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MID-YEAR REPORT

Fiscal Year 2009

“The lasting benefits that we create don’t come because we do good deeds, but because we
do good work – work that is focused on our mission to create value.”
MID-YEAR REPORT
FISCAL YEAR 2009

Writing and Compiling: Program/Project/Field staff


Editing and Modifying: Uon Vichetr, Chhouk Chantha
and Write Away Editing

Layout designed: Uon Vichetr


Photos: CWS Staff

Copies of this report are available at


Church World Service/Cambodia

Office: 69z, Street 450, Toul Tumpong II, Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Phone: (855) 23 217 786, Fax: (855) 23 216 014
E-mail: info@cwscambodia.org, Website: www.cwscambodia.org
© Copyright 2009, Church World Service Cambodia (CWSC)

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any
means, without prior permission from CWSC. Any person who does any unauthorized act in relation to
this publication may be liable to criminal prosecution and civil claims of damages.

First published, 2009

Published by Church World Service Cambodia


This book is not for sale through commercial channels.
Acknowledgements

This document was compiled from extensive reports provided by partner NGOs, CWSC field
staff, project officers and managers, as well as field visits by the three members of the Funding,
Monitoring, Evaluation and Reporting unit: Mr. Uon Vichetr (Reporting and Proposal
Development Officer); Mr. Heng Kun (Monitoring and Evaluation Officer); and Ms. Pong Pagna
Vattey (Data Management Officer).

The FMER unit of Church World Service Cambodia would like to express our deep appreciation
to all CNGOs Partners, as well as our field staff, program officers and managers, Director for
Programming and Country Representative for their valuable contributions and assistance in
compiling and reviewing this report.

We are especially grateful to the residents of the villages where CWSC and our partners work
who were eager to discuss the challenges and opportunities they face, and the effectiveness
and constraints of our work. Their valuable feedback has been the primary source of direction
for our programming as well as this report.

i
Church World Service Cambodia
2009 First Semester Report

Executive summary

Executive summaries are usually just that: business briefings. Perhaps we need to rethink the
way we have been speaking about development. As we talk about programs and outputs and
impacts, we may be cushioning ourselves from the reality of the dire poverty we are trying to
alleviate. This is understandable; it is difficult to face. However, it is helpful to remind ourselves
constantly that absolute poverty is far more difficult to experience than it is to witness.

We are at a crossroads at CWS Cambodia. As we enter the fifth year of our Seven Year
Strategic Directions, our work is becoming increasingly innovative, comprehensive and effective
(there is a growing sense of enthusiasm among our staff), but at the same time we face a
looming and substantial funding shortfall at the end of this reporting period, one that could force
us to scale back delivery of assistance to many villages in rural Cambodia where we, or our
partners, are the only safety net for some of the region’s poorest people.

In this reporting period, for example, we began implementing a 15-month Community Based
Disaster Risk Management in 40 isolated and under served villages along the Thai border in
Northwest Cambodia. In the previous reporting period, we received a Gold Medal from the Royal
Government of Cambodia for our achievements in implementing CBDRM. Now, however, we
are implementing the project through three highly committed Cambodian partner NGOs in
collaboration with district and provincial offices of the Cambodian Red Cross.

This transfer of knowledge and skills is at the heart of how we work. It fosters independence and
helps free families and communities from abject poverty. Already, 81 Red Cross Volunteers
have received training on how to effectively prepare for natural disasters and to mitigate impacts
resulting from them. The training has extended to village leaders, commune, district and
provincial officials. Villages are already drafting and implementing their own plans, with
assistance from CWS Cambodia’s Emergency Response unit and our Cambodian partners.

On the other side of the country, along the border with Vietnam, our Water and Sanitation
Cooperation project is due to phase out of 59 villages in Svay Rieng province at the end of this
reporting period. This project has had remarkable results in reducing illness, improving nutrition
and lifting incomes (through home gardening, for example) in villages where the rate of access
to safe water is among the lowest in the region. Residents say the phase out is happening too
soon. Many have expressed alarm. They say they need more wells, water filters and latrines.

The World Bank agrees with them. Only 2% of rural residents in the province have access to
latrines, it reported last year. At the rate rural Cambodians are gaining access to sanitation, it will
take the country 150 years to achieve universal coverage, the report estimated. Numerous other
reports over the past few years have made the same, or similar, points. Access to safe water
remains a luxury in many areas of rural Cambodia, despite the countless wells that have been
installed over the past decade. The problem with many, however, is that they don’t work or when
the pump breaks no one in the village knows how to fix it. This is one example of why village-
based development is both effective and sustainable. Residents lead the process by, for
example, deciding where to place a well, helping construct it, learning how to maintain it.

We will continue to implement this model. Moreover, our focus on assisting the absolute poor
will continue. This is not only an ethical imperative, but an approach that works. When residents
of a village see their poorest neighbors become self sufficient they start paying close attention
and opening their minds to new ways of thinking. As is noted in the following pages, residents of
villages in Kompong Thom (in the heart of Cambodia) have started home gardening on their own
initiative after seeing how vulnerable families used them to generate income and become self
sufficient.

ii
Government officials have also noticed the effectiveness of our approach. Our holistic partner,
Kumnit Thmey (New Ideas) Organization, for example, was invited to expand into a new
commune in Oddar Meanchey after officials noticed that the villages it was implementing
integrated community development in were developing at a faster rate than the villages in their
commune.

At CWS Cambodia we are constantly on the lookout for new ideas and new partners, but we
remain deeply committed to the humanitarian values that continue to prove to be the most
effective foundation for genuine and sustainable development, which is time consuming,
requires in-depth knowledge of communities, intensive capacity building and an integrated
approach. At its best, this is a joint learning experience.

There are often, however, barriers to development that must be removed before it can occur.
These include the lack of physical and social infrastructure, and, in many areas of Cambodia,
landmines. The Royal Government of Cambodia is in the process of seeking a 10 year
extension to the Ottawa Treaty to provide it with more time to remove the millions of landmines
that remain along the Thai border. CWS Cambodia works in villages where these devices
continue to pose a lethal hazard. Although the number of Cambodians who are maimed or killed
by landmines has thankfully plummeted, these devices continue to trap households and entire
villages in poverty because they obstruct land that could be used for farming.

Funding for our humanitarian demining program in Malai District ran out last year. The work is
very far from complete; unless it continues residents will remain trapped in poverty and reliant on
foreign aid to feed their families.

The following report provides a detailed account of the immense amount of work we have
undertaken over the past six months, as individuals, teams, with partners, and as an
organization. Our achievements and challenges are described in detail in the hope that this will
provide an accurate understanding of the very dynamic way we work, as well as a sense of our
commitment, creativity, enthusiasm and determination to ensure maximum effectiveness.

The report is a joint effort by staff from every project. They are not native English speakers, but
their enthusiasm and concern shines through.

The diversity of our work may give a misleading impression. It may appear that our many
projects lack coherence. This is not the case. Mutually respectful relationships, ingenuity,
honesty, gender equality, peace building, optimism, and transparency are among the values that
are carefully embedded in all the projects we implement then hand over to likeminded groups
who continue to expand and develop them.

Chhouk Chantha
Director for Programming

iii
ABBREVIATIONS
Acronym Full names

ADOVIR Association for Development and Our Villager’s Rights


AFSC American Friends Service Committee
AIDS Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome
BTB Battambang Province
BTM Banteay Meanchey Province
CAWST Center for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology
CAT Capacity Assessment Tool
CBDRM Community Based Disaster Risk Management
CBFA Community Based First Aid
CBO Community Based Organization
CC Commune Council
CCC Cooperation Committee for Cambodia
CCDM Commune Committee for Disaster Management
CD Community Development
CDF Community Development Facilitator
CDW Community Development Worker
CEDAC Centre D’etude et de Development Agricole Cambodgien (Cambodian
Center for Agricultural Study and Development)
CFEDA Cambodian Family Economic Development Association
CIDC Cooperation for Indigenous People and Development in Cambodia
CSF Children Support Foundation
CGA Cambodia Global Action
CHART Creative, Holistic, Action Research for Relationship Transformation
CMVIS Cambodian Mine/UXO Victim Information System
CNGO Cambodian Non-governmental Organization
Com Dev Community Development
CRC Cambodian Red Cross
CWS Church World Service
CWSC Church World Service Cambodia
DAP Direct Aid Project
DCA Dan Church Aid
DCDM District Committee for Disaster Management
DIPECHO Disaster Preparedness of European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office
DSP Direct Services Program
DYMB Dhammayietra Mongkol Borei
DYBTM Dhammayietra Banteay Meanchey
DYBTB Dhammayietra Battambang
ECHO European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office
EED Evangelischer Entwicklungsdienst
ERP Emergency Response and Preparedness
FMER Funding, Monitoring, Evaluation and Reporting
FY Fiscal Year or financial year
GPP Good Principle Project
HC Health Center
HIV Human Immunodeficiency Virus
HVCA Hazard, vulnerability and Capacity Assessment
HMA Humanitarian Mine Action
ICA Initiatives for Change Association
ICD Integrated Community Development
ICDP Integrated Community Development Programme
ICSO Indigenous Community Support Organization

iv
IEC Information, Education, Communication
INGO International Non-profit Organization
KCDA Khmer Community Development Association
KCC Kampuchea Christian Council
Kg Kilogram
KNTO Kumnit Thmey Organization
KORCD Khmer Organization for Rural Community Development
KPT Kompong Thom province
LCP Local Capacity for Peace
LWF Lutheran World Federation
MAC Mine Action Coordinator
MAG Mines Advisory Group
MAO Mine Action Officer
MAPU Mine Action Planning Unit
MAT Mine Action Team
MC Management Committee
MCH Mother and Child Health
M&E Monitoring and Evaluation
MEDICAM Medical Cambodia (Umbrella organization for public health NGOs in
Cambodia)
MoH Ministry of Health
MoEY Ministry of Education Youth and Sports
MoU Memorandum of Understanding
MRD Ministry of Rural Development
NCCA National Council of Churches in Australia
NCCC The NGOs Code Compliance Committee
NCDM National Committee for Disaster Management
NGO Non Government Organization
OMC Oddar Meanchey Province
OD Operational District/Organization Development
OPA Old People Association
Pc Project Coordinator/ Program Coordinator
PDoA Provincial Department of Agriculture
PDoE Provincial Department of Education
PDoH Provincial Department of Health
PCDM Provincial Committee for Disaster Management
PDRD Provincial Department of Rural Development
PFT Provincial Facilitation Team
PRA Participatory Rural Appraisal
PROCOCOM Provincial Coordination Committee
PM Project Manager/Program Manager
PO Program Officer
POG Program Oversight Group
PP Partnership Program/Project
PRA Participatory Rural Appraisal
PRC Provincial Red Cross
PVH Preah Vihear Province
RCV Red Cross Volunteer
SHG Self Help Group
SMCH Support Mother and Child Health/Support Maternal Child Health
SMT Senior Management Team
SRI Integrated System of Rice Intensification
STD Sexually Transmitted Diseases

v
SvR Svay Rieng province
TBA Traditional Birth Attendant
US$ United States Dollar
UXO Unexploded Ordnance
VBCD Village-Based Community Development
VBNK Vityeasthan Bondosbandal Neakkrupkrong (an institute for managers
of organizations working for the development of Cambodia)
VC Village Chief
VCPM Village Committee for Program Management
VDC Village Development Committee
VDV Village Disaster Volunteer
VHV Village Health Volunteer
VL Village Leader
VLA Village Livestock Agent
VP Vulnerable People
WATSAN Water and Sanitation
WCA Working Capital Assistance
WFP World Food Programme
WSUG Water and Sanitation User Group

vi
Table of Contents

Page
Acknowledgements ………………………………………………………………………………………..…i
Executive Summary………………………………………………………………………………………..…ii
Abbreviation or Acronym……………………………………………………………………………………iv
Table of Contents……………………………………………………………………………………………vii

Direct Services Program


1.1 Direct Services Office…………………………………………………………..……………..1
1.2 KPT Village Based Community Development Project…………………………………….9
1.3 PvH Village Based Community Development Project……………………………………19
1.4 SvR Water and Sanitation Cooperation Project…………………………………………..27

Partnership Program

2.1 Partnership Office………………………………………………………………….…………33


2.2 BTB/BTM Partnership Project…………………………………………………….…….…..39
2.3 KPT Partnership Project………………………………………………………….……….…52

Integrated Humanitarian Mine Action

3 Malai District Demining Project…………………………………………………..…………59

Phnom Penh Central Office

4 FMER, Finance, Administration, and Human Resource Management………….…….64

Appendices

Appendix I : Summary of Finances…………………………………………….……………….78


Appendix II : Annual Outputs/Log-frame……………………………………………………..…94
Appendix III : CWS/Cambodia Personnel List…………………………………………………193

Annexes

Annex A : Organizational Chart……………………………………………………196


Annex B : Geographical Implementation Areas………………………………… 197
Annex B : Target Villages ………………………………………………………… 198

vii
DIRECT SERVICES PROGRAM
 KOMPONG THOM VILLAGE BASED COMMUNITY
DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

 PREAH VIHEAR VILLAGE BASED COMMUNITY


DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

 SVAY RIENG WATSAN COOPERATION PROJECT

CHURCH WORLD SERVICE/CAMBODIA


1.1. DIRECT SERVICES PROGRAM

Introduction

The Direct Services Program (DSP) office continues to adapt to the changing realities of our
diverse programs as well as the constraints we face. During this reporting period, for example,
our Village Based Community Development Project was divided into two projects (Kompong
Thom VBCD and Preah Vihear VBCD). This has allowed us to improve the scope and
effectiveness of our work in Preah Vihear, where few international NGOs have a presence, and
CWS Cambodia is pioneering VBCD. DSP staff assisted and supervised the smooth separation
of the two projects, focusing on work plans and operation budgets so that field work would not
be interrupted.

The DSP office was established in 2006 to solve coordination and communication problems
faced by the Community Development Program and Strategic Support Unit. The solution was to
merge these two groups at our central office in Phnom Penh. As a result, we have been able to
streamline and strengthen the provision of technical and managerial support in the field. Our aim
of delivering the most effective and sustainable solutions to meet the most urgent needs faced
by rural Cambodians, especially those isolated in poverty, has been enhanced.

The office’s ten staff members (three women) provide technical support and guidance to all field
work and programs, from VBCD in Kompong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces, to our Water
and Sanitation (WatSan) Cooperation Project in Svay Rieng Province. They also ensure that
cross-sectoral programs (Disaster Mitigation, Emergency Response and Preparedness (ERP)
and Peace Building) are integrated in all our target villages and are embedded in projects
implemented by the Cambodian NGOs that comprise our Partnership Program.

Our ten DSP staff members comprise one program manager, three program coordinators, three
program officers and three program assistants. Their expertise encompasses community-based
organization, income generation, food security, health, emergency response, community-based
disaster risk management and peace building.

During the reporting period preparations were made for the Svay Rieng WatSan cooperation
Project to phase out from 59 villages at the end of this fiscal year. DSP staff stepped up efforts
to enhance the implementation of project activities through staff capacity building and coaching,
and the fine-tuning of necessary guidelines, such as the exit plan.

In addition, with a 15-month grant from the Disaster Preparedness Program of the European
Commission’s Humanitarian Aid Department (DIPECHO) through Dan Church Aid - Cambodia,
CWS Cambodia began implementing a Community Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM)
Project on 15 August, 2008 (the project runs until 14 November, 2009). It is being implemented
through the ERP unit and the Battambang and Banteay Meanchey Partnership Project in 40
target villages along the Thai border: in Banteay Meanchey, Battambang and Oddar Meanchey
provinces. Three Cambodian NGOs (CFEDA, KCDA and KNTO) that are holistic partners in the
BTB&BTM Partnership Project were selected to implement CBDRM.

This report discusses major accomplishments, staff capacity building, program development and
the CBDRM Project. Challenges and lessons learned, the six-month plan and issues not
addressed will be detailed below as well. First, however, it is helpful to reiterate our prime goal,
which each of our programs (as well as our partnerships) is designed to accomplish.

Direct Services Program 1


Our Objective: To improve communities' capacity for peace building, emergency response, and
disaster risk management, and facilitate their ability to define their development direction in a
participatory and democratic manner.

Major Accomplishments and Changes


Capacity Building for Development Planning

♦ Staff Technical Capacity Building

DSP Office staff members support and guide project implementation through technical and
managerial supervision. Consequently, delivering internal technical training courses are a vital
tool for building staff capacity. In this reporting period, the DSP office held eight training courses
to support project implementation.

Date/ # of Participants (female)


No Course Title Facilitator(s)
Location
KPT PVH SVR Other
18-20/08/08 ERP Program Coordinator
1 CBDRM and Planning 8(3) 10(3)
KPT office and Project Assistant

27-29/08/08
2 Primary Health Care Health Program Officer 7(3) 8(3)
PVH office

9-10 Oct 08 Program Coordinator


SHG Concept and
3 Credit and Income 9(3) 10(3)
Bookkeeping PNP office Generation

Direct Services Program


SHG Concept and 24-28 Nov 08 CNGO:
4 Manager, Credit and
Small Business BTB office Income Generation Project 19(9)
Coordinator
Maternal and Child 16-18/07/08 Health Program Officer,
Direct Services Program 1 OD
5 Health Refresher 8(3) 10(3)
KPT Office Officer, Community staff
Workshop
Development Workers
18-21/11/08
1
6 Reconciliation CR, PM-DS, CDRI 1 1 1 15
Koh Kong

Community Led Total 6-8/10/08 Ministry of Rural DSP:


7 9(4) 9(3) 6(0)
Sanitation PNH Office Development 2 (1)

8 Oct 29-31 Dr. Betman S. Bhandari,


Low Cost Sanitation Center for Affordable Water 2(1) 2 2 9 (2)
PNP Office and Sanitation Technology

These courses have significantly improved the knowledge of field staff to facilitate community
development work. Significant outputs of thee of the eight training courses are noted below.

i. CBDRM and Planning: the course was designed to enhance the understanding of staff
in the Kompong Thom and Preah Vihear VBCD projects on disaster preparedness, risk
reduction, response, hazard vulnerability and capacity assessment, and village disaster
risk management planning. Additionally, this course provided key facilitation knowledge
1
Senior Management Team 4 (2 women), PNH Staff 7(1), BTB/BTM 3(1), KPT-PP 1(1)
Direct Services Program 2
and tools so that project staff can duplicate the training courses to relevant members of
villages, including Red Cross Volunteers.

As a result of the “echo training”, 39 Red Cross Volunteers (18 women) attended two
CBDRM and Planning training courses organized by CWS Cambodia staff during the
reporting period. They comprised 20 RCVs (9 women) from Preah Vihear and 19 RCVs
(9 women) from Kompong Thom. The RCVs will use their training by leading
assessments of the hazard vulnerabilities and capacities to deal with them in their
communities in cooperation with VDCs and local authorities.

ii. Community Led Total Sanitation: Our extensive water and sanitation related activities
were enhanced by this training course provided, following the invitation of the DSP
Office, by the Ministry of Rural Development. The training focused on resource mobilizing
approaches and CLTS guidelines for community-initiated latrine construction by using
available local resources at affordable prices. There was also a one-day field visit that
enabled staff to practice the CLTS approach with the participation of 114 (60 women)
residents of villages in Svay Rieng Province.

According to the CLTS strategy,


people are responsible for building
latrines by using their own resources.
However, due to the extreme poverty
in the villages where CWS works, we
are considering subsidizing 50-75% of
the cost of latrine construction.
Beneficiaries would contribute from 25-
50% in cash or the equivalent in labor.
Following the CLTS promotion, four
families in one target village (Beng
Village, Kompong Thom) built their
own dry-pit household latrines
immediately after learning how to do
A CLTS training field practice entitled so from CWS staff who had attended
“Understanding disease transmission and prevention”. the training session. Field staff in the
WatSan Project and VBCD projects in
KPT and PVH have found, however, that promotional charts that clarify the links between
disease and sanitation are very useful for raising awareness and mobilizing the
participation and contribution of local resources for latrine construction.

iii. Maternal Child Health Refresher Course:

With support from the United


Nations World Food Programme,
CWS-C held a three-day refresher
training course on MCH, aiming to
enhance the capacity of staff as
well as their confidence in
implementing the project. Tests
taken before and after the course
found significant growth in
knowledge about MCH among
participants. (Testing scores
improved from 34-70% prior to the
Staff participate in a food grouping exercised at a maternal
course to 57-80% afterwards.) and child health workshop.

Direct Services Program 3


All participants learned how to use counseling cards, which include recipes and
instructions on how to prepare a nutritious corn and soybean (CSB) powder-based meal
and porridge as well as the advantages of breast feeding. Staff members who
participated in the course were able to duplicate the courses to Village Health Volunteers
(VHVs) in KPT and PVH. The two echo training courses passed on the knowledge
gained at the refresher course to 39 VHVs (15 women) in the KPT and PVH target
villages. The pre- and post-test results and found that the trained VHVs were able to
calculate and register children’s ages more accurately, use counseling cards more
effectively and were able to show mothers how to prepare and cook CSB and nutritious
porridge made from locally sourced and inexpensive ingredients.

♦ Community Capacity Building and Awareness Raising


DSP staff members have supported communities in local capacity building for development and
planning. Training courses and awareness raising events delivered directly by the DSP Office in
cooperation with Project staff included ante- and post-natal care, primary health care, dengue
fever, malaria, diarrhea, pneumonia, MCH, SHG concepts and bookkeeping, poultry and fish
raising, and peace concepts.

These courses and awareness raising events have significantly enhanced the knowledge and
understanding of community people and produced behavioral changes. Below are two examples
from the reporting period.

i. SHG Concepts: 188 people (127) in 12


villages in PVH and 471 (370) from 12
villages in KPT received training on SHG
concepts. After training from the credit
and income generation program
coordinator and the DSP program
manager, two additional SHGs in PVH
and 12 additional SHGs in KPT, with an
average of 15 members (including 12
women) in each group, were formed.
Training on bookkeeping at a SHG workshop

ii. Chicken and Duck Raising: 38 families


in PVH were introduced to chicken and
duck raising techniques by DSP staff in
cooperation with project implementation
staff. After the training, participants
began raising poultry, increasing the
numbers of their ducks and/or chickens
steadily during the reporting period.

Ducklings were vaccinated and distributed to


villagers in Svay Village, Preah Vihear 

Direct Services Program 4


Program Development, Management and Supervision
♦ CWS Community Development Model Review
CWS-C is implementing its four-year Village
Based Community Development pilot project in
12 villages in KPT and 18 villages in PVH from
FY08-FY11. This is the 2nd year of the pilot
project. As a learning organization, CWS-C
(following the Action Learning Reflection and
Planning cycle) conducted a 2nd Community
Development Model Review from 15-17
December to analyze accomplishments and
consider further steps. The workshop was
facilitated by Ms. Betty Langeler2.
CD Model Review Workshop
All DSP staff – including those in the program
office, KPT and PVH projects, as well as the Monitoring and Evaluation Officer – were provided
with the opportunity to reconsider the distinction between facilitating and implementing. CWS-C
regards itself as an organization that facilitates the development process, with villages directing
it according to their needs. Staff also participated in in-depth discussions about project boundary
partners, progress markers and outcome mapping. At the workshop staff agreed to form a
Community Development Model Review Team to revise the written guidelines in January 2009.

1. Emergency Response and Preparedness Program


♦ Community Based Disaster Risk Management Project

CWS-C received a US$ 219,100


(€146,067) grant from the Disaster
Preparedness Program of the
European Commission’s
Humanitarian Aid Department
(DIPECHO) through Dan Church
Aid – Cambodia for a joint
Community Based Disaster Risk
Management (CBDRM) Project in
Cambodia. The project has been
running since August 15, 2008
under the ERP Program and
Battambang and Banteay
Meanchey Partnership Project in 40
villages along the Thai border in CBDRM and Commune Development Planning Training Workshop
Banteay Meanchey, Battambang for CWS, CNGO and Cambodian Red Cross counterparts, facilitated
and Oddar Meanchey provinces. jointly by NCDM and MoP, Banteay Meanchey province
Three Cambodian NGOs that are
holistic partners of CWS-C are facilitating project activities in the villages. They are: the
Cambodian Family Economic Development Association (CFEDA), Khmer Community
Development Organization (KCDA) and Kumnit Thmey Organization (KNTO).

2
Ms. Betty Langeler helped facilitate the development of our Community Development Model in May 2006.

Direct Services Program 5


In the reporting period, the CBDRM Project has achieved the following results:

- 81 Red Cross Volunteers (RCV) were elected or selected by community people with
assistance from Cambodian Red Cross provincial branches, CWS-C and CNGO partners.
- 63 RCVs (29 women) were trained on Community Based First Aid by Cambodian Red
Cross provincial branches
- 14 RCVs (4 women), 7 VDC members (1 woman), and seven village leaders participated
in two refresher courses on CBDRM and Planning. The courses were facilitated by ERP
Program staff.
- 67 RCVs (38 women), 23 VDC members (6 women) and 33 village leaders (5 women)
were trained on CBDRM and Planning in four training courses facilitated by ERP Program
staff
- 4 provincial, 16 district (2 women) and 25 commune (2 women) members of committees
for disaster management were trained on Community Based Disaster Preparation and
Roles and Responsibilities by the National Committee for Disaster Management
- 6 CWS staff (1 woman), 5 KCDA staff (2 women), 5 CFEDA staff (4 women), 8 KNTO
staff (3 women) and 2 ADOVIR staff (2 women) were trained on CBDRM and Commune
Development Planning by the National Committee for Disaster Management and Ministry
of Planning.

(Implementation of the CBDRM Project is covered in more detail in the report section on the
BTB&BTM Partnership Project.)

Major Challenges

♦ DSP office staff members have a heavy workload, spending a great amount of time focused
on mentoring the Svay Rieng WatSan Cooperation Project and the VBCD Projects in
Kompong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces. The program has ten staff members, including
one women manager who oversees the projects and a program assistant who is supported
by colleagues in handling office work. Two program officers were assigned to assist the
VBCD Projects in Kompong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces. The health program officer,
and the program coordinators for peace and credit and income generation are responsible for
technical support and capacity building to all three projects, as well as developing
program/project guidelines and other necessary tools. Additionally, the peace program
coordinator coordinates peace work through the partnership program while the ERP program
coordinator and assistants3 are responsible for relevant work in the three direct projects as
well as the CBDRM project. They also coordinate the emergency response component of
CWS’s overall programming.

At the same time, DSP Office staff


members are heavily involved in capacity
building through coaching and
supplementary trainings to staff members
implementing the new VBCD model in
Preah Vihear and Kompong Thom
provinces. This challenge has meant that
some activities are running behind
schedule due to the amount of time spent
building the capacity of VBCD
implementing staff during the first and
second years of the model’s
implementation. One attempt to reduce the
amount of multi-tasking required was

3
The ERP program assistant for training resigned during his probationary period (on 31 December 2008).
Direct Services Program 6
the delivery of technical training courses to VBCD project staff members followed by help
providing echo training to village members. Some training courses were also shortened,
though this often resulted in a lessening of their effectiveness. Consequently, the DSP office
intends to recruit more staff and review its internal structure in the second half of FY09.

Lessons Learned

♦ In the effort to build staff capacity and especially community capacity within a short
timeframe, the program/project should produce or have access to more visual training aids,
such as awareness raising material on primary health care, peace building, drought and
disaster preparedness and food security.

♦ Within Phase One and year one of Phase Two of the VBCD mode, projects and program
plans should more realistically take into account staff capacity and the objectives of each
phase.

Issues Not Addressed

♦ During the implementation of the VBCD Project in Kompong Thom and Preah Vihear, the
need for Village Livestock Agents (VLAs) or veterinarians became apparent. However, there
was no response to this need, as VLAs had not been included in the annual project plan and
budget constraints prevented adding them. However, the DSP will respond to this issue as
soon as community VLA need assessments are conducted.

Future Plans

To implement the projects, including the effective phase out from 59 villages in two districts
(Romeas Haek and Rumdoul) in the second phase of the Svay Rieng WatSan Cooperation
Project, the Direct Services Program is focused on staff capacity building, project guidelines, exit
plan implementation, field mentoring and building capacity in communities based on their needs.
Specific interventions and activities during the second half of this fiscal year include:

 2 training courses on water and health for PVH and KPT staff
 1 training course on primary health care and support for maternal and child health to VHVs in
Yeang Commune, PVH
 2 training courses on pre- and post-natal care to Traditional Birth Attendants in PVH
 1 staff training course on LCP Assessment
 3 staff training courses on Peace Building in Our Life (module 2)
 1 training course on Trauma and Reconciliation in cooperation with the Transcultural
Psycho-social Organization to selected CWS staff and NGO staff whose programs relate to
peace and mental health
 1 staff training course on Gender Equality
 1 staff training course on Home Gardening and Fruit Tree Nurseries
 1 staff training course on Leading and Managing rural Organization
 1 staff training course on Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation
 1 staff training course on Sphere and Accountability
 1 staff training course on Anti-Corruption
 Follow up training on CBDRM and Planning

Direct Services Program 7


 In cooperation with the National Committee for Disaster Management and Ministry of
Planning conduct 3 training courses on CBDRM and Commune Development Planning to
members of the provincial, district and commune committers for disaster management
 2 training courses on Community Based First Aid for RCVs in cooperation with Cambodian
Red Cross Provincial Branches
 Revise and update CWS Community Development Model
 Develop food security guidelines
 Finalize in-kind and cash credit guidelines
 Develop standard package of activities for CBDRM project
 Develop guidelines for assisting and identifying vulnerable people
 Review CWS-C Peace manual
 Revise village phasing out strategies
 Finalize Health Project Implementation guidelines
 Expand the WatSan manual
 Revise Nutrition guidelines
 Finalize and sign MoU with KPT Provincial Department of Health and Ministry of Health
 Enhance links to health and WatSan network: MEDICAM and WatSan Sectoral Working
Group, etc.

Direct Services Program 8


1.2. KOMPONG THOM VILLAGE
BASED COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

Introduction

Our Village Based Community Development (VBCD) project in Kompong Thom has its roots in
work begun in this central province in 1993, following the signing of the Paris Peace Agreement
in 1991. Initially, we focused on humanitarian relief, specifically the re-integration and
mobilization of repatriated refugees from camps along the Cambodian-Thai border. As the
needs of the people evolved, our work shifted to Community Development in order to effectively
respond to the real situation for both newly resettled families and those who had remained
during the decades of devastating civil conflict. This development model has since grown into
the four-year VBCD Project, which we began implementing in Kompong Thom in July 2007.

The project got off to a slow start, which was compounded during the second half of its first fiscal
year by a shortage of field staff. The hiring of new field staff during this reporting period helped
put the project back on schedule. Field staff must be carefully selected as their role in the project
requires a high level of commitment and personal sacrifice because they are required to live a
few days a week in the remote villages where they work during the four-year implementation
period.

The preparatory phase of the project in the 12 target villages was time consuming, as staff
helped organize community-based organizations and helped facilitate elections of Village
Development Committees (VDCs), Village Health Volunteers (VHVs), Traditional Birth
Attendants (TBAs), Community Peace Volunteers (CPVs), Red Cross Volunteers (RCVs) and
Non-Formal Education (NFE, or adult literacy) teachers. At the same time, staff helped facilitate
the creation of Self Help Groups (SHGs), Rice Bank committees, Water Pump User groups and
prayer groups, while collaborating with governmental departments, such as the Provincial
Department of Rural Development (PDRD), Provincial Health Department (PHD), Provincial
Department of Education Youth and Sport, Provincial Department of Women’s Affairs,
Cambodian Red Cross, and district authorities. Capacity building and service delivery were also
provided to Commune Councils, VDCs and other village-based groups so they could implement
development plans. The plans included activities in community development, food security,
peace building, gender equality, education to children and adults, health and sanitation, income
generation, and disaster preparedness.

Staff members began working in the 12 villages in July 2007, becoming members of them by
sleeping at residents’ homes a few nights a week. This is why we call our model Village-Based
Development. CWS does not draft strategies and development plans for villages from offices
located in provincial capitals or Phnom Penh. Instead, our staff members facilitate each village’s
effort to identify the hurdles it faces and pinpoint solutions. This builds trust, fosters solidarity,
and ensures that residents gain the confidence, knowledge and skills necessary to develop their
communities independently. It also allows us to respond immediately to crises, such as floods,
fires, and drought.

The first phase (July 2007-June 2008) was challenging due to the lack of staff in the second half
of the year. During this reporting period, the second phase of the Project is being implemented

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 9


more smoothly, as CWS has hired enough staff to fill all field positions. The project is on track
but progress is still slow due to the need for capacity building for new staff to ensure they can
work effectively with existing staff and community residents as well as understand the details of
VBCD.

Even with a well organized organization, dedicated and well trained staff, our work is as time
consuming and difficult as it is rewarding and effective. It is critical to note that the communities
in which we work have shattered social structures and lack basic infrastructure. Building trust
with residents takes time, skill and empathy. The villages are also remote, isolated and
extremely poor. Literacy rates are low. Capacity building often has to start from scratch, though
once it catches on it often spreads quickly. Our VBCD model is a joint learning exercise between
CWS staff and village residents.

During the reporting period, 87% of the 124 community development initiative plans were
accomplished. These included plans related to health, gender, peace, income generation and
food security, Commune Council support, and Emergency Response were accomplished. For
example, six NFE classes began in six villages with 124 students (94 women) enrolled, 12 new
SHGs with 195 members (151 women) were set up in six villages were formed and
strengthened, one Buddhist prayer group was established in Thmei village with 20 elderly
members (15 women), five rice banks for 116 families in five villages were formed (after they
received emergency rice aid from CWS in late 2007), and five palm sugar producing groups for
19 families were supported. Moreover, 72 vulnerable families in 12 villages were selected and
received training on drafting annual household development plans.

Our focus on helping the absolute poor has inspired neighbors who have watched them acquire
confidence as they acquire the know-how to become self-sufficient and more active in their
communities. Below are several highlights of objectives that were accomplished, challenges and
lessons learned during the reporting period, and plans for the second half of this fiscal year.

