improve their work.

Output 2.2
Improve knowledge and practice of ▪ Support to VHVs in providing aware- ▪ 1,179 peoples (1,150 women) ▪ Women were much interesting
target communities on food nutrition, ness raising to 520 families were educated on food nutrition in MCH project as it could help
and health status of malnourished and SMCH improve health status of their
children five years and under family member
▪ 60 malnourished children under 5 ▪ 533 infants (246 girls) under
years old from 6 villages received 24 months from 12 target
food supplement villages received nutrition foods

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks


2.2.1 Provide refresher training in ▪ Program Officer for Health, CDW, ▪ Cooperate with OD and HC ▪ 4 VHVs are busy on their
nutrition to 26 VHV budget staff to organize a training rice plating and the other 2
on food nutrition and SMCH to go outside village for earning
20 VHVs (9 women) from 12 income
12 target villages
2.2.2 Support VHVs to provide ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Support VHVs to provide
education on nutrition to 520 education on nutrition commun-
families in 12 villages ity
2.2.3 Cooperate with VHVs to provide ▪ CDW, budget, seed ▪ Cooperate with VHVs to provide ▪ Number of supports based on

129
seeds to parents of 60 children vegetable seed to 37 families malnourished children.
under 5 years to improve nutrient who have children under 5 ys
food
2.2.4 Coordinate with VHVs to provide ▪ PO, CDW, budget ▪ Under FWP support 544 infants
nutrient food to improve health (246 girls) from 6-24 months
of 60 children under 5 years benefited from SMCH project
in 13 villages
2.2.5 Cooperate with VHVs to provide ▪ CDW, budget ▪ 532 mothers of children 6-24
ingredients of nutrition food for months received SMCH food
mother of malnourished children from SMCH project
under 5 years

Output 2.3
Improve access to safe water and ▪ 100 families from 12 villages benefit ▪ 24 open wells benefited to 144 ▪ Over planned
household sanitation and reduce from 20 new open well constructions families in 12 target villages
incidence of water-borne diseases of two communes
in target communities ▪ 120 families benefit from 20 upgraded▪ 11 upgraded wells bebefited to ▪ Less than planned due to late
wells 23 families in 3 villages local resourse contribution
from communities
▪ 30 families benefit from 30 bio-sand ▪ 138 ceramic water filter were
filters construction distributed to 138 absolute poor
families with total 702 people
(371 women)
▪ 270 families from 12 villages educated▪ 465 peoples (284 women) in ▪ Higher than planned, based on
on water and sanitation two communes attended real need from communities
water and sanitation awareness
▪ 20 families from 12 villages benefit ▪ 53 household latrines with ▪ Higher need from community
from 20 latrine construction 599 people (314 women) in 8 people
target villages of Sraeung and
Ti Pou commune were
constructed
▪ 800 school children and teachers ▪ Not done ▪ Most target schools had water
from 7 schools benefit from 15 bio- filters supported by other
sand filters construction projects & UNICEF in last FY08

130
▪ 800 school children and teachers ▪ 601 primary school students ▪ Less than planned due to
from 7 schools educated on water (255 girls) were educated on capacity of VHVs and HC staff
and sanitation water and sanitation by HC busy with their original planned
and project staff
▪ 200 people were aware of clean ▪ Not done ▪ No planned in this year
water using through World Water
Day's participation
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks
2.3.1 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW, budget ▪ Cooperate with VDCs and VLs ▪ Achieved as planned
families who will benefit from 20 to select 144 families in 12
new open wells target villages of Sraeung and
Ti Pou communes to benefit
from 24 open wells
2.3.2 Cooperate with VDCs to support ▪ CDW, Pc, materials, ring molds ▪ Support the VDCs, VLs, and ▪ Over planned
the communities in constructing beneficiaries to construct 24
20 open wells for 120 families in open wells
13 villages
2.3.3 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW, materials ▪ Cooperate with VDCs and VLs ▪ Achieved as planned
120 families to benefit from 20 to select 125 families to benef-
upgraded wells from 20 upgraded wells
2.3.4 Support materials to 120 families ▪ CDW, Pc, materials, budget ▪ Provided upgraded wells ▪ Less than planned due to
to upgrade 20 wells construction to 23 families for late contrinution local resourse
upgrade 11 wells from communities
2.3.5 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Cooperate with VDCs to select
vulnerable families who benefit 138 absolute poor families to
from 30 biosand water filters benefit from ceramic water filter
2.3.6 Cooperate with VDCs to provide ▪ CDW, materials, Pc ▪ Support VDCs, VLs, and VHVs ▪ Higher than planned due to
education on WatSan and to provide awareness on water more interest from community
bio-sand filter maintenance to and sanitation, and water filter people
30 VP families maintenance to 138 absolute
poor families
2.3.7 Support 30 families to construct ▪ CDW, materials, molds, PO ▪ Provided 138 water filter to ▪ Refer to 2.3.5 and 2.3.6
bio-sand filter 138 absolute poor families

131
2.3.8 Support & cooperate with VHVs ▪ CDW, materials, PO ▪ Support VHVs to provide ▪ Over planned due to intered
to educate clean water and awareness on clean water and from community people
sanitation to 270 people in 13 and sanitation to 465 people
villages (284 women) in Sroeung and
Tipou communes
2.3.9 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW, materials, ring molds, Pc, ▪ Support VDCs, VLs to select ▪ Over planned due to hight
20 families from 13 villages to PO 53 families in eight target interest from community
construct latrines villages of Sraeung and Ti Pou people
commune for household latrine
construction
2.3.10 Support 20 families to construct ▪ CDW, materials, molds, Pc, PO ▪ VDCs, VLs, and beneficiaries ▪ Refer to 2.3.9
20 household latrines worked together to construct 53
household latrines
2.3.11 Cooperate with District Education ▪ CDW, materials, Pc, PO ▪ Not done ▪ Most target schools had water
to identify number of school to filters supported by project and
receive bio-sand filters UNICEF in last FY08
2.3.12 Support teacher to construct 15 ▪ CDW, materials, molds, Pc, PO ▪ Not done ▪ Refer to 2.3.11
bio-sand filters for 7 schools
(800 teachers and students)
2.3.13 Cooperate with HC to educate ▪ CDW, materials, Pc, PO ▪ Collaborate and support HC ▪ Less than planned due to
on clean water and sanitation to staff to provide awareness on capacity of VHVs and HC staff
800 teachers and students clean water and sanitation to busy with their original work
601 primary school children
(255 girls)
Output 2.4
Children of vulnerable families have ▪ 65 children (60% girls) from VP ▪ 58 primary school children (32 ▪ Less than planned
the necessary materials to attend families are encouraged to attend girls) of absolute poor families
primary schools school by providing necessary were selected from 12 target
school materials villages for scholarship
▪ 80% of 65 supported children ▪ 58 primary school children who ▪ Achieved as planned
(60% girls) passed grade were supported education
materials in previous semester
passed the grade

132
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks
2.4.1 Cooperate with VDC to select ▪ CDW, Pc, PO ▪ Support VDCs to select 58
65 children (60% girls) from VP primary school children
families for scholarship of absolute poor families in 12
target village for scholarship
2.4.2 Support school materials to 65 ▪ CDW, budget, school materials ▪ Support school materials to 58 ▪ The project supported school
children (60% girls) to go to (32 girls) primary school children education materials only one
school of absolute poor families time a year
2.4.3 Cooperate with teachers, VDC ▪ CDW ▪ Project staff, VDCs and school
to motivate children's parents to teachers regularly motivated
encourage their children to attend parents to encourage their
school children to attend school
2.4.4 Cooperate with teachers to ▪ CDW ▪ Project staff coordinated with ▪ 58 primary school children who
monitor study situation of 65 teachers to follow up children were supported education
supported children score in every quarter materials in previous semester
passed the grade.
Output 2.5
Improve agricultural productions, food ▪ At least 65% of 40 fowl alternate / ▪ 34 absolute poor families (27 ▪ Number of innovative farmers
security and household income among livestock trained families improved women) trained on chicken and will be increased as they were
vulnerable people, self-help/ interest their livestock raising technique and duck raising improved technique much interesting in the
groups in target communities increased number of livestock and increased number of livestock techniques
▪ At least 60% of 25 fish raising trained ▪ 17 key people (13 women) from ▪ All 17 fish raising trained people
families start to raise fish 4 target villages in two target were not raise fish yet due to
communes received training not proper completed family
on fish raising ponds for fish raising
▪ At least 60% of 16 SRI trained ▪ 11 trained farmers praticed SRI ▪ Achieved as planned
farmers practiced SRI techniques technigues in their rice plots
in their rice plots
▪ At least 70% of 56 home gardening ▪ Project technical staff directed ▪ Higher than plan due to more
trained families have home garden in coaching to field staff and key interested from community
their plots farmers at village level. As the peole.
result, 115 families have home
garden in household componds

133
▪ 12 farmers practice IFM with supporte ▪ 12 trained farmers practice ▪ Higher than plan due to more
techniques/ materials/ seeds from pig raising with vegetable interested from community
CWSC production. And 26 farmers people.
practiced IFM through coaching
from project field staff
▪ 10 families benefit from 10 family ▪ 11 family ponds were benefited ▪ Over planned
ponds to 14 key farmers in two target
communes
▪ 360 families oriented on SHG concep ▪ 471 community people (370 ▪ Over expectation
and its advantage women) were introduced the
SHG concept
▪ 10 SHG with 250 members organized ▪ 12 SHGs consist of 195 ▪ Numbers of SHG is more than
and function members (158 women) formed plan but member in each
and needed materials supported group is less
▪ 42 trained of 14 SHG committees ▪ 36 SHG committees trained on
have capacity in bookkeeping and SHG concept and book keeping
and operate the group process
▪ 10 SHG used CWS' WCA to run ▪ Not done ▪ All 12 SHG committees had
business for increasing their family limited capacity on bookking
income yet. So project staff are
contiuning build their capacity
in this year
▪ 18 trained farmers increased rice ▪ 23 farmers trained farmers ▪ Over exspected
yield by using compost/ natural are using compost/ natural
fertilizers for soil improvement fertilizers for increased rice
yield.

▪ 15 trained farmers increased family's ▪ 18 trained farmers praticed ▪ Achieved as planned


income from mushroom growing mushroom growing at house-
hold and incresed their income
▪ 3 community tree nurseries created ▪ 2 community tree nurseries ▪ Less than planned one nursery
and have fruit trees for vulnerable created and benefited to as one target village late to
people vulnerable in two commune set up tree nursery committee

134
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks
2.5.1 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Cooperate with VDCs to select
40 vulnerable families for animal 40 absolute poor families (32
raising training courses (20 for women) from target villages
pig training & 20 for chicken) for chicken and duck raising
2.5.2 Provide 2 training courses on ▪ Budget, Program Coordinator for ▪ Provide training on duck raising
fowl alternative and livestock Credit and Income generation, to 22 absolute poor families
raising to 40 families (pig 1 CDW, Project Coordinator (18 women)
course & poultry 1 course) ▪ Cooperate with PDoA to provide ▪ Participants interest to the new
training on chicken raising to technique and willing to apply
14 absolute poor families
(9 women)
2.5.3 Provide fowl alternative, fingerling ▪ Budget ▪ Provide hen breed, which is
to 26 trained families 3 hens and one cock per each
(3 kg of hens/ fam) family, to 24 absolute poor
families,
▪ Provide duckling, which is 15
duckling per each family, to 20
absolute poor trained families.
2.5.4 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ The community people is more
25 families for fish raising 17 key farmers (13 women) interested in livestock raising
training courses from target villages for fish than fish raising as the water
raising training course resource is not available in dry
season
2.5.5 Provide 2 fish raising training ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Program staff supported project ▪ Refer to 2.5.4
courses to 25 families staff to provide one training on
fish raising to 17 selected
farmers
2.5.6 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ Achieved as planned
16 families for SRI training 17 key farmers in Sraeung
commune for SRI training
2.5.7 Provide training on SRI to 16 ▪ Program Coordinator for Credit ▪ Coordinate with PDoA to
selected farmers and Income Generation provide SRI training to 20

135
participants (17 women) from.
2.5.8 Support 16 families to practice ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ 11 trained farmers praticed SRI ▪ Other 5 families will apply
SRI in their rice fields in their rice plots through SRI technique in next year as
coaching from project staff their rice field not available for
water
2.5.9 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Cooperated with VDCs to ▪ Higher than planned as the
56 families for home gardening select 115 families for practice real need from communty
training home gardening in their house- people
hold compounds
2.5.10 Provide 2 training on home ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Not done, but project teachnical ▪ Refer to 2.5.9
gardening to 56 families satff and field staff direct
coaching to 115 key families for
home gardening
2.5.11 Provide vegetable seed and ▪ Budget ▪ 86 absolute poor families in 12
materials to 40 trained families target villages received
vegetable seed for home
gardening
2.5.12 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Cooperated with VDCs to select ▪ As planned
6 demo famers 6 demo farmers
2.5.13 Provide IFM training to 12 model ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Cooperate with PDoA staff to ▪ Achieved as planned
famers (6 in FY08) provide training on IFM to 12
demo farmers
2.5.14 Provide seed and materials to 12 Seed, fingerlings and other materials ▪ During IFM training, project ▪ Achieved as planned
demo farmers provided 12 water baskets and
vegetable seed to 12 demo
farmers
2.5.15 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Cooperated with VDCs to
families to benefit from 10 family select 14 families for family
ponds ponds
2.5.16 Support FFW to 10 families to ▪ CDW, rice food for work, Pc ▪ Project provided FFW to 14 ▪ Achieved as planned
dig 10 family ponds families from two targets
communes for dig family ponds
2.5.17 Organize orientation meeting on ▪ Budget, CDW, Program Coordinator ▪ Program staff coaching field ▪ Over expectation
SHG concept to 360 families in for credit and income generation staff to introduce SHG concepts

136
12 villages to 471 community peoples (370
women) in all target villages
2.5.18 Support to form 10 SHGs and ▪ CDW ▪ Project provided needed
and materials supply materials for 12 SHGs in six
target villages
2.5.19 Provide 2 training courses on ▪ CDW, Program Coordinator for ▪ Program staff supported project
book keeping to 14 SHG with 42 credit and income generation staff in providing a three day
committee members training on SHG concept and
book keeping to 36 SHG
committees
2.5.20 Provide WCA to 10 SHGs after ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator, WCA ▪ Not done
evaluation
2.5.21 Cooperate with VDC to select ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Cooperate with VDCs and VLs ▪ Over expectation as the real
20 VP families for small to select 34 absolute poor need from VP families
business families for income generation
2.5.22 Grant support to 20 VP families ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator, budget ▪ Project provided grant for 12 ▪ Refer to 2.5.21
for small business small bisiness and 22 absolute
poor families for chicken and
duck raising
2.5.23 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ Over expectation as the real
18 families for compost making 23 families for compost making need from communities
training training
2.5.24 Provide training on compost ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Provide training on compost ▪ Refer to 2.5.23
making to 18 families making
2.5.25 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ Achieved as planned
15 families for mushroom 15 families in 7 target villages
training for mushroom growing training
2.5.26 Provide training on mushroom ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ 14 key farmers (12 women) ▪ One key farmers absent during
growing training to 15 families received training on mushroom training time he goes to outside
growing wich provided by village for earn daily income
program staff.
2.5.27 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Cooperated with VDcs to select ▪ Over than planned as the more
18 families for fruit tree nursery 73 absolute poor families for interested from communities
and tree planting training fruit tree planting in their families

137
2.5.28 Provide training on tree nursery ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Project staff directed coaching ▪ Refer to 2.5.27
and tree planting to 18 families to 73 selected families for fruit
tree planting
2.5.29 Provide materials and seeds for ▪ Budget ▪ Supported 2 community tree
3 community tree nurseries nurseries

Theme 3: Strengthening Civil Society


OBJECTIVE
Strengthen target community understanding and practice of peace building and restorative justice
Output 3.1
Community key persons (CCs, VDCs, ▪ 52 CPV, VL and VDCs trained in ▪ 32 CPVs, VDCs, and, VLs
VLs, elderly, monk) play an active Peace Concepts learn from his were trained on peace concept.
role in peace building, responding to activity and apply into her community training was cooperated with
conflict, and utilizing LCP approaches program staff
in their communities ▪ 70 villagers (49 women) receiv-
ed peace concept through
awareness raising
▪ 189 villagers( 107women)
received awareness on elimin-
ation of domestic violence on
on women and children
▪ 38 CPV, VL, trained in LCP ▪ 22 people, 10 women (CPV,
VDC) trained on LCP introdu-
ction
▪ 27 CCs and VLs trained on Local ▪ 19 people, 5 women (CPV,VDC
Capacity for Peace VLs, CC, Police) trained on
LCP introduction
▪ 27 CCs and VLs trained on ▪ Not done ▪ As the course late to provide
Anticorruption (Anti-corruption) to project staff. It will be moved
▪ 4 key people in target villages ▪ 2 CPVs (1 woman) from Tipo
involve in damayeatra and other commune joined a 5 day on
peace activities International Youth Conference
on Peace in Sieam Reap
Province

138
▪ 4 CPVs, VDCs, CC (4 woman)
from two target communes
joined Peace walk event at
Prey Veng province

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks


3.1.1 Conduct 2 training courses on ▪ Budget, materials, Program ▪ Coordinate with Program staff ▪ Achieved as planned
Peace Concept to key people Coordinator for Peace, CDW to conduct two trainings on
(1 course for CPV, 1 course peace concept to 32 CPVs,
for VDC, VL) VDCs and VLs. And 70 people
(49 women) received peace
awareness from CPVs and
project staff
3.1.2 Provide 2 training courses on ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace, ▪ Provide training on LCP to
Local Capacity for Peace to 38 Pcs, field staff 45 CVPs, VDCs, VLs, and CCs
VDCs, CPVs (1 course for
CPV and 1 course for VDC, )
3.1.3 Provide training on Local ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace, ▪ Provide training on LCP to ▪ Refer to 3.1.2
Capacity for Peace to 27 CC,VL CC and VL
3.1.4 Provide 3 days training on ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace, ▪ Not done ▪ The course provided to project
Accountability to 27 CC,VL staff lated. So project move
plan to next year
3.1.5 Support Peace books to schools ▪ Budget, materials, PC, field staff ▪ Supported peace and dhamma ▪ Achieved as planned
and prayer group book and Buddha fold painting
to prayer group in two villages
with 38 members (30 women)
3.1.6 Coordinate with PDoW to ▪ Budget, materials, PC, field staff ▪ Provide training on domestic ▪ Achieved as planned
provide training courses on violence to VDC and key people
Domestic Violence to 52 VDCs ▪ Conduct white ribbon campaign
and key people with 189 people participated
(107 women)
3.1.7 Support 4 people to join Peace ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace ▪ Supported 6 people (4 women) ▪ Over planned as interested
relate in PNP ( damayeatra, to join peace event at Siem from communities
white ribbon day…) Reap and Prey Veng provinces

139
3.1.8 Form 2 prayer groups and ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace, ▪ Project staff facilitated and ▪ Achieved as planned
supporting materials provided materials to organize
two prayer groups in two target
, villages with 38 members
(30 women)

Theme 4: Emergency Response and Preparedness


OBJECTIVE
To ensure meeting basic need of the most vulnerable people and victims of the emergency in the province by prioritizing the target communities
and to enhance community capacity to prepare for and respond to disaster in their communities.