Objective 1: Develop community capacity to engage with government institutions and


CBOs to define their development direction and manage their affairs in a participatory
and democratic manner.

Develop Plans

In cooperation with the Provincial


Department of Rural Development, 72 VDC
members (32 women) were elected or
appointed. Training courses and workshops
on topics such as Roles and
Responsibilities, Problem Analysis, Proposal
Writing, Leading and Managing Rural
Communities, Community Organizing,
Annual Village Planning Workshops and
quarterly meetings were provided to VDCs
and Commune Councils. As a result, the
VDCs were able to put their newly acquired
knowledge into practice by organizing
meetings in their communities, developing A VDC Annual Workshop at Tumnob village, Sraeung
Commune, organized by CWS and the Kompong Thom
and implementing monthly and annual action PDRD.
plans, and mobilizing local resources with the
support of project staff. The capacity of project staff to monitor and evaluate project activities,
however, still needs improvement.

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 10


The community development initiative plans that were implemented included construction of two
community meeting halls (salas), two rural roads, one village culvert road, 11 open wells, 12
household latrines and one small water gate. Two water pumps were also installed and 64 bio-
sand water filters were distributed. Fourteen families received grants to start small businesses.
Eight families received poultry for raising (one received ducks and seven received chickens),
nine families received rice seeds, four household latrines were installed, five families received
open wells, 28 families received water filters, and 19 families began home gardening on their
own initiative.

Eleven residents were selected for training to teach NFE and six NFE classes began with a total
enrollment of 124 students (94 women). The enthusiasm for these classes was high. For
example, NFE students in Thmei village were so eager to learn they asked their teacher to
extend the two hour class an additional hour. They progressed rapidly in reading, writing,
calculating, and also encouraged their children to attend school regularly as they experienced
the value of education.

Mrs. Pol Khim’s reason for attending the adult literacy


class in Thmei Village differed from most of her 24
classmates. “I want to be able to read about
Buddhism,” she explained, during one of the classes,
which are held six day a week. About 90 percent of
the students are women, most of whom are mothers.
The two-hour class is held in the evening because, for
most of them, this is the only free time they can afford.

The class is run in conjunction with the Non-formal


Education division of the Provincial Department of
Education, which trained their teacher, Mr. Cheam
Voeun, and provides him with a small stipend. His
students say he is very talented, enthusiastic and so
dedicated that he allows them to extend class an extra
Mrs. Pol Khim practices multiplication. hour, to 10pm.

The participants have learned to calculate and read


simple text in the Khmer language. Many of the students decided to attend classes because
they were worried about being cheated by brokers as well as in the markets where they
exchange produce and other goods. They also want to be able to help their children with their
studies. The first primary school opened in the village in 2003, and many of the participants’
children attend it. Some mothers say their children are helping them learn to read and write,
while others say they are helping their children do the same. Some students study in small
groups if they have free time during the day.

All agree that they are becoming more confident and less embarrassed. People, sometimes
even their own children, used to call them “stupid” because they could not read or write.

Mr. Yem Im, a VDC, said, “I am very happy with the class, made possible through CWS. Now, I
am able to read and write. It is has greatly impacted and changed my work and life.”

Mrs. Yath Heam, a SHG member said, “I am the treasurer for my group, but I could not have
sufficiently done my job if I didn’t have the opportunity to attend this class. Now, I can record
each savings amount properly and I can accurately calculate the amount that my group
members borrow and repay.”

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 11


Students at an adult literacy class in Beng village, one of six non-formal education classes that began during the
reporting period. Students are so keen to learn they have requested that the classes be extended by one hour.

The NFE class in Thmei Village began on June 30, 2008 with 24 students (19 women). They
include members of Village Development Committees and Self Help Groups. Based on the final
exams of the course on NFE book Part II, 124 students (100%) passed the exams. One student
earned the top grade, 99 received the second, and 24 received the third.

During the reporting period, community and vulnerable families have continued to work together
for sustainable development. Vulnerable household development plans have been conducted by
the families themselves, while villages have begun developing annual plans based on their own
problem analysis. Community solidarity is being enhanced. Residents are working together to
solve problems and social infrastructure that facilitates this is being strengthened.

Objective 2: Improve access to basic social services and amenities, and improve overall
food security for vulnerable people.

Through close coordination and cooperation with health authorities (the Provincial Health
Department, Operational Health District, and Health Centers), local health structures were
established. Twenty-seven VHVs (nine women) were selected and 21 women TBAs were
trained on roles and responsibilities, primary health care, malaria and dengue fever, HIV/Aids,
maternal and child health care, basic nutrition, safe delivery, pre- and post-natal care, and child
health care. Two quarterly meetings were also organized for VHVs to assess the effectiveness
of the training they received.

With some facilitation and support from Project staff, the VHVs collaborated with Health Centers
to provide awareness raising to their communities. Three hundred and sixty-two people (305
women) from nine villages in Sraeung commune participated in malaria and dengue fever
awareness raising in their villages. One hundred and seventy-two (172) people (87 women) from

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 12


two villages in Ti Pou commune and 225 primary school students (110 girls) from five schools
joined the water and sanitation awareness session facilitated by VHVs. Moreover, 144 people
(130 women) from two villages participated in awareness raising organized and facilitated by
TBAs on birth spacing, maternal and child health care and family planning in December.

A joint Maternal and Child Healthcare project, which is being implemented in all target villages in
collaboration with United Nations WFP, produced positive results as VHVs were more actively
collaborating with project staff. Three hundred nineteen (319) children under two, 69 pregnant
women, 126 lactating mothers and another 331 mothers received supplemental nutrition. One
thousand two hundred and eleven women in 12 villages gained knowledge on basic nutritional
needs through monthly awareness-raising sessions facilitated by VHVs. Mothers are
increasingly bringing their children to Health Centers to monitor their weight and growth and
follow up on feeding practices.

From Left: Mothers receive food from a CWS-UN World Food Programme Maternal and Child Health project,
while a mother presents a healthy baby boy who is benefitting from the project.

In response to an increase in school enrollment, the project helped 115 school-aged children (56
girls) attend primary school by providing school uniforms and supplies. The project also
encouraged parents to send their
children to primary school so that
parents begin to take more
responsibility for their children’s
education.

Home gardening and animal-raising


training courses proved to be
effective. Vulnerable families have
started to plan integrated farm
management, combining home
gardening with animal production.
Moreover, farmers are using newly
acquired knowledge and techniques
on crop storage, promoting the use of Mrs. Nang Ky collects herbs from her home garden.
organic fertilizer and improving small-
scale irrigation to expand production.
As a result, 37 households have home gardens, 28 households practice integrated system of
rice intensification, 12 households practice integrated farm management, 100 households have
had their livestock vaccinated, and 30 households have increased poultry production with new
chicken and duck raising techniques.

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 13


All families in the project areas are subsistence farmers. Most increase their incomes through
various agricultural and non-agricultural income-generating projects supported with small grants
from the project and SHG loans. Fourteen (14) vulnerable families received small grants and 12
SHGs were established with support from project staff. All 12 SHG (with 195 members in total,
151 of them women) were functioning fully with their members saving money every month. The
groups used their savings for supporting business plans.

Mrs. Hoeun Ham, 28, is the head of an absolute poor


household in Choam Boeng Village, Sraeung
Commune. In 2001 she married, then had two children.
The family left their village and moved to Kandal
Province in hope of a better life.

Mrs. Hoeun worked in a garment factory, her husband


was a motor-taxi driver and the family lived in a rented
room. But the situation was dismal. She saved nothing
in five years and her family’s living situation worsened.
In 2006, she decided to return to her village with her
children. She worked as a seasonal harvest laborer and
occasionally as a construction worker. However, this
did not pay enough to feed her children, who often got
sick from infectious diseases.

Mrs. Hoeun Ham sells Khmer cakes to In February 2008, after CWS program activities
augment her family income. expanded to this area, the VDC and the village leader
discussed how to help her family. CWS approved a
request for Mrs. Hoeun to start a small business selling breakfast meals and various groceries.

With appropriate coaching from the VDC, village leader, project staff and support from village
residents, her business expanded rapidly. By selling cooked rice and groceries, she earns a net
profit of $2.00 per day. Next, she expanded her business by selling Khmer cakes in the
afternoon, which increases her net profit to $3.00 per day.

Mrs. Ham is very satisfied with her business and says she could not have started it without
CWS’s help. “I can run the business because of educational support and coaching from CWS
staff. Now my family does not suffer from hunger and my children’s health has greatly improved.
I have some extra money to raise animals and grow vegetables. I am grateful am to CWS for
supporting my family so we can have a new life.”

Before Now

- Only rice cultivation (farmer) - Rice cultivation


- Worked as rice cultivation laborer - Stopped working as a farm laborer for
- Worked as construction worker others, but continues to grow rice for her
(occasionally) family
- No animal raising - Sells breakfast meals and cakes in the
- Children were sick two to three times a afternoon
month - Raises chickens and pigs
- Not enough food to eat and dependant on - Children are rarely sick as hygiene and
rice cultivation sanitation have improved
- No household development plan - Has enough food to eat
- Developed Household Development Plan
and plan to extend income-generating
work.

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 14


Objective 3: Strengthen communities understanding and practice of peace building and
restorative justice.

Twenty five (25) Community Peace Volunteers (13 women) were elected by their villages with
the help of project staff. In cooperation with the Provincial Department of Woman Affairs, these
Community Peace Volunteers have identified 56 people (28 women) from seven villages in
Sraeung commune and 46 people (30 women) from four villages in Ti Pou Commune to
participate in a training course on gender equality and domestic violence. Moreover, 168 people
(102 women) joined an awareness session on women’s rights and domestic violence and 132
(77 women) participated in a two-day White Ribbon campaign in Beng village.

Participants at a domestic violence seminar raise their arms to show their commitment to ending violence.
A high number of men participated in the seminars

Thirty two VPVs, VDC members and Village Leaders attended a three-day Peace building
course organized by project staff from 23-25 October. They were able to transfer what they
learned to members of their communities and conducted public awareness meetings on peace,
gender and domestic violence. Gender streamlining has been implemented into the project and
many women are in decision-making positions. Human rights issues are more openly discussed
by residents who now frequently seek solutions from VDCs, Village Leaders and Commune
Councils.

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 15


Thlork Thin, an 11 year old girl living in Trapeang Trom village, Ti Pou Commune is grateful for
the change in her father’s behavior. “Now my father never finds fault or hits my mother like he
did before. Now, he always helps my mother. He helps make cakes, grows vegetable, and
works hard to earn an income.” The family had been identified as a highly at-risk by field staff.
The provision of materials such as a water filter, crop seeds, and working capital assistance
have allowed the family to generate income through home gardening and producing Khmer
cakes.

Awareness raising on gender equity, domestic violence and peace concepts among vulnerable
families, communities, and local authorities has had the most impact. Both vulnerable families
and the target communities could now discuss openly as well as raise their concerns about
human rights abuse or domestic violence to VDC, Village Leaders, and at times to CC for
peaceful resolution.

Objective 4: Ensure meeting the basic needs of the most vulnerable people and victims of
emergency by prioritizing target communities’ needs and enhancing their capacity to
prepare for and respond to local disasters.

Following democratic elections


facilitated by the Provincial Red Cross
and project staff, the 12 target villages
now have 24 (12 women) Red Cross
Volunteers. In coordination with
Provincial Red Cross, two training
courses on Roles and Responsibilities
and Community Based Disaster
Management were provided to the
RCVs and VDCs. Project staff then
helped them prepare disaster
mitigation plans. As a result, eight
villages have begun various disaster
mitigation projects, including
rehabilitation systems, open wells,

rice banks, water pump machine


First aid training in Tumnob Village for Red Cross Volunteers
from 12 villages. groups, and emergency food support.
These mitigation projects were
planned to link with food security activities to ensure long-term food security. Moreover, five
Community Based Disaster Management plans – construction of one water canal, repairs of
three dams, and one CBDRM course – were inserted into the annual village development plans.

Ms. Un Neang, a SHG member in Choam Boeng village, said, “Before, we here never had
enough water for use, especially in the dry season. We had to go to the pagoda to fetch water,
which took a lot of time. Since we got well, my family can grow beans or pickles for sale and
grow vegetables to eat. I plan to expand my garden to grow more produce for sale.”

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 16


Objective 5: Effective and efficient program management and functioning; enhance
community development planning and practice.

Based on the program and project training work plan, nine project staff were trained on Creative
Holistic Action Research for Relationship Transformation (CHART), Leading and Managing
Rural Organization, Participatory Learning and Action, Community Development Concept,
Community Development Model, Peace Concept, Local Capacity for Peace, CBDRM, Water and
Sanitation, Community Led Total Sanitation, Primary Health Care, Maternal and Child Health,
SHG, Most Significant Change and agriculture-related subjects. The monitoring report in June
2008 showed that the project activities were 70% completed as measured against the annual
plan. Thus, another 30 percent of project activities will be achieved in the next semester. This
outcome comes from the joint effort of qualified project staff, communities and related
implementing partners.

Project management is being improved, including the capacity of project staff to work with
communities and with other implementing partners. Based on the monitoring report, the
effectiveness of the implementation of project activities is 7.71 over the average. The
coordination with VDC and Village leaders is 9.4, and beneficiaries’ satisfaction is 8.6.

Major Challenges

Community representatives are elected by residents through free and fair election, but in some
cases one individual can be elected to a few positions at the same time. This can cause them to
be too busy to be effective and to neglect their families, which can result in conflicts with their
spouse. To avoid this, Project staff members encourage elected representatives to balance the
work they do for their village with their responsibilities to their families.

Kompong Thom was identified as one of the three poorest provinces in Cambodia by the
Ministry of Planning in 2004, and there has been an influx of agencies and NGOs into the area
since then. Information sharing among agencies and NGOs is, however, limited, and this can
result in more than one NGO implementing identical programs in a single commune without any
coordination. Different approaches taken by various agencies and NGOs can also complicate
implementation. For example, in Sraeung Commune, our VBCD approach requires residents to
contribute labor as well as a partial payment for the construction of a latrine or well or to receive
a water filter. Other development models implemented by different NGOs require that residents
only contribute labor in exchange for a latrine or well. This has made some residents of the
commune reluctant to contribute partial payment for latrines and wells. Project staff attempted to
explain that the partial payment was intended to ensure a sense of ownership and participation
by the recipients. Eventually, however, a decision was made to stop installing latrines and wells
in Sraeung and increase the number planned for Ti Pou commune instead.

Several target villages are former target areas of other organizations. When CWS staff members
begin implementing VBCD in these villages, they start by promoting SHGs as means for
investing and saving. The intention is to encourage them to work together in a way that sparks
self reliance and frees them from dependency on moneylenders and the crippling rates of
interest they charge. In villages where other development models have failed, SHGs can be a
tough sell initially. Residents are sometimes suspicious are dismissive. As a result field staff
invest a lot of time explaining the strengths and weaknesses of CWS’s SHG model.

1
Maximum score =10

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 17


Lessons learned

The development process can be slowed if residents elect the same individual for multiple
positions. As a result, field staff encourage residents to elect representatives on the basis of
whether they can handle the workload rather than their reputation in the community, and explain
that this leads to more effective development.

For water and sanitation, more research is required during project planning in the target areas to
determine whether other agencies or NGOs plan to implement similar projects. Furthermore,
discussions should be held with other agencies or NGOs implementing (or planning to
implement) similar projects to ensure sustainability and maximum advantages to the community.

Clear presentation of project guidelines and varieties of development activities to be


implemented to local authorities, VDCs, CBOs, and key people through the meeting can
effectively increase their interest for higher participation with the project.

Issues not addressed

According to the four-year work plan, the project covers 12 villages (four in Ti Pou Commune
and eight of nine villages in Sraeung Commune). One village, Svay, with 104 households (451
men and 215 women) was not selected due to its remoteness and isolation. It is inaccessible
during the rainy season. No assistance or services have reached this village.

Following requests from local authorities and village residents, the Project in cooperation with
the Kompong Thom PDRD helped elect a VDC for the village in February 2008. Subsequently,
residents frequently request that CWS implement VBCD in their village. Local authorities have
also requested that the village be added to the Project but at this time CWS cannot fully
implement VBCD in the village.

In response Project staff have asked residents to make an official written request to be added to
the target area in the future. Village Health Volunteers from the Svay village have been invited to
participate in training sessions at the Kompong Thom office.

Future Plans
 Organize two meetings for 24 participants, including commune councilors, police officers and
project staff members
 Conduct a training course on accountability/anti-corruption for 14 Commune Councilors and
13 Village Leaders
 Conduct two training courses on domestic violence for VDCs, Village Leaders and
Community Peace Volunteers (about 50 participants)
 Conduct two training course on Local Capacity for Peace for 52 VDCs, VLs, and CPVs
 Organize two meetings with 26 VDCs and two Commune Councils
 Conduct two participatory Monitoring and Evaluation training courses for 26 VDCs, 13 VLs,
and two Commune Councilors
 Conduct two meetings for NFE teachers and VLs
 Provide three training courses on fish raising, fruit tree nurseries, and SRI for 56 residents of
both communes
 Continue providing monitoring support to SHGs
 Conduct two meetings with 26 VHVs and 26 TBAs from both communes
 Support VHVs to provide awareness raising on water and sanitation, HIV/Aids and sexually
transmitted diseases in both communes
 Support Health Center staff to raise awareness on hygiene and sanitation in schools
 Continue supporting household latrines, community open wells, and apron construction
 Support RCVs to conduct HVCA at all target villages
 Support RCVs to provide echo training on disaster preparedness to communities

KPT Village Based Community Development Project 18


1.3. PREAH VIHEAR VILLAGE
BASED COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

Introduction

CWS Cambodia began its Village Based Community Development (VBCD) pilot project in Preah
Vihear and Kampong Thom Province in July 2007, and subsequently divided it into two parts to
simplify monitoring and support.

The Preah Vihear VBCD Project has targeted four remote communes: Cheam Khsant, Rumdas
Sre, Tuek Krohom, and Yeang in Choam Khsant District. During the reporting period the Project
has implemented stage two: livelihood strengthening. With a high level of commitment, the team
has facilitated positive changes in the community through networking and local capacity building
for development planning.

Staff members have invested their time working as partners with vulnerable families, Village
Development Committees (VDCs), Village Health Volunteers (VHVs), Red Cross Volunteers
(RCVs), Community Peace Volunteers (CPVs), CBOs and local authorities as well as
government offices and departments. With the support of World Food Program the Maternal
Child Health project has improved the health and nutrition of mothers and children through
education and nutritional supplements.

With 11 staff members staying living in the target area three weeks per month and two program
officers living there one or two weeks per month, the Project covers 18 villages, directly
benefiting 8,420 people (6,099 women) and indirectly benefiting 2,030 more (1,320 women).

Major Accomplishments and Changes

Networking with government officials

CWS-C regards relationship and networking building with local authorities and other government
institutions as one of core principles of our work. Cooperation and collaboration with authorities
at all levels is important as they are responsible for assisting the people they represent, while
NGOs like CWS-C can only assist those who cannot afford to help themselves and cannot take
responsibility for the entire population. Within this reporting period, local authorities and
government institutions provided support to CWS staff in many ways, including security, material
and moral support.

Security support: As our staff members spend most of their time in villages with residents,
including staying overnight, they often leave our office, and valuable assets such as motorbikes
and computers, unattended. However, due to our good rapport with local authorities, police
regularly patrol to ensure the office is secure when CWS staff members are away. Moreover,
during the border dispute between Thailand and Cambodia, local authorities kept us updated on
the situation and recommended when it was safe to resume work.

Government offices also assist CWS by providing facilities and materials for free. For example,
during World Aids day, Heath Center staff lent 100 signs and two cloth banners with HIV/Aids
prevention messages, saving CWS about US$ 150 in printing costs. Health Center staff also
provided leaflets on malaria and dengue fever to VHVs for a joint health care campaign.

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 19


Moral Support: Commune Councils and District officials have continuously encouraged our
work and the relationships built in the target area have encouraged authorities in other
communes to invite CWS to work in their areas. These close relationships can translate into
benefits for village residents. During the rainy season last year, some villages in Yeang
commune were inaccessible for about four months. This interrupted the delivery of nutritional
supplements to mothers and children. When this issue was raised by CWS’s Direct Services
Program Manger during her courtesy visit to District Governor Mr. Kao Long said he would do
his utmost to prevent the same situation from arising during the next rainy season. “There must
be no delay [delivering aid] in the future,” he said. “Even if it means that I will have to go to
Yeang commune myself,” he stressed. Close relationships with government officials also allow
CWS staff to cut through formalities when advocating on behalf of residents.

Vegetable Seed Distribution

During the reporting period, CWS staff members distributed vegetable seeds to 90 vulnerable
households in 18 villages. In most cases, these families had little experience in home gardening
and their yields were low. With training, however, residents began placing fences around their
gardens to prevent animals from eating their crops, and started weeding and watering their
home gardens regularly. Seventy of the 90 families had already started their home gardens and
10 had produced surplus vegetables that they could sell to neighbors to generate income. By
growing their own vegetables the families also saved the money they would have spent to
purchase them.

Mrs. Van Khan, who is married with four children, noted that her home garden also saved her
the time she used to spend traveling to and from the market to buy vegetables. “The market is
very far from my house and we have to spend a long time traveling to it. We used to spend
about 3,000 riels a day to buy vegetables but now we grow our own. It saves travel costs,
provides food and a little extra we can sell to neighbors,” she explained.

Project staff members are now encouraging the families to expand their home gardens and
pointing to those households who have been most successful to encourage others to follow suit.
They are also encouraging residents to save money for buy their own seeds in the future.

Mrs. Eam Ean, a widow who supports four children as well as her elderly mother, was easily to
convinced to start buying seeds. The resident of Chat Taing village has experienced the benefits
home gardening for the first time. “I now have vegetables for eating and don’t have to buy them
from the market or neighbors so I can save a bit of money. I also save the cost of traveling to the
market and have bought morning glory seeds to continue my CWS garden,” she said.

Tropeang Thom village resident Mrs. Soeurn Sam On, who also has four children, summed up
the Project’s success in one sentence. “I can see the benefits with my own eyes,” she
explained. “I no longer have to buy vegetables, I can grow them myself and I will continue to do
so.”

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 20


Model farmer Mr. Nou Sareth waters his garden in Kok Sralaov village, Preah Vihear.

Mr. Kong Chon, 24, and his spouse Kong Chim, 25, have two children, (a three year old and a
six month old infant). They live in Rolum Thmor village where they used to use 60% of their
farming land to grow vegetables with chemical fertilizer and pesticides.

Mr. Chon said that he often felt dizzy and had headaches after using chemical pesticides and
that sometimes he and his family sometimes got sick after eating vegetables that had just been
sprayed with chemicals. Because he had never been warned about the dangers of chemical
pesticides sometimes he and his family would eat vegetables that had just been spayed, he
said. He did not realize that this was the reason he and his family often got sick.

CWS staff visited this family and encouraged them to avoid using chemical pesticides to save
money and ensure their health. He was encouraged to try compost fertilizer and natural
pesticides instead. This method was explained by successful farmers in a magazine distributed
by CWS staff. Mr. Chon began experimenting with these new cost-saving and healthy
techniques.

“I started to make compost in October. I used livestock dung and green leaves. After just three
months, I was able to use it,” he said. He made natural pesticide by mixing chili, onion, urine,
sdao leaves and morning glory. It took just two weeks to make, he said. “I notice that my
vegetables look healthier and I don’t feel sick all the time. My family is healthier too,” he
explained.

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 21


Seeing his industrious and creativity, CWS provided his family with seeds and he built a fence
around his the garden to protect it.

Although his vegetables were not yet ready for harvest they looked promising. “I believe there
will be a demand for my vegetables. If I cannot sell them we can eat them or find some way to
turn them into a processed food,” he said. Hs techniques are catching on. Four neighbors have
sought his advice on organic farming.

Mr.Chon’s wife in their garden in Rolum Thmor village. Since they stopped using chemical
pesticides they are feeling healthier and saving money by switching to homemade pesticides.

Book Distribution

Schools in remote area like Choam Khsant District face many challenges, including a lack of
classrooms, qualified teachers and books. Mr. Va Mao is the principal of Choam Khsant High
School. “My school has 172 students (76 girls) and three teachers, but unfortunately there isn’t
enough space for all the students and we have a shortage of reading materials. All we have are
textbooks. To respond compensate for the lack of space, we use four classrooms from Choam
Khsant Primary School while we wait for more classrooms to be constructed,” he said.

As CWS staff members noticed that in Choam Khsant market there are no bookshops selling
reading materials, just shops selling stationary and notebooks. Although CWS staff cannot solve
classroom shortage and lack of qualified teachers, CWS is supporting schools with books.

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 22


CWS staff members first identified appropriate content for reading materials in consultations with
teachers and the principal.

During the reporting period, CWS distributed 222 books on various topics, including moral
education, Khmer literature and peace, youth. With more books to choose from, students will be
more likely to read. The Table below lists the books distributed.

Title
No Amount Topic
(English translation)
1 My Dear Children 6 books Fatherly advice to children
2 The Word from Parents 6 books Parental advice to children
3 Mothers 6 books Motherly advice to children on how
to handle money
4 Four Blessing (longevity, 6 books Advise on living well
happiness, energy, physical
power, intelligence and wisdom)
5 How to Control Anger 6 books Ways to control anger
6 Katiloka (Way of the World) 6 sets of 10 books Folktales
7 Srihitobadesa 6 sets of 4 books Moral education from Sanskrit
literature translated into Khmer
8 Life Constitution 6 books Morals, peace
9 Buddha as Peacemaker 6 sets of 4 books Example of peaceful conflict
resolutions in Buddha’s time
10 Source of Blessing 6 books Introduction to blessing acts
11 The Path of Life 6 books Introduction to downfall acts
12 Life of Buddha (SIPAR’s 3 books Biography of Buddha and outline of
publication) his teachings
13 Collection of Khmer Proverbs 3 books Khmer proverbs
14 Youth and personal values 6 books Values that youths choose and how
(Youth for Peace publication) they affect their lives
15 What is peace?(Youth for Peace 6 books Peace and what youth can do to
publication) bring it about

16 Nationalism (Youth for Peace 6 books Constructive and destructive


publication) nationalism
17 Ethnicity (Youth for Peace 6 books Understanding about ethnicity and
publication) how to eliminate racism
18 I Want to Know Khmer History 6 books Khmer history until independence in
(Part I and 2) 1953
19 National Museum 3 books History of Cambodia’s National
Museum and description of artifacts
on display
20 Pictorial biography of Buddha 3 books Important events of Buddha’s live
from his birth to death
21 Contentment and Quality of Life 3 books How to lead a fulfilling life
22 Venerable Choun Nath’s Idea 6 books Advice from a Khmer scholar on
Khmer language and Buddhism
23 Life’s lessons 3 books Advice from elderly people
24 Khmer Poem on Code of 3 books Khmer teachings about earning a
Conduct living, making friends and getting
married. Some of the poems date
back to early 19th century.
25 Ideas to Consider 3 books Life related
26 43 Buddha Sayings 3 books Steps for living in the moment
Total 222 books

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 23


Students at Choam Khsant Secondary School read books distribute by CWS. There is no bookstore in the
town or district.

During the report writing, staff members met students and


teachers to ask them about the benefit of the books. CWS
also received 17 thank you letters from ten schoolboys and
seven schoolgirls.

Chemistry Teacher Mr. Thong Kim said, “I am very happy


with the books. Even though they are few in proportion to
the number of students and none are related to chemistry
they are helpful for my students and as well as for teachers
like me.”.]

Mr. Seng Sethor, a Chemistry Teacher in Romdas Sre


Secondary School, said that he hoped that by reading the
books students would attend class more regularly and
study hard.

In a letters sent to CWS, 12th Grade student Pouv Sokry


said, “The book that introduced self reflection and choosing
the right livelihood (Way of the World), made me think
deeply.”

Grade 9 student Yean Vannath learned the cause of


A letter of thanks from student Chhan
personal destruction while Lach Tola learned that imitating Sopheakdey from Rom Doh Sre Secondary
others is harmful. School

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 24


Major Challenges

Duck raising

To encourage food security the project bought 500 ducklings from Kompong Thom and
distributed them to 24 farmers in 12 villages. Two families of those selected were identified as
model farmers and received 100 ducklings, while other 22 families received 13-15. However,
due to the young age of he ducklings (one week) and the long distance they were transported,
120 died soon after arrival. As a result, the model farmers received only 70 ducklings, while the
other families received less than 10. Almost two-thirds of those that survived were male
ducklings that farmers could raise only for consumption or sale. The selected families expected,
however, to raise them to produce eggs to sell in local markets demands.

Border Tension

Due to the conflict near Preah Vihear temple the office in Choam Khsant was closed for a month
and staff were shifted to Kompong Thom. Residents were also advised by the government to
speed up their harvest. As a result, the early harvest interfered with many planned activities
such as workshops, food delivery for the MCH project, development activities, meetings, and
monitoring. CWS formed a security committee to monitor the Preah Vihear Project and security
guidelines for staff were introduced and evacuation points identified. Daily security updates were
made and the work plan was revised.

Lessons Learned

To reduce the mortality rate of ducklings they


should be bought when they are between 20 and
30 days old so they can be transported a long
distance. Moreover, it is easier to distinguish the
sex of older ducklings.

Appointing a security assessment team and


drafting a detailed security plan helps create a
feeling of safety among staff working in conflict
areas, as well as appreciation for the organization.

A farmer tending ducklings supplied by CWS.


Issues Not Addressed

Farmers in Cambodia are very busy and have their annual rice harvest in December. They sell
their rice to wholesalers at very cheap prices, about 800 to 1,000 riels per kilogram as they need
money to repay the cost of fuel and chemical fertilizers bought on credit during the planting
season. Selling rice when prices are at their lowest makes it difficult to repay loans. If farmers
could keep their rice in stock they could sell during the planting season when prices nearly
double. Although it is not possible to convince farmers to hold onto their rise when they need to
sell it to repay loans, project staff try to convinced them to consider the possibility of food
shortages before the next harvest.

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 25


Future Plans

 Continue to strengthen relationships with residents, local authorities and government


departments and offices.
 Conduct two training courses on Leading and Managing Rural Organizations to VDCs,
Village Leaders and Commune Councils.
 Conduct three training courses on Project Management and Communication and
Facilitation Skill to VDCs, Village Leaders and Commune Councils.
 Conduct two refresher courses on Safe Delivery, Ante- and Post- Natal Care and Breast
Feeding to TBAs.
 Conduct a training course on Integrated Farming Management to model farmers
 Conduct three training courses on Peace Concept to CPVs, Village Leaders and VDCs
 Conduct one training course on LCP Introduction to Commune Councils
 Conduct a refresher training course on Peace Building and Accountability to Commune
Councils
 Continue to work with teachers and parents to improve school attendance rates
 Support NFE teachers for three literacy classes
 Support VHVs to distribute CSB and nutritional supplements to lactating mothers,
pregnant women and infants from 7-24 months old, with the support from the World Food
Programme
 Support VDCs and local authorities to identify beneficiaries for water filters, hand-pump
and open wells
 Support VDCs and target beneficiaries to construct water filters, hand-pump and open
wells
 Conduct annual VDC workshop with VDCs, Commune Councils and government
agencies
 Conduct capacity building course for project staff.
-

PHV Village Based Community Development Project 26


1.4. SVAY RIENG WATER
AND SANITATION COOPERATION PROJECT

Introduction

Church World Service Cambodia started working Svay Rieng in 1992, focusing on helping the
absolute poor and vulnerable people through integrated community development. The project
was successfully handed over to community based organizations, communities and provincial
authorities in May 2005. By FY06, in partnership with Provincial Department of Rural
Development (PDRD), CWS started a new initiative: the Water and Sanitation Cooperation
Project, or WatSan, focusing on the access to and quality of drinking water, environmental
sanitation, health and hygiene development, wastewater use, use of household water filters and
safe water storage, water-related diseases and other issues.

For three years (2006-2008), the project focused its attention on community awareness as well
as developing the technical capacity of local partners by providing training, workshops and
construction of infrastructure in 19 villages of five communes in Romeas Haek and Rumduol
districts along the border of Cambodia and Vietnam. In order to ensure effective and efficient
implementation of the project, CWS changed its working strategy from being a direct
implementer with large number of staff to working in a cooperative partnership the PDRD, whose
staff have skills and expertise related to water and sanitation.

During this reporting period CWS plans phase out from the target areas and the Memorandum
of Understanding (MoU) was not renewed as CWS could not provide extra funding to its
cooperative partner. However, with seven project staff members and seven commune
development facilitators (CDFs), the WatSan Cooperation Project distributed 10 bio-sand filters
to 49 beneficiaries (27 women). Additionally, 564 beneficiaries (253 women) received training on
village development plans, bio-sand filter operation and maintenance, latrine use and
maintenance, and hygiene and sanitation practice.

Major Accomplishments and Changes

Overall Objective: To expand the coverage of improved water and sanitation facilities to the
under-served population of Romeas Hek and Romduol District, Svay Rieng Province, and to
improve health and hygiene practices related to water-borne diseases and sanitation.

In collaboration with Commune Councils, CDFs, village leaders, user groups and respective
communities, staff conducted needs assessment in 20 villages in five communes in two districts
in September and October. More than one thousand, 1,044, households were identified as in
need of bio-sand filters and 370 interested in household latrines. The beneficiary selection
process included introducing the negative effect of poor sanitation and hygiene, need
prioritization and participatory wealth ranking. As the result, 710 households out of 1,044 were
selected as beneficiaries of bio-sand water filters and 140 households of 370 were selected as
beneficiaries of latrines by communities. Village water and sanitation related action plans were
developed accordingly, covering education and awareness raising, capacity building for key
persons and bio-sand filter and latrine construction.

SVR WatSan Cooperation Project 27


Capacity Building

In this reporting period, 21 training courses delivered by the project has reached 564 people
(253 women), including beneficiaries of bio-sand filters, latrines, user groups, Commune
Councils, village leaders and CDFs (see chart below).

Local capacity in development planning is one of the most critical core concepts of the WatSan
Cooperation Project. The Village Development Plan and Simple Proposal training course is a
crucial intervention to build capacity so that communities can manage and implement their
development activities locally. Participants showed high interest in the course provided by CWS
staff and requested more training courses. Immediately after the training course, a water and
sanitation user group in Trapiang Svay village, Daung Commune was able to write a proposal
and submit it to CWS to request 25 more latrines without any support from staff. In the proposal,
the committee was able to mobilize community contributions as well. This request will be
granted in the next semester.

It is noticed that training courses and awareness raising


provided by CWS also influenced non-beneficiaries of
the project, like Mrs. Hem Sina, 34, in Thmey village. “I
never received any awareness training from CWS, but
became aware that sanitation and hygiene has critical
effects on my family’s health through my neighbor Mrs.
Chan Sophea, who received awareness raising on
water, hygiene and sanitation from CWS. Mrs. Chan
advised me to clean my house compound, clean utensils
and cover the food well before and after eating. She also
explained the danger of drinking unclean water.”

Mrs. Sina continued, “I follow Mrs. Sophea’s advice and


I noticed that all of my family members’ health improved.
We no longer get diarrhea or diseases such as typhoid.
This also helps my family save a lot of time and money
that would be spent on medicine.”

Mrs. Sina cleans her yard.

SVR WatSan Cooperation Project 28


Bio-sand filter construction and installation

Since FY06, the WatSan Cooperation Project has constructed 1,215 bio-sand water filters
benefiting 1,154 households (5,314 people consisting of 2,514 women and 1,348 children), 13
schools (with 115 male teachers, 19 female teachers, 2,744 schoolboys and 2,309 schoolgirls),
five commune halls (with 42 staff), 14 pagodas (78 monks, 187 laymen, 31 nuns and 14
children), and one health center (8 staff).

According to the beneficiary selection process and participatory wealth ranking, the project
allows cash or labor contributions for bio-sand filters. The financial contribution has enabled the
project to supply more filters to families in target communities. It has also allowed the program to
expand coverage beyond the absolute poor in an area where the need for clean water is
immense. The contributions ensure a sense of ownership by recipients as well. In FY08, the
project had supplied 400 more bio-sand filters to residents of 20 villages.

During this reporting period, 10 bio-sand filters were constructed and installed in Bos Mon Leu
Village, Bos Mon Commune, Romeas Hiek District for 10 households benefiting 49 people (27
women), 10 boys and 7 girls. According the future plans, 700 filters will be constructed and
distributed in the next semester to 20 villages.

The need assessment and village planning exercise also indicated that 85-90% of community
people in the target area are now thinking of their health, starting with drinking safe water
(filtered or boiled). Mr. Meas Than, 58, a resident of Kra Nhoung Village, Daung Commune, has
become more health conscious. “Before members of my family often got diarrhea because we
drank water from an open well. We wasted a lot of time and money, mostly spent on health care.
After we received the filter from CWS as well as education, we definitely understood the
importance of sanitation and hygiene (good
food, good living). I and my family believe 100%
in the quality of the bio-sand water filter because
there is no sediment after the water is filtered
and my family’s health has improved. After
seeing the benefits, I recommended that my
neighbors use the water from the filter and clean
the filter as well as household compound to
make our family healthier. Moreover, I usually
tell other villagers that when their village is
cleaned, they will get a higher yield of rice
production because when they live in a healthy
environment, they will be able to do all kinds of
work, including harvesting to support our daily
living.”
One noticeable effect of the WatSan Project is
that residents are keeping yards tidier

The Magic of Bio-sand Filters

Mr. Kao Sophon, 52, and his wife Mrs. Moeng Ry, 37, live in Ta Suos Village, Doung Commune
with their two children (a daughter and a son). Their son later migrated to Phnom Penh to work
as a garment factory worker. During non-harvesting time, his wife and daughter travel across
the border to Vietnam to earn extra income. Sophon’s family often got sick. He himself suffered
from water-related diseases often.

SVR WatSan Cooperation Project 29


In March of 2007, CWS provided this family with a bio-sand filter when it was discovered that the
water from the well in his area had a high concentration of iron concentration. Seventeen
months later when he was interviewed during a monitoring visit to find out how the bio-sand filter
is working at his place, he said: “My family uses the water from the filter for drinking and cooking
100% of the time. My family’s health is much better today and we rarely have diarrhea and
abdominal pain. It saves us time and frees us to do more work thus increasing my family’s
income.”

He also introduced his neighbors and other villagers


to the advantages of bio-sand filter. Some villagers
have changed their behavior of drinking water
directly from the wells to drinking and using filtered
water. His family members and some other villagers
are not only drinking filtered water at home but they
also bring the filtered water with them when they go
to work. They now understand the importance of
clean water for their health.

Besides sharing this information with his neighbors,


M Sophon also shared the water from his filter with
four neighboring families (17 household members).
“The four families always come to get water from my
filter for drinking and cooking daily since they know
the effectiveness of water purified by bio-sand
filters.” Mr. Sophon pours water into his
bio-sand filter.
He and his household members were not greedy.
They strongly urged CWS to provide one bio-sand filter for each family to bring clean water to
them. Now, the entire community has access to clean and safe water.

Latrines construction

Since FY06, the project had constructed 320 household latrines for households consisting of
1,095 members (727 women, 218 boys and 216 girls) and three school latrines benefiting 13
teachers, 343 schoolboys and 333 schoolgirls.

In this reporting period 370 families in 20 villages are identified as in need of household latrines.
However, based on a participatory wealth ranking approach, the project plans to construct 140
latrines in next semester. Moreover, among the 140 identified beneficiaries, 120 families have
already been trained on latrine operation and maintenance.

Through awareness raising and capacity building, communities as well as key people
understand the effect of poor sanitation. This is shown through the numbers of people willing to
use and request latrines as well latrines constructed by village residents based on CWS’s model
(one in Sramor Village, one in Trapeang Thom Village, one in Bos Svay Village, one in Andaung
Krasaing Village and another at the Administrative Police Post of Daung Commune). Moreover,
the water and sanitation user group in Trapeang Svay Village (a target village in FY08)
requested 25 more latrines for their community, volunteering to contribute 50,000 riels (about
US$12.5) for each latrine.

In Andaung Krasaing Village in Pongtoek Commune, the family of Mr. Nhim Tre, 33, constructed
a latrine based on the CWS’s model. “I need a latrine as I realized the negative impact of open
defecation and difficulties during raining season. Getting diarrhea at night time is one of the
examples. Animals eat the excreta and there is bad smell in the village,” he said. He added that
“In 2007, CWS entered my village and I saw the construction of a CWS latrine. I decided to

SVR WatSan Cooperation Project 30


construct one for my family because I understand that latrines help reduce sickness, such as
diarrhea and typhoid; they reduce the chance of getting worms. Besides helping to improve the
health of my family, it is comfortable to use a latrine and we are no longer ashamed by a bad
smell.”

How a Latrine Can Save Lives

Mrs. Kim Thoeurn and her husband Mr. Smong


Leak recalled the direness of their situation in
their village. “Before CWS came to our village in
2008, we had no latrines and were forced to use
the backyard and the nearby forest as our
bathroom. Chickens and pigs often unearthed
the waste buried there and made the
environment unsafe and unhygienic,” she said.
Mr. Leak and the children often suffered from
abdominal pain and stomach maladies.

What made the situation worse was that


because of his hypertension, Mr. Leak was
unable to walk by himself and constantly needed
his wife’s physical assistance. She was so tied
up by this daily chore of helping her husband
move around that it prevented her from earning
a living.

The situation changed when CWS made a


Mr. Smong Leak proudly shows off the family
latrine. timely intervention in their village. Kim Thoeurn
was selected as one of the beneficiaries of the
WatSan project. She recalled her happiness and excitement when she found out that her family
would get a free latrine, saying she was so pleased that she was unable to sleep the night
before the installation.

Her husband said he could not be appreciative enough. “I appreciate CWS’s kindness and
understanding in providing this latrine for my family. It greatly improves our situation because
our house no longer smells bad as it did and we no longer suffer from diarrhea. For me it is
easy to go to our latrine on my own by using a walking stick. I suggest that CWS should
construct more latrines for the vulnerable people in this community. Having the latrine indeed
saved my life as well as my family,” he explained.

CWS provided an average of five latrines per village.

Hand pump well construction

Since FY06, the project has constructed 406 hand pump wells for communities and schools and
upgraded 32 wells for communities, benefiting 1,028 households consisting of 4,715 people
(1,351 women, 128 boys and 113 girls) in 59 villages in the five target communes. The number
of indirect beneficiaries was estimated at 1,900 people. Moreover, 633 people (227 women)
were trained on hand-pump operation and maintenance, and 255 user group members (92
women) were also trained on hand-pump maintenance and repair.

Among the 406 wells, 226 wells have fences to protect them (and adjacent home gardens) from
animals. Of the 226 families with home gardens 49 earn additional income by selling vegetables.
Mr. Svay Lot, 28, in Chea Theach Village, Daung Commune, said that after getting a hand-pump
SVR WatSan Cooperation Project 31
well he and his wife grew vegetables and herbs, such as cucumbers, morning glory, pumpkins,
and lemongrass. His family has access to vegetables for daily consumption and can earn more
income. “Last year my family earned 200,000Riels (about US$50) from selling vegetables that I
grew with water from my well. I used this income to buy 10 chickens, five ducks and one pig to
raise. I believe that this will help increase my income even more, and also help avoid a food
shortage this year”.

However, due to the exit plan, the end of cooperation with the PDRD and the result of the village
need assessment and planning in October 2008, the WatSan project has decided not to
construct wells in FY09.

Major Challenges

Conducting village profiles, activity plans and the selection of user groups is quite time
consuming, and draws staff away from other activities, especially construction of latrines and
water filters. Moreover, the harvest season and extended rainfalls also pose a challenge
regarding the participation of community people in village meetings, awareness raising and bio-
sand filter construction. As the result, most of the construction was delayed. Only 10 water filters
were constructed out of the planned 710 and no latrine was constructed during the reporting
period, though the plan called for 140 to be built.

Lessons Learned

Due to the above challenges, project staff have learned that work plan should be completed
before implementation starts, especially the village profiles, which were conducted in the first
half of the 4 year project implementation.

Future Plans

 Construct 700 bio-sand filter for 700 households in 20 villages


 Construct 6 bio-sand filter for Sramor Primary School
 Construct 140 latrines for 140 households in 20 villages
 Provide education on bio-sand filter operation and maintenance to 700 beneficiaries in
20 villages
 Provide education on general hygiene and sanitation to 840 beneficiaries in 20 villages
 Provide training on roles and responsibilities of water and sanitation user groups to 120
group members in 20 villages
 Provide training on Leading and Managing Rural Organization to Commune Councils,
village leaders and members of user groups in 20 villages
 Count CWS assets in 56 villages
 Review WatSan guidelines
 Conduct handing over workshop to hand over CWS assets in 56 villages to village
leaders and Commune Councils

SVR WatSan Cooperation Project 32


PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
 BATTAMBANG & BANTEAY MEANCHEY
PARTNERSHIP PROJECT
 KOMPONG THOM PARTNERSHIP PROJECT

CHURCH WORLD SERVICE/CAMBODIA


2.1. PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM

INTRODUCTION

After decades of conflict, social dislocation and destruction of both economic and social capital,
international and Cambodian NGOs are working cooperatively to alleviate poverty. CWS is one
of many NGOs in Cambodia that began working with the Cambodian NGO network in Kompong
Thom in 1996 to contribute to poverty reduction. However, without strong effort and capacity
building on institutional development, CNGOs cannot effectively implement their development
programs and handle organizational management to reduce oppression, injustice and inequities.

CWS believes our partnership model is to provide financial and technical capacity for holistic
partners, grant partners and local institution development (LID) partners to build and develop
their professional competencies, including knowledge, skills and attitudes so that they can
become self-reliant. To ensure sound management of the partnership program, CWS has used
its own partnership protocol and guidelines when we partner with civil society. Within this report
period, the Partnership Program continued to focus on building capacity, providing financial and
technical support and joint project implementation with 47 organization partners1 in 10 different
partner categories: Buddhist-based, Christian-based, children at risk, indigenous-based, peace
building, community development, youth partner, advocacy, network, and implementing
partners.

The Partnership Program provides overall leadership and management to the Partnership
Program office, Partnership Project BTB&BTM and Partnership Kompong Thom to assist 59
partner relationships2 including a new holistic partner: Cooperation for Indigenous People and
Development in Cambodia (CIDC). During this reporting period, the Partnership Project
BTB&BTM worked with four holistic partners: KCDA and ADOVIR in Battambang province and
CFEDA and KNTO in Banteay Meanchey province; while the Kompong Thom Partnership
project worked with two holistic partners: KORCD and CIDC. The BTB&BTM Partnership Project
also works with DYBTB in BTB and DYBTM and DYMB in BTM province, while the KPT
Partnership Project words with Adsu Church in Adsu village, Prasath Sambo District.

In addition, the Program Office provided capacity building on different skills of organizational
development: financial management and accounting for 12 CNGO partners (CSF, KCC, CFED,
CC, ICA, and CSCM and the 6 holistic partners); strategic planning for KCC, CSF and CC;
proposal development for CSF; and financial review for CFED Svay Rieng.

MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND CHANGES

Objective 1: To strengthen the capacity of holistic CNGO partners and small project fund
recipients to facilitate programs that will effectively and sustainably improve the living
conditions of the most vulnerable.

CWS technical support enabled KCC and CC to sharpen their focus and confidently
present long-term strategic plans to potential partners and donors.

1
47 partners: 43 CNGOs, 2 INGOs, one international organization and one research institute.
2
59 partners: 6 holistic, 5 graduated, 26 grant, 14 local institution development and 8 implementing partners.
Partnership Program 33
CWS’s Partnership Program has recognized that most of its CNGO partners have either expired
strategic plans or none, as they lack the technical skills and resources to develop such
strategies. The partners have thus implemented their programs based on yearly plans and
budget availability. Most partners have been asked by potential donors to present long-term
strategic plans, but often no such plans exist. This was the case for the Kampuchea Christian
Council (KCC) and Children Committee (CC).

KCC was established and administered by WCC in


July 1998. It now has 80 local church members
across the country with core support from WCC,
CCA and other potential donors. KCC’s vision is to
work for “abundant life in Christ for all, by unity in
affection, justice and peace in order to develop
Cambodian society”. The council has faced many
challenges with their management system and
leadership as well as financing over the last 10
years3. Its strategic plan had expired and it needed
support to develop a new one. With technical
support from Partnership Program staff, KCC was
able to develop a strategic plan and its members
have a clear understanding of why the strategy is
important. KCC staff can now articulate the ideas
from the strategic plan and put them into proposals
submitted to CCA and other donors. At the same
time, KCC is also able to present its strategy to
donors and has gained more confidence from
them.
KCC’s members discuss future directions (top)
The Children Committee (CC) is a grant partner of while KCC’s leader presents their draft
CWS established on 20 September, 1995 through strategy.
the election of children at all levels in different
provinces and was administered by Egos Committee
for Children’s Rights. CC works to enhance the long-
term development of Child Rights and Education for a
better future for children. However, CC is struggling to
run its organization due to limited experience and
skills in management, policy development, strategic
planning and project development for fundraising.
Most donors prefer to provide financial support for
specific interventions rather than core funding that
would allow CNGOs to develop their own programming. CC’s staff used SWOT for strategic
analysis
A strategic plan is one requirement of donors. CWS accepted CC’s request and conducted a
one-week workshop to enable its staff to clarify and understand the details of a strategic plan
developed for their organization. In addition, through a SWOT analysis, staff also practiced
critical thinking and diagnosed their organization’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and
threats. The staff said this was the first time they had looked at their organization deeply,
critically and analytically. “On behalf of CC and child clubs, I would like to express our
thankfulness to CWS for professional guidance and all support with emotional inspiration,
motivation, encouragement, sharing common values and building confidence among us,” said
Ms. So Kunthy, CC Executive Director.

3
27-29 March 2008, KCC with technical support from CWS organized a general assembly and selected a new
general committee with 11 members.

Partnership Program 34
CWS doesn’t only build capacity for CNGO partners it also helps them tap more funds

Objective 3: Provide overall management and supervision and capacity building to


partnership program field staff; develop and strengthen mechanisms, practices,
guidelines and tools to improve the partnership program and lead to enhanced outcomes.

CWS has been working with more than 40 partners in different sectors across the country,
dividing them into three categories. Among these categories, local institution development
requires highly professional and experienced staff as well as longer working hours, more
complex interventions and a greater degree of challenge. During this reporting period, the
Partnership Program provided strong support for the Children Support Foundation (CSF) and
Cambodian Farmer Economic Development (CFED) for their organizational development and
management. CSF faced a funding shortfall for implementation of its programs, while CFED was
required by its donor [MekongPlus] to improve its financial management and accounting system.
CSF promotes advocacy on prevention and protection of at-risk children and their families
through awareness raising, especially on HIV/Aids and other epidemic diseases. This advocacy
requires CSF to strategically organize public campaigns on special occasions, such as the
annual Water Festival, World Aids Day, and Children’s Day. CSF wanted to approach UNESCO
and FAO for funds for these campaigns, but its staff were not strong enough to articulate their
ideas and write proposals.

Seeing great value from this opportunity, the Partnership Program Manager (although pressed
for time with other urgent work) spent two full days to help CSF staff draft their ideas into a
framework and write four small grant proposals. Two proposals were submitted to UNESCO for
the HIV/Aids Campaign and one to FAO for awareness raising on preventing avian influenza.
The campaigns were held during the Traditional Water Festival in November and on World Aids
Day. The last proposal was submitted to ANZ Royal Bank for the child protection project. As a
result, CSF had three proposals approved with fund support of approximately US$ 4,500.00
from UNESCO and US$ 600.00 from FAO for the campaigns. The proposal to ANZ Royal Bank
is on the waiting list. With supporting funds, CSF staff and stakeholders were able to organize
the campaigns successfully with full participation of the project team, municipality, local
authorities, youth volunteers, school teachers, local police and honorable donors. CSF staff said,
“Although this is small fund support, we have strategically built relations and trust with UNESCO
and FAO staff and we hope to seek more support in the future.”

The public campaigns were covered by journalists and released through Kampuchea TV, ABC
Radio and the Phnom Penh Post on 13 November.

CWS assisted CSF to hold an awareness campaign on World Aids Day on1 December
2008, at Indra Devi High School

Partnership Program 35
CNGO partners are better able to clarify and understand their financial systems and build
trust with donors.

Financial accountability and transparency are still high concerns among government, NGO and
business sectors in Cambodia. CWS Cambodia has realized that our CNGO partners also need
capacity to improve their financial management and accounting systems. Within this reporting
period, the Partnership Program in cooperation with Finance Office staff provided training to all
CNGO partner leaders and accountants to review and discuss deeper issues during the five-day
“Financial Management and Accounting System” workshop for 26 participants (12 women)4. The
training included practical exercises on accounting, budgeting and basic financial policy issues.
After the five-day course, CNGO staff members were able to differentiate financial management
and accounting, budget preparation, bookkeeping and cash flow. Through group discussions,
the partners were able to identify their weak points and improve areas. The pre-test result
showed that 55% of participants understood only 20-40% of all financial aspects while 45%
understood 50-70%. However, the post-workshop test showed a significant improvement: 88%
of participants understood from 70-90% of the topics covered, while only 12% understood just
50-60% of them.

Soon after the training, CFED and KORCD staff members were able to revise some of their
financial policies to make them more transparent. KORCD staff simplified their financial system,
making it less time consuming to record bookkeeping and data entry via a computerized system.
KORCD is able to produce financial reports on time for the Partnership Project, while its staff
members are able to prepare budget and financial report according to a set standard and are
able to provide feedback directly to their colleagues on budgeting and recording expenses as
well as reporting. CFED has had improved its understanding of financial management and
gained more trust from MekongPlus for funding support. In this report period, with technical
support from the CWS finance team, a global review of
their financial management found that CFED had
significantly improved on many areas of its financial
management and accounting compared to the previous
review. After this positive change, CFED is going to
receive funding from MekongPlus of about US$
20,000.00 for 2009. According to the financial review
report written by the CWS finance office, “in our opinion
CFED has seen more improvement on financial
management compared to the previous financial review,
however, there are some areas that need to be
improved”.
CFED Accountant received certificate of
financial management and accounting course
MAJOR CHALLENGES

CWS has been working with more than 40 partners in different relationship from the three
categories stated in the partnership protocol, of which most CNGOs need strong funding and
technical programming support from the Partnership Program. Particularly, within this reporting
period, one of the partners, CFED had pressure from their donor (Mekong Plus) to carry out a
global financial review before it would commit new funding support. CFED found no way to do it
except by approaching the CWS finance team to help (at the time CWS finance staff were facing
time constraints due to an external audit). However, despite these constraints and in line with
our goal of “accompanying” our partners, the field accountant and finance manager took time
away from their hectic schedules to conduct the global financial review, and the results were
presented to CFED and MekongPlus. This kind of urgent request was not addressed in the

4
“Financial Management and Accounting” was held on 15-19 September 2008 with 26 participants: 5 holistic partners
(11 staff, 5 women), 2 non-funding partners (4 staff, 2 women), 5 small grant partners (8 staff, 3 women) and 3 CWS
project staff (2 women).

Partnership Program 36
partnership program or finance staff plan and caused time pressure for both finance and
partnership program staff.

Similarly, while the partnership program staff were already over worked due to being under
staffed for local institutional development, CSF had a shortfall of funds and faced program
closure. It requested technical support from the partnership program staff to develop proposals
and submit them to UNESCO, FAO, and ANZ Royal Bank to seek grants to sustain their
organization and programs. At this time Partnership Project staff were already committed to
supporting the Children Committee and Khmer Community Development Association (KCDA) to
develop their strategies. To accommodate the huge scope of work, however, the Partnership
Program Manager intervened to help CSF staff articulate their ideas to develop four proposals.
This kind of work needs staff with a high level of professional expertise and plenty of time. The
time adjustment impacted other tasks and planning of the overall program work.

LESSONS LEARNED

All funding agencies and donors have concerns about the issues of accountability and
transparency among CNGO partners in Cambodia. CFED, one of our graduated CNGO
partners, has recently received funding support from Heifer-International Cambodia and
MekongPlus. CFED was still one of our targets for improving accounting systems, which was
also a condition of their funding donor MekongPlus. If CFED did not properly set up its financial
system and carry out the financial audit, they would not have been given more funds. CWS
Partnership staff learned that this was very critical and that CFED could lose trust and a donor.
CFED could find no one to help them at this risky point. Therefore, following an urgent request
from CFED and MekongPlus, CWS Field Accountant, Mr. Sar Heang and Finance Manager, Mr.
Seng Vutha, with a guidance from the Country Representative and Director for Programming,
carried out the global financial review successfully. The crucial work and positive reference from
CWS was very important for CFED to prevent the loss of a funding donor and to increase its
profile and reputation among other NGOs and funding donors. It would have been impossible to
receive a new financial pledge from MekognPlus without the work from the CWS team. This
shows that CWS’s reference is essential to build confidence and trust between funding agencies
and implementing partners.

Within this reporting period, with a global financial crisis occurring, some CNGOs have shortfalls
of funding to support their organization and programming on the ground and Partnership
Program staff members have received a huge number of requests from CNGOs for capacity
building and funding, while the program has been under staffed. Most requests asked for
technical support and capacity building on fundraising, proposal development and strategic
planning and other organizational aspects. Therefore, program staff, in this period, have turned
their focus from provision of small grants to work on strategic planning, proposal development
and fundraising for non-funding partners, in which KCC, CC, CSF and holistic partner KCDA
have developed their strategic plan and particularly three proposals of CSF were approved by
UNESCO and FAO for public-awareness campaigns on HIV/Aids and Avian Influenza. Working
on local institutional development produces immense benefits for non-funding partners.
However, this work cannot be done without highly experienced and professional staff who have
sufficient time to focus on the intricate work and accompany the partners through the processs.

Partnership Program 37
ISSUES NOT ADDRESSED

ƒ Training on Monitoring and Evaluation for 25 partner staff was not conducted during this
reporting period and it has moved forward to the next semester due to time constraints of
the staff and partners due to donor visits, new projects coming, and the border conflict,
etc.
ƒ Training on Human Resource and Staff Management were cancelled due to limited
budget and tight schedule of the program.
ƒ There were 15 proposals submitted to the partnership program and one of them was
approved due to the uncertainty of program budget within the period.

FUTURE PLANS

ƒ Provide training on Monitoring and Evaluation for the partners


ƒ Provide grants to the prioritized project partners
ƒ Conduct program meeting
ƒ Review CAT and Partnership Operating Guidelines
ƒ Continue to assist partners for the proposal development for fundraising and strategic
plan development
ƒ Continue to build capacity on technical aspects of financial and accounting systems as
well as organizational development to partners (CFED, CSF, CC, KCC, etc.) to build
sound management systems for organization and programming
ƒ Assist the Country Representative to organize the Square Table Meeting on 25-27 March
2009.

Partnership Program 38
2.2. B
BATTAM BANG & BA
ANTEAY
Y MEAN
NCHEY
PA
ARTNE
ERSHIP PROJE
ECT

INTROD
DUCTION

CWS Cambodia has deep ro oots in the western border proviinces of Ba attambang (BTB) and d
Banteayy Meancheyy (BTM) wh here in the early 90s we
w helped the
t Departm ment of Aniimal Health h
and Pro oduction im
mprove vacccination off livestock (in collabo
oration with
h the Luthe eran World d
Federatiion and the
e American Friends Se ervice Com
mmittee). Ass our work expanded, knowledge e
and techhnology fro
om foreign experts
e wass gradually
y and carefu
ully transferrred to loca
al residentss
through our Village
e Livestock Agent train
ning prograam. By 1998 this vital program wasw handed d
over to government
g t departmen
nts.

In 1999 the BTB&B BTM Projecct shifted itss focus to the


t institutional develo
opment of Cambodian
C n
NGOs, a move that was in n line with h our coun ntrywide co ommitment to local institutionall
development (LID)). CWS-C was w quick to recognize the vasst potential of the dy ynamic and d
committe ed Cambod dian NGOs that were emerging
e in the provincces, despite
e minimal su
upport from
m
their inte
ernational counterparts
c s.

The ma ajor developpment in thhe reporting g period iss the imple ementation of Community Based d
Disasterr Risk Mitig
gation (CBDRM) through three of the Pro oject’s four holistic pa
artners: the
e
Cambod dian Familly Econom mic Develo opment As ssociation (CFEDA), Khmer CommunityC y
Developpment Asso ociation (KCCDA) and Kumnit Th hmey Orga anization (KKNTO). They receive e
support from CWS S-C’s Emerg gency Resp ponse unit in collaborration with Provincial Red Crosss
departm
ments. Once e again, vittal international knoww how (thro ough a gen nerous gran nt from thee
Europeaan Commisssion) is beinng transferreed to local residents.
r

CBDRM M is being immplemented d in 40 villag


ges in three
e provinces: BTB, BTB and Oddarr Meancheyy
(ODM). It aims to increase the t capacitty of thesee villages too effectively prepare for naturall
disasterss and to mitigate impa
acts resulting from themm. Eighty-on ne Red Cro oss Volunteers (RCVs))
have beeen trained.. During thee reporting period, nin ne training courses on n CBDRM, Commune e
Developpment Plann ning and Co ommunity Based
B First Aid were organized
o fo
or 200 participants (67
7
women), including RCVs, Village
V Health Volunte eers, Villagge Chiefs, Village De evelopmentt
Committtee membe ers, Commu une, Districtt and Proviincial comm mittees for d
disaster maanagement,
CNGO partners,
p an
nd CWS-C staff
s and theeir Red Crooss counterpparts.

During the
t reportin
ng period, 4,643
4 families were direct beneficciaries of thhe BTB&BT TM Project,
while an nother 4,65 58 1 benefittted indirecctly. The fo
our holisticc partners implement integrated d
commun nity developpment, focuusing on su upporting annd strengthhening Self--Help Group ps (SHGs),
basic heealth care education,
e c
community education, agriculture and anima al raising, and
a supportt
for the absolute
a pooor. They also
a work too strengthen social inffrastructure, such as building
b the
e
capacityy of Commu une Councils, Village Chiefs, Village Development Co ommittee (V VDCs), and d
commun nity-based organization
o ns such as rice
r banks, funeral asssociations, a
and commu unity ponds.

The Prooject also continues


c to
o provide small
s grants
s to three volunteer
v groups that implementt
g
HIV/Aidss and peace educationn in Battam
mbang and Banteay
B Meeanchey: Dhammayietra Mongkoll
Borei, Dhammayiet
D tra BTB andd Dhammayyietra BTM.

1
Direct benneficiaries: 4,643 families (628 led by women) comprising 22,5524 individuals (8,290 women and 7,729 children). Indirect
beneficiarie es comprising 23,185 individuals including 6,20
es: 4,658 familie 09 women and 9,630 children.
BTB & BTM Partnersh
hip Project 3
39
Our objjective: To o strengthe en the cappacity of holistic
h CN
NGO partners and sm mall grantt
recipiennts so they
y can facilittate progra
ams that wiill effective
ely and sus
stainably im
mprove the
e
lives off the most vulnerable
v people.

MAJOR
R ACCOMPL
LISHMENT
TS AND CHANGES

Improve
ed capacity
y of holistic
c partners

The Pro oject has continued


c to assist its four holistic partners. Beside
es the threee alreadyy
mentioned, they incclude the Association
A for Development and Our Village
ers’ Rights (ADOVIR).
This cappacity buildiing applies to all 22 sttaff members (10 wom
men) of the p
partners, an
nd includess
al coaching, monitoring
individua g of program m planning and implem
mentation, p
proposal de
evelopment,,
financiall managem ment and re eporting, and reviews of guideline es and organizational structures..
The Pro oject has also
a workedd closely with
w CWS-CC’s Emergeency Respo onse unit to
o build the
e
capacityy of CFEDA A, KNTO and d KCDA to understand and implem ment CBDRRM.

Frequennt meetingss, discussio ons and fieeld observa ation, have


e shown th hat the parrtners have e
increaseed their cap pacity in ovverall program implem mentation and
a organizzational maanagement.
They ha ave improvved their cooperation n and collaboration with Comm mune Coun ncils, locall
authorities and govvernment de epartments – such as health and d education – and Provincial Red d
Cross department
d s. Their program
p acchievementts, which include co ommunity ponds
p and
d
commun nity school construction, have been recogniz zed and prraised by loocal authoritties. KNTOO
has exppanded its program to o four moree villages in
n Banteay Ampil Distrrict, Oddar Meancheyy
Province en a stronghold of the Khmer Rou
e. (This disttrict had bee uge until the
e late 1990s
s.)

ew of the work conduccted by the four


Below iss an overvie f holisticc partners, ffollowed by a synopsiss
of challe
enges and le n outline of plans for the next half of this fisca
essons learrned and an al year.

2
Associa
ation for De nt and Our Villager’s Rights
evelopmen R

ADOVIR R has becom me more efffective at report


r writing, financial reporting a
and manage ement, andd
strengthening sociial infrastru ucture such h as comm munity sch hools, funerral associa ations, andd
Commune Councilss. Moreove er, field visiits have shhown that th hese increaased skills have been n
passed on to reside ents of the villages
v whe ere ADOVIR R works. Village chiefss, Village De
evelopmentt
Committtees, Comm mune Counccils as well as committtee membe ers of funeraal associatio
ons, parentt
associattions and community
c p
ponds havee increased d their knowwledge and capacity fo or proposall
writing, basic rightss, and advo ocacy. ADO OVIR has also acquired a high re eputation ammong otherr
CNGOs working in its area. It is respecte ed as well by
b local auth horities, Co
ommune Co ouncils, and
d
governm ment officialss, especially those worrking in heaalth, educatiion and veteerinary serv
vices.

ADOVIR R has helpeed enhance e the capaccity of eightt village-bassed funeral associatio
ons in eightt
villages, which in turn
t has strrengthened community y solidarity and providded invaluaable help to
o
impoverrished residdents dealinng with foood shortage es, sicknesss and dea ath. ADOVIR R providedd
material support3 to
o two funera ons in Buo Run and Sthapor Mou
al associatio uy villages. In addition,,
it helpeed funeral association n committe ee members review their operrating guidelines and d
structure
e. According to ADOV VIR staff, th
he result ha
as been inccreased com mmunity solidarity andd
greater assistance
a from the asssociations.
2
ADOVIR has five staff (22 women) and implements inte egrated commu unity developme ent in 14 post-cconflict villages in Ampil Pram
m
Daeum Commune, Bavel District, BTB. Direct
D beneficiaries: 1,499 families ((86 of which are led by w women) with 6,,364 individualss
(2,626 wom
men and 2,090 children).
c Indirecct beneficiaries:: 1,156 families with 6,395 indivviduals (1,544 wwomen and 3,428 children).
3
The materials include coo es, soup bowls, and water-carrrying carts.
oking pots, plate

BTB & B
BTM Partnersh
hip Project 4
40
This asssistance is especiallyy critical duuring emerggencies. Fo or examplee, two families whose e
houses burnt down in Novemb ber 2008 recceived imm
mediate assistance fromm their villagge’s funerall
associattion, which helped them m avoid relying on mo oneylenderss and the crrippling rate
e of interestt
they chaarge. Mr. Chin
C Chum and his fam mily were provided
p with 50,000 rriels, clothin
ng, 50kg off
rice, and
d cooking pots
p and ute ensils by th
he funeral association
a in Boeng SSnoul village e. Mr. Sourr
Chen an nd his family were pro ovided with 20,000 riels, cooking pots and uutensils by the funerall
associattion in Stha age. ADOVIR also disttributed 4 mosquito
apor Pir villa m neets, 4 blanke ets, 2 matss
and 50 kg o each family.
k of rice to

As notedd in the End Year Rep port for FY0


08, Boeng Snuol
S and Kob are tw wo of the moost isolated
d
villages in Ampil Prram Daeum Commune. They lacked school buildings b an
nd accessible roads forr
children to attend classes elssewhere. With
W financiaal support from ADOV VIR, two neew schoolss
(three classrooms each) were e constructeed in the se econd half of o FY08, ass well as a 120 meterr
road to the schooll in Boeng Snoul villa age. Two classrooms were consttructed by communityy
memberrs. They alsso provided d land. Com mbined, the e schools now
n accom
mmodate 35 54 studentss
(156 girrls). They became op perational during
d the reporting period. The eir inaugurration 4 wass
organizeed by ADOV VIR, parent association
ns, Village Chiefs
C and teachers on n Decembe er 26, 2008,
and theyy were hand ded over to the commu unities, locaal authoritiess and comm
mune schoo ol cluster.