Output 4.1
Village Disaster Volunteers function ▪ 24 RCV trained in CBDRR and ▪ 17 RCVs (9 women) trained ▪ Seven RCVs were absent as
actively, commune and village disaster planning & are able to conduct on CBDRR they went outside the villages
preparedness plans developed and HVCA for income generation activities
implemented in target communities ▪ 4 CC, 13 VL trained in CBDRR ▪ Not done ▪ CCDMs were not formed yet
▪ 12 villages have disaster ▪ 22 disaster preparedness plans ▪ Disaster preparedness plans
preparedness plans integrated in were raised by CRVs in 12 is not conducted yet but the
Village Development Plan target villages plan derived from VDPs based
on community experiences
on disaster
▪ CCDM quarterly meetings conducted ▪ one time meeting ▪ Less than planned due to
regularly CCDM structure are not clear
and review some members
after second CC election
▪ 240 interested (5 VDC, 1 VL, 1 ▪ Not done ▪ The HVCA training provided
literacy teacher, 2 VHV and 11 other late to CRVs and limited
interested people) got echo capacity of them for apply.
training on HVCA by RCV

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks


4.1.1 Provide training on CBDRR and ▪ Budget, materials, CDW, ERP Pro. ▪ Provide a 3-day training on ▪ 7 RCVs were absent as
Planning to 24 RCV CBDRR and HVCA to 17 RCVs they went outside the villages
(9 women) from target villages for income generation activities

140
of two communes
4.1.2 Provide training on HVCA to ▪ Budget, materials, CDW, Pc ▪ See 4.1.1 ▪ Refer to the above explanation
24 RCVs
4.1.3 Support 24 RCV in conducting ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW ▪ Not done
HVCA in their respective villages
in association with VLs & VDCs
4.1.4 Provide training on CBDRR and ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW ▪ Not done
Planning to CCDM and VLs ERP Prog.
4.1.5 Assist RCV to develop ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW ▪ Not done
disaster preparedness plan
and implement
4.1.6 Organize quarterly full member ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW ▪ 32 CCDM members and RCVs ▪ Refer to 4.1.4
meeting of CCDM joined one time meeting to
discuss on role of CCDM and
reform new CCDMs as NCDM
policy
4.1.7 Support RCV to provide echo ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW ▪ Not done
training on Disaster
Preparedness to 108 ( 9 per
village) interested people
4.1.10 Provide training on Sphere ▪ Budget, materials, ERP Program ▪ 9 project staff joined training on ▪ Achieved as planned
and Accountability to 9 staff Sphere and Accountability
from program staff

Output 4.2
Improve capacity of RCV to provide ▪ 24 RCVs are equipped first Aid kit ▪ 24 RCVs from 12 target villages ▪ Achieved as planned
first aid services to emergency of 2 communes were equipped
with 24 first aid kids

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks


4.2.1 Support first aid kids to 24 RCVs ▪ Budget, materials, ERP Program ▪ Cooperate with CRC to provide
first aid kits to RCVs

141
Output 4.3
Respond to basic needs of vulnerable ▪ 50 families received emergency kits ▪ 21 absolute poor families ▪ Based on needed
people and disaster victims of when there is emergency stike their supported emergency response
emergency in a timely manner and lives and well being for medical treatment, food
ensure their life with dignity and well suppot, and house repair
▪ 360 kg of rice seed (IR 66) for ▪ Based on needed
dry season cultivation were
provided to 35 families

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks


4.3.1 Coordinate with VDCs, VL, RCV ▪ Budget, materials, ERP Program ▪ Not done as no victim affected ▪ No major disaster in this year
to conduct assessment and
select victim families of
Emergency
4.3.2 Distribute the emergency respo- ▪ Budget, materials, ERP Program ▪ 21 victims from two target ▪ Based on annual VDPs and
nse kit to victims of disaster or communes received emergency actuality
most vulnerable people support as medical treatment,
food, and house repair

Theme 5: Project Development, Management and Supervision


OBJECTIVE
Effective and efficient program management and functioning; enhance community development planning and practice
Output 5.1a
Field staff and field operation ▪ Monthly project monitoring on: ▪ 12 time monitors on VDC ▪ Coaching given on the job
appropriately monitored and 12 project management quarterly meeting, education on training to all CDWs and PCs
supported 12 project implementation activities SMCH, proposal writing training, on staff performance and
6 staff performance base line survey assessment, project implementation
SHG training, VDC planning,
VDC workshop. And 14 times
for sport checks of CDW's
\activities at target villages

142
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks
5.1.1a Field visit of Project Manager to ▪ Pm ▪ Project manager monitored
to monitor Pc & CDW at the project staff and activities
field level 29 times by coaching them
5.1.2a Monthly meeting to reflect the • Pc, CDW • 9 monthly meetings with all • Coaching and advice were
work implementation and see project staffs to discuss and given to project staff on
the strength and weaknesses & feedback the implementation of monthly report, work plan,
develop plan for next month VBCD project and planning for achievement, and project
next month activities management

143
Church World Service Cambodia
Logical Framework Report FY09
Project Name: The Preah Vihear Village Based Community Development Project

Narrative Summary Objectively Verifiable Indicators Actual Output Variances/ Explanation


Overall Objective:
To enhance the communities' capacity to define their development direction and access to their basic needs, basic social services, sustainable
livelihood opportunities and food security.

Theme 1: Capacity Building for Development Planning


OBJECTIVE
Enhance community's capacity and engage with government institutions and CBOs to define their development direction and manage their affairs
in a participatory and democratic manner.

Output 1.1:
Enhance program coordination with ▪ At least 2 coordination meetings with ▪ A district strategic plan meet-
Provincial Department (PDRD, PDoA, PDRD, PDoH, , PDoWA attended ing organized by Provincial
PDoEYS, PDoH and PDoWA), district office was attended
authorities and CCs ▪ 2 coordination meetings with district ▪ 3 meetings with district govenor There are several informal
authorities and 3 coordination to update the progress and meetings between staff and
meetings with commune councils and security and another district authorities have
are conducted meeting with Education Office been conducted instead.
▪ Regular meetings were
conducted between staff and
4 target commune councils
▪ One coordination meetings with ▪ 1 meeting with was conducted
PLAU/POLA are conducted to discuss about strengthening
capacity of CCs and CBOs

144
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
1.1.1 Attend coordination meetings ▪ Budget, Pcs, POs ▪ PO attended 1day meeting, The meeting was participated
with PDRD, PDoEY PDoA, organized by provincial by NGOs, 6 CCs and all
PDoH and PDoWA governor on district 10-year district offices working in
strategic planning. participated Choam Ksant district.
1.1.2 Organize 2 times meeting with ▪ Budget, Pcs, POs ▪ Staff met district governor Several discussions and
district authorities & concerning three times officially discussed meetings were also made
district department offices success and challenges of the informally
project and security update
▪ District chief and Choam Both funding agencies and
Khsant commune chief local authorities could directly
participated in one day on communicate.
Square table Meeting with CWS
funding partners.
▪ Staff met District Education
Official and 3 school master to
discus about book distribution
high school and secondary
school students.
▪ PO and Pc attended District
Integration workshop
1.1.3 Organize 3 times meeting with ▪ Budget, Pcs, POs, Field staff ▪ Staff met commune councils Communication between
CC of 4 communes in 4 communes on a regular CWS staff and CC in target
basis formally and informally areas are very good and
frequently
1.1.4 Meeting with PLAU for CC ▪ Budget, Pcs, POs ▪ PC and PO met vice-chief of PLAU support CWS plan
training in target areas PLAU regarding CWS's plan to provide training to CC
to provide training to commune
counselors

145
Output 1.2:
Strengthen leadership among local ▪ 80 VDCs, VLs & CCs attend 3 times ▪ 33 VDC (17 women), 10 VLs
partners and community structure to of meeting (1 woman) and 7 councilors
better understand and implement attended 2 quarterly meetings
community development principles 4 communes
and processes ▪ 18 VDP developed by VDCs and VL ▪ 18 village development plans
with support from CWS were developed with partication
from 276 people (VDC, VL, litera-
cy teachers, and villagers) from
18 villages
▪ 67 VP developed plan with
support from staff
▪ 88 participants (VDC, VL, CC, District… ▪ One day annual workshop to
attend annual planning workshop look at the success, challenge
and experiences with participation
from 24 VDC ( 8 women), 12 VL
(one woman), 7 CC ( 1 woman)
and 7 representatives from differ-
ent departments in the district
▪ 116 VDCs, VLs & CCs (40% women) ▪ 4 courses on L & MRO were
trained in Leading and Managing provided to 42 VDCs (8 women),
Rural Organization 14 VLs (3 women), 8 CCs (6
women) of 4 communes
▪ 116 VDCs, VLs and CCs (40% women) ▪ Not done. Due to Cambodian-Thai
trained in project management border tension and other
task. However staff have
▪ 116 VDCs, VLs and CCs (40% women) ▪ Not done. shared and coached on
trained in communication and effective communication and
facilitation skills facilitation skill during field
work
▪ 300 vulnerable families are oriented ▪ 276 VP from 18 villages
on community development concept trained on CD concept (self
help concepts)

146
▪ 10 PVH staff trained in Leading and ▪ Not done Staff have learned the concept
Managing Rural Organization of leading and managing
rural organization during train-
ing conducted by PO to VDC
and VL
▪ 10 PVH staff trained in PM & E ▪ Not done Due to Cambodian-Thai
border tension so staff left
the office for security
▪ 10 PVH staff trained on communication ▪ Not done Staff already attend commu-
and facilitation skill nication and facilitation in
CHART training courses
▪ Grant 3,385,500 Riel (USD 846)
provided to support construction
3 bridges and one repairing which
community resource mobilization
6, 900, 000 Riel (USD 1, 683)
and labor contribution.
▪ Grant 1,364,700 Riel (USD 333)
provided to support two dike
repairing
▪ Grant 4,369,500 Riel (USD1,066) People mobilize 710,000
provided to construct 4 new for meeting hall construction
community meeting halls and
expand one old.

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation


1.2.1 Conduct 12 meeting ▪ Materials, budget, Pcs, Staff, PCs, ▪ Staff organized quarterly meetings Yeang Commune, the
with VDCs, VLs & CCs (3times/ POs with 3 communes to discuss meeting couldn't conduct
commune/ year) success and plan of each village due to the road cannot access
1.2.2 Assist VDCs & VLs in 18 villages ▪ Pcs, Staff, PCs, ▪ Staff assisted VDCs, VLs and
to develop Village Development POs others to develop 18 DVP
Plans (VDP)
1.2.3 Encourage VDCs in 18 villages ▪ Pcs, Staff, PCs, ▪ 362 villagers ( 191 women) in

147
to conduct meeting with villagers POs 10 villages participated in VDP
to discuss and approve VDP presentation and approved
18 VDP in their respective
villages under the facilitation of
VCDs with support of staff
1.2.4 Assist 4 commune councils to ▪ PO/PC/CDW ▪ Not done Border tension
develop commune development
plans
1.2.5 Support budget & materials for CC ▪ PC/CDW, budget, materials ▪ Not done Border tension
to implement commune
development plan
1.2.6 Organize annual VDC workshop ▪ Materials, budget, Pcs, Staff, PCs, ▪ Not done Plan in next semester
with VDCs, VLs, CCs and POs
relevant stakeholder
1.2.7 Provide training course on Leading ▪ Materials, budget, Pcs, Staff, PCs, ▪ PO conducted two days The remaining course will
& Managing Rural Organization to POs training on L&MRO to 1 CC, be conducted in next
VDCs, VLs and CCs (5courses) 8 VDC (3 women) and 1 VL semester

1.2.8 Provide training course on Project ▪ Materials, budget, Pcs, Staff, PCs, ▪ Not done To be conducted in next
Management to VDCs, VLs, CCs POs semester
(5 courses)
1.2.9 Provide training course on ▪ Materials, budget, Pcs, Staff, PCs, ▪ Not done To be conducted in next
Communication & Facilitation skill POs semester; however, staff
to VDCs, VLs and CCs (5courses) always coach VDCs, VLs &
CCs about facilitation skill
1.2.10 Organize 18 village meetings to ▪ Budget, materials ▪ Staff provided 18 half-day orienta-
conduct orientation on CD concept tions on CD concepts to 276 VP
to 300 vulnerable families from 18 villages.
1.2.11 Support local initiatives(community ▪ Materials, budget, Pcs, PCs, POs ▪ Provide technical and budget The committee gained more
meeting hall, community road, support to community initiative self confidence in planning
culverts, bridge…) new bridge construction and and resources mobilization
repairing new community
meeting halls and expanding People mobilize 710,000

148
the old one for meeting hall construction
▪ CWS granted 4,369,500 Riel
($USD 1,066) to constructed
4 new community meeting
halls and expand one
old meeting hall
Output 1.3:
Vulnerable families are able to plan and ▪ 54 VP families trained on household ▪ 90 VP were trained on families There are more VP than
manage household resources leading to planning and family assessment assessment and planning expected and most of them
to improve overall living condition expressed their high interest
to participate in the process
▪ 36 VP families in 18 villages are able to ▪ 67 VP developed their households Other 23 VP were in and out
develop their household and implement plan about home garden and the village that make staff
their household plan they were supported by CWS difficult to follow up
▪ 108 VDCs, VLs and interested villagers ▪ Not done Due to Cambodian-Thai
trained on family assessment border tension and
harvesting
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
1.3.1 Coordinate with VDC to select 54 ▪ Materials ▪ 90 VP were selected in coordina- 5 VP were selected from
VP families tion with VDC and VL through the each villages
process of participatory wealth
ranking
1.3.2 Provide 3 training courses on ▪ Budget, materials ▪ Staff conducted training course expressed their high interest
family assessment & household on household assessment and to participate in the process
planning to 54 vulnerable families planning to 90 VP in their own
respective villages
1.3.3 Cooperate with VDCs to assist 54 ▪ PC, budget ▪ Staff supported 67 VP to develop The remained in 23 VP com-
VP families to develop household their respective household plan mitted to develop their house-
planning ehold plan in next semester
1.3.4 Support & monitor 36 VP families ▪ PO/PC/CDW, materials, budget ▪ CWS distributed various 70 of them planted seed
to implement household plan vegetable seeds to 67 VP who
have their household plan and
23 VP who were selected

149
1.3.5 Support & encourage 36 vulnerable ▪ PO/PC/CDW, budget ▪ Staff meet 90 VP on a regular
families to implement household basis and encourage them
plan to improve their living condition
1.3.6 Conduct workshop on family asse- ▪ PC/CDW, budget, materials ▪ Not done Due to Cambodian-Thai
ssment to 108 community people border tension and
(VDCs, VLs, villagers) harvesting
Output 1.4:
Improve literacy and numeracy ▪ 12 literacy trained teacher(30%women) ▪ 12 literacy teachers (1 women) 4 literacy teachers completed
among 9 target communities are able to facilitate literacy class trained and 8 (1 woman) will only one module and this
manage the literacy classes make them not qualify enough
in next semester to facilitate the class.
▪ 100 literacy students (50% women) ▪ 34 literacy students (14 women) After they finished one book
are able to read, write and calculate of 2 classes finished book I they postpone because it's
number time for field activities and
▪ 8 literacy classes consist of 160 ▪ 2 classes are functioning the classes will start in
students (50% women) functioned Oct-09
▪ 300 people (200 students) participated ▪ Not done Time constraints
in International Day of Literacy
▪ 18 mobile libraries are functioned and ▪ 18 mobile libraries were set up in
benefited to 540 readers 18 villages with 600 readers

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation


1.4.1 Coordinate with District NFE officer ▪ Pc/CDW, budget ▪ Not done Classes did not start yet
to monitor 4 old literacy classes
and 8 new classes (12 classes)
1.4.2 Coordinate with VDC & literacy ▪ CDW, materials ▪ 56 illiterate people registered
teachers to identify and register for 3 classes
literacy students for 8 classes ▪ Two literacy classes with 34 1 classed was closed after
students( 28 women) opened opening for 1 week, because
and they finish book I which it number of students were
tooke for 3 months to complete decreased and teacher went
and 2 hours a day to live outside and far from
the village

150
1.4.3 Provide school materials for running ▪ CDW, Pc, budget, materials ▪ CWS provided materials to 3
8 literacy classes consist of 160 literacy classes
students (50% women)
1.4.4 Support stipend to 12 literacy ▪ CDW, Pc, budget ▪ Provide stipend to two literacy
teachers to process 12 literacy teachers (UDS 25/ teacher/
classes on a monthly basis. month including for recharging
battery twice a month)
1.4.5 Cooperate with District Education ▪ CDW/Pc/PO, budget, materials ▪ Not done He plans to meet them
Office conduct quarterly meeting in the next quarter
with literacy teachers (4times/year)
1.4.6 Cooperate with District Education ▪ CDW/Pc/PO, budget, materials ▪ Not done Time constraints
Office to organize International Day
of Literacy with 300 participants
1.4.7 Enhance 18 mobile libraries and ▪ CDW/Pc/PO, budget, materials ▪ 600 reading books cover In average about 10 people
provide education books to those topics such as home garden, read books per months
libraries for 540 readers malaria, dengue fever, drug
and HIV/Aids distributed to
18 libraries.
▪ 18 bookshelves made for 18
villages
1.4.8 Support District Education Officer ▪ CDW/Pc, budget ▪ One district education officer
to attend monthly meeting on NFE regularly attend NFE
in Phnom Penh meeting with other NGOs
in Phnom Penh since
Februray 2009