Boeng Snoul
S Villag
ge Committe ee Develop pment member Mr. Yip p Van, 45, w was among those who o
mobilize
ed support forf the school: “I workked hard to o get people e to work ttogether, including the e
parents’’ associationn, to establiish a schoo
ol constructiion committtee. I even lled the com mmittee. We e
mobilize
ed and colle ected resou urces from the
t commun nity to build
d this three-classroom school butt
we were e not able to
o complete it, as we ca an afford litttle more thaan enough rrice to fill ou
ur rice pots.
Our woo oden schoo ol is 24m byb 7.5m an nd has a co oncrete floo or. It was mmade poss sible by the
e
collaborration betweeen the com mmunity and d ADOVIR and a financia al aid from C
CWS Camb bodia.

“ADOVIR R staff me embers worked very hard with us, startin ng from he elping us prepare
p thee
construcction plan, identifying necessary resources and getting g the comm munity invoolved. Theyy
also con nnected us to commune councilorrs, the direc ctor of the co
ommune scchool cluste er and otherr
officials who rarely visited or offered
o servvices becauuse our villa
age is very iisolated and
d difficult to
o
access. But now we w have a new n schooll. Our child
dren can stu udy and atttend classe es regularlyy
because e the schoo
ol is near ouur village an
nd has enou ugh desks anda school equipment.. The 120m m
road [to the schooll] was builtt by commu unity peoplee through a work-for-ffood projectt. The road d
makes access
a easyy, even duriing the rainyy season, as
a long as itt does not fllood.”

Once th he school was w built, the


t “commu une clusterr school” director
d asssigned three
e voluntaryy
teacherss to it. (Schools are grrouped in co ommune clu usters in Caambodia an nd the direc
ctor of each
h
cluster ensures
e tha
at the curriculum adherres to government stan ndards.) ADDOVIR also distributedd
5
school materials
m to
o the 354 scchool childre
en.

4
About 4000 people, includ
ding school child
dren, members ofo parent assoc
ciations, village residents,
r teach
hers, village chie
efs, and
members ofo VDCs from the e two villages attended
a the inauguration.
5
The mate
erials include 4 note
n books, two pens, one penccil and one ruler per student.
BTB & BTM Partnersh
hip Project 4
41
It is impportant to note
n that prior to 1996, Boeng SnoulS villag
ge was a b battle zone where the e
remnantts of the Kh hmer Rouge and gove ernment forrces foughtt for controll. It is also one of the e
most iso olated villages in Am mpil Pram Daeum
D Com
mmune, located abou ut 70km no orthwest off
Battamb bang town. TheT village is situated in a flood-p prone forested area witth no roads connecting g
it to the Commune or District center. Alth hough, it haas a sizeab ble populatioon (1,044 people,
p 218
8
families)), it has recceived almo ost no servvices from the
t governm ment or humanitarian assistance e
from inteernational oro Cambod dian NGOs,, except AD DOVIR. Neighboring vvillages hav ve receivedd
some asssistance frrom the government. Residents of the villag ge make a living by fa arming ricee
and corn n, and fruit orchards. They also workw ay laborers in agricultu
as da ure production. In mid--
2006, CWS-C
C accoompanied ADOVIR
A sttaff to the village,
v andd provided capacity building and d
grants too support thheir work. ADOVIR
A began by building relatio onships with
h community y memberss
and then n helped th hem conducct a Particip patory Rura al Appraisal. The PRA identified a school ass
one of thhe village’s top prioritie
es, and residents requ uested imme ediate assisstance in bu
uilding one.
Childrenn from Grad des 1-3 had been studyy in a very oldo building g inside Boeeng Snoul pagoda
p and
d
under a house. Ressidents conttributed the eir own mon ney to suppo ort voluntee
er teachers.

Besides school construction, during the reporting periodp ADOOVIR also p promoted basic healthh
awarene ess through h Village Health
H Volunteers and d Health Ce enter staff. VHVs in 14 villagess
disseminnated monthly information on dise eases and health
h topiccs such as m malaria, dengue fever,
respirato
ory disease e, diarrhea, general hyggiene and child
c immun nization. ADDOVIR also distributed
d
40 wateer filters to 40 familiess in Boeng Snoul, Boeng Popou ul and Kob villages. The familiess
shared the cost of o water filtters (from 4,000-5,000 0 riels, USS$ 1-1.25) and were trained byy
ADOVIR R staff and d VHVs on safe drinkking water and waterr-filter use. Reports frrom Health h
Centers show a sha arp drop in disease andd a rise in the number of immunizzed children n.

A
ADOVIR bene
eficiaires recceived ceram
mic water filte
ers, which red
duce
the incidencce of water-b
borne disease es.

With hellp from ADO OVIR, Commmune Councilors in Ampil


A Pram Daeum org ganized a coordination
c n
meeting with 26 participantss (2 wome en) comprising Villag ge Chiefs, Village De evelopmentt
Committtees and members of internationa
i al and Cambodian NGO Os working in the commmune. Thee
district governor
g pre
esented a program
p coo
ordination plan
p so that groups6 wo
orking in the
e communee
could co ollaborate more
m effectivvely and encouraged thhem to conttinue such m
meetings.

6
VSG, CDC
CV, Lutheran World
W Federation
n, CARITAS and
d ADOVIR

BTB & B
BTM Partnersh
hip Project 4
42
V
Village Chiefss, members ofo VDCs and d staff from in
nternational and
a Camboid
dian NGOs meet
m
to coordinate thheir work at a seminar orrganized by the
t Ampil Prram Daeum C
Commune Council.
C

Khmer Communitty Develop ociation7


pment Asso

KCDA became
b ass new holisstic partnerr in FY08. During the e reportingg period, Project
P stafff
memberrs have con ntinued to train and provide
p ensive technical assisttance to KC
inte CDA. As a
result, KCDA
K staff members have
h upgra
aded their skills
s in fina
ancial mana agement an nd programm
impleme entation, particularly
p the Comm munity Development approach,, Participatory Rurall
Appraisaals, SHGs and CBDRM. During their firs st year of partnership support they have e
establish
hed coope erative relaationships with village residentts, local a authorities, Commune e
Councilss, and the Samlout
S Disstrict Red Cross
C Office
e. After seeeing the efffectiveness of KCDA’ss
work in Ta Toak Commune, Councilorss and Village Chiefs in neighbo oring Kamp pong Lpeuvv
Commune invited KCDAK to wo
ork in vulnerrable and poor villagess in their com
mmune.

KCDA’s entry into these new w villages began with building co ooperative rrelationships s and trustt
with ressidents, identifying avaailable reso
ources, barrriers and untapped
u po
otential, tarrget groupss
and pow wer structure
es. Staff maade home visits
v to talk
k informally with reside
ents so thatt they could
d
acquire in-depth understandi
u ng of each h village. KCDA
K stafff then condducted PRA As in nine
e
villages (August 11 1 to Septemmber 12). Participation
P n averaged about 50% % in each village.
v The
e
PRAs identified what the comm munities reg
garded as th heir most pressing nee eds, potential solutionss
and targget groups fo
or direct assistance. The PRAs werew used fo
or developinng program plans.

7
KCDA’s five staff mem mbers (2 wom
men) impleme ent integrated community development
d in 13 villagess in Ta Taok,,
Sung and Ta Sanh com mmunes of Saamlout Districct, BTB. Direct beneficiariees: 364 familie
es (66 led by women) with h
1,737 individuals, includ
ding 456 wom
men and 903 children.
c Indire
ect beneficiarie
es: 1,153 fam
milies with 4,99
99 individuals,,
including 1,370
1 women and 2,108 children.
BTB & BTM Partnersh hip Project 434
A KCDA staff
s memberr conducts a PRA in Ou Nonoung
N villlage, Ta Toa
ak Commune e.
Reside
ents ranked their standarrd of living as
s either rich, middle incomme, poor,
o poorest to help determ
or mine the flow of direct aid and assistan nce.
Encouragging them to establish the eir own rankiing minimizes
Disp
putes over dirrect aid, alters perception ns about
vu
ulnerable houuseholds and d fosters soliidarity.

To strenngthen commmunity-bassed organizzations, KCDA continu ues to supp port ten SHGs8 in ninee
9
villages in Ta Taokk Commune e, Samlout District. Th
he groups have
h membbers from 245
2 familiess
(208 women). KC CDA facilitates monthly meetin ngs to mo onitor the groups an nd discusss
bookkee eping, savin
ngs and borrrowing, pro
oblems, solu utions, and mutual help. KCDA ha as reported
d
that SHGG memberss are helpin ng each othher more freequently. This is especially noticeeable whenn
the poorr and poorest families face
f emergeencies, succh as seriou
us illness or food shorta
ages.

For exam mple, in Se


eptember 20 008, SHGs in Ta Taok k village hellped impoveerished andd distraughtt
parents pay for th he funeral of their 14 4-year-old daughter.
d In November 2008, aftera KCDAA
d six hungryy families10 in Phnum Rai,
identified R Ou Nonoung, and d Ta Taok vvillages, Villa
age Chiefs,
VDCs an nd RCVs were
w quick to
o provide enough
e food
d to the fam
milies (includ
ding powdered milk forr
babies) to last until harvesting season.

From Left:
L A KCDA A staff mem mber facilitate
es a monthlyy SHG meetting in Phnum
m Rai village
e while
anothe
er distributes food to a fam
mily facing a food shortag
ge.
8
KCDA had facilitated SHGs before beco oming a holistic partner.
9
Samlout was
w controlled byb the Khmer Ro ouge until 19988. One of 13 disttricts of BTB, it has
h 7 commune es and 49 villages. It is located
in the southhwest of the pro
ovince and has a population of 30,044 (15,202 women).
10
The six families
f (30 mem
mbers) that faceed food shortages included one e led by a disabled father, 1 led
d by a mother whose husband
had been shot
s dead by a Thai
T border patrrol, 1 led by an ill
i and elderly grrandmother, 1 with
w recently borrn twins, and 1 led
l by a parent
living with HIV/Aids.
H

BTB & B
BTM Partnersh
hip Project 4
44
With inteensive coacching from Project stafff and coord dination with the Samlout District Red Crosss
office, KCDA
K has inntegrated CBDRM
C oject. It has explained tthe conceptt in detail to
into its ICD pro o
village residents,
r V
Village a key individuals (su
Chiefs, VDCs and uch as villag ge elders) and
a helped d
them se elect 26 RC CVs (15 wo omen) from m 13 villagees (2 RCVss per village). The 26 RCVs, 13 3
Village Chiefs,
C and 13 membe ers of VDCss (17 wome en) participaated in a fivve-day training sessionn
on Community Bassed First Aid as well as a a five-day training session
s on CBDRM in Decemberr
2008. Th he training sessions were
w organizzed by CWS S in cooperration with tthe District Red Crosss
office. Besides
B the
e knowledg ge gained, participants s learned how
h to dup plicate the training to
o
residentts of their villages throu
ugh formal and informa al “echo” awwareness-ra aising discuussions thatt
help villa
ages preparre and imple ement disaster mitigation plans.

KCDA iss the only NGO


N workin
ng in a remmote ethnic village alonng Thai borrder on the Cardamon n
mountain range, about 100km m south of Battamban ng town. It had also b been a Khm mer Rouge e
village until
u arly 90s. The ethnic Por
the ea P residen nts have thheir own la anguage, which is nott
understoood by govvernment offficials. The eir isolation is extremee, their histtory difficultt, and theirr
current hardships numerous.
n The village
e was found ded in 1979 9, after the Khmer Ro ouge forcess
had bee en driven to the we estern and northern fringes
f of Cambodia by govern nment and d
Vietnammese forces. At that tim me, 83 ethnnic Por fam milies migratted to the aarea, and named
n theirr
village 83
8 because e it comprissed 83 fam milies. In 19993, after fighting
f stop
pped in the e area, the e
village was
w rename ed Phnom Rey R (Rattan n Hill) beca
ause rattan (which tran nslates as “rey”
“ in Porr
language) is plentiful in the are
ea.

The villa
age has gro own to 147 families
f whho are mainly subsisten nce farmerss, growing rice,
r beans,
and corn on moun ntain terrace
es and in valleys.
v Tra
aditionally, they
t rely onn prayers to land and d
forest sp
pirits prior to planting and
a harvestting. Howev ver, their crrops are oftten eaten byy wild pigs,,
monkeyss and otherr animals, while
w recenttly enacted forest consservation ruules now prevent them m
from trap
pping or hunting wild animals.
a

KCDA starting workking in this village


v 006, by building cooperative relationships witth residentss
in 20
and establishing links betwee en local auuthorities and residentts. KCDA a also explained to the e
residentts that its ap
pproach wa as to help thhem help thhemselves. Their workk in this rem
mote villagee
was one e of the facctors that le
ed the Projeect to selec
ct KCDA ass a holistic partner. Thhe intensivee
capacityy building, grant
g support and acco ompanimentt KCDA hass received h has enabledd it to more
e
effective
ely impleme ent integrate
ed community developm ment, with a special focus on SHGGs.

SHGs were
w a new w concept in i Phnom Rey. KCDA A facilitated
d the formaation of thee first SHG G
(Samakii Phnom Rey)R there. It has 17 families
f as members (13 women), with thrree women n
serving as committtee memb bers. Its lea ader, Mrs. Chhay Pheap, 39, fa acilitates th
he monthlyy
meetings where ea ach membe er contribute es 500 riels
s in savingss. Besides monitoring the moneyy
saved, KCDA
K also assists the group with bookkeepin ng. As of the end of thiis reporting period, the
e
group haas saved 18 80,000 rielss, which members borrrow primarilyy to purchase food and d medicine.
More immportantly, during
d the monthly meetings,
m members alsso discuss mutual pro oblems and d
solutionss, which fossters social solidarity.

The SHG is succe eeding in allleviating fo ges and its capacity to


ood shortag o do so is increasing,,
accordin DA staff. In November 2008, the SHG
ng to reportss from KCD S distribu
uted 10,000 0 riels each
h
to two fa
amilies facing food shoortage. In addition,
a KC
CDA provide ed 20kg of rice and otther stapless
to each family. Thiss support provided
p the
e two familiies with eno
ough food tto last till harvest timee
when me embers cou uld find work as day labborers.

“What KCDA
K has given
g us iss hope,” exp plained Mrs s. Chhay Pheap.
P “Sincce they arrrived in ourr
village they
t have supported
s u and encouraged ou
us ur initiative. We will co
ontinue to expand
e ourr
Self Helpp Group. Th
he future off our village is looking brighter.”
b

BTB & BTM Partnersh


hip Project 4
45
Kumnit Thmey (Ne
ew Ideas) Organizatio
O on

With financial and technical assistance from CWS S, KNTO expand


e its ICD progra am to fourr
isolated villages 11 in
i Ampil Commune, Banteay
B mpil Districtt 12 , Oddar Meanchey during the
Am e
g period. It has steadily
reporting s up
pgraded its s organiza ational stru ucture and d program m
impleme entation, wh hile its eigh
ht staff meembers (thre ee women)) have imp proved theirr skills and
d
confidennce in plann ning, reportting, propossal writing and financial management. In the reporting g
period, KNTO
K bega an integrating CBDRM ommunity development work with
M into its inttegrated co h
support from CWS and in coo operation with the BTM M Red Crosss and Bante eay Ampil District
D Red
d
Cross offfices.

It has
h explain ned CBDRM M concepts in-depth to o
Coommune Councils,
C V
Village Chieefs, VDCs,
ressidents, and d key indiviiduals (suchh as village
e
eldders), and selected
s 24
4 new RCV Vs in the 155
villlages it worrks in, raisin
ng the totall number off
RCCVs to 31 3 (14 wo omen). Tw wenty-threee
ressidents (6 women)
w –1 11 RCVs, eight
e VHVs,
thrree VDC members, an nd one Villaage Chief –
atttended a three-day refresher course on n
Coommunity Based Firsst Aid and d CBDRM M
orgganized in November 2008 by CW WS. Since e
theen the participants h have been n providingg
“eccho trainingg” and awareness rais sing in theirr
villlages as well
w as leading the pre eparation off
dissaster mitigation plans.

The higgh reputatio


on KNTO has h acquireed among internation nal and Ca ambodian NGOs,
N and
d
governmment departtments and d officials in
i BTM annd OMC KN NTO is especially res spected byy
provincia
al and distrrict health, agriculturee and educaation officia
als), helped
d it receive a grant off
US$12,0000.00 fromm the Austra alian Embasssy for FY009 to implem ment ICD inn the new taarget area133
14
in Oddaar Meanchey. Its ICD program
p c
covers now covers 15 villages in Preah Netr Preah (3))
and Serei Saopho oan (4) districts, Batttam Bang, and Ban nteay Ampil (8) Distrrict, Oddarr
Meanchey.

KNTO’s entry into o the new villages included hom me visits that allowed
d staff to experience
e
firsthand
d residents’’ daily livess. Staff then
n conducted
d a PRA from Septem mber 1-5, 2008. Aboutt
t residentts participatted in the asssessment, which KNT
60% of the TO used forr its program
m plan.

KNTO hash a speccial focus on


o improving g the qualiity of educaation for chhildren in the isolatedd
villages of Chub Korki Lech h and Chub Korki Kooeut 15 in Banteay
B Ammpil where e Thai and d
Cambod dian soldierrs are facing off over a border dispute. The ere was a ssingle, old school
s in a
state of disrepair with
w no teachers in thhe area. As
s a result, children
c recceived educ cation from
m

11
The 4 new
n villages arre Tbaeng Chas, Kdol, Cha
ar and Souphe
eap.
12
Bantea ay Ampil is a post-conflict district in OM MC with 4 com mmunes and 46 villages a and a population of 38,221
(19,105 women).
w
13
The new w villages in ODM
O are: Chob Korki Lech, Chob Korki Kaeut,
K Tbaeng Thmei, Tbaen ng Chas, Kouk Prech,
Kdol, Chaar and Souphe eap.
14
Direct beneficiaries:
b 1
1,158 families (130 led by women)
w comprrising 5,321 in
ndividuals (1,6627 women an nd 1,133
children). Indirect benefficiaries: 470 families
f comprrising 2,256 inndividuals (598
8 women and 526 children).
15
Chub Korki
K Lech andd Chub Korki Koeut
K villagess are located on
o Dong Rek Mountain,
M along the Thai boorder in Ampill
Commune e, Banteay Am mpil District, OMC. They are e about 110km m north of BTM M town and we ere controlled by the Khmerr
Rouge in 1998. They arre located in an a area where the border dis spute with Thaailand is intense.

BTB & B
BTM Partnersh
hip Project 4
46
monks ata the local pagoda. Altthough the monks werre well liked by the children and treeated them
m
nately, they were untrained in teacching and th
affection he quality off education was low.

In coooperation with the goveernment clu uster schooll


directoor, KNTO helped
h parent associatiions in both h
village
es construcct a small (16m by 7m) primaryy
schoo ol (Grades 1 and 2) forr 54 childrenn (32 girls)..
However, due to o the borderr conflict, 163 familiess
were displaced to t temporarry shelters about 5km m
from their villagees in mid-O
October 2008. As the e
situatiion calmedd about 60 0 families returned
r to
o
their homes. To o prevent a an interruption in the e
childreen’s educcation, KNTO help ped locall
authorities, teacchers and parents by y providing g
school materials
m to the displacced children
n so they could attend a neighborin ng school.

To strenngthen SHG
Gs, KNTO provided
p coaaching durin
ng the repo
orting period
d to 27 SHG G memberss
(20 wom men) from four
f SHGs in Chub Ko orki Koeut, Tbeng Thm mey and Ko ok Prech villages. The e
training focused on
o bookkee eping, savinngs, borrow
wing, recorrding minuttes of mee etings, andd
discussions of SHGG principles. KNTO su upports 26 SHGs
S in 11 villages (19 in its old target area
a
in BTM and
a seven ini its new ta
arget area in
n OMC) witth 346 mem mbers (224 wwomen).

KNTO staff
s reporte
ed that Villa
age Committtees for Prrogram Man nagement in n old targett villages in
n
BTM ha ave acquire ed the capa acity to suppport SHG committee es to condu uct monthly y meetings.
Moreove er, the SH HGs have dramatically increase ed capacityy, solidaritty, and mu utual help,
especiallly for suppoorting vulne
erable familiies facing crises. For example,
e aS SHG in Tba aeng villagee
distribute
ed 14kg off rice to a widow
w and her childre en who face ed a food sshortage in Novemberr
2008. Inn September 2008, SHG Gs in Ruessei village contributed
c 20,000 rielss to transpo
ort a seven--
year-old girl to Preaah Netr Preeah District Hospital for treatment of dengue fever. She recovered.
(The death rate fro om dengue fever is ve ery low if proper
p and timely treattment is received, butt
delayed or imprope er treatment can heigh hten the risk k of denguee hemorrhagic fever, and a dengue e
shock syndrome,
s w
which can be fatal. In 2007 the ere were over
o 40,0000 cases of dengue in n
Cambod dia, most off them childdren. The fa
act that SHG G memberss arranged hospital transportation n
demonstrates that they
t have acquired
a the ability to recognize the
t symptom ms of deng gue and the e
need forr timely and proper treaatment.)

To imprrove health conditions among the e poor in the


t new tarrget villages in Ampil commune,
KNTO cooperated
c h Center sta
with Health aff and VHV Vs to conduuct awarene ess raising for
f malaria,
dengue, diarrhea, hygiene an nd safe drin nking waterr for 283 re esidents (1881 women) during the e
g period. In
reporting n seven othe er villages, VHVs, VDC Cs and Villa
age Chiefs held “Villagge Hygienee
Day” forr residents and schoo ol children. In Decemb ber 2008, with
w funding from the e Australian
n
Embasssy, KNTO distributed
d 120 water filters, 150 0 mosquito nets, and 85 water jars j to 3288
families in eight viillages (eacch family contributed between 1,000-5000 riels, 25 US U cents to o
US$1.25 5 towards the
t cost). Prior
P to disstributing th
he materialss, KNTO p provided edducation onn
health isssues and water-filterr use. As a result, res sidents of the villagess have bec come more e
knowleddgeable abo out preventing illness and
a hygiene e. The incid
dence of illn
ness causedd by unsafee
water haas declined dramaticallly.

BTB & BTM Partnersh


hip Project 4
47
KN
NTO staff meembers cond duct a denguue and malariria awareness campaign in a target viillage.
The poste er illustrates the
t differencce between th he two endem mic diseasess and explain
ns
tha
at the mosqu uitoes that trransmits den
ngue bites du
uring the dayy, while
the mosquito
m tha
at transmits malaria
m bites at night.

Additionally, during the reporting period, funding from


m the Austrralian Emba assy allowe
ed KNTO too
provide training on chicken raaising and home
h gardeening in eig
ght villages. Chickens, seeds andd
agricultu
ural tools were
w supplie
ed to 42 faarmers (5-6 farmers pe er village) tto improve household
d
nutrition and incommes.16 The farmers
f plan to sell su
urplus chickkens and ve egetables to
t generate
e
income.

Cambod
dian Family
y Economiic Developm
ment Asso
ociation

Within the reportinng period, CFEDA’s


C d
director and
d accountan nt resigned. With guiddance fromm
Project staff,
s the asssociation restructured
r d its organiz
zation to prromote femaale leaders in a three--
memberr management committtee. Ms. Liim Savuth, 28, now th of the committee, hass
he director o
been witth CFEDA since 2003 3 (CFEDA wasw formed in 1998) when w she be
egan as a Community
C y
Developpment Worker. Althou ugh she iss now a key k manag ger committted to org ganizationall
manage ement and development, she still works to find solutio ons to build
d sustainab
ble income--
generation activitiess for vulnera
able familie
es and comm munities.

CFEDA is a grassro oots organizzation guide


ed by an inttegrated community de evelopmentt model thatt
is rooted
d in organizzational devvelopment and value-b based workk.17 It implements its programs
p in
n
17 villag
ges comprissing both fo ormer Khme er Rouge annd non-Khm mer Rouge residents in n northwestt
Cambod dia. It directtly benefits 1,328 households (7,,778 people e) and indirrectly beneffits anotherr
1,895 hoouseholds.

When entering
e a village
v CFEEDA spendss six month hs on trustt-building reelationships
s based on n
open co
ommunicatio on and prin
ncipals of cllarity and honesty.
h The trust issu ues apply too both stafff
and residents as well
w as bettween the residents
r th
hemselves: returnees from refug gee camps,
newcommers and forrmer Khmerr Rouge soldiers. The confidence
c building is b
bolstered byy regular
16
Each fammily received 4-8
8 chickens, toolls, and vegetablle seeds (the co
ost was about US$
U 40 per familly).
17
Its value
e-based approacch includes peaaceful solutions, gender equity equality,
e democcracy and buildin
ng good governance. It works
directly with
h Commune Co ouncils under Caambodia’s new decentralized
d sy
ystem.

BTB & B
BTM Partnersh
hip Project 4
48
visits, offten overnigght, in the village.
v Sta
aff rely on the
t old Khm
mer adage, “We meet in order to
o
separate e and we separate so we ca an meet again,” as a kind of shorthand d for initiall
conversa ations, disccussions andd chats.

As a ressult of the ongoing


o discussions, CFEDA
C succeeded in building
b coo
operative re
elationshipss
with village reside ents, local authorities and Com mmune Cou uncils. At the same time, theyy
increase ed cooperation and co ollaboration
n with intern nd Cambodian NGOs as well ass
national an
Governm ment departtments. The ese includeed Mines Ad dvisory Group, Health Centers, Malai Districtt
Health Office, and d Banteay Meanchey Red Cros ss. Through implementing the Community
C y
Develop pment apprroach, PRA As, SHGs and CBDR RM, CFEDA A has imp proved its capacity
c in
n
programm implementtation, allowwing it to recceive a US$$ 12,000 grrant from th
he Australian Embassyy
for FY09 9 for an In
ntegrated Community
C Developme ent Project in a new target area a 18 in Malaii
District, Banteay Me eanchey.

The worrk of CFEDA A staff has helped


h prevviously tensse and fractured comm munities buildd solidarity,
mutual assistance,
a and improvved relationnships. Village Committees for Pro ogram Management in n
arget area19 have also
its old ta o improved their capac city to manage develo opment activities. With h
five stafff (four women), CFEDA A implemen nts ICDP in 17 villagess in two disttricts of BTM
M Province:
Ou Chro ov and Mallai. It directtly benefits 1,622 fammilies (346 led by wom men) comprrising 9,102 2
people (3,581 wom men and 2,725 childre en), and inndirectly be
enefits 1,87 79 families comprising g
9,535 pe eople (2,6900 women an nd 3,198 chhildren).

With fun
nding suppo e Australian Embassy and
ort from the a CWS to o improve tthe health of
o residentss
in eight new targett villages in
n Malai Disstrict, CFEDDA cooperated with He ealth Centeer staff and
d
VHVs too increase awareness
a about mala
aria, dengue e fever, dia arrhea, gene eral hygiene
e, and safee
drinking water. The ese intervenntions were
e the first off their kind in two villages, while six villagess
are beneefiting from ongoing caampaigns thhat reach 1,690 residen nts (1,170 w
women).

During the
t reportin
ng period, CFEDA
C disttributed 106
6 water filte
ers, 300 mo osquito netts, and 100 0
water bu uckets to 3000 families. Each family shared th he cost (rannging from 2 2,000-5000 0 riels or 50
0
US centts to US 1.25). CFED DA also org ganized a two-day tra aining sesssion (29-30 Decemberr
2008) att the Toul Pongro
P Health Centre forf 16 VHVs s (8 women n) to increasse their undderstanding g
about malaria,
m deng gue fever, safe
s drinking g water, hyg
giene, and diarrhea. B Based on an n evaluationn
of the tra
aining sesssion, VHVs gained
g in-depth understanding off the topics as well as the t skills too
dissemin nate this knowledge
k to village residents. CFEDA sta aff memberrs have ob bserved an n
increasee in the nummber of peoople boiling water for drrinking, and d using wate er filters and mosquito o
nets. Improvementss in family hygiene
h havve also occuurred.

The leve el of educa


ation for chiildren of the
e most vuln nerable fam milies in Sa
antepheap, Banteay Tii
Muoy, OuO Ampil, an nd Ou Sa OmO villages in Malai Diistrict is verry low becau use the clossest schooll
is quite far
f to accesss by foot: absenteeism
a m is high forr children froom poor fam
milies. CFE
EDA worked d
with Villa
age Chiefs, parent asssociations and school directors to t select 400 children to distribute
e
bicycles and schoo ol materials20
2
to. The children atte
ended Grades 2-5, ran nged in age from 11 to o
14, and included 23 2 girls. Foollowing the on, teacherrs reported that the ch
e interventio hildren hadd
begun attending
a cla
asses regulaarly.

During the reporting g period, CFEDA staff also assistted commun nities to esttablish four new SHGss
with 56 members (36 women n) in four villages
v in Malai Distrrict. CFED DA also sta aff provided
d
coaching g to 69 SHG
S commmittee and general members (24 women) from five SHGs on n
bookkee eping, savinngs and borrowing. CF FEDA supp ports 34 SH
HGs in 12 vvillages (19 in the new w
target arrea in Malaii and 15 in Ou
O Chrov) comprising
c 517 membe ers (345 woomen). CFE EDA staff

18
The new w target villag
ges in Malai District
D are: Khla
K Ngoab, Koh
K Snuol, Saantepheap, Ba anteay Ti Muo
oy, Ou Ampil,,
Kbal Tumnob, Ou Sa Om, O Banteay Ti T Pir, and Ou Sampor.
S
19
The villa
ages in Ou Ch hrov District where
w CFEDA has been worrking are: Bonllech, Voat, Sa amraong, Thmmenh Trei, Bat
Trang, Thmei, Anhchan nh and Ou Chrrov.
20
Supplies comprised 10 1 notebooks, 2 pens, 1 pen ncil, 1 bag and
d 1 uniform for each student.
BTB & BTM Partnershhip Project 49
4
hat SHG co
report th ommittee members
m ha
ave upgrade ed their skiills in bookkeeping, fa
acilitation off
meetings and reco ording minutes of mee eover, they report a re
etings. More emarkable increase in n
commun nity solidaritty and mutu
ual assistan
nce, which is
s especiallyy noticeable
e in supportt vulnerablee
families in crisis. For example, in September 2008, SHG members in Ou Am mpil village e
contributed 10,000 riels (US$ 2.5), labor, wood and materials to o repair the house of a vulnerable e
family.

Moreove er, during the


t ng period, two more SHG committee mem
reportin mbers who had been n
isolated in extreme poverty were electted to loca al positions following training an
nd capacityy
building from CFED DA. Mr. Chhhet Bora wa t be the new leader o
as elected to of Santephe
eap village,
while Mrr. Sot Kimsa
an was eleccted leader of the VDC
C.

ensive technical assisttance and coaching


With inte c fro
om CWS an nd cooperation from the e BTM Red d
Cross office, CFED DA has inteegrated CBD DRM into itts integrate ed community development work.
As is th
he case with its two im mplementinng counterp parts, it hass explained CBDRM concepts
c to
o
Commune Councils, Village Chiefs,
C VDCCs and res sidents. Mo oreover, it h
has and se elected and d
trained 18 new RC CVs in 12 target villagges. CFED DA now sup pports 24 RRCVs (11 women).
w In
n
Novemb ber 2008, fivve RCVs, tw
wo VHVs, six
s members s of VDCs, and one Village Chief (1 woman))
attendedd a three-day course on Commu unity Based First Aid and a CBDRM M organized d by CWS.
The 14 participantts gained knowledge as well as a the skills to provid de echo trraining and d
awarene ess raising in
i their com
mmunities ass well as heelp lead the preparationn of disaste
er mitigation
n
plans in March 2009.

MAJOR
R CHALLEN
NGES

The resignation of two CFED DA staff dellayed progrram implem mentation and consum med a greatt
amount of Project staff
s time. They
T helpedd the group p restructure
e its leadersship and managementt
as well as recruit replacemen nts. Once the recruitm ment and re estructuring was comp pleted, theyy
continueed to investt a great ammount of tim
me with the new manag gement com mmittee me embers and d
staff to build management, leadership and progra amming capacity. The ey providedd individuall
coaching g as well as
a motivatio on to help CFEDA
C staff become familiar witth their neww roles andd
responsibilities. Pro
oject staff re
ealized thatt the new fe emale committee lead ders require
ed intensivee
training in managem ment and le eadership skkills to allow
w them to suuccessfully operate CF FEDA.

Implemeentation of the 15-month CBDR RM Projec ct had bee en well pla anned with the three e
implemeenting partnners, but fin
nal approva al for the project
p wass slightly de
elayed to mid-August.
m
Consequ uently, impllementation
n in the firstt six monthss occurred on a very ttight schedu
ule. This, in
n
turn, ca
aused delayys in imple ementation of Australiian Embasssy-funded integrated communityy
development becau use partner staff had too focus morre time thann planned on the CBDR RM Project.
To resppond to thee tight scheedule, Proje ect, partnerr staff and communitie es often worked
w overr
weekend ds to accom
mplish goalss.

NS LEARNED
LESSON

Althoughh KCDA is a new holiistic partner, it got off to a good start by eff ffectively en
ntering new w
commun gh CWS-C’s model of
nities throug o focusing on building g relationsh
hip with res sidents and d
commun nity and NGGO partners via a particcipatory app proach that has proven n to be highhly effective
e
for commmunities in the area. The effectivveness of their
t integra
ated commmunity work,, especiallyy
through SHGs, attrracted the interest of residents, Village
V Chie
efs and Coommune Co ouncilors inn
Kompon ng Lpeuv co ommune. They
T subseq quently invited KCDA to work the ere. At the same time,
CWS BT TB&BTM sta aff have been inspired by the com mmitment an nd professio
onalism of KCDA
K staff,
a their ability to adherre to the “Do
as well as o No Harm”” philosophyy.

BTB & B
BTM Partnersh
hip Project 5
50
Project staff memb bers have continued
c to
o fully enga
age commu unities and relevant sttakeholderss
and invo olve them in the enttire project management cycle. Consequen ntly, comm munities aree
identifyin
ng their owwn problemss, recognizing their po otential and directing thheir own de evelopmentt
paths. This
T approa ach continue es to inspirre communiities to assume ownerrship of pro ograms and d
take greeater respon mplementation, which leads to heightened su
nsibility in im uccess. This s approach,,
howeverr, is quite time consum ming and re equires extensive netw working by highly com mmitted and d
qualified
d facilitatorss. For exam mple, to construct the community
c s
schools in B
Boeng Sno oul and Kob b
villages, ADOVIR staff held in-depth discussions d with Village Chiefs, parent as ssociations,
teacherss and resid dents of bo oth villagess during th he entire de ecision-makking and construction
c n
process, which finished abou ut one yea ar. Construc ction was completed
c in Octoberr 2008. Byy
engaging all stakeh holders in alla process, community y people ha ad the oppoortunity to provide theirr
input annd, thus, acquire resp ponsibility for
f school maintenancce and ma anagement along with h
recognittion from the e Commune e Council, Cluster
C Schhool Director, Bavel Disstrict Educa
ation Officerr
and Disttrict authoritty.

S NOT ADD
ISSUES DRESSED

The borrder tension n that turne ed critical on


o 15 Octo ober near th
he famous world herittage Preah h
Vihear Temple he eightened lingering conflict
c bettween the two coun ntries, whicch affected d
Cambod dian NGO partners
p working in the Northwest provinces of o Oddar MMeanchey an nd Banteayy
Meanchey. As note ed earlier, 163 familiess from Chu ub Koki Lecch and Chuub Koki Koe eut villagess
(where KNTO
K workks) were dissplaced and d resettled about 5km from their villages in inadequate e
shelters, with little access to water,
w a shoortage of fo
ood shortag
ge, and a la
ack of educational and d
health services.
s T
The situatio
on was no oted by KN NTO and CWSC and an assess sment wass
conducteed, but a lack of fun nding preve ented an adequate
a re
esponse. CCWS’s ERP P unit then n
requesteed emergen ncy funding from CWS New York.

CWS pa artners worrking along the Cambodian-Thai border havve reported d negative impacts on n
poor and d absolute poor families who wo ork as laborrers on farm
ms in Thailaand. Since the borderr
tension erupted, Thhai authorities have reestricted the
e access off Cambodia an laborers.. Moreover,
Thai farrmers are upgrading
u their agricu
ultural technology, usiing more thresher ma achines forr
examplee, and are becoming
b le
ess reliant on
o Cambodian laborerss. As a result, border co ommunitiess
are facin
ng declining
g opportunities to gene erate incomme at farmss in Thailand. The bordder tension
n
also cre
eated imme ense dema and in com mmunities fo or the limitted resourcces offered
d by CWS--
supporteed Cambodian NGOs.

Future Plans
P

ƒ Cond duct Capacity Assessm ments of the e four holistiic partners and
a help th hem prepare e proposalss
for FY10
F proposals, while continuiing to stre engthen th heir capaciity for org ganizationall
mana agement an nd program implementa ation.
ƒ Contiinue to streengthen capacity of CEFEDA’s
C new
n manag gement com mmittee, especially forr
organnizational managemen
m t and program implementation.
ƒ Contiinue to imp plement CBBDRM proje ect: organizze eight traaining coursses for RC CVs, VDCs,
Villag
ge Chiefs, as well as Commune, Distriict and Provincial D Disaster Managementt
Comm mittees, and PFT in Battam
B Bang g, Banteay Meancheyy and Odda ar Meanchey. Provide e
coach hing and suupport to partners to assist
a RCV Vs, VCs and d VDCs to conduct ec cho training
g
and raise awarreness in their
t villagees, and he elp them prepare
p andd implement disasterr
mitigaation plans.
ƒ Provide micro-prroject grants in 40 villages through h CNGO pa artners.
ƒ Contiinue to provvide small grants
g to Dh hammayietrra groups fo or peace ed ducation an nd HIV/Aidss
progrrams.
ƒ Organize progra am-related workshops and intern nships for partner
p stafff to facilita
ate learning
g
excha ange.

BTB & BTM Partnersh


hip Project 5
51
2.3. KOMPONG THOM PARTNERSHIP PROJECT

INTRODUCTION

Since it began working with the CNGO Network and other partners in 1996, the project has
maintained its focus on institutional development and programming in multi-religious
communities. It also provides financial grants to CNGOs. This reporting period marks the second
year of working with the Khmer Organization for Rural Community Development (KORCD) as a
holistic partner. Project staff provides capacity building for institutional development, with a focus
on improving reporting skills, financial management and accounting, and enhancing
administrative capacities. Furthermore, they help KORCD implement conflict resolution, non-
formal education classes, enhanced agricultural techniques and the formation of elder
associations.

During the reporting period, KORCD relocated its office to Prampi Makara village, Tang Krasang
Commune, Sontuk District, from which it continues to implement integrated community
development in 10 target villages spread across three communes (Thnot Chum, Pnov and Tang
Krasang) in two districts (Santuk and Baray). The 10 villages are: Tang Krasang, Prampi
Makara, Kang Meas Cheung, Kang Meas Tbong, Vaing Cheung, Tuol Chan, Thormneath, Pnov
Thom, Pnov Tbong and Tnot Chum Ti Muoy. Residents of these villages total 4,376 families, of
which 951 families (3,655 people, 2,308 women) are direct beneficiaries, while the remaining
3,425 families (19,414 people, 9,515 women) are indirect beneficiaries.

The Project also provided technical assistance to Cooperation for Indigenous People and
Development in Cambodia (CIDC) to prepare its self for applying to become as a CWS holistic
partner. Monitoring of the Adsu weaving program was also conducted by Project staff.

MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND CHANGES

KORCD has improved its report writing, financial management and administration skills

The Partnership Project Coordinator has continued intensive coaching and one-on-one training
for KORCD staff to improve their report-writing skills. Specifically, the Coordinator introduced
concepts such as “input”, “output”, “outcome” and “impact” that allowed KORCD staff to more
objectively plan, implement and monitor their work. KORCD staff members were also asked to
review and reflect on their individual draft reports in light of these concepts and then revise
them. The Coordinator reviewed the drafts from each staff member and provided
encouragement and feedback. As a result, KORCD staff members are able to write higher
quality reports that are more organized, reflective and detailed. These reports provide more
precise and comprehensive accounts of activities with detailed descriptions of outputs,
outcomes and impacts.

To upgrade financial management and accounting, KORCD’s director and accountant attended
a Basic Financial Management training session organized by the Partnership Program in
September 2008 at our Phnom Penh office from 15-19 September. This was the first formal
training session the accountant participated in and she said it enhanced her understanding of
financial management and accounting as well as the importance of coding.

KPT Partnership Project 52


“I never attended official training on financial management and
accounting before. I worked as an accountant based on a little
knowledge. Now, I understand the broader concepts of financial
management and accounting, as well as practical skills in preparing
budgets and financial reports. I also learnt about the immense value
of financial management and accounting, which makes my
understanding much clearer and provides me with the confidence to
better control budget inflows and outflows.”

Kin Sineng, KORCD accountant

Also during the reporting period, the Kompong Thom Partnership Project Coordinator
encouraged KORCD to review its financial policies, identify weak points as well as the
differences between their previous and new formats for financial reports, and Advance Request
Forms. The Project Coordinator guided the accountant through a practice exercise: the
accountant prepared a report according to the enhanced format and the Project Coordinator
provided intensive feedback. As a result, the accountant is now able to prepare financial reports
correctly. During the last two months of the reporting period the financial reports were correct
and included sufficient supporting documents.

KORCD administration staff was also provided with coaching and technical assistance from our
Kompong Thom Administration project staff. With coaching and on one-on-one training, their
understanding of administration systems, roles and responsibilities, office management and
filing systems were enhanced.

Following this intensive coaching and training, KORCD is now able to produce all necessary
documents for financial reports, training reports, guidelines and other documents in accessible
formats and a well ordered filing system.

Enhanced conflict resolution skills lowers domestic violence

CWS Partnership Project staff provided technical to help KORCD conduct the three-day (25-28
August) training course “Conflict Resolution Part II” for 30 participants.1 The facilitator, the
Partnership Project Coordinator and KORCD staff helped them understand conflict analysis as
well as techniques for resolving conflicts, the process of negotiation and reconciliation. After the
course, an evaluation was conducted. It found that 80% of participants had deepened their
understanding of conflict resolution techniques, which they had already been applying within
their communities.

Within the reporting period, VDCs and village leaders applied their enhanced knowledge and
skills to resolve six conflicts in four villages: five were cases of domestic violence (two cases in
Tang Krasang, one case in Prampi Makara, one in Thorm Neath and another in Pnov Thom
villages) and one was a land conflict between two neighbors in Prampi Makara village.

Mr. Leng Boeun, 60, a former commune councilor in Tang Krasang Commune, used to beat his
wife, Mrs. Oak Roeun. Following intervention he expressed remorse as well as gratitude to
those who intervened: “I regret what I had did to my wife. It was wrong. I am thankful to the
conflict resolution committee who spent their evenings persuading me to resolve my family
problem without violence.”

1
30 participants: 6 KORCD staff, 3 community peace volunteers and 21 village residents (14 women).
KPT Partnership Project 53
KORCD staff members report that members of all 10 communities they work in are encouraging
them to increase the capacity of conflict resolution committees.

Reports by the three commune councils where KORCD works note a significant decline in
domestic violence and attribute this to the high commitment of the conflict resolution committees
who have received CWS-led training that fuses an analytical component with effective
intervention techniques. Committee members become known by village residents through the
awareness raising campaigns they implement after their initial training session. Residents
involved in conflicts then approach committee members for assistance, but in some cases
committee members make the first move. In such cases, committee members are informed
about conflicts in their village by other residents. The committee then calls for a meeting to
discuss the conflict before approaching those involved. The committee then facilitates
discussions between those involved in a conflict with the goal of seeking a just resolution.

The lack of policing and legal assistance in remote villages, as well as gender inequality, makes
these committees the only viable solution, especially for women who experience domestic
violence.

Self help inspires literacy classes

KORCD has been introducing and facilitating Self Help Groups for almost two years. Most
members are women who are raising families alone, the absolute poor and vulnerable families
who received little or no education during Cambodia’s 30 years of civil conflict. Illiteracy is a
major challenge KORCD faces in promoting SHGs, which have proven to enhance social
solidarity and mutual help. Weaving programs have been a key activity of KORCD’s SHGs.

With technical guidance from CWS, KORCD encouraged and assisted SHG members to start
adult literacy classes in Toul Chan and Thormneath villages in August 2008. Two teachers who
received certificates from the Education Office in Baray District were selected to provide classes
for the SHGs. Although the SHG members are busy with livelihood activities every day, the 37
female members2 are highly committed to these classes. They attend the daily classes from 12
to 2pm. Students of the classes say the ability to read and write has vast consequences. One
student said it would reduce the conflicts with her husband and savings group caused by the
mistrust that sometimes arises over written numbers. “I really appreciate the help from KORCD
staff,” she explained. “The refresher training on bookkeeping3 encouraged the members of the
27 SHGs in the 10 villages who do not read and write. They should spend time to attend the
literacy classes after lunch time.”

Case Study: A foundation for new life

“My name Ros Pheap. I am 53 and my wife Mrs. Pal Him is 39. We have seven boys and one
girl and live in Kang Meas Tbong village. After we married, we lived in a small hut on a spot of
land given by my mother-in-law. We were very poor. We had no education, no permanent jobs
and just half a hectare of land for farming that was given to us by my mother-in-law. The land
was not very productive because it flooded so much, and often did not produce enough food to
feed us. I had to borrow from moneylenders to buy food and fishing nets. They charged very
high interest so I had work on construction sites doing jobs like carrying soil to pay the interest.
“In 2005, KORCD started to work in my village and introduced a savings group, rice bank, cow
bank, vegetable group, and techniques for increasing crop production. They also introduced the
village development plan and encouraged poor families to participate in the groups. I joined all
the groups. This gave me a chance to participate in village development work and I gained a lot
of knowledge about development initiatives. What was really helpful was that I could borrow

2
37 members: 22 females in Tuol Chan and 15 females in Thormneath
3
Training in November 2008 for 30 participants

KPT Partnership Project 54


money from the savings group with low interest, borrow rice from the rice bank for food and
seedlings during the planting season. Because of this I did not have to borrow from money
lenders. My wife and I worked very hard to grow other crops, such as potatoes, so that we could
sell them to earn more money. Eventually we saved enough to buy wood to build a bigger house
in 2007.

“I am very happy that KORCD and CWS brought community development to my village,
especially the Village Development Committee, Saving Groups, Rice Banks, Cow Banks and
Vegetable Groups. I’m also happy that they provided know how on crop production for higher
yields. I think I can speak on behalf of my village and say we are committed to higher crop
production for better livelihoods and that we can keep doing this. I hope KORCD and CWS keep
working with us.”

From Left: Ros Pheap & his wife at their first home. Their vegetable garden helped them increase
their income so that they could build a larger home for them and their seven children.

Villages going green with home gardens

A major cause of malnutrition in children and mothers in rural Cambodia is a lack of vegetables.
Traditionally, village residents collected seasonal wild vegetables from their fields or nearby
forests for their own consumption as well as sale. However, due to increasing population and
deforestation such practices are no longer sufficient to meet basic nutritional needs.

The introduction of home gardening techniques has proven to be a sustainable and effective
method of improving nutrition and incomes. Home gardens are planted after the rice harvest in
the fields, but many households grow them in their yards.

With financial assistance from CWS, KORCD has provided training on home gardening and
compost making for 25 members (21 women) of new vegetable groups in two villages during the
reporting period: Prampi Meeker and Tang Krasang. After the training and support from
KORCD, members of the new groups made their own compost and started home gardens. With
these new groups, the number of vegetable groups KORCD has facilitated has risen to 10 (142
members, 124 women) in the 10 target villages.

The change is visible. Within the reporting period the villages looked very green as most
households were surrounded by vegetable gardens. More importantly, home gardens are
producing surplus vegetables and herbs that can be sold in local markets to generate income.
For example, Mrs. Doha Pat, 37, a SHG member in Vain Cheung village with six children (three
girls) grows vegetables and buys more from her neighbors to sell at Taking Krasang market
every day. Besides enabling members to cultivate vegetables, SHG loans have provided them
with the capital to start raising pigs and launch small businesses.
KPT Partnership Project 55
Mr. Cheat Ly, a village development committee member in Vain Cheung village, said that
financial assistance from CWS through KORCD to form SHGs and vegetable groups had
reduced food shortages by about 90%. Moreover, poor families are able to keep their children in
school and repair their homes, he noted. Interviews with vegetable group members found that
on average they earned about 65,000 Riles (16 US$) per household each season from selling
surplus vegetables. Those who also bought vegetables in their villages to sell at markets said
their profit ranged from 7,000 to 10,000 Riles (1.80 to 2.50US$) per day.

Elder Associations breathe new life into village development

Interest rates from moneylenders average 5-10% per day. When impoverished families face
emergencies, such as sickness, they often have no other choice but to borrow at such crippling
rates. Unless this cycle of indebtedness is broken there is no escape from absolute poverty.
An Elder Association formed in 2005 at Kang Meas pagoda by pagoda members have
developed into a group that provides low interest loans to those who need them. However, when
it was first formed it lacked sufficient guidelines for distributing assistance. In late 2007, after
KORCD received full financial assistance from CWS, its staff, in cooperation with local
authorities and the pagoda committee, realized that the Elder Association had great potential to
assist community members – especially the elderly, the absolute poor and vulnerable families –
when they faced food shortage, sickness and death. Consequently, it started building the
association’s capacity and assisting its members to develop guidelines.

This initiative began with 50 members of the pagoda and subsequently inspired five more
pagoda committees and villagers to establish similar associations in their areas. They visited
and learned from the first association. By December 2008, there were six Elder Associations (in
Kang Meas, Pnov Thom, Pnov Tbong, Ton Chum, Tool Chan and Thorm neat pagodas) with
298 members (189 women).

Combined, the six associations have capital of 5,430,000 Riels (US$ 1,358.00), of which
1,965,000 Riels is from earned interest4. In addition to granting small loans, local residents also
received assistance from the associations. For example, the Elder Association in Pnov Thom
Pagoda provided 50 Kg of white rice and 50,000 Riels to Mrs. Yea Seng, an impoverished
elderly bind woman who lives alone in the village. The Elder Association in Kang Meas provided
20,000 Riels for the funeral ceremony of a widow, Mrs. Chim Trorng, whose three children
drowned on 20 December.

Case Study: Elders chart new directions for community

Yin Sim, 65, is Ajar (laymen) and a leader of the Elder Association at Kang Meas Pagoda. This
is his account of the how the association
developed:

“In accordance with Buddhist tradition, especially


old people and pagoda members regularly meet
together in the pagoda every Sil Day (holy day) for
meditation and to receive blessings from the
monks. We also discuss the construction and
development of the pagoda. The pagoda
traditionally establishes two committees: one for
ceremonies and another for boat racing. But the
committees had no operating guidelines and were
not recognized by local authorities because they
had limited understanding of association principles.
Elder Association members in Kang
Meas
4
Loans are provided to members at an interest rate of 3% per month

KPT Partnership Project 56


“In 2005, KORCD started working in our village, building relationships with the pagoda leader,
committee, and Ajar and pagoda members. Later, KORCD staff helped form the Elder
Association as the pagoda members wanted to improve the quality of life of older people and set
a model for the new generation. We also wanted people to build trust and resolve problems in
accordance with the Buddhist path, which brings peace to the heart. The Elder Association was
established for everyone, regardless of color, position, religion or political party.

“We started in 2005 without proper guidelines and with 42 members. Now we have 112
members and total income of 2,970,000 Riels, of which 1,130,000 Riels is shared capital and
1,840,000 Riels interest.

With help from KORCD, the association is now recognized by the local authorities with
guidelines and a quarterly meeting. Our members are happy as they understand the guidelines
and are able to borrow loans with a low interest rate to start a business and support their
livelihoods.

“I am very happy with KORCD and CWS who have been working in my pagoda, especially for
the establishment of the Elder Association. On behalf of Kang Meas villagers, I express our
great support and admiration for the work of KORCD and CWS. I wish KORCD and CWS
success for all their work and that it will be sustainable.”

MAJOR CHALLENGES

With financial support from CWS and cooperation from the Provincial Department of Rural
Development, KORCD has formed 36 VDCs in their target villages. It provides ongoing capacity
building on different areas, including management and technical programming. However, the
capacity of VDCs is not yet strong enough to provide training for community members or
manage their projects independently.

KORCD staff, with technical assistance from CWS, has been working hard to train and coach
VDCs on project management and monitoring SHG bookkeeping, but progress has been slow.
Nevertheless, KORCD still encourages members of groups to attend all trainings sessions and,
offers one-on-one assistance.

With 80% of Cambodia’s population reliant on farming, rice is the main source of income
generation. As the rice harvest occurred during this reporting period, members of groups put
their programs on hold so that they could tend to their fields. For example, production by the
weaving program plunged during harvest season. The women will continue their weaving in the
coming months when they no longer have to farm.

LESSONS LEARNED

With encouragement from our Partnership Project Coordinator, KORCD staff is encouraging
exchange visits among SHG members. It believes that such networking is useful and
compounds success. These networking events allow members to exchange experiences, skills
and knowledge, which they then apply. The number of Elder Associations, for example, has
grown rapidly in two years (from one to six) following study tours to the original group.

KPT Partnership Project 57


ISSUES NOT ADDRESSED

Although this was not a component of KORCD’s plan, it received a study tour in September
2008 from Foundation Health in Cambodia (FHC), a nongovernmental organization based in
Oddar Meanchey province. FHC sent 50 members to observe KORCD projects, including SHGs,
Elder Associations, Weaving Programs, Rice Banks and Home Gardening. Group members
were eager to share their experiences with the visitors. FHC’s coordinator praised KORCD staff
and the communities for sharing their experiences with his group, and he said he and his
members were determined to incorporate what they learned from KORCD in their own
organization program.

FUTURE PLANS

The Partnership Project Kompong Thom achieved the objectives of its six-month plan for the
reporting period. Within the next six months of FY09 the following objectives are proposed:

• Work closely with KORCD, CIDC staff and their target community representatives to visit
and learn from other organizations.
• Provide technical support to KORCD to organize an event for International Women’s Day
• Work closely with CIDC staff to prepare an implementation plan and monitor it.
• Attend national partnership meeting and meetings with CNGO partners.
• Provide technical assistance to develop proposals for KORCD and CIDC for FY10 and
submit them to the funding committee.
Prepare FY10 log-frame and budget plan.
• Conduct capacity assessment of partner and follow up with discussions.
• Continue to encourage and monitor partners’ activities.
• Coach and mentor partners to review financial guidelines and restructure when
necessary.

KPT Partnership Project 58


INTEGRATED HUMANITARIAN MINE ACTION
MALAI DISTRICT, BANTEAY MEANCHEY
PROVINCE (LOCALITY DE-MINING)

CHURCH WORLD SERVICE/CAMBODIA


3. INTEGRATED HUMANITARIAN MINE ACTION
MALAI DISTRICT, BANTEAY MEANCHEY PROVINCE
(Reporting Period: 1 July - 30 September 2008)

INTRODUCTION

Malai District in Banteay Meanchey province is situated on the border between Thailand and
Cambodia and was the scene of heavy fighting for many years. The K5 mine belt runs through
the district, creating a barrier between communities and access to the border and employment in
Thailand. There have consistently been around 35 casualties per year according to Cambodian
Mine and UXO Victim Information System data. Additionally, the area is targeted due to its
proximity to the border town of Poipet where scrap metal dealers are based who target specific
communities for the metal found in remnants of conflict.1

The problems caused by mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO) in the ex-battlegrounds of
Malai require continuous intervention. Mines Advisory Group (MAG) has sought to address
these problems by providing efficient, effective and safe clearance using an integrated
Humanitarian Mine Action team under the generous support of Church World Service. The exact
sites for clearance within the province were selected by MAG, CWS, the Cambodian Family
Economic Development Association (CFEDA), the Provincial Government and the Mine Action
Planning Unit, prioritizing areas that, through the clearance of mines and UXO, will have the
greatest positive economic and social impact on the residents in the district.

MAG provided an integrated response through the continued deployment of one Mine Action
Team (MAT) to clear mines and UXO affecting the social and economic development of
communities the district. The activities conducted by the team directly enable CWS and its
partner CFEDA to implement development activities within this district.

MAJOR ACCOMPISHMENTS AND CHANGES

The following project activities have been conducted:

Target sites were selected in Banteay Ti Pir village and Kbal Tumnob village in Ou Sampoar
commune, Malai district.

The Mine Action Team achieved the following outputs:

 conducted clearance of 8,083 m² of suspect land in 2 villages*


 found and destroyed 12 anti-personnel mines
 removed 11,643 pieces of scrap metal fragmentation from working lanes2

1
MAG uses the term Remnants of Conflict to describe all items recovered and destroyed as part of its humanitarian
disarmament activities, which include Anti-Personal and Anti-Vehicle mines, Explosive Remnants of War, abandoned
and unexploded ordnance (UXO) and SA/LW. This term has been developed to reflect more accurately the broad
range of clearance activities undertaken by MAG
2
As scrap metal gives off the same signal as a landmine, each piece has to be excavated carefully following Standard
Operating Procedures, which is both a time consuming and labour intensive process

MAG Demining Project 59


 Honda petrol trimmers deployed have cleared vegetation from 3,166 m² of land in
preparation for manual clearance.
 Clearance activities during this period benefited 14 families comprising 61 people.
 1 technical assessment was conducted

The table below lists full details of all project outputs

Statistical data by month


Month Team Area Cleared APM ATM UXO Scrap Metal
(m²)
Jan-08 41,281 25 0 1 3,990
Feb-08 26,916 67 0 4 8,223
Mar-08 7,443 69 2 0 8,412
Apr-08 4,593 0 0 0 3,220
May-08 MAT-16 8,339 26 0 4 6,204
Jun-08 6,518 20 0 6 4,215
Jul-08 2,915 0 0 0 3,582
Aug-08 2,949 7 0 0 4,727
Sep-08 2,219 5 0 0 3,334
Total 103,173 219 2 15 45,907

3 month no-cost extension period

*See Project Challenges for information on reduced productivity in this period.

A technical assessment conducted by MAG staff.

MAG Demining Project 60


Success story
47 year-old farmer Mr. Moeun Ry and his laborer wife Chum Rath (47) arrived in Banteay Ti Pir
village, Banteay Meanchey in 1998. They have four children, and two daughters still live with
them. A former soldier and landmine survivor, Ry talked of the difficulties of living with the
continued threat of death or injury from mines and UXO.

“I was tired of fighting and thought when we came here that we could settle. We thought we had
bought land on which we could build a home, but no, we had bought land contaminated with
mines. We worried every day, for our safety and our lives. Life has been very hard for the few
people who live here, for something as simple as going to work to earn enough for a bowl of rice
we had to face our fear of mines. Nobody went far from the village because of this fear, so we all
lived in terrible poverty. My family was very poor. I lost a leg to a landmine I have had to struggle
hard to earn enough to support my family. I tell my daughters to do the best they can and be
patient in their life.”

From Left: Mr. Ry’s daughter collects water from a pond. Mr. Ry and his family outside their home.

MAG Demining Project 61


However, life is better than before as they now have safe land to farm and grow rice on. Mr. Ry
feels that given time the family may even be able to start a small business: “My family and the
other villagers would like to say thanks to MAT 16. They cleared land mines often in very difficult
conditions to make things much better for the poor people in this community.”

Village chief Ream Sopheak expressed his feelings on the effect of clearance upon his
community: “I very much appreciate the MAG team who worked to rid our land of landmines.
Now many development organizations come here and help us to construct wells and ponds and
teach us how to raise pigs and chickens.”

INTERNAL TRAINING AND MONITORING

MAG field, technical and administrative staff undergo regular training that leads to enhanced
levels and quality of support for all program activities.

During this reporting period, training took place in Battambang on innovative dual-sensor
detection technology and on using Mine lab F3 detectors to support clearance activities. In
addition, training on GIS systems for staff from the Information Technology department, the
Information Cell and the Grants and Partnerships Office took place in MAG Cambodia
headquarters, Phnom Penh in August/September 2008.

Field monitoring visits to project operations are conducted by Mine Action Officers, a Standard
and Training Officer and a Mine Action Coordinator. During the de-mining period 15 monitoring
visits were made to the project sites.

During this reporting period and in accordance with MAG’s commitment to safe, effective and
efficient operations a revision of SOPs took place. The updated SOPs have been disseminated
to all staff and are available in Khmer and English. Briefings on the updated SOPs were
delivered to regional staff by the Mine Action Quality Assurance Manager in August.

MAJOR CHALLENGES
Developments that have impacted upon the project

A number of factors impacted upon program outputs during the de-mining period. A stand down
period for holidays of 5 days took place in July/August and a further stand down of 7 working
days in September. Operations also ceased under government instructions from 16 July until the
end of that month for the national election period. MAG teams undertook additional training
activities during this enforced operational stand down.

Clearance figures were impacted by minefield conditions. In addition to climatic conditions,


dense bush and bamboo clumps hampered progress, as did topography (inclined surfaces) and
soil conditions. It should be noted that MAG target figures for clearance are reviewed regularly to
reflect operational realities as there are many factors which impact productivity in the variety of
deployment scenarios encountered in Cambodia. At the time of writing the proposal for this
grant, the figure stood at an estimated 13,200m² per month per team, which was revised to
11,500m² earlier this year and is again under review pending further reduction. MAG endeavors
to give realistic figures as indicators, but success should not be judged upon m² indicators alone.
As can be seen from section 3.2 above, MAG operations have a profoundly positive effect upon
mine-affected communities. This de-mining period also encompassed part of the rainy season in
Cambodia and heavy rainfall had a significant negative impact upon operations. Flooding of the
minefield which occurred during September severely hampered operations in that month.

MAG Demining Project 62


ISSUES NOT ADDRESSED
MAG teams see firsthand the impact a known threat or suspected threat of a single item of
Remnants of Conflict can have on the livelihoods of communities, let alone an entire minefield.
Therefore, MAG Cambodia is pleased to report that during this three-month NCE period MAG
activities mean that 14 families comprising of 61 men, women and children will be able to have
more fulfilling livelihoods through CWS funding of the clearance of 8,083m² of land, while the
removal of 12 AP mines has undoubtedly contributed towards saving the lives and limbs of
people in those mine-affected communities of Banteay Meanchey province of Cambodia.

In summary, during the total 9 month period covered by this grant, clearance of 103,173m² of
land by MAG team took place, which represents an achievement of 87% against targets. In the
process, 219 AP mines, 2 AT mines and 15 items of UXO have been located and destroyed.
Additionally, 45,907 pieces of metal fragmentation were removed from the working lanes. These
activities have directly benefited 168 people from 31 mine-affected families.

Report/pictures by: Prum Sovuthy, CLW, MAG Siem Reap


Translated by: Chham Rivann, Project Officer, MAG PNP

MAG Demining Project 63


FMER, FINANCE, ADMINISTRATION AND
HUMAN RESOURCES

CHURCH WORLD SERVICE/CAMBODIA


4. PHNOM PENH CENTRAL OFFICE
FMER, FINANCE, ADMINISTRATION & HUMAN RESOURCES

Introduction
The Central Office ensures the programs and projects we and our partners implement reach the
absolute poor as efficiently and effectively as possible. To do so, staff provide a variety of
support functions, including financial management, administration, proposal development for
new funding, consolidation of program reporting for funding partners and government bodies,
publicizing impacts of program activities, monitoring data collection and collation for the
centralized information system, conducting bi-annual full program monitoring, overall
management services and technical support for the entire organization. A transfer from each
project to the central office covers the cost of these services. For this reason, we include this
report with the program reports.

One significant point during the reporting period was the amount of time required to prepare for
the Ecumenical Funding Partners meeting (“Biannual Square-table Meeting”) held from March
25 to 27, 2009. The preparation for this event took more time and energy of our Senior
Management Team than expected.

Organizational Development

CWS Cambodia values creative approaches to organizational development and problem


solving. The seven-year strategic directions adopted by CWS Cambodia provide a clear and
coherent agenda guiding the organization and its operations into the next decade. In order to
achieve this agenda, the institutional structure and culture as well as organizational approaches
have been reviewed to adopt the current development practice. The Community Redevelopment
Program is partnered to do a peace alliance exercise with other NGOs involved in peace work in
order to learn more about the specific type of work each organization does. This also gave CWS
and other NGOs in attendance an opportunity to identify the different organizations involved in
peace work with the goal of collaborating with them in future.

Planning

Each program/department has reviewed logical framework and annual detailed work plans for
FY09 by following the format developed from last year to support program activities. Senior
Management Team meetings were conducted bi-weekly to handle ongoing issues that related to
policies, MoUs with government bodies and international organizations and NGOs, as well as
other internal and external issues. A monthly meeting is held by the Program Oversight Group
(POG) to address program development, review the specific recommendations identified by the
program monitoring team, identify strategic issues challenging the organization and develop
specific action plans to follow as well as lessons learned.

In these project and program planning exercises, several options were chosen to:

 Address major needs of target groups in isolated and remote areas


 Have the greatest expertise and capacity in implementation
 Best fit mission, goals and the mandates of major stakeholders,
 Obtain resources and make the most effective use of them.

Phnom Penh Central Office 64


Monitoring & Evaluation

The full program monitoring for the second half of FY08 was delayed to 4-29 August from June
because the National Election, which was held in July, restricted access for conducting field
interviews in target areas.

Every project in both the Direct Services and Partnership Programs was fully monitored. This
included following up on the agreed actions from the first monitoring, planning, achievements
and changes, training packages, program guidelines, quality of work and the effectiveness of
each project. Primary data collection was made through interviewing CWS and CNGOs staff
members, beneficiaries and related/associated local authorities, while the secondary data was
based on available documents (proposals, log-frames, Gantt charts, agreements, and so on) at
project and CNGOs offices. The Monitoring Team provided verbal feedback to the projects on
the last day of field monitoring based on what was found out through interviews and discussions.

The formal presentation made to the Program Oversight Group was impressive. With support
from the Country Representative, the monitoring activities were more active and useful. The
presentation of specific findings is intended to:

 Indentify strengths and areas that could be improved


 Understand monitoring concepts in order to prepare/implement enhanced projects for
evaluation and the future design
 Focus mainly on the quality of the project implementation and identity of the organization
and funding partners that CWSC is international and professional organization
 Follow guidelines/standards required by the government as well those developed by
organization and funding donors,
 Fill the gap which the implementers (programs and projects) do not see because they are
busy implementing activities
 Improve communication and coordination between project programs and the
organizational level.

As result, all specific recommendations for improvement from the first semester monitoring in
FY08 were implemented by the respective projects and programs. These results were
documented in the FY08 second semester monitoring report.

Effectiveness of training provided to partners (Partnership Program) found during first semester
monitoring field work.

NGO Training Provided Effectiveness/ Change/ Applied


After training staff were able to developed 3-year strategic
Strategic plan,
plans (2009-2011) with support from CWS. Strategic
VMG
document was sent to CWS to finalize.
ADOVIR Developed FY09 proposal to CWS with support from CWS
Proposal writing
project staff 10%. The proposal was approved.
Wrote semester report for FY08: quality and information
Report writing
enhanced.

Phnom Penh Central Office 65


After training staff were able to developed 3-year strategic
Strategic plan,
plan (2009-2011) with support from CWS. Strategic
VMG
document was sent to CWS to finalize.
CFEDA
Proposal writing Developed FY09 proposal to CWS. It was approved

Report writing Wrote semester report for FY08.