Theme 2: Meeting Basic Need and Building Self-reliant, Sustainable Livelihoods


OBJECTIVE
Improve access to basic social services and amenities and improve overall food security of vulnerable people.
Output 2.1
Improve overall community health ▪ 30 TBAs trained in education and coun- ▪ 30 TBAs trained in how to provide
status and individual health condition selling on pre & post natal care to the education and counselling on pre
communities & post natal care to communities

151
▪ 720 people from 18 villages were ▪ 559 people from 18 villages were
awared of birth spacing, mother & awared of mother & child health
child health care care
▪ 43 VHVs trained in education on prim- ▪ 14 VHVs in 3 communes trained Postponed the training
ary health care, avian, influenza, on primary health care, dengue in Yeang due to security
dengue fever and HIV/ AIDS to the fever, malaria, diarrhea and problem at the border tension
communities pneumonia
▪ 810 people are awared of HIV/ AIDS ▪ 270 people participated in World
and sexual transmitted diseases AIDS Day
prevention
▪ 810 people were aware of dengue ▪ 113 people from 3 villages More awareness raising
fever, malaria and avian influenza of Yeang commune attended will be conducted in next
prevention 3 half-day awareness raising semester
events on malaria, dengue,
AI prevention
▪ 300 people aware of HIV/AIDS ▪ 270 people participated in
through World AIDS Day World AIDS Day (183 students
(93 women) 55 villagers (28
women), 14 teachers (1
woman) and 18 government
officials)

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation


2.1.1 Cooperate with HC staff to provide ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Cooperated with HC to provide
refresher course to 30 TBAs refresher course to TBA
2.1.2 Support trained TBAs from 18 ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Support trained TBAs from 18
villages to provide awareness on villages to provide awareness
birth spacing, mother & child on mother & child health care
health care to 720 people (40p/vill)
2.1.3 Cooperate with HC staff to provide ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Staff provided 2-day refresher 2.1.3, 2.1.4, 2.1.5 were not
refresher training to 43 VHVs on course to 14 VHV (8 women) done due to boarder tension
HIV/ AIDS, dengue fever, malaria on diarrhea, dengue fever between Cambodia and
and primary health care and acute respiratory disease Thailand

152
2.1.4 Support VHVs to provide awareness ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Not done
on HIV/AIDS & STD to 810 people
from 18 villages
2.1.5 Support VHVs to provide awareness ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Supported VHV providing awaren-
on primary health care, malaria, ess raising on primary health care
dengue fever and avian influenza to pregnant women and lactating
prevention to 810 people from mothers
18 villages
2.1.6 Cooperate with HC/OD to organize ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Cooperated with district authority Due to time constraints
World AIDS Day with participation and OD to organize a World only one commune was
of 300 people AIDS Day campaign able to get the campaign

Output 2.2
Improve knowledge and practice of ▪ 1,100 families applied nutritious food ▪ 450 people (430 mothers) partici- Postponed the training
target communities on nutrition, and for children and family members after pated in awareness raising on in Yeang due to security
health status of malnourished under awareness raising on nutrition and how to feed problem at the border and
5 year children. children harvesting
▪ 14 VHVs (8 women) trained on
primary health care
▪ 26 VHVs (15 women) refreshed
their understanding on
nutrition and MCH activities
▪ 270 malnourished children under 5 ▪ 450 children have accessed to
years old have better health nutritious food prepared by their
mother and VHVs
▪ 523 children under 2 years old
(265 girls) have better health
through MCH commodities
▪ 121 lactating mother, 128
pregnant women and 43 VHVs
(25 women) have better health
through MCH commodities
▪ With supported WFP, 22,737kg Food delivery to 6 villages

153
of CSB, 18,298kg of rice, 2,849kg in Yeang commune
of sugar and 1,207kg of oil were was not done from August
distributed to 523 children under to November 08 because of
5 years (265 girls), 498 mothers road condition was so bad
of infants, 121 lactating mothers
and 128 pregnant women and
43 VHV (25 women)

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation


2.2.1 Provide refresher training on ▪ PO, CDW, budget ▪ In cooperation with HC provided 2.2.1 & 2.2.2 wasn't done
nutrition to 43 VHVs a 2-day training course on prima- in Yeang commune due to
ry health care to VHV border tension between
Cambodia and Thailand
▪ Staff conducted a 2-day
refresher training course on
nutrition VHVs
2.2.2 Support VHVs to provide education ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Supported VHV in providing
nutrition to 1,100 families in education to 370 mothers who
18 villages participated in CSB distribution
2.2.3 Cooperate with VHVs to provide ▪ CDW, budget, seed ▪ CWS provided seed to 105 We target only the most
seeds to parents of 270 children parents whose children <5 years malnourished children in this
under 5 to improve nutrient food semester
supply
2.2.4 Coordinate with VHVs to provide ▪ PO, CDW, budget ▪ Cooperated with mothers and
nutrient food to improve health of VHVs prepared nutrition food and
270 children under 5 in 18 villages feed 450 children < 5
2.2.5 Cooperate with VHVs to provide ▪ CDW, budget ▪ Cooperated with VHV in providing
ingredients of nutrition food for ingredients such as egg, oil,
mother of malnourished children vegetable and meat for preparing
under 5 years in each village
Output 2.3
Improve access to safe water and ▪ 180 families from 11 villages benefited ▪ 16 open well constructed which Villagers can use this water
household sanitation to reduce from 25 open wells construction benefited to 160 households for growing vegetable

154
incidence of water-born diseases ▪ 15 wells committees are able to ▪ 16 well committees were fromed
in target communities maintain & repair 15 hand pumps
▪ 90 families from 7 villages benefited ▪ 8 Han pump constructed in 7
from 8 hand pumps construction villages benefited to 64 families
▪ One hand pump constructed
in Choam Khsant high school
benefited 200 students and 9
teachers
▪ 240 families benefited from 35 well ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
aprons construction
▪ 30 families benefit from 8 family ponds ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
▪ 200 VP families can access to clean ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
water from 200 bio-sand filters
▪ 900 families from 18 villages improved ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
water and sanitation condition
▪ 50 families from 18 villages benefited ▪ 12 latrines constructed and
from 50 latrines benefited to 60 families
▪ 750 school children & teachers from ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
3 secondary & primary schools drink
clean water from 15 biosand filters
▪ 750 school children and teachers ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
from 3 schools improved hygiene &
sanitation
▪ 12 HC staff of 2 Health Centers can ▪ One health center receive 2 Planned in next semester
access to clean water from 2 biosand biosand filetr
filters
▪ 300 people are aware of clean water ▪ 160 people ( 110 women) They know about water
using through participation in World participated in Word Water scarcity and what they
Water Day Day they can do to make water
clean
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
2.3.1 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW, budget ▪ Staff cooperated with VDCs to
families who will benefit from 30 select 160 families to benefit from

155
open wells construction 16 open wells
2.3.2 Cooperate with VDCs to construct ▪ CDW, materials, Pc ▪ Work with VDC to select hand Border tension make it hard
25 open wells for 180 families in pump beneficiaries to complete as planned
11 villages
2.3.3 Cooperate with VDCs to form & ▪ CDW, materials, Pc ▪ Cooperate with VDC to form Training to well committees
train well committees well committee will be done in next semester
2.3.4 Construct 8 hand pumps for 90 ▪ CDW, materials, Pc ▪ 8 hand pumps constructed for
families in 7 villages (drilling and community and 1 for high school
installation hand pump)
2.3.5 Cooperate with VDCs to select 240 ▪ CDW, materials, Coordinators Planned in next semester
families to benefit from 35 well
apron construction
2.3.6 Support materials to 240 families to ▪ CDW, materials, budget ▪ Support cements to upgrade 9
well aprons in 4 villages
upgrade 40 wells aprons
2.3.7 Coordinate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
families who benefit from 8 family
ponds
2.3.8 Support FFW to 30 families to dig ▪ CDW, materials, Pc ▪ Not done Due to border tension and
8 family ponds rain started early
2.3.9 Coordinate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Work with VDC to select VP Planned in next semester
vulnerable families to benefit to benefit from biosand filter
from biosand water filters
2.3.10 Coordinate with VDCs to provide ▪ CDW, materials, Pc ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
education on water filter mainte-
nace to 200 VP families
2.3.11 Support 200 families in constru- ▪ CDW, materials, molds, PO ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
cting bio-sand filter
2.3.12 Support and cooperate with VHVs ▪ CDW, materials, PO ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
to educate clean water & sanitation
to 900 people from 18 villages
2.3.13 Cooperate with VDCs to select 50 ▪ CDW, materials, ring molds, Pc, PO ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
people from 18 villages to construct

156
latrines
2.3.14 Support 50 families to construct ▪ CDW, materials, molds, Pc, PO ▪ CWS support 2 families to cont' next semester
50 household latrines construct 2 latrines.
2.3.15 Cooperate with District Education ▪ CDW, materials, Pc, PO ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
Office to identify number of school
to receive water filters
2.3.16 Support teachers to construct 15 ▪ CDW, materials, molds, Pc, PO ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
bio-sand filters for 3 schools with
750 teachers and students
2.3.17 Cooperate with HC to educate ▪ CDW, materials, Pc, PO ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
clean water to 750 teachers &
students
2.3.18 Support HC staff to construct 2 ▪ CDW, materials, molds, Pc, PO ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
bio-sand filters for 2 HC
2.3.19 Cooperate with HC to organize ▪ CDW, materials, Pc, PO ▪ Cooperated with HC to organize
World Water Day with 300 World Water Day
participants

Output 2.4
Children of vulnerable families have ▪ 90 school children (60% girls) from ▪ 90 school children (49 girls) from
the necessary materials to attend vulnerable families are encouraged 11 primary schools in 18 target
primary schools to attend school by providing school villages of 4 communes received
necessary materials school materials
▪ 80% of 90 supported children ▪ Not done Data will be collected in nex
(50 girls) passed grade semester
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
2.4.1 Cooperate with VDCs to select 90 ▪ CDW, PC, PO ▪ Staff cooperated with VDCs to
children(60%girls) from VP families select 90 children from poor
to receive educational materials families to receive school
materials from CWS
2.4.2 Provide educational materials to ▪ Budget, education material package ▪ Staff cooperated with VDCs
90 children of VP families and teachers provided school
(60% girls) materials to the children

157
2.4.3 Cooperate with teachers & VDCs to ▪ CDW ▪ Staff talked to parents to encour-
motivate parents' children to enco- age their children to school
urage their children to attend
school
2.4.4 Cooperate with teachers to monitor ▪ CDW ▪ Staff cooperated with teachers
study situation of 90 supported to support and monitor the
children selected school children
Output 2.5
Improve agricultural productions, food ▪ At least 70% of 108 livestock trained ▪ 38 families from 6 villages trained Due to border tension and
security and house hold income among families improved their livestock on chicken and duck raising and harvest season, more traini-
vulnerable people, self-help/interest raising technique and increased and 20 trainees received 500 ngs will be conducted in next
group in target communities number of livestocks ducklings semester
▪ At least 60% of 54 fish raising trained ▪ 33 people from 12 villages trained Fingerlings will be distributed
families start to raise fishes on fish raising in 3rd quarter 2009
▪ 24 SRI trained farmers practiced SRI ▪ Not done Border tension
techniques in their paddy field
▪ At least 90% of 96 trained farmers on ▪ 190 of 195 households planted
home garden have home garden in their vegetable
their plots ▪ 50 families in 12 villages received Staff planted seeds at the
180 mangos and 20 jack fruit tree office during free time
▪ 18 selected demo farmer (9 in FY08) ▪ 3 new model farmers were No model farmer guideline
implement IFM with technical/ selected designed
materials/ seeds from CWS
▪ At least 60% of 270 participants improve▪ Not done No IFM guideline designed
knowledge on IFM yet
▪ 34 SHG with 408 members formed ▪ 188 interest villagers (127 Due to Cambodian-Thai
and functioned women) in 12 village were border tension and
introduced SHG concept harvesting that the project
▪ 2 SHGs were formed with could not reach the planned
29 members (24 women) target
▪ 102 member of 34 SHG committees ▪ Not done Due to Cambodian-Thai
are able to prepare bookkeeping and border tension and
maintain the group performance harvesting

158
▪ 18 SHG (8 SHG in FY08) used CWS' ▪ Not done The formed SHG did not
WCA to run business for increasing function yet
their family income
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
2.5.1 Cooperate with VDCs to select vul- ▪ CDW ▪ Staff cooperated with VDCs to The training conducted in
nerable families for animal raising select 38 people for chicken planting season, The rest
training courses(108 families) and duck raising training will provide next semester
2.5.2 Provide 7 training on fowl alternat- ▪ Budget, CDW, Pc ▪ PC and staff conducted 1-day More training will be in next
ive livestock raising to 108 families training course on chicken semester as time due to
and duck raising to 38 people border tension and harvesting
and provided 500 ducklings to 2 model farmers get 100
20 families ducklings to raise
2.5.3 Provide vaccines of livestock to ▪ Budget ▪ Vaccinated 400 ducklings against 100 ducklings died after
108 trained families (Vaccines) new castle disease one months long raised
2.5.4 Cooperate with VDCs to select 54 ▪ CDW ▪ Staff cooperated with VDCs The training conducted in
families for fish raising training selected 33 families in 12 planting season, The rest
courses villages for fish raising training will provide next semester
2.5.5 Provide 2 fish raising training ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Staff provided 3 fish raising
courses to 54 families training courses to 33 families
▪ No done in this semester too. During that period, staffs of
PVH project are not working
regularly in the target
because of the conflict
between Khmer-Thai soldier
2.5.6 Provide fingerlings & materials to ▪ Fingerling, pond construction ▪ Not done In high raining season
54 trained families materials the trained beneficiaries
did not raise fish yet
2.5.7 Cooperate with VDCs to select 24 ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Not done Time constraints due to
families for SRI training border tension
2.5.8 Provide training on SRI to 24 farmers▪ Budget, CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Not done See 2.5.7
2.5.9 Support 24 families to practice SRI ▪ Budget, CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Not done See 2.5.7
in their field
2.5.10 Cooperate with VDCs to select 96 ▪ CDW ▪ Staff cooperated with VCD

159
families for home garden training selected 90 vulnerable families
to receive vegetable seed
2.5.11 Provide 4 training on home garden- ▪ Budget,CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Staff provide instruction to Formal training will be
ing to 96 families single 195 family on vegetable provided in next semester
planting techniques
2.5.12 Provide vegetable seed & materials ▪ Budget, CDW ▪ Staff distributed vegetable 70 families have harvested
to 96 trained families seeds to 90 VP in 18 villages their vegetable for
consumptions and selling
▪ Provide vegetable seed to The provision is made due
105 mothers with under to those 105 mothers have
five children in 7 villages to severe malnourish
promote their 105 children under 5
malnourished children
2.5.13 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Staff cooperated with VDCs No model farmer guideline
9 model famers selected 3 new model farmers designed
2.5.14 Provide IFM training to 18 model ▪ Budget, CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Not done During that period, staffs of
famers (9 in FY08) PVH project are not working
regularly in the target
because of the conflict
between Khmer-Thai soldier
2.5.15 Provide seed and materials to ▪ Seed, fingerlings… and other materials ▪ Staff provided seed to 3 model See 2.5.14
18 demo farmers farmers and provided 100
duckling to 2 of them
2.5.16 Conduct 9 Farming Days in 9 diffe- ▪ Budget, CDW, Pc ▪ Not done See 2.5.14
rent places for 270 families in
cooperation with PDoA
2.5.17 Support to form 34 new SHGs ▪ CDW ▪ PC and project staff conducted Due to Cambodian-Thai
and stationeries awareness raising on SGH border tension and
concept to 188 interested harvesting thus the project
villagers (127 women) in 12 could not reach the planned
villages. target
▪ 2 SHGs were formed with
29 members (24 women)
2.5.18 Provide 5 training courses on book ▪ Budget, CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Provided on course on bookkeep- 2 SHG are functioning

160
keeping to 34 group with 102 ing to 12 SHG committee mem-
committee members bers of 2 SHG
2.5.19 Provide WCA to 18 groups ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator, CWS Not done SHGs are not evaluated
(10 SHGs in FY08) WCA (Loan)
2.5.20 Cooperate with VDC to select 15 ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Not done Due to Cambodian-Thai
VP families for small business border tension
2.5.21 Grant support to 15 VP families for ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator, budget ▪ Two VP families were decided One family used the money
small business by togive as grant to start small to salling cakes and another
business used for buying vegetable
or fish to sale in the villages.