Proposal writing Developed a proposal for FY09. It was approved.
Wrote semester report for FY08: quality and information
KNTO Report writing
enhanced.
Advocacy Integrated advocacy into SHGs.
Strategic plan,
5-year strategic plan (2008-2012) was developed.
VMG
Proposal for FY09 developed with less support from CWS
Proposal writing
staff than last year. It was approved.
70-80% of conflicts now solved in the community rather
than courts. Conflict-resolution committees formed in 8
villages. Sometimes land conflicts in the community cannot
KORCD Conflict resolution
be solved and residents ask KORCD Manager and/or
Director to help solve them. KORCD staff invited to
participate in conflict resolution at the district level.
Management and Improved management and leadership within organization
leadership and CBOs.
Report writing Semester report was written and sent to CWS.
PRA PRAs of 10 target villages were documented.

Full Program Monitoring for Church World Service Cambodia is critical since two main programs
are separate; the Direct Services Program is implemented by CWS staff while the Partnership
Program is implemented through CNGO partners. For this reason, the monitoring tools require
revising in advance for each monitoring conducted. The revision is made to absorb changing
practices in field activities as well to ensure monitoring tools measure the impact of programs.

Reporting

During the reporting period, various reports such as the FY08 End-Year Report, a short annual
report for FY08 called “Developing in Sight”, two CDC quarterly reports, and UMCOR annual
2008 were produced and disseminated. In CWS-C hired a short-term consultant to assist the
reporting unit to produce “Developing in Sight” to ensure it could encapsulate our work in a way
that appealed to broader audiences. Five hundred copies were published in late January 2009
and distributed to partners, donors, stakeholders, and other interested institutions in early
February 2009.

Phnom Penh Central Office 66


By working hard and closely with the Government, the CDC quarterly reports produced by CWS-
C were recognized by the Ministry of Rural Development as detailed report. This is one instance
among others that has helped CWS-C become a highly regarded and well-recognized
organization by the Royal Government of Cambodia. This recognition has affirmed CWS-C’s
steps towards outputs that focus on priority needs of the Royal Government of Cambodia’s
development framework.

Website

Due to increased duties and workload in the IT section, CWS-C’s website,


www.cwscambodia.org, was handed over for further development by the Data Management
Officer of the FMER Unit from 26 December 2008. It has been slightly restructured. For
example, the option of allowing visitors to select a preferred language was removed as recently
uploaded pages are only available in English. The FMER Unit’s Reporting and Proposal
Development Officer has proposed a new structure for the website. The design and information
flow for the new website structure has already been created, and a more dynamic website will
begin its coding by the Data Management Officer soon after approval is obtained from the
Senior Management Team and Country Representative.

Newsletter

To update partners, donors, stakeholders, and other interested institutions about the progress of
CWS-C at the field level, a monthly newsletter has been issued since January 2008. So far,
seven issues have been released. In addition, five newsletters (“Fact Sheets”) on specific
programs (Water and Sanitation, Village-based Development, Partnership Development, Peace,
and Humanitarian De-mining) were produced to capture and reflect the reality of fieldwork and
the impact of programs on the lives of the most vulnerable residents in remote areas, particularly
villages along the border with Vietnam in Svay Rieng province and villages along the border with
Thailand in the northwest.

Proposal Development

No new proposal was developed during this reporting period as most of the proposals were
developed and submitted in the previous semester. However, two proposals submitted from last
semester were approved for funding support:

 The proposal for the Water and Sanitation Cooperation project in Svay Rieng
province was approved by UMCOR in their new quadrennial 2009-2012. They
committed US$ 50,000 per year.
 The proposal for the Battambang/Banteay Meanchey Partnership Project was
also approved by UMCOR in their new quadrennial 2009-2012. They committed
US$ 50,000 per year.

As a major funding shortfall beyond June 2009 has been identified, particularly for the
Partnership Program, Local De-mining and the Water & Sanitation Cooperation Project, CWS
Cambodia is in the process of revising proposals for these projects to obtain funding support.
The process has been tried through the CWS regional office and other funding support offices.
This major funding shortfall was on the agenda for discussion during the Ecumenical Funding
Partners “Square-table” meeting for a possible solution.

Phnom Penh Central Office 67


Centralized Data Management system

CWS-C’s Data Management System was designed to collect and collate data from all projects
and programs. This collection and collation provides CWS-C with a user-friendly system at the
central office that allows staff to easily access data for preparation of report and proposal
development.

In early September a database structure was designed and over 30 questionnaire forms were
used to gather and present data. Sixteen key staff members from FMER, Programs (Direct
Services and Partnership) and their Projects participated in a presentation workshop, organized
by the Data Management Officer. Through the workshop, feedback from participants was used
to redesign and revise some points of the system to better incorporate data from the field level.

Completed questionnaires have been sent in hard and soft copies to the Central office for
encoding and summarization. This new system is not restricted to data collected from project
staff members, but tries to encompass all data gathered from every project/program and office.

As a result, information about thousands of project beneficiaries was consolidated, including, for
example, the number of wells and latrines installed or upgraded, water filters distributed and the
scope of capacity building/education interventions in five provinces. In addition, summarized
outputs are sent to management staff for verification before formal use. The enhanced flow of
comprehensive, up-to-date and accurate data is gaining momentum.

Finance

During the second half of FY09 the finance department has performed well on the management
of financial implementation, budgeting and cash flow, and has maintained safeguards for
financial accounting data and systems. There has been good cooperation from all staff
throughout the organization in maximizing resources with a commitment to adhering to the
financial policies and procedures. In addition, the finance department provided technical support
on financial accounting to finance staff at the provincial level as well as to Cambodian NGO
partners.

The finance department produced accurate monthly, quarterly and semester financial reports
within deadlines. In this semester, the financial report showed expenditures were 80% of the
planned budget, indicating that financial and budgeting management was highly effective.

Moreover, the department worked well with the external auditor, Pricewaterhousecoopers, which
audited EED funding and had an open discussion during the audit exit meeting. The result of the
audit findings were that there were no major risks in the financial, budgeting and accounting
systems.

A new finance manager was recruited in October 2008 to replace an interim finance manager
who was subsequently transferred back to his post as Field Accountant. With his wide
experience in financial management, the new financial manager has performed well. With daily
support from the Director of Programming finance staff are on board and fully functioning.

Phnom Penh Central Office 68


Fiscal Operations

In the first six months of FY09 the finance department achieved the following:

 Promoted financial transparency to individual staff through the organization by


making them aware of organizational policies and procedures and ensuring they are
committed to comply with them.

 Daily financial transactions were carefully reviewed, checked and entered into
financial accounting records on time.

 Monthly financial reports were produced on time with accuracy. All managers have
been aware of financial monitoring through monthly financial variance analysis.

 Quarterly financial reports were produced and submitted to the Royal Government of
Cambodia on time.

 The six-month audited financial report of funds from the donor EED for the Kompong
Thom and Preah Vihear Community Development programs and annual global
audited financial report of the entire CWS-C organization were sent to their
appropriate recipients and CWS headquarters on schedule.

 The Field Accounting Officer conducted the second financial review of CNGO CFED
in Svay Rieng province. The financial review finding with the positive result that
CNGO CFED has a great improvement on financial management; there had no major
risk found. In the result of this, the CFED continues to obtain funding from other
donor because of great support from CWS Cambodia.

Administration

The Administration Office continues to provide a variety of support to CWS-C programs,


including the Phnom Penh Central Office. The office is responsible for purchasing of office
supplies, equipment, vehicles, renewal of office contract, placing job advertisement and other
necessities upon request. The transportation of staff and funding partners, whether using CWS
or rental vehicles, is also under the office’s responsibility. It also contacts with government
officials in renewal of MoUs as well as requesting vehicle acquisition and license plates,
processing of visas and passport extension, logistics arrangement for external visitors, sending
reports to CWS stakeholders and providing learning opportunities through internships for local
partners for their personnel. Moreover, the office ensures that staff work comfortably, safety and
effectively and that the integrity of the organization is maintained in all operations.

Facilities, Assets and Technical Support

Three lease contracts (the Phnom Penh office and field offices in Preah Vihear and Battambang)
were renewed.

In cooperation with the IT officer, several replacement desktop and laptop computers were
purchased for the program and projects. Nine motorbikes were purchased for the Svay Rieng,
Kompong Thom, Battambang and Preah Vihear projects. The process of registering motorbikes
and obtaining appropriate license plates was made to the relevant government department for
approval and took longer than expected.

Phnom Penh Central Office 69


All fixed assets in the Phnom Penh, Kompong Thom, Svay Rieng, Battambang and Banteay
Meanchey, and Preah Vihear offices were maintained and taken care by the administration
office.

IT Server Security and System Upgrade

On June 12, 2008, the capacity of the computer system was reviewed in our PHP office, aiming
to increase the performance of computers for each employee. With the approval of the Country
Representative each department has upgraded its computers to function at a faster speed and
improve the efficiency of each employees work.

On September 3, 2008, a Backup Domain Controller (BDC) was installed and tested in the IT
department in order to ensure that the Primary Domain Controller (PDC) was up and running. A
BDC could authenticate the users in a domain, but all updates to the domain (new users,
changed passwords, group membership, etc) could only be made via the PDC, which would
then transfer these changes to the BDC in the domain.

Network and Internet Installation for CWS/SVR, CWS/KPT, CWS/BTB


Previously, these three projects had many problems with their email systems, printing, sharing
documents, and virus infections from using flash drives from outside sources. Email systems
posed a special problem because they relied on dialup connections, which provided only speeds
of 20kbps maximum. In the last three weeks of December 2008, a new Internet connection was
installed with the speed of 128kbps maximum and a network connection for these three projects
to reduce connectivity problems.

For security reasons, all computers are hooked to the network and Internet, but only key staff
(project managers or project coordinators) have internet access.

Building Capacity of CWS staff and Partners

The IT unit conducted a three-day training session for CWS Partners (14-16 October 2008) at
CWS’s Battambang Office with eight partner staffs from Kompong Thom, Battambang, Banteay
Meanchey and other provinces. The training provided focused on information, communication
and technology (ICT), but the main goal was to transfer general knowledge about viruses and
maintenance of computer systems by focusing on the following topics: hardware and software,
viruses, identifying a common type of virus extension, anti-virus protection software, updating
virus definitions, troubleshooting software errors and maintaining computer systems.

Health and Accident insurance for CWS staff and vehicles: Newly recruited staff have been
signed up with the insurer (Forte) for illness and accident claims and shown how to claim
reimbursements for medical expenses.

Phnom Penh Central Office 70


External Visitors

The table below lists CWS-C’s external visitors from July to December 2008.

No. Visitors Sex Country/ Agency Purposes

1 Ms. Marlene Schroth F EED Financial Meeting

2 Mrs. Rachel Barnett F UMCOR Field Visit to WatSan

Came to drop a copy of


4 Ms. Carol Gleason F Tour consultant
letter Mr. John Denish

5 Ms. Janejinda Pawadee F CCA Visit CWS main office

6 Dr. Prawade M CCA Visit CWS office


Conducted the Low Cost
7 Mr. Betman Bhandari M CAWTS Sanitation workshop for CWS,
others NGOs and Ministry

CWS Com Dev Model


8 E. (Betty) Langeler F Consultant
Reflection Workshop

9 Mr. Vincent MacIsaac M Consultant Conduct Report

Country Context Affecting Operations

Security: Cambodia has achieved a relatively stable peace and has entered its 11th year of
relative political stability. The security situation in Cambodia related to the civil war is over.
However, human rights abuses and criminal activity are still considered a main area of concern.

In addition to politically related attacks, retribution and revenge continue to permeate the overall
climate. There are worrying signs of tension between Cambodia and Thailand over Preah Vihear
Temple that could escalate into war. It is a hot issue in Thai politics and the dispute has arisen
from a misunderstanding of a judgment by the International Court of Justice in June 1962 on the
part of Thai successive government and politicians. The tension has been exacerbated by
incorrect and fraudulent statements made by Thai partisans. More than 1,000 troops were
engaged in a stand-off at the ancient site last year for several months. Tensions rekindled, and
erupted into open combat on July 15. Three Cambodian and one Thai soldier died in exchanges
of fire. The clash, near the ancient temple, has prompted Thailand to urge its nationals to leave
Cambodia. Tension has been high since July, when hundreds of soldiers on both sides faced off
meters apart. Both sides have said they want to find a peaceful solution and will hold talks to
discuss the conflict. Accordingly, only a small contingent from each side would remain at Preah
Vihear temple.

Phnom Penh Central Office 71


This tension directly affected to the operation of CWS Cambodia programs for a full month in
July and August, 2008, particularly the Preah Vihear VBCD project as well as partnership project
in the north-west provinces including: Battambang, Banteay Meanchey and Odor Meanchey. All
staff based in Preah Vihear were relocated to a temporary to base in the Kompong Thom VBDC
project until an assessment of the security situation found it was safe to return. All operations of
the partnership project in the north-west provinces were postponed more than one month until
security along the border stabilized. Staff members were restricted from field work while an
assessment of the security situation conducted by CWS-C was conducted. Two security
assessment teams visited the two areas to assess the situation. The operations along the border
of Thailand returned to normal after August and staff members returned to work.

Dengue-related deaths plummet in Cambodia in 2008: Only 65 people died from dengue
fever in Cambodia in 2008, down from 407 last year thanks to preventive measures taken by the
government and international agencies, a Health Ministry official said. Dengue is transmitted by
mosquitoes and causes fever, headaches, agonizing muscle and joint pains, and in serious
cases internal hemorrhaging and profound shock. It infected 9,300 people during last year
compared with more than 40,000 in 2007, the highest in nearly a decade, said Ngan Chantha,
director of the health ministry's anti-dengue program. Website: http://tvnz.co.nz/health-
news/dengue-related-deaths-down-in-cambodia-2431527 (However, the dramatic decline in
cases in Cambodia last year was in line with regional trends and some epidemiologists who map
outbreaks of dengue say they tend to occur in 3-5 year cycles (as the prevailing serotype of the
virus changes: there are four serotypes). Cambodia’s health infrastructure remains inadequate
to cope with major outbreaks and preventive interventions, especially community-based
education that changes behaviors, must be applied constantly, they say. Water storage jars
used in rural areas are the primary breeding ground of the dengue-transmitting mosquito in
Cambodia.)

Road Accidents: Traffic accidents are becoming increasingly common in Cambodia, with
collisions between motorcycles and automobiles causing a high causality rate. In September
2008 an estimated 1,970 casualties were reported by the participating hospitals, health centers,
private clinics and traffic police departments in the 24 provinces. Among them, 538 sustained
severe injuries and 129 died.

In Phnom Penh alone, 531 casualties were reported, marking a 10% increase over September
2007 and a 24% increase over the previous month. Among them 18 died: 33% of the fatalities
were workers, followed by students (17%), house keepers/servants (17%) and motor taxi drivers
(17%). Almost half of the fatalities in Phnom Penh, 44%, were between 20 and 24 years old,
compared to only 20% in province. About three quarters, 73%, of all fatalities occurred on
national roads.

The highest daily number of casualties were reported during the Pchum Ben holiday (28-30
September), with a peak of 129 causalities on the 29th, twice the daily average for the month. In
total, 292 people were injured and 20 died during the three-day holiday. (See RTAVIS monthly
report on September 2008 at www.roadsafetycambodia.info and www.cnctp.info.)

Human Resource Management

The Human Resource Department is responsible for managing the implementation of


employment policies and staff development of the organization; to ensure the personnel
procedures are accurate and the organization complies with the Cambodian Labor Law. The
Human Resource Manager oversees staffing requirements to ensure the whole organization is
functioning at optimum conditions.

Phnom Penh Central Office 72


As previous 6 month report, SMT had met with all staff to brainstorm of their concern related to
inflation that direct affect to the daily living of staff. The follow up actions was undertaken to
conduct salary survey with other 7 international NGOs. The data and other need information had
been selected, identified and finalized. The tasks had been assisted from external consultant
and expect to complete in July 2009. The conclusion result will detail in the next report.

Personnel

New Hires and resignations

Eight new staff members were recruited for new positions or to replace vacancies due to
resignation. The new Finance Manager was selected, and Interim Finance Manager returned to
his previous position as Field Accounting Officer from 06 October 2008. A temporary cleaner in
the KPT project was promoted to regular staff and a new ERP Program Assistant was selected.
Tables below list new employees and resignations.

New Employees

No Position Start date

1 Cleaner-KPT 01 Jul

2 Program Manager for Funding and Reporting-PNH 08 Jul

3 Full time Volunteer in Partnership-PNH 01 Jul

4 Full time Volunteer Partnership-KPT 01 Jul

5 Part time Cleaner-BTB 01 Oct

6 Part time Cleaner-BTM 01 Oct

7 Finance Manager-PNH 06 Oct

8 ERP Program Assistant-PNH 03 Nov

Resignations

Last date
No Position Reason
in office

Program Manager for Funding


1 07 Oct Did not pass probation
and Reporting-PNH

Found employment better suited to


2 Volunteer Partnership-KPT 10 Aug
his skills.

Applied for the ERP Coordinator


3 ERP Program Assistant 31 Dec position, and decided to resign from
current position.

He returned to live and run a small


Finance Office Assistant-SVR business in Phnom Penh after he
4 31 Dec
was away from home. He had
worked with CWS-C for 9 months.

Phnom Penh Central Office 73


Staff Development

As a learning organization, all staff members are encouraged and supported to develop their
capacity based on their actual training needs to perform their work effectively. Internal
promotions are also encouraged. This has been taken into consideration when each staff
development plan is undertaken, looking at the possibility to help them gain more knowledge
and skills to move forward in their career. Moreover, all staff members have the opportunity to
attend either short training courses or continue their academic study, and are able to attend
short training courses abroad based on their work requirements.

Internal CWS Training

Three different internal training sessions were conducted for 54 CWS-C staff members to further
enhance and strengthen knowledge skills (one staff member might attend two or three
sessions). The full list is in Table 1 below.

External Training

Three different external training sessions in Cambodia were attended by 13 staff members,
including eight senior management members on Gender Discrimination and Advocacy at the
Advocacy and Policy Institute, four project managers on Leadership Development Program in
VBNK and one executive assistant attended an English training course. The full list is in Table 2
below

External workshop or conference

Sixteen staff members visited “House in Battambang Province in the Past” at Reyum Gallery,
and seven staff attended the Khmer Rock Opera “Where Elephants Weep”. The purpose of the
exposure visits was to orient young Cambodians generation about Khmer culture and new
creative directions. The full list is in Table 3 below.

Scholarship support

CWS-C provides partial and financial support to staff members for their academic study, which is
relevant to their current work as well as for their future career. Some staff members are
continuing their academic study this semester: one for a BA in English, one is studying Finance
and Banking, and one started a Master’s in Development in October 2008. The full list is in
Table 4 below.

Local Institution Development: CWS-C has provided learning opportunities through


internships to two trainees from a local partner, Cambodian Women’s Development Agency, for
office skills practice. The trainees completed a three-month short course on office skills through
working closely with the Receptionist. They learn basic office skills: answering phone calls,
sending faxes, taking messages, greeting visitors, typing and copying documents for staff. Since
LID started, 17 interns (women and men) have found employment elsewhere after completing
their internship with CWS-C.

Phnom Penh Central Office 74


Overseas Conferences

The program coordinator for Peace participated in the six-day “Action Asian Peace Builders”
forum in Kathmandu, Nepal from 16-23 October 2008, organized by Action for Conflict
Transformation. The forum was critical for sharing and learning, as well as aligning strategies
and developing the capacity of peace workers and activities to a higher level. It also provided an
opportunity for peace workers to rejuvenate their personal commitment, focus and energy, and
to build important networks for developing their national work. The full list is in Table 5 below.

Table 1: Staff Attendance at Internal Training Courses

Number of Staff

Institutions
Attended

Duration
Training

(Days)
Place/
Description Date

BTB/

KPT/
BTM

PVH
PnP

SvR
Peace Building and Sihanouk 3 days 08-10 Sep 3 3 12 1
Reconciliation Workshop (SMT Ville
and Core team)

Senior Management Team Koh Kong 3 days 11-15 Oct 7


Retreat

Community Development Model Sihanouk 4 days 15-18 Dec 19 9


Reflection Workshop (Direct Ville
Service Team)

Table 2: Staff Attendance at External Training Courses

Number of
attended staff
Training Place
Description Duration Date
/ Institution
BTB&B

KPT&P

(Days)
PNP

SRV
TM

VH

Gender, Advocacy, and The Advocacy 3 days 3-5 Dec 1 7


Discrimination and Policy
Institute
( 7 senior management team
members, 1 partnership
project manager)

Leadership Development VBNK , 5 days 15-19 Sep 3 1


Program (4 middle Training
5 days 17-21 Nov
management team member) Institute

English course (outside Pannasastra 3 months 22 Oct-22 1


working hours, executive University Jan
assistant )

Phnom Penh Central Office 75


Table 3: Staff Attendance at Workshops and Conferences

Number of
attended staff

Training Place /
Description Duration Date

BTB&BTM

KPT&PVH
Institution (Days)

PNP

SRV
The Civil Code GADNet NGO 2 days 17-18 Nov 1 2
Workshop

Youth and Youth for Peace 6 days 18-23 Sep 6


Reconciliation NGO
Conference

Exposure visit to Gallery Expose Half day 8 Aug 16


gallery’s historical name “Reyum“ in
photos of Battambang Phnom Penh
province

Drama Rock Opera Cambodian Evening 04 Dec 7


”Where Elephants American Artist at
Weep” National Theater

Table 4: Staff Receiving Scholarship Support

Masters of Art in Royal University of 2 years Nov 2008 1


Development Study Phnom Penh
Oct 2010
(outside working
hours-M&E Officer )

Bachelor of English PUC University 4 years Oct 2007- 1


(outside working Oct 2012
hours-Finance
Assistant I )

BA in Accounting Sovanaphum 4 years Oct 2006- 1


(outside working hours- University
Finance Assistant II ) Oct 2010 b

Phnom Penh Central Office 76


Table 5: Staff Attendance at Overseas Forums

Number of
attending staff

Description Place/Institution Duration Date

BTB/BTM

KPT/KVH

PNP

SRV
Action Asian Peace Action for Conflict 6 days 16-23 Oct 1
Builder Forum Transformation in
Kathmandu, Nepal

Implementation of Staff Policies

All staff members are expected to understand that the National Staff Policy applies to them in full
when they are dealing with personnel issues.

During this semester period, the Senior Management Team has amended in the National Staff
Policy to add a condition to the Provident Fund. The new condition is that if an employee resigns
without giving CWS the required notice under the Cambodian Labor Code, CWS has the right to
disburse only the employment share. However, if a project closes employees are entitled to
receive full compensation from the Fund independent of the two-year requirement.

The Senior Management Team has also amended the Driver appraisal form and policy to make
it compliant and consistent with other staff appraisal forms. The new form includes full
instructions, comments from staff and supervisors on each section (i.e. driver professionalism,
interpersonal skills) as well as open questions from the employee.

The Senior Management Team also amended the CWS-C Identity Card for 2009. The new card
adds a Khmer version logo on the front and in color.

The Human Resource Department is also working on a new database for personnel data,
including leave queries, attendance, and other important information.

Phnom Penh Central Office 77


APPENDIX I
SUMMARY OF FINANCES AND
VARIANCE ANALYSIS

CHURCH WORLD SERVICE/CAMBODIA


FINANCIAL SUMMARY
AND VARIANCE ANALYSIS

STATEMENT OF FUND RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS


FOR THE SIX MONTHS 01 July – 31 December 2008

STATEMENT OF THE MANAGEMENT’S RESPONSIBILITIES

It is the responsibility of the management to prepare the financial statements for each financial
year, in the preparation of this, the management requires to:

• Select the suitable accounting policies and adherently carry out in compliance with those
policies.
• Prepare the financial statements on the going concern basis unless it is inappropriate to
presume that the organization will continue its operations.
• Make judgments and estimations with much more reasonably and prudently

The management is responsible for keeping proper accounting records accurately and timely at
any time of the financial implementation of the organization and also responsible for taking such
steps as reasonably open to safeguard the assets of the organization and to prevent and detect
fraud and other irregularities.

REVIEW OF BUDGET, INCOMES & EXPENSES DURING SIX MONTHS IN FY 2009

Budget : US$ 745,463.84


Incomes : US$ 704,561.40
Expenses: US$ 590,177.98
In analysis of the budget, incomes and expenses as reported above, the incomes are less than
budget plan in amount of 40,902.44 or 5.49%. And the expenses are also less than budget plan
in the amount of US$ 155,285.86 equivalent 20.83%. CWS – Cambodia received a clean report
from the auditors.

The financial report of incomes and expenses can be viewed as below:

Opening
The financialFund Balance:
audited report as well as income and expense statements canUS$ 321,515.47
be viewed as below:

Donations/Revenues and Transfers: US$ 704,561.40

Total Fund Available: US$ 1,026,076.87

Closing Fund Balance: US$ 435,898.89

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 78


STATEMENT OF FUND RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS
FOR THE SIX MONTHS ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2008

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 79


Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 80
Church World Service - Cambodia Program
Financial Statements
For the 6 months 01 July, 2008 to 31 December, 2008

Schedule Amount Amount


Statement of funds Reference USD USD

Opening fund balance : 321,515.47

ADD - Incoming amounts :


Svay Rieng WatSan Cooperation Project 3 110,287.71
Kompong Thom VBCD Project 4 64,124.98
Preah Vihear VBCD Project 5 43,759.80
Kompong Thom Partnership Project 6 53,481.32
Banteay Meanchey Demining Project 8 0.00
BTB & BTM Partnership Project 7 217,978.36
Phnom Penh Central Office 9 120,987.62
DIPECHO Project 10 93,941.61 704,561.40

Total fund available 1,026,076.87

LESS - Outgoing amounts :


Svay Rieng WatSan Cooperation Project 3 62,986.23
Kompong Thom VBCD Project 4 104,632.68
Preah Vihear Dev't Project 5 94,311.04
Kompong Thom Partnership Project 6 37,053.65
Banteay Meanchey Demining Project 8 29,960.00
BTB & BTM Partnership Project 7 84,043.29
Phnom Penh Central Office 9 139,718.97
DIPECHO Project 10 37,472.12 590,177.98

Less- Fund Reserve: 0.00

Closing fund balance : 435,898.89

Notes to the Financial Statements


Schedules 1 to 14 form an integral part of these Financial Statements

Date: 17 February 2009

__________________________________ ________________________________
Seng Vutha Josephine Barbour
Finance Manager Country Representative

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 81


Church World Service - Cambodia Program
Financial Statements
As at 31 December, 2008

Balance Sheet Schedule Amount Amount


Reference USD USD
ASSETS

Cash and bank balances :


Cash on hand 67,726.66
Cash at banks 1 962,212.55 1,029,939.21

Amounts receivable : 1 12,416.12

TOTAL ASSETS 1,042,355.33

LIABILITIES

Amounts payable : 2 606,456.44

TOTAL LIABILITIES 606,456.44

ASSETS LESS LIABILITIES 435,898.89

Represented by :

FUND BALANCES

CWS programs
Svay Rieng WatSan Cooperation Project 3 (9,123.86)
Kompong Thom VBCD Project 4 18,527.44
Preah Vihear VBCD Project 5 38,090.76
Kompong Thom Partnership Project 6 20,853.59
Banteay Meanchey Demining Project 8 163,383.71
BTB & BTM Partnership Project 7 173,970.92
Phnom Penh Central Office 9 (26,273.16)
DIPECHO Project 10 56,469.49 435,898.89

TOTAL FUND BALANCE 435,898.89

Notes to the Financial Statements


Schedules 1 to 14 form an integral part of these Financial Statements

Date: 17 February 2009

__________________________________ _________________________________
Seng Vutha Josephine Barbour
Finance Manager Country Representative

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 82


Church World Service - Cambodia Program
Schedule to the Financial Statements
As at 31 December, 2008

Amount
Cash at Banks USD

In current account with :


Standard Chartered Bank, Singapore (US Dollar account - interest bearing) 480,857.62
Standard Chartered Bank, Singapore (US Dollar account - interest bearing) 139,747.15
Standard Chartered Bank, Singapore (US Dollar account - interest bearing) 128,783.28
Foreign Trade Bank of Cambodia, Phnom Penh (US Dollar account) 136,105.23
Foreign Trade Bank of Cambodia, Phnom Penh (Cambodian Riel account) 7,291.13
ACLEDA Bank, Kompong Thom,Cambodia (US Dollar account) 7,462.76
ACLEDA Bank, Kompong Thom,Cambodia (Cambodian Riel account) 4,209.58
ACLEDA Bank, Svay Rieng,Cambodia (US Dollar account) 17,160.84
ACLEDA Bank, Svay Rieng,Cambodia (Cambodian Riel account) 7,009.28
ACLEDA Bank, Battambang,Cambodia (US Dollar account) 32,086.97
ACLEDA Bank, Battambang,Cambodia (Cambodian Riel account) 1,498.71

Total Cash at Banks : 962,212.55

Church World Service - Cambodia Program


Schedule to the Financial Statements
As at 31 December, 2008

Amount Amount
Amounts Receivable USD USD
Advances to CWS Projects and staff:
Staff advances 969.50
Project advances 0.00 969.50

Awaiting reimbursement :
Telephone deposits 2,857.00
Josephine Barbour Personal 1,443.81
CWSW - Cow bells /Scarfs and shipping 5,816.07
Other Debtors 1,329.74 11,446.62

Total amounts receivable : 12,416.12

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 83


Church World Service - Cambodia Program
Schedule to the Financial Statements
As at 31 December, 2008

Amount Amount
Amounts payable : USD USD

Held in trust :
National Taxation 0.00
Funds Held in Trust 0.00
Provident Fund 147,758.44
Vehicle Replacement Funds 110,770.00
Funds Reverve 347,928.00
Josephine Barbour - Personal 0.00
CWSW - Cow bells /Scarfs and shipping 0.00

Total amounts payable : 606,456.44

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 84


Church World Service - Cambodia Program
Schedule to the Financial Statements
As at 31 December, 2008

Natural
Chart Emergency Women's Resource Learning Support
Phnom Penh Central Office Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisation Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Organizat 'n Support Organizat 'n Production Generation
USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
6 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD

Opening balance : (7,541.81) *

ADD - Incoming amounts :


CWSW/New York (SED)
ICCO
CWS ODD 43,525.00
CWS Agent Reimbursement 24,792.72
C. D Discretionery Funds
Martha Teas Memorial Funds
Mey Meakea Memorial Funds
Interest on general bank account 742.23
Other (Dis- general equipment, Admin) 7.61
Disposal Vehicle
Admin costs recovered CWS 51,920.06

Total incomes 120,987.62

LESS - Outgoing amounts :


Personnel-expatriate 11,417.15 11,417.15
Personnel-National 82,568.76 82,568.76
Technical support 2,500.00 2,500.00
CWS staff development 2,300.63 2,300.63
CWS Organizational Development 1,914.02 1,914.02
Education and training for civil society -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving out -
Community WatSan Construction -
Grants and contributions 745.51 745.51
Emergency Response -
General office costs 34,987.90 34,987.90
Vehicles & fixed assets 3,285.00 3,285.00

139,718.97 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 139,718.97

Administration charge - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Total expenditure 139,718.97 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 139,718.97

Less Fund Reserve -

Closing balance (26,273.16)

Note: Second quarter of FY09 actual income $21,766 and CWS Agent reimbursement of quarter 1 and 2 of FY09 have not yet been received, therefore, in this report reflected overspent $26,273.16

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 85


Church World Service - Cambodia Program
Schedule to the Financial Statements
As at 31 December, 2008

Natural
Chart Emergency Women's Resource Learning Support
Kompong Thom VBCD project Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisation Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Organizat 'n Support Organizat 'n Production Generation
USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
6 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD

Opening balance : 59,035.14 *

ADD - Incoming amounts :


CWSW/New York (SED) -
CWS Tool of Hope -
Christian Aid -
NCC/Australia -
EED 36,322.29
ICCO -
UMCOR 24,987.50
SHG Repayment WCA 73.15
C. D Discretionery Funds 747.04
Disposal General Equipment 1,578.00
Other (Disposal general equipment) -
Interest on bank account EED 417.00
-
Total incomes 64,124.98

LESS - Outgoing amounts :


Personnel-expatriate - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Personnel-National 42,070.51 - 11,992.23 2,697.40 - 3,844.52 5,146.89 8,292.38 4,599.47 - 5,240.45 257.17 - - -
Technical support 1,059.00 - - - - - - 50.69 - - 1,008.32 - - - -
CWS staff development 1,701.75 - 203.88 42.16 - 64.81 82.55 248.55 69.23 - 983.97 6.60 - - -
CWS Organizational Development 4,371.16 - 577.46 191.46 - 223.16 637.81 1,419.65 275.95 - 1,034.14 11.53 - - -
Education and training for civil society 6,532.80 - 2,141.16 23.48 - 581.99 262.56 2,241.49 244.36 - 692.37 345.39 - - -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc 518.22 - 518.22 - - - - - - - - - - - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving out - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Community WatSan Construction 1,163.96 - - - - - - 1,163.96 - - - - - - -
Grants and contributions 5,991.12 - 1,916.38 21.94 - 562.89 410.93 337.12 706.55 - 2,032.13 3.18 - - -
Emergency Response - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
General office costs 21,471.18 - 6,083.90 1,191.79 - 1,908.11 2,289.39 5,065.89 2,066.35 - 2,662.07 203.68 - - -
Vehicles & fixed assets 6,105.20 - 1,721.75 331.70 - 537.83 648.06 1,424.49 584.82 - 798.34 58.21 - - -

90,984.90 - 25,154.98 4,499.93 - 7,723.31 9,478.19 20,244.22 8,546.73 - 14,451.78 885.76 - - -

Administration charge 13,647.78 - 3,773.26 674.99 - 1,158.50 1,421.72 3,036.64 1,282.02 - 2,167.78 132.87 - - -
Total expenditure 104,632.68 - 28,928.24 5,174.92 - 8,881.81 10,899.92 23,280.86 9,828.74 - 16,619.56 1,018.63 - - -

Less Fund Reserve

Closing balance 18,527.44

* Fund balance carry foreward from FY08 $147,373.14 - $60 is allocated a proportion of 40% to Preah Vihear VBCD project and the rest 60% allocated to Kongpong Thom VBCD project.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 86


Church World Service - Cambodia Program
Schedule to the Financial Statements
As at 31 December, 2008

Natural
Chart Emergency Women's Resource Learning Support
Preah Vihear VBCD Project Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisation Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Organizat 'n Support Organizat 'n Production Generation
USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
6 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD

Opening balance : 88,642.00 *

ADD - Incoming amounts :


CWSW/New York (SED) -
CWS Tool of Hope -
Christian Aid -
NCC/Australia -
EED 42,639.22
ICCO -
UMCOR -
SHG Repayment WCA -
C. D Discretionery Funds 1,120.58
Disposal General Equipment -
Other (Disposal general equipment) -
Interest on bank account EED -

Total incomes 43,759.80

LESS - Outgoing amounts :


Personnel-expatriate - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Personnel-National 47,759.33 - 10,741.79 3,247.40 - 4,830.77 5,469.51 9,568.00 5,195.29 - 6,025.45 2,681.12 - - -
Technical support 1,588.51 - - - - - - 76.03 - - 1,512.47 - - - -
CWS staff development 1,545.70 - 33.54 8.98 - 14.59 21.47 38.76 15.56 - 1,405.19 7.60 - - -
CWS Organizational Development 6,779.86 - 519.64 349.25 - 430.56 1,197.67 1,650.42 752.74 - 1,517.94 361.64 - - -
Education and training for civil society 4,919.31 - 1,122.98 105.57 - 286.52 120.22 1,993.61 356.27 - 858.99 75.15 - - -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving out - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Community WatSan Construction 4.88 - - - - - - 4.88 - - - - - - -
Grants and contributions 5,070.45 - 1,144.32 8.84 - 404.17 11.30 483.15 10.66 - 3,001.24 6.76 - - -
Emergency Response - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
General office costs 8,614.76 - 1,752.62 401.41 - 712.53 846.38 1,638.58 781.71 - 2,128.08 353.45 - - -
Vehicles & fixed assets 5,726.80 - 1,123.43 382.40 - 549.03 597.69 1,281.66 558.43 - 926.66 307.51 - - -

82,009.60 - 16,438.33 4,503.85 - 7,228.17 8,264.23 16,735.10 7,670.65 - 17,376.02 3,793.23 - - -

Administration charge 12,301.45 - 2,465.75 675.57 - 1,084.22 1,239.64 2,510.26 1,150.61 - 2,606.40 568.99 - - -
Total expenditure 94,311.04 - 18,904.08 5,179.42 - 8,312.39 9,503.87 19,245.37 8,821.26 - 19,982.43 4,362.22 - - -

Less Fund Reserve -

Closing balance 38,090.76


0%
* Fund balance carry foreward from FY08 $147,373.14 - $60 is allocated a proportion of 40% to Preah Vihear VBCD project and the rest 60% allocated to Kongpong Thom VBCD project.

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 87


Church World Service - Cambodia Program
Schedule to the Financial Statements
As at 31 December, 2008

Natural
Chart Emergency Women's Resource Learning Support
Svay Rieng WatSan Cooperation Project Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisation Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Organizat 'n Support Organizat 'n Production Generation
USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
6 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD

Opening balance : (56,425.34)

ADD - Incoming amounts :

UMCOR 24,987.50
NCC/Australia 84,545.00
ICCO -
CWS Tools of Hope -
CWSW/New York (SED) -
SHG Repayment WCA 77.21
C. D Discretionery Funds -
Disposal General Equipment -
Other (Disposal general equipment) 678.00

Total incomes 110,287.71

Personnel-expatriate - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Personnel-National 30,025.33 - 3,448.44 - - 878.67 1,399.26 20,462.75 1,254.05 - 2,429.68 152.49 - - -
Technical support 1,134.65 - - - - - - 54.31 - - 1,080.34 - - - -
CWS staff development 1,022.86 - 9.91 - - 2.35 3.79 5.07 3.38 - 997.83 0.53 - - -
CWS Organizational Development 2,064.59 - 3.69 - - - - 1,276.44 - - 784.46 - - - -
Education and training for civil society 3,424.22 - 423.61 - - 37.64 73.92 2,325.75 61.33 - 448.29 53.68 - - -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc 1,243.63 - - - - - - 1,243.63 - - - - - - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving out - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Community WatSan Construction 2,345.67 - - - - - - 2,345.67 - - - - - - -
Grants and contributions 2,152.24 - 100.00 - - - - - - - 2,052.24 - - - -
Emergency Response - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
General office costs 6,240.44 - 639.46 - - 148.20 238.26 3,711.31 212.74 - 1,257.12 33.34 - - -
Vehicles & fixed assets 5,117.00 - 223.38 - - 48.50 77.98 4,275.18 69.62 - 411.42 10.91 - - -

54,770.62 - 4,848.49 - - 1,115.36 1,793.21 35,700.10 1,601.12 - 9,461.38 250.96 - - -

Administration charge 8,215.61 - 727.28 - - 167.30 268.98 5,355.02 240.17 - 1,419.21 37.64 - - -
Total expenditure 62,986.23 - 5,575.77 - - 1,282.67 2,062.19 41,055.13 1,841.29 - 10,880.59 288.60 - - -

Less Fund Reserve 0.00

Closing balance (9,123.86)

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 88


Church World Service - Cambodia Program
Schedule to the Financial Statements
As at 31 December, 2008

Natural
Chart Emergency Women's Resource Learning Support
BTB & BTM Parntership project Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisation Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Organizat 'n Support Organizat 'n Production Generation
USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
6 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD

Opening balance : 40,035.85

ADD - Incoming amounts :


Christian World Service/NZ -
CWSW/New York (SED) 134,022.00
CWS Tools of Hope -
ICCO 78,840.00
UMCOR -
AJWS -
SHG Repayment WCA -
Other Income 5,116.36
Total incomes 217,978.36

LESS - Outgoing amounts :


Personnel-expatriate - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Personnel-National 34,003.70 - - - 34,003.70 - - - - - - - - -
Technical support 120.00 - - - 120.00 - - - - - - - - -
CWS staff development 706.51 - - - 706.51 - - - - - - - - -
CWS Organizational Development 29.29 - - - 29.29 - - - - - - - - -
Education and training for civil society 3,465.38 - - - 3,465.38 - - - - - - - - -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving out - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Community WatSan Construction - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Grants and contributions 22,031.52 - - - 22,031.52 - - - - - - - - -
Emergency response - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
General office costs 10,584.73 - - - 10,584.73 - - - - - - - - -
Vehicles & fixed assets 2,140.00 - - - 2,140.00 - - - - - - - - -

73,081.13 - - - 73,081.13 - - - - - - - - - -

Administration charge 10,962.16 - - - 10,962.16 - - - - - - - - -


Total expenditure 84,043.29 - - - 84,043.29 - - - - - - - - - -

Less Fund Reserve -

Closing balance 173,970.92

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 89


Church World Service - Cambodia Program
Schedule to the Financial Statements
As at 31 December, 2008

Natural
Chart Emergency Women's Resource Learning Support
Kompong Thom Partnership Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisation Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Organizat 'n Support Organizat 'n Production Generation
USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
6 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD

Opening balance : 4,425.92

ADD - Incoming amounts :


EED -
ICCO -
Christian World Service/NZ 52,862.00
CWSW/New York (SED) -
Other Income 619.32

Total incomes 53,481.32

LESS - Outgoing amounts :

Personnel-expatriate - -
Personnel-National 10,302.05 10,302.05
Technical support 80.00 80.00
CWS staff development 60.00 60.00
CWS Organizational Development 378.93 378.93
Education and training for civil society 2,699.61 2,699.61
Support for partners, c 'parts etc - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving out - -
Community WatSan Construction - -
Grants and contributions 14,501.62 14,501.62
Emergency Response - -
General office costs 3,156.37 3,156.37
Vehicles & fixed assets 1,042.00 1,042.00

32,220.58 - - - 32,220.58 - - - - - - - - - -

Administration charge 4,833.07 - - - 4,833.07 - - - - - - - - - -


Total expenditure 37,053.65 - - - 37,053.65 - - - - - - - - - -

Less Fund Reserve -

Closing balance 20,853.59

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 90


Church World Service - Cambodia Program
Schedule to the Financial Statements
As at 31 December, 2008

Natural
Chart Emergency Women's Resource Learning Support
Banteay Meanchey Demining project Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisation Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Organizat 'n Support Organizat 'n Production Generation
USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
6 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD

Opening balance : 193,343.71

ADD - Incoming amounts :


Christian Aid
NCC/Australia
EED
Interest on bank account EED

Total income -

LESS - Outgoing amounts :


Personnel-expatriate -
Personnel-National -
Technical support -
CWS staff development -
CWS Organizational Development -
Education and training for civil society -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving out -
Community WatSan Construction -
Grants and contributions 28,000.00 28,000.00
Emergency Response -
General office costs -
Vehicles & fixed assets -

28,000.00 - - - - - - - 28,000.00 - - - - - -

Administration charge 1,960.00 - - - - - - - 1,960.00 - - - - - -


Total expenditure 29,960.00 - - - - - - - 29,960.00 - - - - - -

Less Fund Reserve -

Closing balance 163,383.71

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 91


Church World Service - Cambodia Program
Schedule to the Financial Statements
As at 31 December, 2008

Natural
Emergency Women's Resource Learning Support
DIPECHO Project Chart Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisation Office
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Organizat 'n Support Organizat 'n Production Generation
USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
6 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD

Opening balance : -

ADD - Incoming amounts :


DIPECHO 93,941.61

Total incomes 93,941.61

LESS - Outgoing amounts :


Personnel-expatriate -
Personnel-National 7,415.22 7,415.22
Technical support -
CWS staff development -
CWS Organizational Development -
Education and training for civil society 15,857.90 15,857.90
Support for partners, c 'parts etc 4,677.27 4,677.27
Credit and Self Help Groups giving out -
Community WatSan Construction -
Grants and contributions 1,329.00 1,329.00
Emergency Response -
General office costs 3,347.73 3,347.73
Vehicles & fixed assets 4,845.00 4,845.00

37,472.12 - - - - - - - 37,472.12 - - - - - -

Administration charge - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Total expenditure 37,472.12 - - - - - - - 37,472.12 - - - - - -

Less Fund Reserve -

Closing balance 56,469.49

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 92


Church World Service - Cambodia Program
Schedule to the Financial Statements
As at 31 December, 2008

Natural
Emergency Women's Resouce Learning
Consolidated Chart Project Local Institution Building Food Security Health Response Advocacy Peace Equity Management Organisation Office Costs
Community Commune Cambodian
Total Based Council Non-Gov'tal Food Income
Amount Organizat'n Support Organizat'n Production Generation
USD-FY09 Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount Amount
6 months USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD

Opening balance : 321,515.47 *

ADD - Incoming amounts :

CWSW/New York (SED) 134,022.00


CWS Tool of Hope -
CWS ODD 43,525.00
Christian Aid -
Christian World Service/NZ 52,862.00
EED 78,961.51
ICCO 78,840.00
UMCOR 49,975.00
NCC/Australia 84,545.00
ADPC -
DIPECHO 93,941.61
American Jewish World Service -
CWS Agent Reimbursement 24,792.72
SHG Repayment WCA 150.36
C. D Discretionery Funds 1,867.62
Other (Disposal general equipment) 685.61
Other Income 5,735.68
Mey Meakea Memorial Funds -
Martha Teas Memorial Funds -
Interest-bank account and deposits 1,159.23
Disposal General Equipment 1,578.00
Admin costs recovered CWS 51,920.06

Total incomes 704,561.40 704,561.40 -

LESS - Outgoing amounts :


Personnel-expatriate 11,417.15 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 11,417.15
Personnel-National 254,144.90 - 26,182.46 5,944.79 44,305.75 9,553.96 12,015.67 38,323.13 18,464.02 - 13,695.58 3,090.78 - - 82,568.76
Technical support 6,482.16 - - - 200.00 - - 181.03 - - 3,601.13 - - - 2,500.00
CWS staff development 7,337.44 - 247.33 51.14 766.51 81.75 107.80 292.38 88.17 - 3,386.99 14.73 - - 2,300.63
CWS Organizational Development 15,537.85 - 1,100.79 540.71 408.22 653.72 1,835.48 4,346.51 1,028.68 - 3,336.54 373.17 - - 1,914.02
Education and training for civil society 36,899.22 - 3,687.76 129.05 6,164.99 906.16 456.70 6,560.85 16,519.86 - 1,999.65 474.22 - - -
Support for partners, c 'parts etc 6,439.12 - 518.22 - - - - 1,243.63 4,677.27 - - - - - -
Credit and Self Help Groups giving out - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Community WatSan Construction 3,514.51 - - - - - - 3,514.51 - - - - - - -
Grants and contributions 79,821.46 - 3,160.70 30.79 36,533.14 967.06 422.23 820.28 30,046.21 - 7,085.61 9.94 - - 745.51
Emergency response - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
General office costs 88,403.11 - 8,475.98 1,593.21 13,741.10 2,768.84 3,374.03 10,415.78 6,408.54 - 6,047.27 590.47 - - 34,987.90
Vehicles & fixed assets 28,261.00 - 3,068.57 714.09 3,182.00 1,135.36 1,323.72 6,981.34 6,057.87 - 2,136.42 376.63 - - 3,285.00

538,257.92 - 46,441.80 9,003.77 105,301.71 16,066.85 19,535.63 72,679.43 83,290.61 - 41,289.19 4,929.95 - - 139,718.97

Administration charge 51,920.06 - 6,966.29 1,350.56 15,795.23 2,410.03 2,930.34 10,901.92 4,632.80 - 6,193.39 739.50 - - -
Total expenditure 590,177.98 - 53,408.09 10,354.34 121,096.94 18,476.87 22,465.98 83,581.35 87,923.41 - 47,482.58 5,669.45 - - 139,718.97

Less Fund Reserve 0.00

Closing balance 435,898.89 0.00% 9.05% 1.75% 20.52% 3.13% 3.81% 14.16% 14.90% 0.00% 8.05% 0.96% 0.00% 0.00% 23.67%

Financial Summary and Variance Analysis 93


APPENDIX II
ANNUAL OUTPUTS/ LOGFRAMES

CHURCH WORLD SERVICE/CAMBODIA


Church World Service Cambodia
Logical Framework FY09
Project Name: Direct Services Program

Narrative Summary Objectively Verifiable Indicators Actual Output Variances/ Explanation

Overall Objective:
To enhance the communities' capacity to define their development direction and access to their basic needs, basic social services;
sustainable livelihood opportunities and food security.
Theme 1: Capacity Building for Development Planning
OBJECTIVE
Enhance networking with NGO and engage with government institutions to define their development direction and manage their affairs in a
a participatory and democratic manner
Output 1.1:
Enhance program coordination with ▪ 6 meetings with Medicam ▪ 1 meeting on district strategic ▪
NGO and relevant Ministries plan organized by Provincial
▪ 6 meting with watsan working office attended
group ▪ 2 formal meeting with district ▪ There are several informal
▪ 2 networking meetings GAD
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
Medicam Monthly Meeting ▪ Program Officer for Health ▪ Attend 3 meetings with Medicam ▪ Meeting was attended
according to request made
Watsan Sectoral Working Group ▪ Program Officer for Health ▪ Attend 3 meetings with WatSan and availability
Meeting working group
GAD networking meeting ▪ Program Officer for Peace ▪ Attend GAD networking one time

Other meeting/workshop ▪ PM and PO ▪ attended international event on


Sanitation impact, organized by
World Bank and MRD.

94
▪ attended International Day of
sanitation organized by MRD
▪ attended Pesticide impact work-
shop organized by NGO forum
▪ attended small and Micro Business
experience sharing, organized by
NGO forum
▪ Attended CCSP meeting organized
by CCSP
Theme 2: Meeting Basic Need and Building Self-reliant, Sustainable Livelihoods
OBJECTIVE
Improve access to basic social service and amenities and improve overall food security of vulnerable people.

Output 2.1
Improve overall community health ▪ 18 project staff knowledge on primary ▪ 15 field staff (6 women) which is 7 ▪ All staff members are able
status and individual health condition health care, dengue fever, malaria, from KPT and 8 from PVH trained to transfer their knowledge
and avian-influenza prevention on Dengue Fever, Malaria, Primary to target communities
Health Care and Diarrhea

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation

2.1.11 Provide training on dengue fever ▪ Program Officer for Health, budget, ▪ Provide training on Primary
malaria, avian-influenza materials Health Care, dengue fever,
prevention, and primary health malaria, diarrhea prevention to
care to 18 staff 15 staff which is 7 from KPT (3
women) and 8 from PVH (3 women)

95
Output 2.5
Improve agricultural productions, food ▪ 18 trained staffs are able to monitor ▪ 19 staff were trained on SHG
security and household income among and assist SHG committees on concept and book keeping at CWS
vulnerable people, self-help/interest book keeping and group central office in Phnom Penh
group in target communities management
▪ 19 CNGO partners staff trained on
SHG concept, bookkeeping and micro
business

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation

2.5.30 Provide training on Bookkeeping ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Provide a-3 day training on SHG ▪ Staffs can provide training
to 19 staff concept and book keeping to 19 to SHG in their respective
project field staffs (6 women), village
10 from PVH and 9 from KPT at
CWS central office Phnom Penh
▪ Cooperate with partnership project ▪ All CNGO staffs interested
in BTB to provide a-5 day training on and request for next training
SHG concept and micro- business and commit to apply in their
management to 19 CNGO staffs area
(9 women)

96
Theme 3: Strengthening Civil Society
OBJECTIVE
Strengthen target community understanding and practice of peace building and restorative justice

Output 3.1
Output 3.2:
Key persons in the community VLs, ▪ 19 project staff trained in Accountabi- ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
WSUG, CDF, CCs, old persons and lity (Anti-corruption)
monks play an important role in
peace building, conflict resolution ▪ 19 project staff trained on Gender / ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
and use the LCP methodology in Women equality
their community
▪ 4 project staff have ability to conduct ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
LCP assessment practice and will be practice LCP
assessment in Jan 09

▪ 18 staff (SMT, POG and core staff ▪ Participants interested and


provided training on reconciliation suggested to have it in every
6 months
▪ 13 participants ( 5 women) from ▪ Cambodian Youth feel happy
KPT and BTB BMC joint Youth and and have opportunity to learn
Reconciliation conference in Siem and share to other
Reap province.
11 participants (4 CPV from KPT ▪
and PvH; 3 NGOs staff and 6 CWS
youth staff)

97
▪ 32 participants (13 women) in Timor ▪ The training finished in 3
Leste (10 CWS TL, 6 NGO partners modules as committed to
staff and 16 youth) trained Module III support CWS Timor Leste
of Peace Building and Restorative

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation

3.1.9 Provide training course on ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace, ▪ Not done ▪ Planned next semester
gender to 19 CWS staff

3.1.10 Training course on Accountability ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace, ▪ Not done ▪ Planned next semester
to 19 CWS staffs
3.1.11 Workshop on Trauma and ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace, ▪ Not done ▪ Planned next semester
Restorative Justice for 4 CWS
staff in Kirirum Resort (4 days)

3.1.12 Lead all field staff to conduct ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace, ▪ Not done ▪ Planned next semester
LCP Assessment
▪ Coordinate with CDRI to conduct ▪ Participants interested and
Reconciliation workshop to 18 px suggested to have it in every
( SMT, POG and Core team) at 6 months
Sihanuk Ville

▪ Support 13 participants ( 5 women) ▪ Youth have opportunity to


(2 CPV from KPT, 2 CPV from PVH, learn from youth inside and
3 CNGOs staff from KORD and , outside country on
CIDC, and 6 CWS youth staff) to reconciliation process.
join Youth and Reconciliation
conference which organized by
Youth For Peace Organization

98
▪ With support from CWS Country ▪ The training finished in 3
Representative, 32 participants (13 modules as committed to
women) of Timor Leste including 10 support CWS Timor Leste
CWS TL staff, 6 NGO partners and They requested to provide
16 youth provided Module III of more session that related to
Peace Building and Restorative peace building.
Justice training
Output 4.1
Red Cross Volunteers (RCVs) are ▪ 19 staff trained on CBDRR and ▪ 18 staff (6 women), 9 from KPT ▪ As Planned
actively functioning, commune and planning and 10 from PVH trained on
village disaster preparedness plans CBDRR
developed and implemented in ▪ 19 staff trained on community first ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
target communities aid
▪ 19 staff trained on Sphere and ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
Accountability (ERP)

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation


4.1.8 Provide training on CBDRR to ▪ Budget, materials, ▪ Provide a three-day training on ▪ Achieved as planned
18 staff Program Coordinator and Assistant CBDRR to 18 staff (6 women), 10
of ERP from PVH and 8 from KPT project

4.1.9 Coordinate with CRC to provide ▪ Budget, materials, ERP Program ▪ Not done ▪ The project prioritize to the
training on First Aid to 19 staff other task and this is not the
urgent needed

4.1.10 Provide training on Sphere ▪ Budget, materials, ERP Program ▪ Not done ▪ Planned next semester
and Accountability to 19 staff

99
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
5.1.3a Medicam Monthly Meeting PO 3 meetings (17 Oct; 9 July; 19 Sept) Base on invitation letter
Watsan Sectoral Working PC & PO 3 meetings (4 Nov; 2 Sept; 1 July) and time availability
Group Meeting
Other meetings/national events/ PO & PC 4 times(18,11,9 Dec & 27 Nov)
workshop

Theme 5b: Program Development, Management and Supervision


OBJECTIVE
Effective and efficient program management and functioning; enhance community development planning and practice

Output 5.1b
Field staff and field operation ▪ Monthly project monitoring on: ▪
appropriately monitored and 12 project management
supported 12 project implementation activities
6 staff performance
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
5.1.1b Field visit of Program Manager ▪ PM, PO, PC ▪ Regular field monitoring from
to monitor project management Program Office and rarely from
Program Manager as time constraint

5.1.2b Field visit of Program staff to ▪ Program staff conducted 15 regular


project implementation and field monitoring in purpose of
quality program implementation of
Health, SHG, Food production,
WatSan etc……

100
▪ Program Manager conducted 2 one ▪ The one day meeting was
day meeting on Most Significant improved knowledge of
Change meeting with all project project staff on MSC concept
staff of PVH, KPT and SVR. and how to apply MSC in the
communities.

▪ Program Manager conducted 6 ▪ Coaching and advice was


times of field monitoring to projects, given to project manager
which 2 times in SVR, one time in on staff performance and
KPT and 3 times in PVH project implementation.

Output 5.2b
Improved design, planning, manage- ▪ On the job training & formal training/
ent and monitoring capabilities of capacity building of staff on:
project staff
▪ 1 VBCD reflection

▪ 1 CD reflection

▪ 19 project staff (9 KPT and 10 PVH)


staff trained in leading and managing
rural organization

▪ 19 project staff (9 KPT and 10 PVH)


staff trained in PM &E

▪ 19 project staff (9 KPT and 10 PVH)


are able to facilitate training to
communities

101
▪ 4 exposure visits

▪ 4 on the job trainings

▪ 4 tools development

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation

5.2.1b Organize VBCD reflection ▪ PM,Pm and PCs ▪ Not done ▪ Due to the time constrain to
complete project activities,
VBCD reflection workshop
be moved to next semester

5.2.2b Organize annual reflection on ▪ PM,Pm and PCs ▪ 27 staff attended a 3-day CWS ▪ Achieved as planned
CWS CD model Com Dev model reflection workshop
workshop (9 PVH, 9 KPT, 9 Prog.
office and one M and E Officer)

5.2.3b Provide Leading and Managing ▪ Pcs, field Staff, Pm, budget, ▪ Not done due to program give ▪ The program give priority to
Rural Organization Training materials priority to other training the CLTS course which is
19 project staff (9 KPT and 10 urgent need for field staff
PVH)
▪ The Training on leading and
managing rural organization

5.2.4b Provide Participatory Monitoring ▪ Pcs, field Staff, Pm, budget, materials ▪ Planned in next semester ▪ will move to next quarter
and evaluation training course to
19 project staff (9 KPT and 10
PVH)

102
5.2.5b Provide on the job training to KPT ▪ PM,POs, Pm ▪ Program staff conduct on the Job ▪ Integrated plan of Program
and project staff training to project staff during field office and project
visit and meeting

▪ Program Manager and Program ▪ All annual program work plan


staff conducted three day meeting were integrated in project
with all project, PVH, KPT and PVH work plan. Its help to support
staff to integrate FY09 planning of project implementation at
program and project. target villages.

5.2.6b Develop tool development for ▪ PO,Pm,Pc ▪ Develop 3 tools: VP monitoring ▪ The other tool will develop
implementation (4tools) book, database forms, and SMCH next semester
forms.

5.2.7b Organize exposure visit for KPT ▪ Pm,PCs ▪ Only 2 internal exposure visit in ▪ The external exposure visit
and PVH staff (4 times) the target village area, SHG and will be done in next semester.
VDC activities.

Conducted Low Cost Sanitation Budget, materials, Program Officer ▪ Coordinate with CAWST to provide ▪ Unplanned, but it's necessary
training to CWS and other NGO for Health training to project staff and other for staff capacity
staff NGO staff on Low Cost Sanitation enhancement to support their
which is 6 CWS (2 from KPT, 2 work quality
from PVH and 2 from SVR) and 9
other NGO staff

Conduct Community Led Total Budget, materials ▪ Coordinate with MRD to provide ▪ Unplanned, but it's necessary
Sanitation Training to CWS field Training on Community Led Total for staff capacity
staff Sanitation to 25 staff (10 PVH, 9 KPT enhancement to support their
and 6 SVR) work quality

103
Output 5.3b ▪ Develop guidelines of:
Effective exit strategies, phase-out/
hand over guidelines/ tools, baselines Food Security guideline ▪ In the process to finish it.
survey instrument…developed, trialed VP family guideline
and introduced
▪ Review guidelines of:
In-kind and cash credit guideline ▪ In-kind and in cash credit guide line
reviewed and plan to submit to POG
early next semester
Health Activity Implementation ▪ Health Activities implementation
guideline guideline was presented to POG

ERP contingency plan ▪ ERP contingency plan developed


ERP guideline ▪ The ERP guideline drafted

Village Phasing out ▪ Phase out plan for SVR is in placed ▪ The implementation of
and implement from October 08 phasing out plan has made
changes of the FY09 plan
Water and Sanitation guideline ▪ WatSan guideline reviewed
Water and Sanitation manual ▪ WatSan manual drafted

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation

5.3.1b Develop food security guideline ▪ PO,PC ▪ Food security guideline was drafted ▪ Will review again after
and it will submit to POG next comment and advise from
semester Program Manager

5.3.2b Develop VP family guideline ▪ PO,PC ▪ Program staff develop VP ▪ The VP guideline will finish
monitoring book to link with VP monitor in next
semester

104
5.3.3b Review in-kind and cash credit ▪ PO,PC ▪ In kind and in cash credit ▪ Will submit to POG next
guideline guideline developed semester
5.3.4b Review Health activity ▪ PO,PC ▪ Reviewed health Activity ▪ Have been submitted to POG
Implementation guideline Implementation guideline on member for the approval
30 July 08 and presented to and will be finalized next
POG on 31 July 08 semester

5.3.5b Review ERP contingency plan ▪ PO,PC ▪ ERP contingency plan was ▪ Achieved as planned
already reviewed and submitted to
POG

5.3.6b Review ERP guideline ▪ PO,PC ▪ The ERP guideline was already ▪ This guideline will be in valid
drafted and will need POG approval after POG approval

5.3.7b Review CWS Peace manual ▪ PO,Pm ▪ In the process

5.3.8b Develop village phasing out ▪ The phase out plan was made ▪ Planned was approved and
by SVR staff after 2 consultation implemented in Oct 08 until
meetings with PM, PC and PO Jun. 09
and 1 meeting with CR and DP

5.3.9b Review water and sanitation ▪ WatSan guideline reviewed with ▪ Will present to POG
guideline Project staff and will be finalized next semester
early next semester

5.3.10 Review water and sanitation ▪ WatSam manual developed with ▪ Will present to POG
manual expert consultant next semester

105
Church World Service Cambodia
Logical Framework Mid Year Report FY09
Project Name: The Kompong Thom VBCD Project
Project No.

Narrative Summary Objectively Verifiable Indicators Actual Output Variances/Remarks


Overall Objective:
To develop the communities' capacity to define their development direction and improve them to meet their basic need; access to basic social
services; sustainable livelihood opportunities and food security.

Theme 1: Capacity Building for Development Planning


OBJECTIVE
Develop community capacity to engage with Government institutions and CBOs to define their development direction and manage their affairs
in aparticipatory and democratic manner.
Output 1.1:
Enhance program coordination with ▪ At least 2 coordination meetings with ▪ 6 coordination meetings with ▪ Over planned
sectoral forums (PROCOCOM) PDRD, PDOH, PDoEY, PDoWA, PDRD, PDoH, PDoA, and
provincial departments (PDRD, PDoA are conducted. PDoE were conducted
PDoA, PDoE, PDoH), district
authorities and CCs ▪ 2 coordination meetings with district ▪ Two meetings with district ▪ Achieved as planned
authorities and concerning officers of Prasat Sambou
government office are conducted and Santuk were organized

▪ 2 coordination meeting with commune ▪ Two quarterly meetings were ▪ Achieved as planned
councils are conducted conducted
(2 meeting in each commune)
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks

1.1.1 Attend coordination meetings ▪ Project Manager, Project Coordinators ▪ Program Manager, Project ▪ PDRD and UNICEF agreed to
with PDRD, PDoA, PDoE, PDoH Program Manager Manager, and Coordinator allow community people from
organized one coordination CWS target areas, Ti Pou
with PDRD and UNICEF to commune, to join the training
discuss on the collaboration of on water storage and hand
water and sanitation project washing with their beneficiaries

106
▪ Program Officer for Health and ▪ Program Officer for Health and ▪ PDoH agreed to provide two
Project Coordinator Project Coordinator meet with trainers to support project's
PDoH to discuss on refresher activities
training courses to VHVs and
TBAs

▪ Project Coordinator ▪ Project Coordinator meet with ▪ PDoA agreed to provide one
PDoA one time to discuss on trainer to discus on the topic
Integrated Farm Management and conducted the training
Training to demo farmers

▪ Program Manager an Project ▪ Program Manager and Project ▪ PDoE provided two district
Manager Manager meet with PDoE education officers from Prasat
Officers on supporting and Sambou and Santuk district
monitoring NFE classes in six to cooperate and support
target villages, two communes the project.