Theme 3: Strengthening Civil Society


OBJECTIVE
Strengthen target community understand and practice peace building and restorative justice
Output 3.1
Community key persons (CCs, VDCs, ▪ 104 VDC, VL, VHV & CPV trained on ▪ 9 CPV introduced their roles and
VLs, elderly, monk) play an active role in Peace Concepts responsibilities
peace building, responding to conflict & ▪ 11 VDC, 6 VL and 2 CPV trained 3 more courses will be
utilizing LCP approaches in their on peace concept conducted in next semester
communities ▪ 18 VDC, trained on LCP ▪ Not done Due to Cambodian-Thai
▪ 24 CCs strengthened capacity on ▪ Not done border tension
Peace Building
▪ 20 CPV strengthened capacity on LCP ▪ 18 CCs ( 2women) received 3 Training provided in Jan 09
days training on LCP by program staff
intorduction from 4 communes
▪ 24 CCs trained in accountability ▪ Not done Will be conducted after
training to staff
▪ 10 project staffs trained in account- ▪ 9 staff ( 2 women) trained on
ability Anti-corruption
▪ 300 people increased knowledge on ▪ In collaboration with District Focus on the history of
how to reduce domestic violence in Women Affairs, organize Interna- Women Affairs work together
their communities tional Women Day with 178 to stop all forms of violence
persons comprising of (105 against women and children

161
▪ villagers, 60 secondary school It is the first time for them to
students (41 girls), 1 CC (woman) participate in that event
2 VLs, 1 DoWA (woman) and in the district at commune
1 Vice District Governor level

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation


3.1.1 Conduct 5 training courses on ▪ Budget, materials, Peace Pc, PC, ▪ PC-Peace in coordination with Peace training could not be
Peace Concept to key people Team A, Team B project staff provided a 3-day conducted in Yeang
(1course for CPV, 4 courses for training course on peace commune
VDC, VL) concept to VDC, VL and CPV
3.1.2 Provide 2 training courses on LCPs ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, Pc, ▪ Not done 3.1.2-3.1.8 was not done
to VDCs, CPVs Team A, Team B due to boarder tension be-
tween Cambodia and
3.1.3 Provide refresher training on peace ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, Pc, ▪ Not done Thailand
building to 24 CCs Team A, Team B
3.1.4 Provide training on LCP to 24 CCs ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, Pc, ▪ Provided a 3 day training on LCP
Team A, Team B introduction to CC
3.1.5 Provide 3 days training on ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, ERP PC ▪ Not done Will be conducted after
Accountability to 24 CCs training to staff
3.1.6 Cooperate with DoWA to organize Budget, materials, Peace PC, PC, ▪ Not done
White Ribbon campaign CDW
3.1.7 Cooperate with DoWA to organize ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, PC, ▪ Cooperated with DoWA to organ-
International Women Days with CDW ize International Women Day
300 people
3.1.8 Cooperate with CC in Yeang to ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, PC, ▪ Not done see 3.1.2 above
provide 2 trainings courses on CDW
gender to 42 VDC and VL
3.1.9 Coordinate with DoEYS to organize ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, PC, ▪ Not done
International Children days with CDW
250 people (180 students)
3.1.10 Provide Peace books to 3 schools ▪ Budget, Peace PC, Pc, ▪ Provided 222 books related to They enjoy reading
in target areas CDW peace to 3 schools with 657 stud- the books
ents (328 girls) and 30 teachers

162
(8 women)
▪ Provided 39 books related to It is unplanned but CWS staff
Khmer art and culture to 3 schools have asked these books
from Reyum Art Institute
3.1.111 Coordinate with DoWA to provide 3 ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, Pc, ▪ Not done But the concept of domestic
training courses on Domestic CDW violence was integrated into
Violence to 75 VDC, VL in 3 peace related training courses
communes
3.1.12 Support 4 people to join Peace ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, Pc, ▪ CWS supported two CPVs
related activities in Phnom Penh CDW (one woman) to attend
(dhammayietra, white ribbon day…) Youth and Reconciliation
conference organized by YFP
▪ Support 10 people from
Choam Khsant ( 2 VL, 3 CC,
3 CPV, 2 VDCs) to participate in
5 day peace walk in Prey Veng

Theme 4: Emergency Response and Preparedness


OBJECTIVE
To ensure meeting basic needs of the most vulnerable people and victims of the emergency in the provinces are met (prioritizing the target
communities) and to enhance community capacity to prepare and respond disaster within their communities.

Output 4.1
Red Cross Volunteers (RCVs) are ▪ 36 RCV trained on CBDRR and plan- ▪ 20 RCVs trained on CBDRM and Yeang commune wasn't
actively functioning, and commune and ing are able to conduct HVCA in their planning conducted due to rainfall
village disaster preparedness plans villages (4day, 2courses)
developed and implemented in target ▪ 18 villages have HVCA ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
communities ▪ 18 villages have disaster prepared ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
plan integrated into the existing village
development plan
▪ 8 CCDM member, 18VL trained on ▪ Not done CCDM was not formed yet
CBDRR and planning (1couses)
▪ CCDM quarterly meeting conducted ▪ Not done CCDM was not formed yet
regularly with the participation of at

163
least 20 member (commune chief,
VL, Chief of cluster school, HC, RCV,
commune of police)
▪ At least 720 people in 18 villages (40 ▪ Not done Due to border tension, staff
people /village) raised awareness on could not support RCVs to
disaster preparedness by 18 public conduct awareness raising
event (1 in each village) by RCV
▪ At least 2 villages implement DRR ▪ Not done Planned in next semester
measure under leadership of RCV &
VDCs
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
4.1.1 Provide training on CBDRR, HVCA ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW, ERP ▪ Staff conducted a 3-day training 1 course in Yeang commune
and planning to 36 RCV (2 courses Pro. course on CBDRM and planning will be conducted in next
1 in Yeang and 1 at office) to 20 RCVs quarter
4.1.2 Support 36 RCV in conducting ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW ▪ RCV had planned but not done No HVCA support material
HVCA in their respective villages in and due to border tension
association with VLs and VDC.
4.1.3 Assist RCV to develop disaster ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW ▪ Not done No HVCA result yet
preparedness plan integrating into
VDP
4.1.4 Provide training on CBDRR and ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, PO, CDW ▪ Not done No CCDM was formed yet
planning to VLs and CCDM
4.1.5 Organize semester full member ▪ Budget, materials, CDW ▪ Not done No CCDM was formed yet
meeting of CCDM
4.1.6 Support RCV to provide awareness ▪ Budget, materials, CDW ▪ RCV had planned but not Due to border tension, staff
on DRR to 720 interested people done could not support RCVs to
conduct awareness raising
4.1.7 Support RCV to provide echo ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, PO, CDW ▪ RCV had planned but not done see 4.1.6.
training on Disaster Preparedness
to key interested people in their
respective villages.
4.1.8 Support RCV & VDC to implement ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, PO, CDW ▪ RCV and VDC have not identified See 4.1.3.
micro project in at least 2 villages micro project yet.

164
Output 4.2
Improve capacity of RCV to provide ▪ 36 RCVs are equipped first Aid kit ▪ Not done All RCVs have already
first aid services to emergency equipped the kit by CRC
victims and most vulnerable people
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
4.2.1 Coordinate with CRC to provide ▪ Budget, materials, ERP Program ▪ Not done All RCVs have already
refresher training on CBFA and equipped the kit by CRC
support first aid kids to 36 RCVs
Output 4.3
Respond to basic needs of vulnerable ▪ 270 families received emergency kits ▪ 3 most vulnterable families in Srae The amount and kinds of
people and disaster victims of emergen- when there is emergency strike village received 25kg of rice, one the materials are different
cy in a timely manner and ensure their their life and well-being 30 liter bucket, 1 liter of vegetable from village depend on the
lives with dignity and well being. oil, 1 bottle of fish sauce, 2kg of situation of eah family
salt, 1 mosquito net, 0.5kg of
soap power and 10 canned fish
▪ 3 most vulnerable families in Veal
Thum village received 25kg of rice,
1 liter of vegetable oil, 1 bottle of
fish sauce, 2kg of salt, 1 mosqui-
to net, 0.5kg of soap powder, 1
sarong, 1 krama, 1 digging hoe,
5 canned fish
▪ 3 most vulnerable families in
Kouk Sralau village received 30
liter bucket, 1 mosquito net, 0.5kg
of soap powder, 6 canned fish, 1
bottle of fish sauce, 1kg of sugar,
1 liter of vegetable oil, and 1 kettle

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation


4.3.1 Coordinate with VDCs, VLs, RCV ▪ Materials, Pc, CDW, ERP Pro ▪ Not done No emergency/disaster
to conduct assessment and select occurs

165
victim families of Emergency
4.3.2 Distribute the emergency response ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW, ERP Pro. ▪ Staff supported ERP team to It is unpredictable
kit to victims of disaster or most conduct need assessment of IDP
vulnerable people. at border conflict and distributed
emergency assistance
4.3.3 Cooperate with PRC to support ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW, ERP ▪ Identified most vulnerable families
budget or emergency kits to victim Pro. and provide the emergency
families in target district/ province assistance

Theme 5a: Project Development, Management and Supervision


OBJECTIVE
Effective and efficient program management and functioning; enhance community development planning and practice
Output 5.1a
Monitor and support field staff and ▪ Monthly project monitoring on: ▪ 2 program officers conducted 2 program officers were
field operation in appropriate manner 12 project implementation activities at least 12 on-going field visits assigned to support field
10 staff performance within 12 months office on a regular basis by
▪ 3 monthly staff meetings spending about 2 weeks of
conducted within 6 months each PO at PVH
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
5.1.1a Field visit of Program Officers ▪ POs ▪ 2 program officers monitored
to monitor Project Coordinator the project on a monthly basis
and CDW performance and provide necessary support
to make the project become
effective
5.1.2a Monthly meeting to reflect the • POs, Pc, CDW ▪ PO and PC conducted regular Some times it was done
work implementation and see monthly reflection meeting with weekly
the strength and weaknesses & all staff
develop plan for next month

166
Church World Service Cambodia
Logical Framework Report FY09
Project Name: Svay Rieng Water and Sanitation Cooperation Project

Narrative Summary Objectively Verifiable Indicators Actual Output Variance/Explanation


Overall Objective:
To expand the coverage of improved water supplies and sanitation facilities to underserved population of Romeas Haek and Rumduol District,
Svay Rieng Province, and to improve health and hygiene practices related to water borne diseases and sanitation.

Theme 1: Capacity Building for Development Planning

OBJECTIVE
Develop community capacity to engage with Government institutions define their development direction and manage their affairs in
a participatory and democratic manner

Output 1.1:
Enhance program coordination • At least 2 coordination meetings • 4 coordination meetings with • Cooperation was finished acco-
with sectoral forums: provincial with PDRD, PDEYs, PDoH PDRD was conducted to rding to CWS has no support
(PDRD, PDEYs, PDoH, PDAFF), PDAFF discuss cooperation budget for PDRD staff's
district authorities and CCs. agreement allowance which was requested
by PDRD after MoU for FY09
was signed
• 4 coordination meetings with • The Director of PDRD join the
PDRD were conducted to World Water day celebration
discuss World Water day and CWS donor meeting; and
celebration, CWS donor meet- feel happy with the significant
ing and report the progress of achivement of CWS
program implementation
• 1 coordination meeting with • The Dirctor of PDoA approved
PDoA to discuss on Home to send 2 technical staff to
Gardening training provide training on home
gardening to villagers
• 3 coordination meeting with • Discuss and collect data on

167
Head of Health Center in CWS Health issue before and during
target areas CWS program implemented
• Attended 3 meetings related to • CWS is a member of WatSan
Water and Sanitation program Group recognized in the
which organized by Government provincial and national level
Official
▪ 4 coordination meetings with • 3 coordination meeting with • The District Governor join and
district authorities (2times/ district) District Governors to discuss support CWS to celebrate
World Water Day celebration World Water Day
and training on Local Capacity
for Peace
▪ 20 coordination meetings with CCs • 5 coordination meetings • Commune Councilors request
(4 times/ commune) conducted in 5 communes CWS to continue the program
on CWS's exit plan in their communes
• 3 coordination meeting with • Commune Councilors approve
Commune Councils to discuss to send Village Leaders to join
on Local Capacity Training the LCP training

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Explanation


1.1.1 Attend meetings /relationship • Project Coordinator, Program Officer • Attended 3 meetings related to
with provincial department and WaSan program which organi-
other relevant offices (PDRD, zed by Government Official
PDAFF, PDEYs, PDoH) • 1 coordination meeting with
PDoA to discuss on Home
Gardening training
• 3 coordination meeting with
Head of Health Center in CWS
target areas
1.1.2 Organize semester meeting with • Budget, Pc, PO • 3 coordination meeting with
district authorities and related District Governors to discuss
district officers to share the on World Water day celebration
achievements and planning for and training on Local Capacity
and next semester / year for Peace
1.1.3 Conduct quarterly meeting with • Budget, Pc, PO • CCs, VLs,WSUGs 38(F8)

168
Commune Councils in 5 attended meeting in Bos Mon,
commune to strengthen the Pong Toeuk, Daung and Tras
coordination and supporting commune hall of RomeasHek
and Rumduol districts
• 3 coordination meeting with
Commune Councils to discuss
on Local Capacity Training
1.1.4 Project Coordinator met repre- • Pc, CDW • PM and PC conducted 4
sentative or director of PDRD to coordination discussion with
strengthen the implementation PDRD Director on MoU
of WatSan activities in target • Conduct 4 coordination meetings
communities with PDRD to discuss World
Water Day, CWS donor meeting
meeting and report the progress
of program implementation
1.1.5 Monthly meeting with CWS • Pc, CDWs, Budget • 11 monthly meetings conducted • Monthly rotate from commune
staff, PDRD staff and CDFs with 7 CWS staff and 6 CDFs to commune to discuss about
for quality program implemented the progress and challenges
of program implementation

Output 1.2: • 75 CCs & VLs (40% women) train • 3 CC (1 W), 29 VL (3W), 202 • Village Development Planning
Strengthen leadership among local CD concept WSUG members (83 women) and Simple Proposal Writing
partners to better understand the from 42 villages in 5 communes course was provided instead of
community structures and better were introduced village proposal CD Concept as it is necessary
implementation of community development through 8 training after CWS exit from the village
development process and principle. courses
• 75 CCs & VLs (40% women) • 109 WSUG members (44
trained in leading and managing women) from 27 villages in 5
rural organization communes trained on Leading
and Managing Rural Organization

169
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Explanation
1.2.1 Provide 3 training courses on • Pc, PO, Materials and Budget • Provided 4 trainings on Leading
Leading and Managing Rural and Managing Rural Organizat-
Organization to 35 CCs, 40 VLs tion to 109 WSUG members
from 20 villages in 5 communes. (44 women) from 27 villages
1.2.2 Provide 3 training courses on • PO, Pc, Materials, Budget • Project staff provided 8 training
CD Concept to 35 CCs, 40 VLs courses on Village Development
from 20 villages in 5 communes & Simple Proposal Writing
3 CC (1 woman), 29 VL (3
women), 202 WSUG members
(83 women) from 42 villages in
5 communes.

Output 1.3
Vulnerable families are better able to • 60 vulnerable people from 20 • 120 vulnerable families were
plan and manage household villages in 5 communes trained in coached on household planning
resources. developing & implementing house-
hold planning

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Explanation


1.3.1 Support CDFs in monitoring 60 • CWS staff • Coached 120 families on house- • The vulnerable families have
vulnerable families on household hold planning home gardening around their
planning practice • Provide vegetable seeds for home yard
home gardening with technical
support from PDoA and follow
up support from CDFs
Output 1.5:
Successful withdrawal of CWS • 20 VLs & 10 CCs are able to • CWS is still continuing the • It will be phased out next year
from selected communities; continue WatSan activities in 20 WatSan activities in the target
hand-over of selected programming handed over villages areas due to the needs and
to local actors (CCs, and VLs) request from communities; And
the data collection is done to
preparing for phase out

170
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Explanation
1.5.1 Conduct workshop to review • PM, PO, PC, Pc, CDW, Budget • The WatSan guideline was • All guidelines and translate in
all guideline related to WatSan reviewed with Program Officer English
program of Monitiring and Evaluation;
Program Manager, Program
Coordinator and Field staff
1.5.2 Coordinate with VL, CCs, WSUG • PO, PC, Pc, CDW, Budget • Instead of assets counting, 36 • 36 village plan on WatSan
PDRD to join assets count for Village Leader particupate in develop and submit to CWS
handing over in 20 villages developing village plan for Water
activities
1.5.3 Coordinate with PDRD to hand • PM, PO, PC, Pc, CDW, Budget • Instead of handing over meeting • More needed on bio-sand filters
over CWS' assets to CCs and 1,909 villagers (1,109 women)
20 VLs to manage from 36 villages attended in
village develop planning meeting

Theme 2: Meeting basic need and building self-reliant, sustainable livelihoods


OBJECTIVE
Improve access to basic social services and amenities and improve overall food security of vulnerable people
Output 2.3 • 40 hand pumps constructed and • Hand pump is cancelled due to •
Improved access to safe water and benefit to 120 families in 20 villages the cooperation between CWS
household sanitation; reduce and PDRD is finished and the
incidence of water borne diseases primary needs of the community
in the target communities are latrine
• 50 hand pumps upgraded and • This plan is cancelled and • No cooperation agreement
benefit to 50 families in 20 villages instead of hand pump the with PDRD anymore
project add the number of
household latrine
• 20 WSUG established with 100 • 24 WSUG were formed in 24 • More than planned as 4 WSUGs
members (40% women) to maintain villages with 120 members (56 are the outstanding from FY08.
repair & provide education on water women)
& sanitation among communities • 10 trainings on Role and Respo- • More than planned to Build the
nsibility of WSUG were provided capacity of WSUG members to
to 228 WSUG members (107 understand their role and

171
women) from 56 villages of reponsibility on WatSan activities
5 communes in their community
• 800 families benefit directly from • 12 bio-sand filters constructed • It is difficult to construct in rainy
800 bio-sand filter construction and benefited to 13 teachers season as well as the suppliers
(3 women) and 460 students cannot bring construction
(226 girls) in 3 primary schools materials to the target areas due
and 1 kindergarten to road condition
• 892 bio-sand filters constructed • More needed from school as
which benefited to 4,203 people the teachers and students
(1,959 women) including 1,441 understad the important of safe
children (671 girls), 6 monks, drinking water
2 laymen. • More needed from communities
as people understant the
important of safe drinking water
• 1000 educated people will have • 2 communities awareness on • Less than planned due to the
good health by using safe water & hygiene and sanitaion to 119 the project prioritised on building
practicing family & individual people (83 women) from 2 capacity of WSUG members
hygiene villages on their role and reponsibility,
• 60 families benefit from 60 latrines • 170 household latrines constru- • More than planned due to the
construction cted benefitted to 170 hhs with needed and understand on
809 members (425 women) impact of open defication
including 229 children (129 girls)
• 8 community awareness on
latrine operation, maintanance
and sanitation provided to 165
people
• At least 110 families trained on • No well construction.
well maintenance and pump
repairing (120 from hand pump
construction & 50 families from
upgrading wells)
• 480 school children and 20 teachers • 7 trainings on hygiene and • More than planned as the project
from total of 775 school children & sanitation to 45 teachers (8 add 2 new primary school
25 teachers practice using clean women) and 910 school

172
water regularly after receiving children (455 girls) in 7 primary
education schools in 4 communes
• 300 people participated in World • 218 people incduding district • Government supported
Water Day governor, PDRD director, CWS
staff and CDF; and 100 school
children join World Water Day
celebraton

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Explanation


2.3.1 Collaborate with PDRD and local • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Provide 10 trainings on Role &
authorities to orient role, Responsibility to 228 WSUG
responsibility and how important members (107 women)
of WSUG to people in target vill.
2.3.2 Collaborate with PDRD and local • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Staff, CDF and VL facilitated
authorities to facilitate the WSUG the election of 24 WSUGs in
election in 20 target villages. 24 villages in 3 communes
2.3.3 Collaborate with PDRD to • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Provide training on Role and
provide training on role and Responsibility to WSUG
responsibilities of WSUG and
WatSan Action Plan to WSUG
members in 20 villages
2.3.4 Collaborate with PDRD and local • Pc, CDW, Documents • Staff in cooperation with VL, CC
authorities in selecting beneficia- and CDF selected 710 bio-sand
ries to benefit from 40 hand filter beneficiaries and 140 latrine
pumps, 50 well aprons, 800 beneficiaries through village
bio-sand filters and 60 latrines planning and need assessment
process with villagers
2.3.5 Collaborate with PDRD in • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Well construction is instead of There are more well in the
constructing new 40 hand household latrine communities but less latrine
wells which benefited to 180
families
2.3.6 Collaborate with PDRD to • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Well construction is instead of
repair and upgrade 50 wells household latrine
which benefited to 50 families

173
in 20 villages
2.3.7 Collaborate with PDRD to select • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Staff, CDF and VL selected 710
800 people to construct and bio-sand filter beneficiaries and
demonstrate 800 bio-sand filters installed 10 bio-sand filters for
in 20 villages 10 families
2.3.8 Collaborate with PDRD to • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Staff, CDF and VL select 140
motivate 60 people to construct latrine beneficiaries in 20 village
60 latrines in 20 villages in 5 communes.
2.3.9 Collaborate with PDRD to • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Not done and instead of this
educate 110 people on well activities, the project select
maintenance, clean water used more beneficiries of hosehold
and sanitation latrine and biosand water filter
2.3.10 Collaborate with PDRD to • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Staff provided 6 awareness • 20 more beneficiaries will be
provide training on latrines courses on latrine operation and trained in next semester
construction, latrines use and maintenance to 120 selected
maintenance to 60 families beneficiaries in 19 villages of 5
communes
• 2 tarining on latrine use and
maitenance; and sanitation to
45 people (26 women)
2.3.11 Collaborate with PDRD to • Pc, CDW, Budget • Staff and CDF provided 1 training • More training will be done before
provide training on bio-sand course on bio-sand filter constr- filter construction in next
filter installation, how to use and uction and maintenance to 22 semester
maintenance bio-sand filter to (8 women) beneficiaries
800 families from 20 villages • 27 courses on biosand water • More than planned as needed
filter use and maintenance; and from communities
sanitation to 891 people (285
women from 22 villages in
5 communes
2.3.12 Collaborate with PDRD to • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • 2 communities awareness on • Less than planned due to the
educate 1000 people from 20 hygiene and sanitaion to 119 the project prioritised on building
villages on Water and Sanitation people (83 women) from 2 capacity of WSUG members
villagesof Koki commune on their role and reponsibility,
2.3.13 Collaborate with PDRD to • CDW, Budget, Materials • 7 trainings on hygiene and • More than planned as the project

174
provide awareness on WatSan sanitation to 45 teachers (8 add 2 new primary school
to 800 teachers and school women) and 910 school
children (25 teachers) from children (455 girls) in 7 primary
5 schools in target areas schools in 4 communes
2.3.14 Collaborate with PDRD and • CDW, Pc, Budget, Materials • Field saff collaborate with CDFs • Less than plan as the other
teachers to monitor and monitor WatSan practice in one school is just provided bio-sand
evaluate on WatSan practice primary school which comprise filter in June
in 5 schools in target areas of 4 teachers and 156 schoool
children (77 girls)
2.3.15 Collaborate with PDRD and • PO, Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • 218 people incduding district
local authorities in celebrating governor, PDRD director, CWS
World Water Day with 300 staff and CDF; and 100 school
participations children join World Water Day
celebraton

Output 2.5
Improve agricultural production, food • At least 90% of 160 families received • 120 vulnerable people trainined • Vulnerable have home gardening
security and household income among training on vegetable growing have on home gardening surronding their house
vulnerable people and interest group home garden
in target communities

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Explanation


2.5.1 Collaborate with CDFs, WSUG, • CDW, budget, materials • Coordinate with Village Leaders • 120 VPs selected
VL in selecting 160 VP in 20 and WSUGs to select VPs
villages to train on vegetable families for home gardening
growing in the community
2.5.2 Provide training on vegetable • Pc, CDW, budget, materials • 120 Vulnerable People from 19 • Less than planned as CWS
growing to 160 VP (5 courses) documents villages in 5 communes trained prioritized the poorest of the
on home gardening. poor in each target area

Theme 3: Strengthening Civil Society


OBJECTIVE
Strengthen community understanding and practice of peace building and restorative justice

175
Output 3.2:
Key persons in the community VL, • 80 CCs, VLs, WSUG, elders, monks • 2 training on Local Capacity for • Less than planned due to the
WSUG, CDF, CCs, old persons and WSUG, VDCs, CDFs trained on Peace trained to 57 people (21 Program Coordinator is busy
monks play an important role in Local Capacity for Peace/ Peace women) incuding VLs, WSUG with the other training related
peace building, conflict resolution building (4 courses) CDFs from 25 villages in 3 to peace for staff and CWS
and use the LCP methodology in communes partners
their community
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Explanation
3.2.1 Provide 4 training courses on • P.C, P.O, CDW, Materials, Budget • Cooperate with Program to
LCP /peace building to 80 CCs, provide training on LCP to VL,
VLs, WSUG, monks, old persons, WSUG & CDF
VDC, CDFs from 20 villages

Theme 5: Project Development, Management and Supervision


OBJECTIVE
Effective and efficient project management and functioning; enhance community development planning and practice

Output 5.1:
Field staff and field operation ▪ Monthly project monitoring on: • Regular project monitoring by PC •
appropriately monitored and 6 project management is done 14 times
supported 12 project implementation activities
5 staff performance • 8 visits conducted by PM, PC • Field monitoring visit will improve
and PO to support developing in next semester to ensure exit
exit plan & project management plan is properly implemnted
• 45 villages assessed for the • Plan to expand the project areas
new target areas selection base on request from district
governor while the project has
enough funding support

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Explanation


5.1.1 Regularly field visit of Project • Pc, Pos, CDW, Vehicle • Project Manager conducted
Coordinator to monitor CDW regular fied visit (14 times) to
and cooperation partners in support and encourage satff
project implement in field implementation

176
5.1.2 Monthly meeting to reflect the • Pc, CDW • Project Manager conducted • 3 time in irst semester and 5
work implementation and see regular monthly staff meeting to time in second semester as the
the strengths & weaknesses and identify staff challenges and project has visitor from Peace
develop plan for next month strengths and develop monthly Tour (NCCA) and UMCOR
plan
5.1.3 Monthly field visit to follow up and • PCs, Pos • Same 5.1.1 • Same 5.1.1
improve skill acquisition
5.1.4 Collaborate with PDRD in • Pc, PO, CDW, documents, budget • Conduted assessment to 45
evaluating new target area and villages for new target selection
to assess the working size
5.1.5 Coordinate with Program Staff • Pc, PO, CDW, materials, budget • 6 project staff including Project • Annual activities and budget
to develop activities and budget PM Manager and field staff join plan submit to Program Manager
Plan for FY 2010 the meeting with Program
Manager to develop annual
activities and budget plan
5.1.6 Regularly visit for project • PO and PM, Vehicle • PM, PC and PO conducted 3 • Field monitoring visit will be
management visits to support developing improved in the next six months
exit plan and project to ensure exit plan is properly
management implemented
• 4 times field visit by Program • Support on overall management
Manager and Deputy Program and project activities
Manager implementation

177
Church World Service Cambodia
Logical Framework Report FY09
Project Name: Partnership Program Office

Narrative Summary Objectively Verifiable Indicators Actual Outputs Variance/Remarks


OVERALL OBJECTIVE:
To strengthen the institutional capacity of CNGO partners and ensure the effectiveness of the project implementation
Theme 1: Capacity Building of CNGOs and Ecumenical Partners and Provide Small Grants to CNGO Partner
OBJECTIVE. 1
Strengthen the capacity of holistic • CNGO & Small Project fund recepients
CNGO partners and small project practiced necessary organizational
fund recipients to facilitate systems and technical capacity to
program that will effectively and carry out effective community
sustainably improve the living development interventions in support
condition of the most vulnerable of the most vulnerable
Output 1.1
Matured organizational capacity • Strategic plan of KCDA developed • CFEDA & KCDA's strategic plan • Achieved as planned
for CNGO & Ecumenical Partners developed
• KNTO & KORCD's strategic plan
reviewed

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Remarks


1.1.1 Support the partnership project • Program and Project staff, budget, • CFEDA & KCDA developed their • Time constrained for OD officer,
KCDA & CIDC training materials strategic plan KCDA will planned in next year
develop strategic plan for partner • KNTO & KORCD reviewed their
strategic plan
Output 1.2
CNGO partner matured in technical • Partners developed project • CSF made four small grant proposals • Two proposal were developed
capacity • Partners obtained M and E skills • None • Training moved to next year
• Partners reviewed their HR policies • CFED was reviewed their manual • Mannual policies were finalized
policies

178
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Remarks

1.2.1 Develop proposal for small • Program staff • Program staff assist to edit and review• One proposal were summitted
grant partners proposal for CSF to FAO & another to UNESCO
1.2.2 Conduct training on Project • Program and project staff, budget, • None • M&E training will be held on
Monitoring & Evaluation for all CWS M&E Staff 10-14 August 2009
partners
1.2.3 Conduct training on Human • Program staff, budget, • Program staff assist to review • The mannual policies was
Resource & Staff Management materials mannual policies for non-funding finalized and used in place
to all partners partner CFED

Output 1.3
Increased Advocacy & Awareness • 3 CNGOs received small grant • CFC, CC, CSF & CFED • Co-funding
Raising activities in partner's targets received small grant support

• Partners conducted Human Rights • CFC received co-funding • CFC organized International
Child at risk, Women's Day, support Women's Day
Peace Building • CC received co-funding • CC organized International
support Children's Day
• CSF received co-fundind • CSF organized International
support Children's Day
• CFED received co-funding to • CFED provided materials to
support 17 child clubs located in
Svay Chrum district

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Remarks


1.3.1 Provide small grants to CNGO • Program staff and budget • CFC organized 1 day workshop on • 945 participants involved
partners to implement activities International Women's Day
including Child at risk, women, • CSF organized International • 1200 participants involved
and peace building Children's Day
• CC organized International • 1500 participant involved
Children's Day
• CFED received co-funding to • 272 received donation from

179
support 17 child clubs through CFED
International Children's Day

Theme 3: Management and Supervision


OBJECTIVE
Provide overall management, • Partnership projects are smoothly • Over 90% of the project • Need ongoing monitor
supervision and capacity building implemented acitivities completed as plan
to partnership program field staff;
develop & strengthen mechanism, • 4 holistic partners are able to develop • KORCD, CFEDA, KNTO developed th• The program and project
practice, guideline and tools that will phase-out plan with their community phase-out Plan will assist to review the phase
improve the partnership program & out plan
lead to enhanced outcomes • 4 holistic partners are able to design • 2 holistic partners summitted their • 2 holistic partners CIDC &
project, proposal and report proposal for FY10 to funding KORCD
committee
Output 3.1
Improved capacity of CNGO • 12 visits to holistic partners • Program staff visited CFED,
partners to plan, implement, at least two times per partner/ year KORCD, KNOT, HAPO
monitor, assess & report outcomes

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Remarks

3.1.1 Visit partners at least two times • Program staff, budget and time • The program staff visited tow time • Some visits were followed up
per year to monitor outputs and to CFED, KORCD, KNTO, HAPO child club and one followed up
feedbacking learning action plan and
CWS proposal another one collected data for
CWS proposal
3.1.2 Support partners for exposure • Program staff, budget and time • None • Too small budget available
visits to other partners
3.1.3 Support partners to attend • Program staff, budget and time • None • Advised the project BTB to
other training/workshop send their partners to attend
training on NGO Good
Governance
3.1.4 Organize the Partnership • Program staff, budget, materials • None • This will be done next FY10
Reflection workshop for partners

180
Output 3.2
Improved program implementation • At least 2 visits to project field office
• Two visits to KPT office and one time • Staff meeting
at field level; and improved staff per year office
management and development • Feedback and recommendation from • Two documents were recommended t• Few recommendations were
partners documented staff made for improvement

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Remarks

3.2.1 Visit field office and feedback • Program staff, budget • The program staff provided feedback • The project staff commentted
for the management & program project staff on strategic plan format
implementation • The program staff provided recom- •
mendation on strategic document

Output 3.3
Improved program management • At least 3 program meetings/year • Two full program meeting • As planned
and coordination conducted
• At least 7 meetings with POG/year • Two POG meeting was attended
• At least 7 meeting with SMT/year • Four SMT meeting was attended
• At least 7 meetings with other NGOs • 2 meetings with KCC & • Strategic review
• CSF, HAPO • Proposal development

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Remarks

3.3.1 Conduct program meetings • Program staff, budget • Two full program meeting • The 2nd meeting on 10-12
conducted Feb 09 and the 3rd meeting
on 27-29 May 2009
3.3.2 Attend POG & SMT Meeting • Program staff • The Program Manager attended in • The POG meeting on 05 Feb
POG metting 2009
3.3.3 Attend the meeting with other • Program staff, budget • Meeting with 2 CNGO partners, • Development work
NGOs (partenrs, donors, KCC & CSF, HAPO
network)

181
Output 3.4
Better informed programming & • Target groups satisfied with Partner's • The holistic partners KORCD, • On going
practice as result of periodic service KNTO, CFEDA & ADOVIR will
evaluations of CNGO partners have external evaluation

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Remarks

3.4.1 Coordinate for internal or • Program/project staff, time, budget • The program staff coordinated with ex• Setember - November 09
external M&E to partners consultant for evaluation for partners
3.4.2 Support the project staff to • Program/project staff, time, budget • The projectstaff already took action • The program staff will help to
develop the follow up actions to help CFEDA to develop its follow up the strategic plan
strategic plan

Output 3.5 • CAT reviewed • CAR reviewed • Finalized and used in place
Defined partnership strategies and
developed necessary tools for • Training Need Assesment Tool • TNA developed • Finalized and used in place
monitoring & assessing program developed
capapcity • Partnership Operating Guideline • Operating Guileline in Khmer • On going
reviewed version was reviewed

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Remarks


3.5.1 Review CAT • Project/program staff • Done • All project staffs are using
with their partners
3.5.2 Develop TNA Tools • Program staff • Done • All project staffs are using
with their partners
3.5.3 Review Partnership Operating • Project/program staff, budget • Operating Guileline in Khmer version • This will be discussed in 1st
Guideline reviewed program meeting FY10
Output 3.6
Improved profiling & promotion • 2 Donor coordination meetings • One meeting with Mekong Plus • Mekong Plus is one of CFED
of CNGOs partners to other donors donors
for resouce mobilizations • 2 proposals submitted to other donors • One meeting with CWSNZ • CWSNZ is one of KORCD
donors

182
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Remarks
3.6.1 Coordinate meeting with other • Program and project staff, budget • Meeting with CFED for a financial rev • CWS finance staff already
donors Mplus, AusAID, Hiefer, of CFED before they send financial took action
and NGOs meeting/forum report to Mekong Plus
3.6.2 Support partners to develop • Program and project staff, budget • None • None
project proposals

Output 3.7
Staff development; effective • Program staff possess OD skills • The project staff received OD skill • Project coordinator KPT, BTB-
training and mentoring of field office BTM
staff; enhanced capacity building of • Program/project staff improved skill • None • None
program office staff of project management

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Remarks


3.7.1 Provide on-going coaching to • Program staff • Provide coaching to project staff on • Ongoing
program and project staff on organizational assessment/strategy
the OD & Project Management
3.7.2 Support program & project • Program/project staff, budget • The program staff attended JD • Jun-09
staff to learn necessary skills workshop
through internal & external • The program stafff attended Disas
training/ workshop ter Risk Reduction workshop • 9-May

Acronyms
CBO : Community Based Organization PRA : Participatory Rural Appraisal
CNGO: Cambodian Non-governmental Organization SMT : Senior Management Team
ICD : Integrated Community Development ToR : Term of Reference
M & E : Monitoring and Evaluation TNA : Training Need Assessment
OD : Organizational Development VMG : Vision, Mission, Goal
POG : Program Oversight Group

183
Church World Service Cambodia
Logical Framework Report FY09
Project Name: Battambang and Banteay Meanchey Partnership Project

Narrative Summary Objectively Verifiable Indicators Actual Output Variances/Explanation


Overall Objective:

Theme 1: Capacity building of holistic CNGO partners


OBJECTIVE
Strengthened capacity of CNGO ▪ CNGOs and small project fund ▪ CFEDA, KNTO, ADOVIR, ▪ The programs benefited
partners and small project fund recipients have the necessary KCDA, DYMB & DYBTM directly to 5,403 families
recipients to facilitate effective and organizational system and technical increase capacity & ability to (24,385 persons) and
sustainable programs that will improve capacity to carry out effective implement program to benefit indirectly to 4,055 families
the living condition of the most community development more absolute poor families (21,024 persons).
vulnerable. interventions in support of the in 59 remote villages of BTB,
vulnerable. BTM & OMC.
Output 1.1
Emerging organizational capacity ▪ FY 2009 grants were approved and ▪ FY 2009 grants were disbursed ▪ 100% achieved as planned.
for 2 newly engaged CNGO partners disbursement provided to 4 partners to 4 partners (KNTO, CFEDA,
and maturing organizational capacity (CFEDA, KNTO, ADOVIR & KCDA) ADOVIR & KCDA).
for 4 established CNGO partners. to implement ICD program in remote
villages.
▪ 2 new CNGOs selected as holistic ▪ Not done ▪ Priority was given to the
partners. implementation of
DIPECHO project.
▪ Governing board of CFEDA, KNTO ▪ Governing board of 3 partners ▪ 80% achieved as planned.
& ADOVIR were strengthened. were strengthened.
▪ Non functioning board of ▪ continue coaching CFEDA
CFEDA was dissolved and role to identify and select
& responsibilities of the board governing board members.
was reviewed.
▪ Governing boards of KNTO & ▪ A board member of KNTO

184
ADOVIR were reviewed their was changed. ADOVIR will
membership. identify a woman board
member.
▪ KCDA obtained 3 year-strategic ▪ KCDA obtained 3 year-strategic ▪ 100% achieved as planned
plan and proposals. plan.
▪ KCDA obtained financial, ▪ KCDA obtained admin & staff ▪ 100% achieved as planned
administration & staff policies/ policies/guidelines. KCDA obtained financial
guidelines. guideline in first semester.
▪ KCDA is able to develop village ▪ KCDA is able to prepare ▪ 100% achieved as planned.
profiles & monitoring forms. monitoring forms. KCDA is able to develop
village profiles in the first
semester.
▪ Capacity needs of KCDA and 2 new ▪ Not done for new partners. ▪ 30% achieved as planned
partners assessed and capacity Capacity building plan of
building plan developed KCDA was developed in
the first semester.
New partners were not
selected.
▪ 4 partners (CFEDA, KNTO, ADOVIR ▪ 4 partners were assessed ▪ 100% achieved as planned.
& KCDA) assessed organizational organization growth by using ▪ Weakness was
performance by using CAT. CAT. incorporated in FY 10 plan
for improvement.
▪ V, M, G & core values of 2 new ▪ Not done ▪ New partners were not
partners defined. selected.
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation
1.1.1. Assist & assess proposals ▪ Holistic grants ▪ Assisted 4 partners to prepare ▪ 100% achieved as planned
and plan of CFEDA, KNTO, ▪ Project and Program staff FY 2010 proposal and plan
ADOVIR & KCDA for FY 2010. ▪ Transportation
1.1.2 Select 2 new holistic CNGO ▪ Training fund, materials. ▪ Not done ▪ Priority was given for
partners. ▪ Training room. implementation of
DIPECHO project.
1.1.3 Prepare agreements and ▪ Grants of USD 45,385 was ▪ Grants of USD 23,497 was
disburse grants for CFEDA, disbursed to KNTO, CFEDA, disbursed in first semester
KNTO, ADOVIR, KCDA & 2 ADOVIR & KCDA. FY 2009.

185
new CNGO partners.
1.1.4 Conduct partnership meeting ▪ Not done ▪ New partners were not
with 2 new partners and explain selected.
partnership operation guideline.
1.1.5 Conduct financial monitoring ▪ Conducted financial monitoring ▪ Monthly monitoring for
for 6 partners (monthly for new for 4 partners. CFEDA & KCDA and
partners and every two months every two months for
for ADOVIR, CFEDA & KNTO). ADOVIR & KNTO.
1.1.6 Provide coaching, mentoring ▪ Provided coaching to CFEDA ▪ Continue coaching CFEDA
regarding meeting of governing to dissolve non- functionial in identify a new
board. board and review roles and governing board.
responsibilities.
▪ Provided coaching & mentoring
to ADOVIR & KNTO to review
membership of governing
boards.
1.1.7 Provide mentoring, coaching ▪ Provided regular coaching &
and field monitoring regarding field monitoring to CFEDA,
organizational strengthening & KNTO, ADOVIR & CFEDA.
program implementation.
1.1.8 Provide coaching to KCDA staff ▪ Provided coaching to KCDA
to develop 3 years-strategic staff to develop strategic plan.
plan.
1.1.9 Provide coaching to KCDA staff ▪ Provided coaching to KCDA ▪ Coaching on preparation
to develop financial, staff to develop relevant of finance guideline was
administration & staff policies/ guidelines. done in the first semester.
guidelines.
1.1.10 Provide coaching to KCDA staff ▪ Provided coaching to KCDA ▪ Coaching on preparation
to develop village profiles & staff to prepare monitoring of village profiles was done
monitoring forms. forms. in the first semester.
1.1.11 Conduct capacity assessment ▪ Done in the first semester ▪ New partners were not
needs for KCDA and 2 new for KCDA selected.
partners & prepare capacity
building plans.

186
1.1.12 Conduct CAT to evaluate ▪ Used CAT to assess org.growth
organizational growth of 4 of 4 CNGO partners.
partners.
1.1.13 Provide coaching to 2 new ▪ Not done ▪ New partners were not
partners to define V, M, G and selected
core values.
Output 1.2
Emerging technical capacity among 2 ▪ At least 2 training courses (LCP ▪ 2 training courses on MCH & ▪ 200% achieved in
newly CNGO partners, maturing assessment & conflict resolution how we see conflict were comparision with planned.
technical capacity among 4 established etc) provided to 40 CNGO organized for 31 partner staff ▪ Partner staffs increase
CNGO partners. partner staff (20 staff/course). (15 women) from 4 CNGOs. knowledge/skill and apply it
to improve their program.
▪ 3 training courses were
organized & provided for
37 staff (16 women) in the
first semester.
▪ At least 10 training courses & ▪ 8 training courses on CBFA, ▪ 170% achieved in
workshops regarding Community CBDRM and CDP were comparision with planned.
Based Disaster Risk Mitigation organized for 188 participants ▪ 9 training courses were
(CBDPM) organized for 20 partner (48 women) from RCVs, VCs, organized in the first
staff, and 230 persons (RCVs, VHVs, VDCs, CCDM, DCDM, PCDM, semester for 200
VCs, VDCs, CCs, District & DFT and PFT from target participants (67 women)
Provincial government staff areas of KCDA, CFEDA, &
(DIPECHO project). KNTO in BTB, BTM & OMC.
▪ 9 training courses (6 training
courses & 3 refresher training)
on CBFA, CBDRM, and
Commune Development
Planning were organized for
200 participants (67 women)
of RCVs, VCs, VDCs, VHVs,
CCDM, DCDM, PCDM, CNGO
partner & CWS staff and
RC Counterparts from target

187
areas of KCDA, CFEDA, &
KNTO in BTB, BTM & OMC.
▪ 40 first aid kits were distributed
to 40 RCVs
▪ At least 2 workshops related to ▪ 2 workshops/meeting regarding ▪ 100% achieved as planned.
program implementation organized exchange of learning and
for 30 partner staff. experience on implementation
of CBDRM were organized &
facilitated for 34 staff
(16 women) of KCDA, KNTO &
CFEDA.
▪ One exposure visit organized for 12 ▪ Exposure visit was organized ▪ 100% achieved as planned.
CNGO partner staff. for 5 partner staff (4 women)
to learn experience regarding
MCH in KPT project.
▪ Internship organized & facilitated ▪ Not done ▪ Priority was given for
for 4 CNGO partner staff. implementation of
DIPECHO project.
▪ At least 15 CNGO partner staff & 15 ▪ 9 partner staff were supported ▪ 100 % achieved as planned
CCs supported to attend relevant to attend square table meeting, 9 partner staff were
training & workshops, organized by organized by CWS PHN supported to attend training
Partnership Program office. ▪ 9 partner staff (4 women) from in the first semester.
4 partners were arranged and
supported to attend training
on basic finance management.

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation


1.2.1 Organize and provide training & ▪ Budget ▪ Organized two training on MCH ▪ The rainings were provided
training follow-up to partner ▪ Project and Program staff & how we see conflict for by Direct Service Program
staff. ▪ Transportation. partner staff. staff.
1.2.2 Coordinate with relevant stake ▪ Training materials/documents. ▪ Organized 8 training courses: ▪ The trainings were provided
holder to organize training & ▪ Training room. ▪ Organized 2 training courses by DM staff, OMC & BTM
workshops related to CBDRM. of five days on CBFA for 38 PRC, NCDM & MOP.
RCVs (21 women) from BTM & ▪ Participants have increased

188
OMC. and gained knowledge
▪ Organized 3 training of four regarding CBFA, CBDRM
days on CBDRM & CDP for 77 and CDP.
participants (6 women) of
CCDM, DCDM, PCDM, DFT &
PFT from OMC, BTB & BTM.
▪ Organized 3 training courses
of five days on CBDRM for 73
participants (21 women) of
VDCs, VCs & RCVs from OMC
& BTM.
1.2.3 Organize & facilitate program ▪ Organized 2 workshops and
related workshops. meeting for partner staff.
1.2.4 Organize and facilitate ▪ Done
exposure visit for partner staff.
1.2.5 Organize internship for ▪ Not done
CNGO partner staff.
1.2.6 Coordinate with Program office ▪ Done ▪ Coordinated with program
to support partner staff & CCs staff
to attend training & workshops.

Output 1.3
Developing practice among 2 newly ▪ CFEDA, KNTO and KCDA ▪ Capacity of CFEDA, KNTO & ▪ 100% achieved as planned.
engaged CNGO partners & maturing increased capacity in building KCDA on CBDRM project ▪ CWS supports 3 partners
practice among 4 established CNGO capacity and support communities increased. to implement CBDRM
partners. regarding CBDRM in their target ▪ CFEDA, KNTO & KCDA project in 40 villages in
villages. received coaching & support BTB, BTM & OMC.
to build capacity of RCVs,
VDCs & VCs to conduct echo
training on CBDRM of two
days to key villagers and to
raise awareness on DRR to
villagers.
▪ 136 RCVs, VCs & VDCs from

189
34 villages able to provide echo
training to 496 (278 women)
key villagers.
▪ 506 villagers (312 women) in 12
villages attended awareness
raising on DRR.
▪ Under DIPECHO project; micro ▪ Not done
project grants were provided to ▪ 40 micro project proposals (40
CFEDA, KNTO and KCDA to villages) on CBRDM were deve-
support communities regarding loped with supported by partners
CBDRM.
▪ CFEDA, KNTO & ADOVIR are able ▪ Not done ▪ Priority was given for
to use LCP tools to assess their implementation of
program. DIPECHO project.
▪ ADOVIR increased capacity to ▪ Capacity of ADOVIR staff ▪ 100% achieved as planned.
strengthen community structure & to increased.
prepare phase out plan from old
target villages.
▪ KCDA increased capacity in ▪ KCDA increased capacity in ▪ 100% achieved as planned.
implementation of ICD program support SHGs, RCVs,
activities such as support SHGs, community forestry, working
need let CBOs, CCs and community with VCs, VDCs & CCs.
changed agents etc.

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation


1.3.1 Provide training & coaching ▪ Holistic grants ▪ Organized training on CBFA, ▪ Continue coaching.
to CFEDA, KNTO & KCDA staff ▪ Project and Program staff CBDRM & CDP in BTB, BTM .
related to capacity building & ▪ Transportation & OMC.
support to communities on Training fund/materials. ▪ Provided coaching & support
CBDRM. to partner staff to build
capacity of VCs, VDCs &
RCVs to conduct echo training
& raise awareness on CBDRM
for key villagers and villagers.

190
1.3.2 Provide micro project grants to ▪ Not done ▪ continue in first semester
CFEDA, KNTO & KCDA to of FY 2010.
support communities regarding
CBDRM projects.
1.3.3 Provide training & coaching to ▪ Not done ▪ Priority was given for
to CFEDA, KNTO, KCDA & implementation of
ADOVIR staff regarding LCP DIPECHO project.
assessment in their program.
1.3.4 Provide coaching to ADOVIR ▪ Provided coaching to ADOVIR
staff regarding strengthening of related to community structure
community structure & phase strengthening & phase out
out plan from old target villages. plan from old target villages.
1.3.5 Provide coaching & support ▪ Provided coaching on SHGs, ▪ Coaching on PRA was
to KCDA to implement ICD CBDRM activity, working with done in first semester.
program such as SHGs, support VCs, VDCs & CCs.
CCs, & need let CBOs etc.

Output 1.5
Resources mobilized in support ▪ At least one CNGO partner received ▪ CFEDA received a small grant
of CNGO partners. fund from other funding agency. from a MAG's funding partner.

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation


1.5.1 Share funding information & ▪ Project and Program staff ▪ Shared relevant funding ▪ will continue
establish link between CNGO information to CNGO partners.
partners and potential donors. ▪ Assisted CFEDA & KNTO
regarding preparation of report
& proposals.

Output 1.6
CNGOs, CBOs, CCs etc are to ▪ At least 3 small projects approved ▪ Grants were provided & ▪ 100% achieved as planned.
implement small projects in support of and implemented (peace building, supported to 3 CNGOs and
the most vulnerable in their community development, food association in BTB & BTM.
communities. security, community pond & HIV ▪ DYBTM received grant to ▪ The activities started in May

191
focused program etc). implement peace education 2009 & will finish in April
for BTM prisoners & conduct 2010
workshop on conflict resolution
for Village Chiefs, CCs, key
persons & monks in BTM.
▪ DYMB received grant to ▪ The grant period started
implement HIV focused from March 2009 & finish
program, to support Building a in February 2010.
New Life Center income
generation project (BNLC).
The BNLC provides skill to
PLHA women & their families
regarding making of flowers
crafts and bead-jewelry &
sewing in order to earn family
income.
▪ 1 pond (20x30x3) was constru-
cted, 3 pairs of watering cans,
4 hoes, 50 manago seedling
were provide to school which
benefited to 168 children (76
girls) grade 1-6
▪ Through KCDA & ADOVIR, ▪ The school children attend
distributed 60 bicycles, 60 class in grade 1-9 and
bags, 4,434 note books, 498 from 7 schools.
rulers and pencils, 1,494 pens,
187 pair of clothes to 498 poor
& poorest school children from
6-18 year's old (241 girls) from
13 villages in Samlout & Bavel
Districts, BTB.
▪ Through KCDA, ADOVIR & ▪ The families live in 13
CFEDA, distributed health villages of 3 Communes
materials (460 mosquito nets, (Tatok, Ampil Pram Dem &

192
210 water filters,150 water Toul Pongro) in BTB &
kittles and 217 water buckets) BTM.
to 936 poor and poorest
families.

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation


1.6.1 Conduct appraisal of proposal ▪ Project and Program staff ▪ Conducted assessment and ▪ The proposals received
and field assessment. ▪ Fund for small project appraisal of proposals of approval from funding
DYBTM, DYMB & committee.
association.
1.6.2 Prepare agreement and grant ▪ Prepared project agreements & ▪ USD 8,131 was disbursed
disbursement. disbursement of grants & supported (USD 2,373
for DYBTM, USD 4,240
for DYMB & USD 1,517
for digging pond in
Kampoing Lei school.
1.6.3 Monitor project implementation ▪ Conducted field visit to monitor ▪ Feedback was given
the project implementation. to improve the program.

Output 1.7
Vulnerable people provided emergency ▪ At least USD 1,500 made available ▪ Through KCDA, ADOVIR and ▪ Each family member
relief through CNGO partners. and disbursed through CNGOs for CFEDA, distributed 5,553 kg received 7-10 kg of white
emergency relief. of white rice to 129 food rice to secure food from
shortage families (607 persons) 15-20 days.
in 12 villages from 4 communes
in BTB & BTM.
▪ Through KNTO, 7,770 kg of rice ▪ The families left their
86 bottles of cooking oil, 172 villages because of tension
bags of iodine salt, 430 canned between Thai & Cambodia
fish, 28 mosquito nets, 54 armies regarding border
buckets, 71 ceramic filters, 28 problem.
plastic tents were distributed to
135 displaced families (518
people, 265 women) in Chub

193
Chob Kokir Khang Kaeut and
Chob Kokir Khang Lech.

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation


1.7.1 Conduct assessment of ▪ ER fund. ▪ Conducted assessment of ▪ USD 2,006 of project grant
emergency situation, prepare ▪ Project staff emergency needs. was used in response to
for response and monitoring ▪ Transportation. ▪ Coordinated and supported the food shortage situation.
CNGO partners to distribute USD 4,935 of DM grant
food and materials to food was used in response to
shortage & displaced families. the needs of displaced
families in OMC.
Output 1.8
Increase public awareness raising ▪ At least USD 400 contributed to ▪ Contributed 15 boxes of ▪ The Depts.were able
activities through CNGOs & Govt. CNGOs and Govt.Dept for organizing drinking water to BTB Dept. of to raise awareness on
Departments. of awareness raising events. Environment to organize Intern- environment protection
al Environment Day. and participation of women
▪ Contributed 15 boxes of in economic and social
drinking water to BTB Dept.of development.
Women Affairs to organize Int-
ernational Women Day.

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation


1.8.1 Support partners (CNGOs, Govt ▪ Fund.
Depart) to organize the public ▪ Materials and transportation.
awareness events such as ▪ Project staff
International Women's Day, etc

Theme 3: Management and Supervision


OBJECTIVE
Improved program design, monitoring
and evaluation; effective and efficient
implementation; enhanced program
outcomes

194
Output 3.1: Improved capacity of ▪ Regular visits by project manage- ▪ Regular visits to partner program ▪ 100% achieved as planned.
CNGOs to plan, implement, monitor ment staff to CNGO partner were done. CNGO partners implement
assess and write report (monitoring of organizational and manage their program
functioning; implementation of & organization more
activities; problem solving and effectively & more benefite
strategizing; mentoring of partners) to the target groups.
every two months.
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation
3.1.1 Visit and meeting by PM/ DPM ▪ Project and Deputy Manager ▪ Done every two months ▪ Feedback and advise was
to CNGO partners office & field provided to improve their
program.
Output 3.3: ▪ Regular staff meeting and planning ▪ Monthly staff meeting & ▪ 100% achieved as planned.
Improved program management/ (monthly meeting) planning conducted.
coordination
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation
3.3.1 Conduct staff meeting & planning ▪ Project staff ▪ Conducted staff meeting &
planning.

195
Church World Service Cambodia
Logical Framework Report FY09
Project Name: Partnership Project - Kampong Thom

Narrative Summary Objectively Verifiable Indicators Actual Out put Variences/Remarks


OVERALL OBJECTIVE:
Theme 1: Capacity Building of CNGOs and Ecumenical Partners
OBJECTIVE: Strengthen the capacity ▪ Holistic CNGO partners and small
of holistic CNGO partners and small project grant recipients have the
project grant reciptients to facilitate necessary organizational system
program that will effective and and technical capacity to carry out
sustainably improve the living condition effective community Development
of the most vulnerable by supporting the vulnerable
Output 1.1: Matured organizational ▪ VMG and core values of new CNGO ▪ CIDC have V,M,G and core ▪ CIDC was selected as
capacity for KORCD and one new reviewed value. partner and it was received
holistic partner fund onJanuary 2009.
▪ Governing board of CNGOs ▪ KORCD conducted board ▪ KORCD conduct the meeting
strengthened meeting two times per year with two board of members
and contacted the third by
phone.
▪ Financial, administrative, staffing
▪ Administrative, staffing policy ▪ Admin and staffing policy
policy of new partner documented of KORCD were revised. The have been improved and
in place and strengthened new partner CIDC created reflect the current situation
the organizational policy & change within the org.
▪ Strategic plan, annual plan and ▪ CIDC have three year-strategic ▪ CIDC received fund amount
proposal documents and report plan, six months plan, proposal US$7,090 to implement
for new partner in place and report are in place. it project .
▪ Implementation, monitoring and ▪ KORCD staff conduct the rout-
reporting on time ine monoring their project in
10 villages and report on time.
▪ KORCD and new partner assessed ▪ KORCD and CIDC assessed
by using CAT their organization by using
CAT

196
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Output Variances/Explanation
1.1.1 Facilitate to review VMG for ▪ Budget, project staff and materials ▪ VMG of CIDC no need to review in ▪ CIDC has VMG in place, it
new partner this year. will be review next year.
1.1.2 Support KORCD and new partner ▪ Budget and materials ▪ KORCD coducted the Board ▪ KORCD reviewed it structure
to organize Board meeting and meeting the fisrt on 7 August 08. on January 09 under the
Training and the second on 16 June 09. recommendation of Board
and Partnership staff.
1.1.3 Provide coaching to new partner ▪ Budget, materials and project staff ▪ SentTwo KORCD staff (Director ▪ The financial report of KORCD
staff and strengthen KORCD on andAccount) to attend Fnancial is acceptabe and the document
finance, admin, bookkeeping Management traing conducted and policy are in order and good
and staffing system by Partnership Program.Provided filling. CWS staff planed to
coaching on Admin work to to monitor them every month.
Admin staff of KORCD
1.1.4 Facilitate to review/develop strate- ▪ Budget, materials, program staff ▪ KORCD reviewed strategic plan ▪ Strategic plan of KORCD is in
gic plan, annual plan, proposal and partners with facilitated by Partnership place.Due to CIDC just starting
project staff and Program staff on to implement, the stategic plan
11 December 2008. will review next year.
Annual plan with detail ofactivities
and time frame was develop and
being implemented
1.1.5 Conduct regular monitroing to ▪ Transport, project staff and motor ▪ Conducted regular monitoring ▪ Feedback and Advice was
KORCD and new partner and both organization and project provided to improve the
small grant partners implementation of partners program.
1.1.6 Conduct TNA for KORCD and ▪ Project staff, budget ▪ TNA was conducted for KORCD ▪ TNA of KORCD and CIDC were
new partner and CIDC put into their staff conducted and their training
development plan. schedule followed TNA plan.
1.1.7 Conduct Capacity Assessment ▪ Project stafff, budget ▪ KORCD was conducted it ▪ KORCD has able to do the
of KORCD & new partners by capacity on 7-8 May09 and assessment it organization by
using CAT CIDC in 10-11June 09. using CAT & CIDC is in training

197
Output 1.2: CNGO Partners matured Training for CNGOs:
in technical capacity ▪ 10 CNGO staff are able to practice ▪ Six KORCD staff & one CIDC
PRA in the villages are able to conduct PRA in two
new villages and KORCD PRA
report are arealy prepared.
▪ 10 CNGO staff understand account ▪ Two KORCD staff and two CIDC
system & able to prepare financial staff attended Basic Financial
report Management Six CIDC staff and
4 KORCD staff were coaching on
Finance report
▪ 25 (10 CNGO staff and 15 VDCs) ▪ 31 people(KORCD 6, 45 VDC and
solved problems at their community key persons) from 10 villages
solved 10 conflict in 10 villages.
▪ 5 CNGO staff able to organize the ▪ All CORCD staff are able to cond-
Program Reflection Workshop uct reflection workshop with less
support from CWS staff with 84
participants (37 women).
▪ At least 4 CNGO staff improved ▪ Five CNGO staff improved ▪ After each training or workshop
technical skills through outside technical skill on Good Governa- they used to coach or share
training/workshop/internship nce, Proposal writing and Peace the knowledge to other staffs.
workshop at Seam Reap province

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Output Variances/Explanation


1.2.1 Conduct PRA coaching to 10 new ▪ Budget, program/project staff and ▪ Not done ▪ It will be done August next fiscial
staff materials year, because CIDC received
fund support on January 09
1.2.2 Conduct a basic financial ▪ Budget, program/project staff and ▪ Four CNGO partners attended ▪ Partnership staff provided coac-
management training for materials training on Basic financial Mana- hing to 6 CIDC staff on financial
10 CNGO staff gement which conducted by report.
Partnership Program for two days
in September 08.
1.2.3 Conduct training on conflict ▪ Budget, project staff and materials ▪ After 30 trainees received the ▪ As the result, the conflict
resolution (II) for 10 partner staff training on"Conflict Resolution " resolution team members plays
15 VDCs two KORCD staff and four VDCs the important role in solving

198
in each villages formed the team conflict in the community.
the team members of conflict
resolution Team for each village.
They have sold 10 cases of
conflicts for the 10 villages( 9
domestic violent &one land issue)
1.2.4 Support partners to organize the ▪ Budget, project staff and materials ▪ All CORCD staff are able to cond-
Program Reflection Workshop uct reflection workshop with less
support from CWS staff with 84
participants (37 women).
1.2.5 Support at least 4 CNGO staff ▪ Budget ▪ Six CNGO staff were support to ▪ After training back, partner staff
to attend outside trainings/ attend training on Good Governa- wrote proposal and submit to
workshop nce, Proposal writing with Network other doners and have planned
director in Kampong Thom,Peace to intergrate Peace in their
Building with CDRI and Peace project activities plan.
workshop at Seam Reap province
and CCC w/s at Seam Reap on
3-4 June 09.
1.2.6 Organize exposure visit for 16 ▪ Budget, project staff ▪ Organized one day study tour for ▪ After came back, CIDC formed
CNGO staff to other good 26 people, 16 females(6 KORCD four Child club in three villages ,
practitioners staffs, 3 CIDC staffs & 17 children 21 groups, 315 group members
to visit & learned experiances (189 girls). And KORCD has
planed to form the Child club in
FY 2010.
1.2.7 Support 2 new CNGO staff to ▪ Budget ▪ Supported two CIDC staffs to
attend internship of management learned attend training on Finance
system Management system from KORCD
in February 09.

Output 1.3: Matured practice among ▪ 9 village profiles of new partner ▪ Planned in the next Fiscical year
partners developed
▪ 6 VDCs and 3 CBOs able to write ▪ 40 people from10 villages(20 VDCs ▪ 20 VDCs in 10 villages has able
simple proposal, report, planning 10 village leaders and 10 CBOs) to write their progressive report
and facilitate resolutions received training on simple prposal, to KORCD on time & they also

199
report, minute taking and planning submited two proposals to
conducted by KORCDstaff under KORCD
supporting from CWS staff.
▪ CNGO staff worked closely with ▪ KORCD and CIDC staff attended ▪ KORCD made intergration
CC, local authorities & villagers every quarterly meeting with CC planning with Baray and Suntuk
district.
▪ 20 target groups of CNGO partners ▪ 148 families planted vegetable
have home garden, animal raising and made compost fertilizer in
and compost making 10 target villages of KORCD
so that they have vegetable to eat,
share with neighbor and can sell.
▪ 200 people understood and practice ▪ 203 people women155 understood ▪ People reduce on malaria,
primary health care and hygiene parimary health care Typhoid and Tuberculosia 40%
from 2007.
▪ 25 VDC understood SHG concept ▪ 30 VDC and SHG members in 10
and bookkeepping villages understood SHG concept
and able to check book

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Output Variances/Explanation


1.3.1 Provide coaching to new CNGO ▪ Budget, project staff ▪ Not done ▪ It will done in August 09
on the community/partner profile
collection
1.3.2 Provide training course on simple ▪ Budget, project staff ▪ KORCD staff provided training on ▪ As the result, 20 VDC from 10
proposal and report writing, simple proposal, report writing and villages sent quarterly report to
and planning to VDCs & CBOs planning to 40 people (20 VDCs, KORCD and VDC from three
30 VCPM include 24 women) villages,Kang Meas Cheung &
in 10 villages on 3-4 and 8/12/08. K.M.Tbong, Tuol Chan and Pnov
summitted proposal to borrow
four water pumpes for their dry
rice season.
1.3.3 Mentor CNGO staff to build good ▪ Project staff ▪ KORCD staff worked closely with ▪ Three KORCD staff attended
relationship with CC, VDCs, CDCs, village leader and CC and regularly in quarterly meeting
villagers district authority. of Commune councile in three

200
communes.
1.3.4 Support partners to promote ▪ Budgets, technical ▪ KORCD staff has able to provide ▪ 148 families in 10 villages
home garden, animal raising and training on home garden and including 25 trainees,planted
compost making compost making to 25 villagers vegetables and made compost
(21 women) fertilizer.They earned money from
selling vegetables amount
52,012 Riels each family.
▪ Three visiting field operation of ▪ 42 families in three villages
KORCD target villages Vaing planted vegetables by practicing
Cheung, Korng Meas Tbong and technical from the training and
Tuol Chan to monitor the imple- using compost fertilizer.
mentation of vegetable growing.
1.3.5 Encourage partners to promote ▪ Budget ▪ KORCD staff conducted extension ▪ The number of illness people
primary health care and hygiene on primary health careawareness on malaria,tuberculosis,typhoid
awareness on Tuberculosis, Aids prevention reduce 40% from last year.
,malaria,typhoid to 425 people,.. This year 203 people go to health
381 women in 10 target villages. center when they were sick,98
families sleep in the mosquito-net
and124 families drink boiling water
1.3.6 Conduct refresher training on ▪ Project staff, budget ▪ Conducted the refresh training on ▪ Participants happy to use the
bookkeeping and coaching to book keeping 30 participants,27 new format of SHG bookkeeping
SHG, VDCs and CBOs SHG members and three VDCs because it is simple and easy
to review SHG bookkeeping and to compile. 30 VDCs have able to
introduce the new format of SHG Check SHG books.
book.

Output 1.4: CNGOs and CBOs ▪ At least 2 partners received small ▪ Not done ▪ Budget not available
implemented the small projects project grant support

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Output Variances/Explanation


1.4.1 Assess and review proposal of ▪ Budget, CWS staff ▪ Proposal submitted to Partnership
partners at office and target areas Program Manager (holistic partner)
but budget was not available.
1.4.2 Submit proposal of partners and ▪ Project staff ▪ Join in proposal appraisal with the ▪ The Funding committee approved

201
join in proposal appraisal with Funding Committee CIDC as Holistic Partner on
Program Office January 2009.

Output 1.5: Increased advocacy ▪ 300 people attended the Internationa▪ 227 people (189 women, included
awareness in the partner target areas Women's Day District Governor, 3 commune
chiefs, 10 village leaders) participa-
ted in International Women Day.

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Output Variances/Explanation


1.5.1 Support partners to organize the ▪ Project staff and budget ▪ KORCD organized International ▪ Pnov is one of the 10 target village
International Women's Day Women Day with support from of KORCD. Village leader, VDC
CWS staff. six key persons in this village
requested to held this womenDay
in Pnov pagoda because their
villagers wanted to involve deeply
in this workshop.
1.5.2 Mainstream gender concept in ▪ Project staff and budget ▪ KORCD increase capacity in On going to implement
VDCs, SHGs, CVPMs and intergration of gender concept &
activities peace building as cross cutting
issue in VDCs,SHGs& VCPMs.
Theme 3: Management and Supervision
OBJECTIVE
Output 3.1: Improved capacity of ▪ Annual Plan of KORCD are better ▪ KORCD staff improved ability in ▪ KORCD staffs are able to make
CNGOs to plan, implement, monitor prepared developing annual plan, implement- acceptable and write the report.
assess and write report ion and writing report.
▪ CNGO staff have regular monthly ▪ KORCD has conducted regularly ▪ The capacity of KORCD staff
meeting monthly meeting has strengthened

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Output Variances/Explanation


3.1.1 Provide advice to partner staff to ▪ Project staff and budget ▪ KORCD has annual plan, and ▪ Annual , quarter plan ,report and
have clear process for planning submitted quarter activities plan others document are in place
and implementation to Partnership Coordinator and

202
quarterly report on time.
3.1.2 Provide advice and support ▪ All files of KORCD are well organize ▪ Provided coaching on Admin ▪ Documents policy and guideline
partners to organize filing system work and filling system to are in good order
KORCD staff.
3.1.3 Conduct regular visits to the fields ▪ Budget, project staff and materials ▪ Conducted regular visits to the ▪ Monitoring feedback was given
and office to ensure the quality field and office to monitor the to partner's staff to improve
of the project implementation project implementation of KORCD their program
and CIDC.
3.1.4 Attend monthly and quarterly ▪ Budget, project staff and materials ▪ Attended regular monthly meeting
meeting with partners and quarterly meeting with KORCD

Output 3.2: Partners improved project ▪ Partners have clear planning proces ▪ CNGOs partners have clear exit ▪ Exit plan and villages profile
management and development plan with CWS and village profile are in place
updated every year.
▪ CNGO partners understood CWS's ▪ CNGO partners understood the
partnership guidelines & proposal partnership guideline and proposal
development procedure development procedure of CWS

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Output Variances/Explanation


3.2.1 Provide orientation to CNGOs ▪ Budget, project staff and materials ▪ KORCD prepared the two new ▪ Villages profile of KORCD are
partners to prepare Village Profile villages profile and up dated the in place.
eight villages profile.
3.2.2 Provide orientation on the ▪ Budget, project staff and materials ▪ Conducted orientation on partnership▪ The two partners KORCD and
partnership guidelines, proposal guideline, proposal format and CIDC understood well Partnership
format and appraisal process appraisal process to KORCD. guideline and process of
Project staff oriented CWS holistic appraisal and proposal format of
partner to CIDC in January 09 CWS.

203
APPENDIX III
CWS/CAMBODIA PROGRAM
PERSONNEL LIST

CHURCH WORLD SERVICE – CAMBODIA


CWS – CAMBODIA PERSONNEL LIST
(Jan-June)

PHNOM PENH OFFICE

1. Ms. Josephine Barbour Country Representative


2. Mr. Chhouk Chantha Director for Programming

3. Ms. Svay Samol Executive Assistant

HUMAN RESOURCE DEPARTMENT


1-Ms. Seng Sothla Human Resource Manager

FINANCE DEPARTMENT

1- Mr. Ok Bounna Director of Financial Affairs


(Recruited on: 24 April 2009)

2- Mr. Seng Vutha Finance Manager


3- Ms. Lieng Oubol Leakhena Deputy Finance Manager
4- Ms. Prum Leakhena Finance Assistant I
5- Ms. Sar Chanyadeth Finance Assistant II

ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT

1- Ms. Chum Jany Administrative Officer


2- Mrs. Ly Sothea Administrative Assistant
3- Mr. Keo Serai Senior IT Administrator
4- Mr. Soeur Kemsy Information Technology Assistant
5- Ms. Has Vicheka Receptionist/ Librarian
6- Mr. Oum Vanthy Driver
7- Mr. Oun Vibol Driver
8- Mr. Om Lim Driver
9- Mr. Kong Phal Day Guard and Grounds Keeper
10- Mr. Sermat Sary Guard at Country Representative’s house
11- Mrs. Huon Phon Cleaner
12- Ms. Son Sophy Cleaner

FMER Unit (Funding, Monitoring & Evalution, Reporting)

1 Mr. Heng Kun Monitoring and Evaluation Officer


2 Mr. Uon Vichetr Reporting & Proposal Development Officer
3 Ms. Pon Pagna Vattey Data Management Officer

DIRECT SERVICES PROGRAM

4. Ms. Mao Sophal Program Manager


5. Mr. Koh Chhina Credit / Income Generation Coordinator
6. Mr. Nao Sok Program Officer Com Dev & Peace
7. Ms. Tauch Norneath Program Coordinator for Peace

204
8. Mr. Pich Phourith Program Officer fro Comdev
9. Mr. Khem Thann Program officer for Health
10. Ms. Ek Sothea Program Coordinator
(promoted on 01 June 2009)

EMERGENCY RESPONSE and PREPAREDNESS PROGRAM

11. Hong Reaksmey Deputy Program Manager


12. Ms. Sam Savourn Emergency Response & Preparedness Coordinator
(Recruited on: 2 February 2009)

13. Mr. Min Vannak Emergency Response and Preparedness Program


Assistant

PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM

1 Mr. Mot Sana Program Manager


2 Mr. Kong Sedth Program Officer – Organization Development
3 Mr. Choun Mony Roath Program Assistant
(Promoted on: 01 Jan 2009)

KOMPONG THOM – PREAH VIHEAR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

1. Mr. Khem Sophal Project Manager


2. Mr. Kao Vanny Project Coordinator
3. Mr. Chheang Sok Mao Project Coordinator
4. Ms. Kim Van Thoeun Finance Officer
5. Mr. Man Sarat Office Assistant
6. Mrs. Khem Ratha Community Development Worker
7. Mr. Thong Chhen Community Development Worker
8. Mr. Dy Sovann Project Coordinator
9. Ms. Surn Meng Community Development Worker
10. Mr. Ou Vannkea Community Development Worker
11. Mr. Chan Haksokhom Community Development Worker
12. Ms. Mak Sreyny Community Development Worker
13. Mr. Chey Pisith Community Development Worker
14. Mr. Hiek Chhai Ny Community Development Worker
15. Ms. Samreth Amara Community Development Worker
16. Mr. Bun Sakhan Community Development Work
17. Mr Thy Pov Community Development Work
(Recruited on: 15-June-2009)

18. Mr Pheap Siphal Finance and Office Assistant


(Recruited on: 15 June 2009)

19. Sann Touch Community Development Work


(Recruited on: 15 June 2009)

20. Khem Khen Community Development Work


(Recruited on: 15 June 2009)

21. Ly Sophal Community Development Work


(Recruited on: 15 June 2009)
22. Mr. Chan Savat Driver

205
23. Ms. Eang Thida Cleaner

KOMPONG THOM – PARTNERSHIP PROJECT

1. Ms. Prak Vimeany Project Coordinator

SVAY RIENG – WATER AND SANITATION PROJECT

1. Mr. Ven Yath Project Manager


2. Ms. Ma SokRanin Finance and Office Assistant
(Recruited on: 12 Apr 2009)

3. Mr. Teng Phearom Community Development Worker


4. Mr. Ven Vannavuth Community Development Worker
5. Mr. Lim Kok Community Development Worker
6. Mr. Chheng Kosal Community Development Worker

BATTAMBANG/BANTEAY MEANCHEY – PARTNERSHIP PROJECT

1. Mr. Lee Bun Kun Project Manager


2. Mr. Meach Sothea Deputy Project Manager
3. Ms. Nou Vary Project Coordinator
4. Mr. Chourn Narith Office Assistant II
5. Mr. Penh Saro Project Assistant
6. Mr. Tim Vanna Driver
7. Ms. Kauy KimHean Cleaner Part time
8. Ms. Thor Daniep Cleaner Part time

206
ANNEX A:

CHURCH WORLD SERVICE – CAMBODIA


ORGANIZATIONAL CHART
End -Year Report, Fiscal Year 2009

ADMIN, FINANCE & FIELD


PEACE BUILDING
ACCOUNTANT, AND
HUMAN RESOURCE
EMERGENCY RESPONSE

VBCD-ACTIVITY
KOMPONG THOM
FUNDING, MONITORING,
CWS-CAMBODIA EVALUATION & REPORTING
VBCD-ACTIVITY
PROGRAM PREAH VIHEAR

WATSAN COOPERATION PROJECT


SVAY RIENG
NOTICE DIRECT SERVICES
Manage
Support PARTNERSHIP-ACTIVITY
BATTAMBANG, BANTEAY MEANCHEY
AND ODDAR MEANCHEY

PARTNERSHIP PARTNERSHIP-ACTIVITY
KOMPONG THOM

207
ANNEX B: CHURCH WORLD SERVICE - CAMBODIA
GEOGRAPHICAL IMPLEMENTATION
End-YEAR REPORT, FY 2009

Banteay Meanchey Partnership


Preah Vihear Village Based
Project partners: Community Development
 Holistic Support: CFEDA and KNTO
 Small Project Fund: DYMB, DYMTB Project partners:
 MAG Demining  Government Departments (PDoH, local
authorities)
Project Beneficiaries: [32 villages]  CBOs/ VDCs/ VHVs
 Direct families: 3,189
[P: 14,365, W: 4,716] Project Beneficiaries: [18 villages]
 Indirect families: 1,911  Direct families: 1,413 (P: 7,069, W: 3,787)
[P: 10,600, W: 3,703]  Indirect families: 273 (P:1,369, W: 818)

Battambang Partnership

Project partners:
 Holistic Support: ADOVIR, KCDA

Project Beneficiaries: [22 villages]


 Direct families: 2,214 (P: 10,020, W: 3,197) Kompong Thom Village Based
 Indirect families: 2,144 (P: 10,424, W: 3062) Community Development

Project partners:
 Government Departments (PDoH, PDoA,
PDoEYs, PDoWA)
 CBOs, VDCs, SHGs, CPVs, RCVs, VHVs,
Emergency Response: TBAs, Rice banks and NFE groups
 Direct families: 338 (P: 1084, W: 545)  Cambodia Red Cross
 CBDRM training to P: 167, W: 35
Project Beneficiaries: [12 villages]
 Direct families: 778 (P: 3,890, W: 2, 336)
 Indirect families: 587 (P:3,083, W:1,201)

KPT Partnership
Svay Rieng WATSAN Cooperation Project
Project Partners:
 Holistic Support: KORCD
Project Partners:
 Small Project Fund: CIDC, COP, HAPO, IDP
 CBOs (CCs, VLs, CDFs and WSUG)
Project Beneficiaries: [10 villages]
 Direct families: 951 (P:3,655, W:2,308) Project Beneficiaries: [33 villages]
 Indirect families: 3,425 (P:19,414, W:9,515)  Direct Families :1,053 (P: 10546 , W: 5132)

208
Kompong Thom target villages
District Commune Village
No. V_Code
English Khmer English Khmer English Khmer
1 Baray ប យណ៍ Tnaot Chum េ ន តជុំ 06011709 Kang Meas កងមស
2 Baray ប យណ៍ Tnaot Chum េ ន តជុំ 06011705 Pnov េពន
3 Baray ប យណ៍ Tnaot Chum េ ន តជុំ 06011701 Tnaot Chum Ti Muoy េ ន តជុំទី ១
4 Prasat Sambour ្រប ទសំបូរ Sraeung េ្រសើង 06050402 Anlong Slaeng អន្លង់ែស្លង
5 Prasat Sambour ្រប ទសំបូរ Sraeung េ្រសើង 06050404 Beng េបង
6 Prasat Sambour ្រប ទសំបូរ Sraeung េ្រសើង 06050403 Boeng Khvaek បឹងែខ្វក
7 Prasat Sambour ្រប ទសំបូរ Sraeung េ្រសើង 06050409 Choam Boeng ជំបឹង
8 Prasat Sambour ្រប ទសំបូរ Sraeung េ្រសើង 06050412 Sraeung េ្រសើង
9 Prasat Sambour ្រប ទសំបូរ Sraeung េ្រសើង 06050411 Thmei ថមី
10 Prasat Sambour ្រប ទសំបូរ Sraeung េ្រសើង 06050401 Tnaot Chuor េ ន តជួរ
11 Prasat Sambour ្រប ទសំបូរ Sraeung េ្រសើង 06050410 Tumnob ទំនប់
12 Santuk សនទុក Ti Pou ទីេព 06070907 Choam Thnanh ជំថនញ
13 Santuk សនទុក Ti Pou ទីេព 06070905 Samraong សំេ ង
14 Santuk សនទុក Ti Pou ទីេព 06070903 Thmei ថមី
15 Santuk សនទុក Ti Pou ទីេព 60709011 Trapeang Trom ្រតពំង្រតុំ
16 Santuk សនទុក Pnov េពន 06070603 Kang Meas កងមស
17 Santuk សនទុក Pnov េពន 06070602 Pnov េពន
18 Santuk សនទុក Tang Krasang ំង្រក ំង 06070808 Thomm Neath ធមមនថ
19 Santuk សនទុក Tang Krasang ំង្រក ំ ង 06070801 Prampir Meakkakra ៧មក
20 Santuk សនទុក Tang Krasang ំង្រក ំ ង 06070802 Tang Krasang ំង្រក ំង
21 Santuk សនទុក Tang Krasang ំង្រក ំ ង 60708010 Veang Khang Cheung ំ ខងេជើង

22 Santuk សនទក Tang Krasang ំង្រក ំ ង 06070805 Tuol Chan ទួលចន់

209
Preah Vihear Province target villages
District Commune Village
No. V_Code
English Khmer English Khmer English Khmer
1 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Choam Ksant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត 13030102 Kouk Sralau គោកស
្ រ ឡៅ
2 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Choam Ksant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត 13030103 Veal Pou វាលពោធ
ិ៍
3 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Choam Ksant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត 13030104 Veal Thum វាលធំ
4 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Rumdaoh Srae រំ ដោ
ះស្ រែ 13030402 Kouk គោក
5 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Rumdaoh Srae រំ ដោ
ះស្ រែ 13030403 Rolum Thma រល
ំ ថ
្ម
6 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Rumdaoh Srae រំ ដោ
ះស្ រែ 13030401 Srae ស
្ រែ
7 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Rumdaoh Srae រំ ដោ
ះស្ រែ 13030404 Svay ស
្ វាយ
8 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Tuek Kraham ទឹកក្រហម 13030202 Chat Tang ចា ត់តាំ ង
9 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Tuek Kraham ទឹកក្រហម 13030205 Ou Khsan អូរខ្ស
ាន
្ត
10 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Tuek Kraham ទឹកក្រហម 13030203 Sangkom Thmei សង
្ គមថ
្ម

11 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Tuek Kraham ទឹកក្រហម 13030204 Trapeang Thum ត្រពាំ ងធំ
12 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Tuek Kraham ទឹកក្រហម 13030201 Tuek Kraham ទឹកក្រហម
13 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Yeang យា ង 13030505 Choam Antil ជាំ អន
្ទ
ិល
14 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Yeang យា ង 13030506 Choam Srae ជាំ ស
្ រែ
15 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Yeang យា ង 13030504 Kampeanh កំពា ញ
16 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Yeang យា ង 13030502 Kong Yaong គង់យ៉ ោ

17 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Yeang យា ង 13030503 Reaksmei រស
្ មី
18 Choam Khsant ជាំ ក្ស
ាន
្ត Yeang យា ង 13030501 Yeang យា ង

210
WatSan Project Target Areas

District Commune Village


No. V_Code
English Khmer English Khmer English Khmer
1 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Doung ដូង 20040704 Bos Sangkhoar បុសសង្ប័រ
2 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Doung ដូង 20040719 Chea Theach ជា ធា ជ
3 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Doung ដូង 20040708 Chheu Teal ឈើទា ល
4 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Doung ដូង 20040716 Doung ដូង
5 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Doung ដូង 20040705 Kampong Thna កំពង់ថ្នា
6 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Doung ដូង 20040715 Kor គរ
7 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Doung ដូង 20040702 Poun ពោន
8 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Doung ដូង 20040714 Prey Angkunh ព្រៃអង
្ គញ

9 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Doung ដូង 20040710 Prey Tuol ព្រៃទួល
10 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Doung ដូង 20040721 Svay Pok ស
្ វាយពក
11 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Doung ដូង 20040701 Ta Suos តា ស
ួ ស
12 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Doung ដូង 20040717 Trapeang Phlong ត្រពាំ ងផ
្ល
ុង
13 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Doung ដូង 20040703 Trapeang Sla ត្រពាំ ងស
្ល

14 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Doung ដូង 20040712 Trapeang Svay ត្រពាំ ងស
្ វាយ
15 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Doung ដូង 20040707 Trapeang Thlok ត្រពាំ ងធ
្លក
16 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Doung ដូង 20040709 Trapeang Thum ត្រពាំ ងធំ
17 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Kokir គគីរ 20040905 Kokir គគីរ
18 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Kokir គគីរ 20040902 Prey Kdei ព្រៃក
្ត

19 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Kokir គគីរ 20040901 Ta Sek តា សេ ក
20 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Kokir គគីរ 20040903 Ta Veang តា វាំ ង
21 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Tras ត្រស
់ 20041612 Boeng បឹង
22 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Tras ត្រស
់ 20041603 Muni Proeksa មុន
្ន
ី ប្រឹ ក្ស

23 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Tras ត្រស
់ 20041608 Popul ពពូល
24 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Tras ត្រស
់ 20041611 Serei Ao សេ រី អោ
25 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Tras ត្រស
់ 20041606 Ta Suos តា ស
ួ ស

211
26 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Tras ត្រស
់ 20041613 Trapeang Banteay ត្រពាំ ងបន្ទាយ
27 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Tras ត្រស
់ 20041610 Veal Tmat វាលត្មាត
28 Romeas Haek រមា សហែ ក Tras ត្រស
់ 20041609 Veal Veaeng វាលវែង
29 Rumduol រំ ដួល Bos Mon បុសមន 20030101 Bos Mon Leu បុសមនលើ
30 Rumduol រំ ដួល Bos Mon បុសមន 20030104 Bos Svay បុសស
្ វាយ
31 Rumduol រំ ដួល Bos Mon បុសមន 20030107 Srama ស
្ រ ម៉
32 Rumduol រំ ដួល Pong Tuek ពងទឹក 20030704 Prey Ta Yoan ព្រៃតា យ
័ ន
្ត
33 Rumduol រំ ដួល Pong Tuek ពងទឹក 20030706 Trapeang Thkov ត្រពាំ ងថ
្ក
ូវ

212
BattamBang Target villages

District Commune Village


No. V_Code
English Khmer English Khmer English Khmer
1 Bavel បវេល Ampil Pram Daeum អំពិលប្រាំ ដើម 02040503 Ampil អំពិល
2 Bavel បវេល Ampil Pram Daeum អំពិលប្រាំ ដើម 02040506 Buo Run ប
៊ ួ រុ ន
3 Bavel បវេល Ampil Pram Daeum អំពិលប្រាំ ដើម 02040501 Dangkao Kramang ដង្កោ
ក្រម៉ាង
4 Bavel បវេល Ampil Pram Daeum អំពិលប្រាំ ដើម 02040507 Doung ដូង
5 Bavel បវេល Ampil Pram Daeum អំពិលប្រាំ ដើម 02040502 Siem សៀម
6 Bavel បវេល Ampil Pram Daeum អំពិលប្រាំ ដើម 02040504 Sthapor ស
្ ថាពរ
7 Bavel បវេល Ampil Pram Daeum អំពិលប្រាំ ដើម 02040508 Sthapor Pir ស
្ ថាពរ ២
8 Bavel បវេល Ampil Pram Daeum អំពិលប្រាំ ដើម 02040505 Ta Khiev តា ខៀ វ
9 Bavel បវេល Kdol Ta Haen ក
្ត
ុ លតា ហែ ន 02040613 Boeng Sangkae បឹងសង្កែ
10 Samlout សំ ឡ
ួ ត Ta Taok តា តោ ក 02090108 Ou Krouch អូរក្រូ ច
11 Samlout ស
ំ ឡ
ួ ត Ta Taok តា តោក 02090105 Ou Nonoung អូរននោង
12 Samlout ស
ំ ឡ
ួ ត Ta Taok តា តោក 02090107 Ou Tateak អូរតា ទៀក
13 Samlout ស
ំ ឡ
ួ ត Ta Taok តា តោក 02090102 Ou Traeng អូរត្រែង
14 Samlout ស
ំ ឡ
ួ ត Ta Taok តា តោក 02090106 Peam ពា ម
15 Samlout ស
ំ ឡ
ួ ត Ta Taok តា តោក 02090101 Peam Ta ពា មតា
16 Samlout ស
ំ ឡ
ួ ត Ta Taok តា តោក 02090109 Phnum Rai ភ
្ន
ំ រ៉ ៃ
17 Samlout ស
ំ ឡ
ួ ត Ta Taok តា តោក 02090104 Ta Taok តា តោក
18 Samlout សំ ឡ ួ ត Ta Taok តា តោ ក 02090103 Veal Rolueum វាលរល ឹ ម
19 Samlout ស ំ ឡ ួ ត Sung ស៊ុង 02090403 Kandal កណ ្ តាល
20 Samlout ស ំ ឡ ួ ត Sung ស៊ុង 02090401 Sung Muoy ស៊ ុ ង១
21 Samlout ស
ំ ឡ ួ ត Ta Sanh តា សា ញ 02090702 Prey Rumchek ព្រៃរំ ចេ ក
22 Samlout ស ំ ឡ ួ ត Ta Sanh តា សា ញ 02090705 Ta Sanh Tboung តា សា ញត្បូង

213
Banteag Meanchey target villages

District Commune Village


No. V_Code
English Khmer English Khmer English Khmer
1 Malai ម៉ាឡៃ Tuol Pongro ទួលពង្រ 01090504 Banteay Ti Muoy បន្ទាយទីមួយ
2 Malai ម៉ាឡៃ Tuol Pongro ទួលពង្រ 01090502 Kaoh Snuol កោ
ះស្ នួល
3 Malai ម៉ាឡៃ Tuol Pongro ទួលពង្រ 01090503 Khla Ngoab ខ្ល
ាងា ប់
4 Malai ម៉ាឡៃ Tuol Pongro ទួលពង្រ 01090506 Ou Ambel អូរអំបិល
5 Malai ម៉ាឡៃ Tuol Pongro ទួលពង្រ 01090505 Santepheap សន
្ត
ិ ភា ព
6 Malai ម៉ាឡៃ Ou Sampor អូរស
ំ ព័រ 01090304 Banteay Ti Pir បន្ទាយទីពីរ
7 Malai ម៉ាឡៃ Ou Sampor អូរស
ំ ព័រ 01090303 Kbal Tumnob ក្បាលទំនប់
8 Malai ម៉ាឡៃ Ou Sampor អូរស
ំ ព័រ 01090302 Ou Sampor អូរស
ំ ព័រ
9 Malai ម៉ាឡៃ Ou Sampor អូរស
ំ ព័រ 01090301 Ou Sampor Muoy អូរស
ំ ព័រមួយ
10 Ou Chrov អូរជ្ រៅ Koub កូប 01050209 Ou Chrov អូរជ្ រៅ
11 Ou Chrov អូរជ្ រៅ Samraong ស
ំ រោ
ង 01050508 Anhchanh អញ
្ ចាញ
12 Ou Chrov អូរជ្ រៅ Samraong ស
ំ រោ
ង 01050501 Banlech បន
្ល
ិច
13 Ou Chrov អូរជ្ រៅ Samraong ស
ំ រោ
ង 01050507 Bat Trang បត់ត្រង់
14 Ou Chrov អូរជ្ រៅ Samraong ស
ំ រោ
ង 01050503 Samraong ស
ំ រោ

15 Ou Chrov អូរជ្ រៅ Samraong ស
ំ រោ
ង 01050505 Thmei ថ
្ម

16 Ou Chrov អូរជ្ រៅ Samraong ស
ំ រោ
ង 01050506 Thmenh Trei ធ្មេញត្រី
17 Ou Chrov អូរជ្ រៅ Samraong ស
ំ រោ
ង 01050509 Voat វត
្ត
18 Preah Netr Preah ព្ រះនេ ត្រព្ រះ Rohal រហា ល 01040607 Popel ពពេ ល
19 Preah Netr Preah ព្ រះនេ ត្រព្ រះ Rohal រហា ល 01040609 Ruessei ប
្ញស
្ស

20 Preah Netr Preah ព្ រះនេ ត្រព្ រះ Rohal រហា ល 01040605 Snay ស
្ នាយ
21 Serei Saophoan ស
ិ រី សោភ័ណ
្ ឌ Bos Sbov បុសស
្ បូវ 01060113 Khchas ខ្ចាស

22 Serei Saophoan ស
ិ រី សោភ័ណ
្ ឌ Bos Sbov បុសស
្ បូវ 01060115 Khu Svay ឃ
ូ ស
្ វាយ
23 Serei Saophoan ស
ិ រី សោភ័ណ
្ ឌ Bos Sbov បុសស
្ បូវ 01060116 Khvav ខ្វាវ
24 Serei Saophoan ស
ិ រី សោភ័ណ
្ ឌ Bos Sbov បុសស
្ បូវ 01060117 Tbaeng ត្បែង

214
Oddar Meanchey target villages

District Commune Village


No. V_Code
English Khmer English Khmer English Khmer
1 Banteay Ampil បនទយអំពិល Ampil អំពិល 22020124 Cha ចរ
2 Banteay Ampil បនទយអំពិល Ampil អំពិល 22020113 Chob Kokir Khang Kaeut ជប់គគីរខងេកើត
3 Banteay Ampil បនទយអំពិល Ampil អំពិល 22020114 Chob Kokir Khang Lech ជប់គគីរខងលិច
4 Banteay Ampil បនទយអំពិល Ampil អំពិល 22020106 Kdol ក្តុល
5 Banteay Ampil បនទយអំពិល Ampil អំពិល 22020122 Kouk Prech េគកេ្រពច
6 Banteay Ampil បនទយអំពិល Ampil អំពិល 22020126 Soupheap សូភព
7 Banteay Ampil បនទយអំពិល Ampil អំពិល 22020120 Tbeng Chas ែតបងចស់
8 Banteay Ampil បនទយអំពិល Ampil អំពិល 22020121 Tbaeng Thmei ែតបងថមី

215
CWS/CAMBODIA FY09 FUNDING PARTNERS
CWS – CAMBODIA CURRENT DONORS/FUNDING PARTNERS