1.1.2 Organize semester meetings ▪ Project Manager, Project Coordinators ▪ Project Manager meet with two ▪ District governor understand
with district authorities and Program Officers, budget, vehicle district governors of Prasat CWS program and willing to
agriculture, education, rural Sambou and Santuk on CWS integrate in Commune
development office and OD/HC program and commune development plan
development plan

1.1.3 Organize quarterly meetings with ▪ Project Manager, Project Coordinators ▪ Project organized two quarterly ▪ Achieved as planed
commune councils for Program Officers, budget, vehicle meetings with participation of
2 communes 11 CC members, police officer,
and key commune officers to
discuss on collaboration and
how to implement activities

107
Output 1.2:
Strengthen leadership among local ▪ 43 VDCs, VLs & CCs attend 2 times ▪ 26 VDCs, VLs, and CCs from Achieved 50% of project plan
partners and community structure meeting 12 target villages attended two will organize another meeting
to better understand and implement VDC/CC quarterly meetings in next semester
community development principles
and processes ▪ 13 VDPs developed by VDCs and VL ▪ Annual village development ▪ Achieved as planned
planning in 13 target villages
were developed
▪ 63 VDCs & CCs attend annual plan- ▪ 56 VDCs, CCs, VLs and other ▪ 89% of project plan achieved
ning workshop relevant district government
officers (14 women) attended
the annual planning workshop
▪ 43 VDCs, VLs & CCs (40%women) ▪ 17 VDCs and CCs (1 woman) ▪ Achieved 50 % of project plan.
trained in leading and managing rural from 4 target villages of Ti Pou as communities are busy with
organization commune attended the training rice harvest. The training
on leading and managing rural planned at the end of first
organization semester will move to next
semester
▪ 43 VDCs, VLs & CCs (40% women) ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
trained in Participatory Monitoring and
Evaluation (PM&E)

▪ 43 VDCs, VLs & CCs (40% women) ▪ 146 peoples (105 women) in 12 ▪ CD concept was a subject
trained in CD concept target villages received regular requiring more conceptualizing.
coaching on CD concept from Based on knowledge of VDCs
project staff during community VLs, and for more efficiency,
meeting project staff provided them
regular coaching
▪ 43 VDCs, VLs & CCs (40%women) ▪ 23 VDCs, VLs, and CCs ▪ Achieved 50 % of project plan.
trained in planning & proposal writing (6 women) attended the training The training planned at the end
on planning and proposal of first semester will move to
writing next semester

108
Variances/Remarks
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities

1.2.1 Conduct 2 semester meetings ▪ Pcs, field Staff, Pm, budget, materials ▪ Two quarterly meetings were ▪ Achieved as planed, to share
with VDCs, VLs and CCs conducted with 26 participants
(2times/commune/year) including VDCs, VLs and CCs
to present 3 achievement and
next planning

1.2.2 Encourage VDCs & VLs in devel- ▪ Pcs, field staff, , materials ▪ Project field staff, VDCs, and ▪ Achieved as planned
oping VDPs in 13 villages VLs worked together to organize
13 village general meetings to
set up annual VDPs

1.2.3 Encourageg VDCs in 13 villages


g ▪ Pcs,
cs, field
e d Sta
Staff,, Pm,materials
, ate a s ▪ See 1.2.4 ▪ The
e integration
teg at o oof VDPs
s into
to
to integrate VPD into commune communal development plans
development plans was done during annual VDC
workshop

1.2.4 Organize annual VDC workshop ▪ Pcs, field Staff, Pm, budget, materials ▪ Organize the annual VDC ▪ The workshop present the village
to present achievement and next workshop with 56 participants achievement and annual plan of
planning to VLs CCs and (14 women) included VDCs, 2009; and to integrate VDP
relevant stakeholders VLs, CCs, District Department into commune development
of Education Officers, PDRD, plans
PDoW officer, HC staff and
project staff

1.2.5 Provide training course on ▪ Program Manager, budget, materials ▪ 14 VDCs (one woman) and 3 ▪ Achieved 50 % of project plan.
Leading and Managing Rural CCs from 4 target villages of The training planned at the
Organization to 43 VDCs, VLs Ti Pou commune attended the end of this semester will move
and CCs (2courses) training on Leading and to conduct next semester due
managing rural organization to communities busy with rice
harvesting

109
1.2.6 Provide training course on CD ▪ Pcs, field Staff, Pm, budget, materials ▪ Provide orientation to villagers ▪ CD concept was a subject
concept to 43 VDCs, VLs, CCs and regular coaching to VDC requiring more conceptualizing
(2 courses) CD concept to 146 people Based on knowledge of VDCs
(105 women) in 12 target VLs, and for more efficiency,
villages of two communes project staff provided them
regular coaching
1.2.7 Provide training course on ▪ Pcs, field Staff, Pm, budget, materials ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
PM & E to 43 VDCS, VL and
CCs (2courses)
1.2.8 Provide training course on ▪ Pcs, field Staff, Pm, budget, materials ▪ One training course on planning ▪ Another training will conduct
Planning and Proposal writing to and proposal writing with 23 in next semester
VDCs, VLs and CCs (2courses) participants (6 women) included
of VDCs, VLs, and CCs
attended.
1.2.9 Support local initiatives ▪ Materials, budget, Pcs, field staff ▪ Project provided supports to ▪ Based on annual village
(community meeting hall, bridge, local initiatives such as one development plans
community road, culverts…) water pump machine, one
community hall and one
community latrine
1.2.10 Provide training in gender to ▪ Materials, budget, Pcs, field staff ▪ Two training courses on Gender ▪ Achieved as planned
VDCs, VLs, CCs & CPVs and Domestic Violence were
provided to 69 peoples (38
women) in Sroeung commune
1.2.11 Assist 2 commune councils to ▪ PO/PC/CDW ▪ Not done ▪ The commune development
develop commune development plan was already developed
plans by commune councils in June
2008
1.2.12 Support budget and materials for ▪ PC/CDW, budget, materials ▪ Not done ▪ Refer to 1.2.11
CCs to implement commune
development plans

110
Output 1.3:
Vulnerable families better able to plan ▪ 130 VP families trained to understand ▪ 146 community peoples (105 ▪ Over expectation
and manage household resources, on Com dev Concept women) including absolute poor
leading to improvement in overall living families attended the orientation
conditions training on CD concept
▪ 30 VP families in 12 villages are able ▪ 38 absolute poor families were ▪ Over expectation
to develop their household plans and developed household plan
implemented

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks

1.3.1 Orientation meeting on CD ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, staff ▪ See 1.2.6 ▪


concept to vulnerable and
communities

1.3.2 Coordinate with VDC to select ▪ Materials, staff ▪ With coordination of VDC and ▪ 50% achieved of project plan
65 families for training in house- field staff, 35 families were as another 50% was selected
planning and family assessment selected from 12 target villages last fiscal year
to attend the training on
household planning and family
assessment

1.3.3 Provide 2 training courses on ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, staff ▪ The training course on family ▪ Over expectation
family assessment & household assessment and household
planning to 42 vulnerable families and household planning were
conducted to 72 absolute poor
families
1.3.4 Cooperate with VDCs to assist ▪ PC, staff, budget ▪ With coordination of VDC and ▪ Achieved as planned
36 VP families to develop their field staff, 38 absolute poor
household planning families were supported on
household development
planning

111
1.3.5 Support and monitor 30 VP ▪ PO/Pc/CDW, materials, budget, ▪ Project staff provided regular ▪ Most absolute poor families
families to implement household supports and monitor to 38 interested in improving their
plan absolute poor family to families living status and
implement their household actively involved with project
development plans, included 8 activity
families plan of chicken and
duck raising, 12 of micro-
business and 19 of home
gardening
1.3.6 Support and encourage 12 ▪ PO/PC/CDW, budget ▪ Refer to 1.3.5 ▪ Refer to 1.3.5
vulnerable families to implement
household plan

Output 1.4:
Improve literacy and numeracy ▪ 11 trained literacy teacher (30% ▪ Eight literacy teachers were ▪ Not achieved as planed due to
among 9 target communities women) are able to facilitate literacy success complete the training 3 literacy teacher candidates
class on pedagogy of Non-Formal abandoned the class
Education
▪ 100 literacy students (50% women) ▪ 124 literacy students (94 ▪ Over expectation
are able to read, write and calculate women) enrolled in six classes
are able to read, write and
numeracy
▪ 6 literacy classes consist of 120 ▪ Six literacy classes with 124 ▪ Women are more interesting
students(50%women) functioned well students (76% women) are in literacy class than men
well functioned
▪ 200 people(120 students) participated ▪ 450 community peoples and ▪ Over expectation
in International Day of Literacy 183 students participated in
International Day of Literacy
▪ 12 community mobile libraries ▪ Planned in next semester ▪ Planned in next semester
established and functioned,
benefited to 240 readers

112
Variances/Remarks
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities
1.4.1 Coordinate with VDC and literacy ▪ CDW, materials ▪ Support the graduated literacy ▪ Achieved as planned
teachers to identify and register teacher to coordinate with VDC
literacy students for 6 classes to select 124 students (94
women) to attend the NFE in six
classes
1.4.2 Coordinate with District NFE ▪ Pc/CDW, budget ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
officer to monitor 6 classes
1.4.3 Provide school materials for ▪ CDW, Pc, budget, materials ▪ Provide school materials to ▪ Achieved as planned
running 6 literacy classes consist 124 NFE students (94 women)
of 120 students (50%women) in 6 classes
1.4.4 Support stipend to 6 literacy ▪ CDW, Pc, budget ▪ Provide monthly stipend to 6 ▪ Achieved as planned
teachers to process 6 literacy literacy
y teachers from Julyy 08
classes on a monthly basis.

1.4.5 Cooperate with PDoE to provide ▪ CDW, Pc, budget, materials ▪ Not done ▪ Due to the NFE classes will
incentive to 30 literacy students be graduated in next semester
who have high score from 1 to 5
(6 literacy classes and 3 times/
class)
1.4.6 Cooperate with District ▪ CDW, Pc/PO, budget, materials ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
Education Office conduct
meeting with literacy
teachers (2 times/year)
1.4.7 Cooperate with District ▪ CDW, Pc/PO, budget, materials ▪ Cooperated with District ▪ Over expectation
Education Office to organize Department of Education to
International Literacy Day with organize an International
200 participants (120students) Literacy Day with participated
of 450 villager (321 women)
and 183 school children (106
girls) from 8 target villages of
Sroeung commune

113
1.4.8 Enhance 12 mobile libraries ▪ CDW, Pc/PO, budget, materials ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
and provide education books to
those libraries for 240 readers

1.4.9 Support District Education ▪ Pc, budget ▪ Support the district education ▪ Based on the invitation from
officer to attend monthly meeting officer to attend the monthly Phnom Penh department
on NFE in Phnom Penh coordination meeting on NFE at
Phnom Penh 4 times

Theme 2: Meeting Basic Need and Building Self-reliant, Sustainable Livelihoods


OBJECTIVE
Improve access to basic social services and amenities and improve overall food security of vulnerable people

Output 2.1
Improve overall community health ▪ 26 TBAs trained in education & coun
coun- ▪ 23 TBAs were trained on Pre ▪ There are only 23 TBAs in 12
status and individual health selling on pre & post natal care to the Pre and Post Natal Care and target villages
condition communities Counseling

▪ 390 people from 13 villages received ▪ 144 community peoples (130 ▪ Due to HC staff not available
awareness on birth spacing, mother women) in three target villages this period, we will move some
and child health care attended awareness raising on activity to next semester
Birth Spacing

▪ 26 VHVs trained in education on prim- ▪ 20 VHVs (9 women) from 12 ▪ Achieved as planned


ry health care, avian, influenza, deng- target villages were trained on
ue fever and HIV/ AIDS to the Dengue Fever, Malaria, Primary
communities Health Care, Diarrhea and
pneumonia.

▪ 520 people from 13 villages received ▪ Not done ▪ As the HIV/AIDS & STD training
awareness of HIV/ AIDS and sexual is still not provided to VHVs yet,
transmitted diseases prevention the awareness raising will
move to next semester

114
▪ 520 people form 13 villages received ▪ Not done ▪ As the topic on dengue fever,
awareness of dengue fever, malaria malaria prevention and primary
prevention Health care is just provided,
the awareness raising will
move to next semester
▪ 520 people from 13 villages received ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
awareness of avian influenza
prevention
▪ 200 people in Ti Po commune ▪ 197 peoples (138 women) in ▪ Participants were interesting
participated in International World Ti Pou commune attended in HIV/AIDS awareness and
AIDS Day International World AIDS Day understood how to prevent
themselves from the disease
Variances/Remarks
Activities CWS's Inputs
p Actual Activities

2.1.1 Cooperate with HC staff to ▪ Program Officer for Health, budget, ▪ In cooperation with OD and HC ▪ There are only 21 TBAs in 12
provide refresher course to 26 materials staff, the program staff provided target villages
TBAs a training course to 21 TBAs on
pre and post natal care and
counseling on 22-24 Sept 08.
2.1.2 Support trained TBAs from 12 ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Support TBAs in 3 target ▪ Due to time constrain and
villages to provide awareness on villages to organize and provide HC staff not available in this
birth spacing, mother and child awareness raising on birth period, some activities will
health to 390 people spacing to 144 community move to next semester
(30 people/ village) peoples (130 women)
2.1.3 Cooperate with HC staff to ▪ Program Officer for Health, CDW ▪ In cooperation with OD and HC ▪ 4 VHVs go outside village
provide refresher training to 26 materials, budget staff, the program staff provide for their earning income
VHVs on HIV/AIDS, dengue fever a training on dengue fever,
malaria and primary health care malaria, primary health care
diarrhea and pneumonia to
22 VHVs (9 women) from 12
target villages on 18-19 Nov 08

115
2.1.4 Support VHVs in providing ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Not done ▪ As the training on HIV/AIDS &
awareness on HIV/AIDS & STD STD did not provide to VHVs
to 520 people from 12 villages yet, So the project plan to
implement nest semester
2.1.5 Support VHVs in providing ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Support VHVs to provide ▪ Based on capacity of VHVs in
awareness on primary health awareness raising on primary some target villages, the project
care to 520 people from12 health care to 172 community plan to collaborate with HC staff
villages peoples (147 women in and VHVs on this awareness
Sroeung commune in next semester
2.1.6 Support VHVs in educating mala- ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Not done ▪ The project plan to collaborate
ria and dengue fever prevention with HC and VHVs on this
to 520 people in 12 villages topic next semester
2.1.7 Support VHVs to educate on ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
avian -influenza
influenza prevention to
520 people in 12 villages
2.1.8 Cooperate with HC/OD to organ- ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Organized an International ▪
ize International World AIDS Day World AIDS day with 197
with participation from 200 participants (138 women) from
people from 4 villages target villages of Ti Pou
commune

2.1.9 Cooperate with HC/OD to organ- ▪ Pc, CDW, budget, materials ▪ Not done ▪ HCs were busy with their
ize 3 times meeting for VHVs original plan. So the activity
will move to next semester
2.1.10 Cooperate with HC/OD organize ▪ Pc, CDW, budget, materials ▪ Not done ▪ Refer to 2.1.9
quarterly meeting for TBAs
Output 2.2
Improve knowledge and practice of ▪ Support to VHVs in providing aware- ▪ 435 peoples (406 women) were ▪ Women were much interesting
target communities on food nutrition, ness raising to 520 families educated on food nutrition and in MCH project as it could help
and health status of malnourished SMCH improve health status of their
children five years and under family member

116
▪ 60 malnourished children under 5 ▪ 331 infants (157 girls), 324 ▪ The children above 24 months
years old from 6 villages received mothers, 72 pregnant women, under 60 months will support
food supplement 105 lactating mother and 25 next semester
VHVs received nutrition foods
Variances/Remarks
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities

2.2.1 Provide refresher training in ▪ Program Officer for Health, CDW, ▪ Cooperate with OD and HC ▪ 4 VHVs are busy on their
nutrition to 26 VHV budget staff to organize a training rice plating and the other 2
on food nutrition and SMCH to go outside village for earning
20 VHVs (9 women) from 12 income
12 target villages

2.2.2 Support VHVs to provide ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Support VHVs to provide ▪ Women were much interesting
education on nutrition to 520 education on nutrition to 435 in SMCH project as it could help
f ili in
families i 12 villages
ill peoples
l (406 women)) in i 12 to improve health status of their
target villages of two commune children
2.2.3 Cooperate with VHVs to provide ▪ CDW, budget, seed ▪ Cooperate with VHVs to provide ▪ Number of supports based on
seeds to parents of 60 children vegetable seed to 37 families malnourished children.
under 5 years to improve nutrient who have children under 5 ys
food
2.2.4 Coordinate with VHVs to provide ▪ PO, CDW, budget ▪ Under FWP support 331infants ▪ The children above 24 months
nutrient food to improve health (157 girls) from 6-4 months,324 under 60 months will support
of 60 children under 5 years mothers, 72 pregnant women, next semester
in 13 villages 105 lactating mother and 25
VHVs benefited from SMCH
project a total of 14.2 T of white
rice, 0.948 T of oil, 17.550 T of
CSB and 2.193 T of sugar
2.2.5 Cooperate with VHVs to provide ▪ CDW, budget ▪ Planned in next semester ▪ It will continue to support
ingredients of nutrition food for children above 24 months to
mother of malnourished children 60 months
under 5 years

117
Output 2.3
Improve access to safe water and ▪ 100 families from 12 villages benefit ▪ 3 open wells benefited to 21 ▪ 17 open wells benefiting 88
household sanitation and reduce from 20 new open well constructions families in two target villages families will be constructed in
incidence of water-borne diseases of Sroeung commune next semester
in target communities
▪ 120 families benefit from 20 upgraded ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
wells

▪ 30 families benefit from 30 bio-sand ▪ 64 absolute poor families were ▪ Final decision to put ceramic
filters construction selected in 7 target villages of water filters was made with all
Sroeung and Ti Pou commune staff participation based on
actual need of communities
▪ 28 ceramic water filter was and target area
p p
provided to 28 absolute poor
families
▪ 270 families from 12 villages educated ▪ 240 peoples (130 women) in ▪ Achieved as planned
on water and sanitation Sroeung commune attended
water and sanitation awareness
raising
▪ 20 families from 12 villages benefit ▪ 12 household latrines in eight ▪ Other eight household latrines
from 20 latrine construction target villages of Sroeung and will be constructed in next
Ti Pou commune were semester
constructed

▪ 800 school children and teachers ▪ Not done ▪ Most target schools had water
from 7 schools benefit from 15 bio- filters supported by project and
sand filters construction UNICEF in last FY08

▪ 800 school children and teachers ▪ 240 primary school students ▪ Other 560 primary school
from 7 schools educated on water (130 girls) were educated on students will be targeted in next
and sanitation water and sanitation by HC semester
and project staff

118
▪ 200 people were aware of clean water ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
using through World Water Day's
participation
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks

2.3.1 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW, budget ▪ Cooperate with VDCs and VLs ▪ Achieved as planned
families who will benefit from 20 to select 109 families in 12
new open wells target villages of Sroeung and
Ti Pou communes to benefit
from 20 open wells
2.3.2 Cooperate with VDCs to support ▪ CDW, Pc, materials, ring molds ▪ Support the VDCs, VLs, and ▪ 17 open wells were planned in
the communities in constructing beneficiaries to construct 3 next semester
20 open wells for 120 families in open wells benefited 21 families
13 villages in two target village of Sroeung
Commune
2.3.3 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW, materials ▪ Cooperate with VDCs and VLs ▪ Achieved as planned
120 families to benefit from 20 to select 125 families in 12
upgraded wells target villages of two commune
to benefit from 20 upgraded
2.3.4 Support materials to 240 families ▪ CDW, Pc, materials, budget ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
to upgrade 40 wells
2.3.5 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ The original plan is Bio-sand
vulnerable families who benefit 64 absolute poor families in 7 water filter but the communities
from 30 biosand water filters target villages of Sroeung and interest on ceramic as they
Ti Pou communes for ceramic see in some areas used.
water filters
2.3.6 Cooperate with VDCs to provide ▪ CDW, materials, Pc ▪ Support VDCs, VLs, and VHVs ▪ Achieved as planned
education on water sanitation and to provide awareness on water
bio-sand filter maintenance to and sanitation, and water filter
30 VP families maintenance to 64 absolute
poor families

119
2.3.7 Support 30 families to construct ▪ CDW, materials, molds, PO ▪ Provided 28 ceramic water filter ▪ Refer to 2.3.5
bio-sand filter to 28 absolute poor families
2.3.8 Support & cooperate with VHVs ▪ CDW, materials, PO ▪ Support VHVs to provide ▪ Achieved as planned
to educate clean water and awareness on clean water and
sanitation to 270 people in 13 and sanitation to 240 people
villages (130 women) in Sroeung
commune
2.3.9 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW, materials, ring molds, Pc, PO ▪ Support VDCs, VLs to select ▪ Other eight families will be
20 families from 13 villages to 12 families in eight target selected in next semester
construct latrines villages of Sroeung and Ti Pou
commune for household latrine
construction
2.3.10 Support 20 families to construct ▪ CDW, materials, molds, Pc, PO ▪ VDCs, VLs, and beneficiaries ▪ Refer to 2.3.9
20 household latrines worked together to construct 12
household latrines in eight target
villages of Sroeung and Ti Pou
commune

2.3.11 Cooperate with District Education ▪ CDW, materials, Pc, PO ▪ Not done ▪ Most target schools had water
to identify number of school to filters supported by project and
receive bio-sand filters UNICEF in last FY08

2.3.12 Support teachers to construct 15 ▪ CDW, materials, molds, Pc, PO ▪ Not done ▪ Refer to 2.3.11
bio-sand filters for 7 schools with
800 teachers and students

2.3.13 Cooperate with HC to educate on C▪ CDW, materials, Pc, PO ▪ Collaborate and support HC ▪ Other 560 primary school
clean water and sanitation to 800 staff to provide awareness on children will be targeted in next
teachers and students clean water and sanitation to semester
240 primary school children
(130 girls)

120
Output 2.4
Children of vulnerable families have ▪ 65 children (60% girls) from VP ▪ 65 primary school children (32 ▪ Achieved as planned
the necessary materials to attend families are encouraged to attend girls) of absolute poor families
primary schools school by providing necessary school were selected from 12 target
materials villages for scholarship
▪ 80% of 65 supported children ▪ 58 primary school children who ▪ The result of 65 primary school
(60% girls) passed grade were supported education students supported in this
materials in previous semester semester will be disclosed at
passed the grade the end of this semester
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks
2.4.1 Cooperate with VDC to select ▪ CDW, Pc, PO ▪ Support VDCs to select 65 ▪ Achieved as planned
65 children (60% girls) from VP primary school children (girls)
families for scholarship of absolute poor families in 12
target village for scholarship

2.4.2 Support school materials to 65 ▪ CDW, budget, school materials ▪ Support school materials to 65 ▪ The project supported school
children (60% girls) to go to primary school children of education materials only one
school absolute poor families time a year

2.4.3 Cooperate with teachers, VDC ▪ CDW ▪ Project staff, VDCs and school ▪ Project staff cooperated with
to motivate children's parents to teachers regularly motivated VDCs and VLs to follow up
encourage their children to attend parents to encourage their and motivate children's parents
school children to attend school
2.4.4 Cooperate with teachers to ▪ CDW ▪ Project staff coordinated with ▪ 58 primary school children who
monitor study situation of 65 teachers to follow up children were supported education
supported children score in every quarter materials in previous semester
passed the grade.
Output 2.5
Improve agricultural productions, food ▪ At least 65% of 40 fowl alternate / ▪ 34 absolute poor families (27 ▪ Number of innovative farmers
security and household income among livestock trained families improved women) trained on chicken and will be increased as they were
vulnerable people, self-help/ interest their livestock raising technique and duck raising improved technique much interesting in the
groups in target communities increased number of livestock and increased number of livestock techniques

121
▪ At least 60% of 25 fish raising trained ▪ Not done ▪ The communities interest on
families start to raise fish livestock than fish raising
as the water resource is not
available in the dry season
▪ At least 60% of 16 SRI trained ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
farmers practiced SRI techniques in
their rice plots
▪ At least 70% of 56 home gardening ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
trained families have home garden in
their plots
▪ 12 farmers practice IFM with supported ▪ 12 trained farmers practice ▪ Achieved as planned
techniques/ materials/ seeds from pig raising with vegetable
CWSC production
▪ 10 families benefit from 10 family
y ▪ Not done ▪ Refer to the familyy pond is
ponds purpose on fish raising
▪ 360 families oriented on SHG concept ▪ 471 community people (370 ▪ Over expectation
and its advantage women) were introduced the
SHG concept
▪ 10 SHG with 250 members organized ▪ 12 SHGs consist of 195 ▪ The members of SHG is
and function members (151 women) formed less than plan as estimated
and needed materials supported plan is 25 member per group
▪ 42 trained of 14 SHG committees ▪ 22 SHG committees trained on ▪ Another training course will be
have capacity in bookkeeping and SHG concept and book keeping conducted in next semester
and operate the group process

▪ 10 SHG used CWS' WCA to run ▪ Planned in next semester ▪


business for increasing their family
income

▪ 18 trained farmers increased rice ▪ 18 farmers selected for ▪ The training will be done in next
yield by using compost/ natural compost fertilizer training semester as the farmers
fertilizers for soil improvement selected in Dec 08.

122
▪ 15 trained farmers increased family's ▪ 18 farmers selected for ▪ The training will be done in next
income from mushroom growing mushroom growing training semester as the farmers
selected in Dec 08.
▪ 3 community tree nurseries created ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
and have fruit trees for vulnerable
people
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks
2.5.1 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ All absolute poor families
40 vulnerable families for animal 40 absolute poor families (32 interested in chicken and duck
raising training courses (20 for women) from target villages raising than pig raising as they
pig training & 20 for chicken) for chicken and duck raising did not have enough food for pig

2.5.2 Provide 2 training courses on ▪ Budget, Program Coordinator for ▪ Provide training on duck raising ▪ All absolute poor families used
f l alternative
fowl lt ti and d livestock
li t k Credit
C dit andd Income
I generation,
ti CDW to 20 absolute poor families the learnt knowledge to apply
raising to 40 families (pig 1 Project Coordinator (18 women) from 2 villages, at their home bases.
course & poultry 1 course) Ti Pou commune
▪ Cooperate with PDoA to provide ▪ Participants interest to the new
training on chicken raising to technique and willing to apply
14 absolute poor families
(9 women) from 8 villages,
Sroeung commune
2.5.3 Provide fowl alternative, fingerling ▪ Budget ▪ Provide hen breed, which is ▪ The other trained families
to 26 trained families 3 hens and one cock per each will provide hen breed after they
(3 kg of hens/ fam) family, to 7 absolute poor finish chicken and
families, duck house in next semester

▪ Provide duckling, which is 15


duckling per each family, to 20
absolute poor trained families.

123
2.5.4 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Not done ▪ The community people is more
25 families for fish raising interested in livestock raising
training courses than fish raising as the water
resource is not available in dry
season

2.5.5 Provide 2 fish raising training ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Not done ▪ Refer to 2.5.4
courses to 25 families
▪ Provide 15 fishing net to 15
absolute poor families from
Thmei village, Ti Pou commune in
purpose of earning income

2.5.6 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
16 families for SRI training
g
2.5.7 Provide training on SRI to 16 ▪ Program Coordinator for Credit ▪ Coordinate with PDoA to ▪ More families interested on
selected farmers and Income Generation provide SRI training to 20 this training course
participants (17 women) from.
Thnot Chuo village, Sreung
commune

2.5.8 Support 16 families to practice ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
SRI in their rice fields

2.5.9 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Planned in next semester ▪


56 families for home gardening
training

2.5.10 Provide 2 training on home ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
gardening to 56 families

2.5.11 Provide vegetable seed and ▪ Budget ▪ Planned in next semester ▪


materials to 40 trained families

124
2.5.12 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Cooperated with VDCs to select ▪ As planned
6 demo famers 6 demo farmers
2.5.13 Provide IFM training to 12 model ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Cooperate with PDoA staff to ▪ Achieved as planned
famers (6 in FY08) provide training on IFM to 12
demo farmers
2.5.14 Provide seed and materials to 12 Seed, fingerlings and other materials ▪ During IFM training, project ▪ Achieved as planned
demo farmers provided 12 water baskets and
vegetable seed to 12 demo
farmers
▪ Provide 360 kg of rice seed ▪ Based on needed from
(IR 66) to 35 families for dry communities whom their rice
rice season cultivation field affected by drought
2.5.15 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Not done ▪ It will be done in the next
families to benefit from 10 family semester
ponds
2.5.16 Support FFW to 10 families to ▪ CDW, rice food for work, Pc ▪ Not done ▪ Refer to 2.5.15
dig 10 family ponds
2.5.17 Organize orientation meeting on ▪ Budget, CDW, Program Coordinator ▪ Program staff coaching field ▪ Over expectation
SHG concept to 360 families in for credit and income generation staff to introduce SHG concepts
13 villages to 471 community peoples (370
women) in all target villages

▪ Form 12 SHG consist of 195 ▪ The number of members are


members (151 women) in 6 less than planned
target villages of two commune.

2.5.18 Support to form 10 SHGs and ▪ CDW ▪ Project provided needed ▪


and materials supply materials for 12 SHGs in six
target villages

125
2.5.19 Provide 2 training courses on ▪ CDW, Program Coordinator for ▪ Provide a three day training on ▪ Another training course will be
book keeping to 14 SHG with 42 credit and income generation SHG concept and book keeping conducted in next semester
committee members to 22 SHG committees in at Ti Pou commune
Sroeung commune
commune
2.5.20 Provide WCA to 10 SHGs after ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator, WCA ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
evaluation
2.5.21 Cooperate with VDC to select 20 ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Cooperate with VDCs and VLs ▪ Over expectation
VP families for small business to select 22 absolute poor
families in 8 target villages for
income generation activities
2.5.22 Grant support to 20 VP families ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator, budget ▪ Project provided grant for small ▪ Refer to 2.5.21
for small business business and eight with chicken
and duck to 14 absolute poor
families
2.5.23 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ Achieved as planned
18 families for compost making 18 families in four target villages
training for compost fertilizer making
training
2.5.24 Provide training on compost ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Not done ▪ The selection was done at the
making to 18 families end of December 2008. So the
training will be done next
semester
2.5.25 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ Achieved as planned
15 families for mushroom 15 families in 7 target villages
training for mushroom growing training

2.5.26 Provide training on mushroom ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Not done ▪ As explained in 2.5.24
growing training to 15 families

126
2.5.27 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
18 families for fruit tree nursery
and tree planting training

2.5.28 Provide training on tree nursery ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
and tree planting to 18 families

2.5.29 Provide materials and seeds for ▪ Budget ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
3 community tree nurseries
Theme 3: Strengthening Civil Society
OBJECTIVE
Strengthen target community understanding and practice of peace building and restorative justice
Output 3.1
Communityy keyy persons
p (CCs,
( , VDCs,, ▪ 52 CPV,, VL and VDCs trained in ▪ 32 CPVs,, VDCs,, and,, VLs ▪ Another course will conduct
VLs, elderly, monk) play an active Peace Concepts were trained on peace concept next semester
role in peace building, responding to
conflict, and utilizing LCP approaches
in their communities ▪ 38 CPV, VL, trained in Local Capacity ▪ Not done, ▪ The project move this training
for Peace to next quarter as requested
by program staff

▪ 27 CCs and VLs trained on Local ▪ Planned in next semester ▪ Planned in next semester
Capacity for Peace
▪ 27 CCs and VLs trained on ▪ Not done ▪ As the course need to provide
Anticorruption (Anti-corruption) to project staff before CCs and
VLs, so it will move to next
quarter.

▪ 4 key people in target villages ▪ 2 CPVs (1 woman) from ▪ Other two is from Partnership
involve in damayeatra and other two target villages of Ti Pou program
peace activities commune joined International
Youth Conference on Peace at
Sieam Reap Province

127
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks
3.1.1 Conduct 2 training courses on ▪ Budget, materials, Program ▪ Coordinate with Program staff ▪ Achieved as planned
Peace Concept to key people Coordinator for Peace, CDW to conduct two trainings on
(1 course for CPV, 1 course peace concept to 32 CPVs,
for VDC, VL) VDCs and VLs
3.1.2 Provide 2 training courses on ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace, ▪ Not done ▪ The project agreed to move
Local Capacity for Peace to 38 Pcs, field staff this activity to next semester
VDCs, CPVs (1 course for as requested by program staff
CPV and 1 course for VDC, )
3.1.3 Provide training on Local ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace, ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
Capacity for Peace to 27 CC,VL
3.1.4 Provide 3 days training on ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace, ▪ Not done ▪ As the course need to provide
Accountability to 27 CC
CC,VL
VL to project staff before CCs and
VLs, so it will move to next
quarter.
3.1.5 Support Peace books to schools ▪ Budget, materials, PC, field staff ▪ Supported peace and dhamma ▪ The project planned to support
and prayer group book and Buddha fold painting to peace book to three target
prayer group in Thmei village schools in next semester
with 20 members (15 women)
3.1.6 Coordinate with PDoW to ▪ Budget, materials, PC, field staff ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
provide training courses on
Domestic Violence to 52 VDCs ▪ Conduct white ribbon campaign
and key people with 189 people participated
(107 women) in Sroeung
commune
3.1.7 Support 4 people to join Peace ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace ▪ Support two CPVs (one woman) ▪ Other two CPVs were from
relate in PNP ( damayeatra, from two target village of Ti Pou Partnership program
white ribbon day…) commune to join International
Youth Conference on Peace
at Sieam reap province

128
3.1.8 Form 2 prayer groups and ▪ Budget, materials, PC for Peace, ▪ Project staff facilitated and ▪ The project planned to organize
supporting materials provided materials to organize another group in next semester
one prayer group in Thmei
, village, Ti Pou commune with
20 members (15 women)
Theme 4: Emergency Response and Preparedness
OBJECTIVE
To ensure meeting basic need of the most vulnerable people and victims of the emergency in the province by prioritizing the target communities
and to enhance community capacity to prepare for and respond to disaster in their communities.

Output 4.1
Village Disaster Volunteers function ▪ 24 RCV trained in CBDRR and ▪ 17 RCVs (nine women) trained ▪ Seven RCVs were absent as
actively, commune and village disaster planning & are able to conduct HVCA on CBDRR they went outside the villages
preparedness plans developed and for income generation activities
implemented in target communities
▪ 4 CC, 13 VL trained in CBDRR ▪ Not done ▪ The CCDMs were not formed
yet. Program and project staff
planed to discuss with PCDM
in next semester

▪ 12 villages have disaster ▪ 22 disaster preparedness plans ▪ Disaster preparedness plans


preparedness plans integrated in were raised in VDPs is not conducted yet but the
Village Development Plan plan derived from VDPs based
on community experiences
on disaster
▪ CCDM quarterly meetings conducted ▪ Not done ▪ Refer to the above explain on
regularly CCDM formation

▪ 240 interested ( VDC:5 , VL:1 , literacy ▪ Planned in next semester ▪


teacher: 1 VHV:2 and other interested
people: 11 ) got echo training on
HVCA by RCV

129
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks
4.1.1 Provide training on CBDRR and ▪ Budget, materials, CDW, ERP Pro. ▪ Provide a 3-day training on ▪ 7 RCVs were absent as
Planning to 24 RCV CBDRR and HVCA to 17 RCVs they went outside the villages
(9 women) from target villages for income generation activities
of two communes
4.1.2 Provide training on HVCA to ▪ Budget, materials, CDW, Pc ▪ See 4.1.1 ▪ Refer to the above explanation
24 RCVs
4.1.3 Support 24 RCV in conducting ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW ▪ Not done ▪ Prioritize to the training for field
HVCA in their respective villages staff on Community Led Total
in association with VLs and VDCs Sanitation as this the urgent
need of staff capacity building
4.1.4 Provide training on CBDRR and ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW ▪ Not done ▪ The CCDMs were not formed
Planning to CCDM and VLs ERP Prog. yet. Program and project staff
planed to discuss with PCDM
in next semester

4.1.5 Assist RCV to develop ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW ▪ Not done with RCV but 22 ▪ The plan derived from VDPs
disaster preparedness plan of disaster preparedness plan based on community
and implement were raised in Village experiences on disaster
Development Plan
4.1.6 Organize quarterly full member ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW ▪ Not done ▪ Refer to 4.1.4
meeting of CCDM

4.1.7 Support RCV to provide echo ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
training on Disaster
Preparedness to 108 ( 9 ps per
village) interested people

4.1.10 Provide training on Sphere ▪ Budget, materials, ERP Program ▪ Planned in next semester ▪
and Accountability to 9 staff

130
Output 4.2
Improve capacity of RCV to provide ▪ 24 RCVs are equipped first Aid kit ▪ 24 RCVs from 12 target villages ▪ Achieved as planned
first aid services to emergency of two communes were equipped
with 24 first aid kids
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks
4.2.1 Support first aid kids to 24 RCVs ▪ Budget, materials, ERP Program ▪ Cooperate with CRC to provide ▪ Achieved as planned
24 first aid kids to 24 RCVs in
12 target villages
Output 4.3
Respond to basic needs of vulnerable ▪ 50 families received emergency kits ▪ 9 absolute poor families ▪ Based on needed
people and disaster victims of when there is emergency stike their supported emergency kids
emergency in a timely manner and lives and well being
ensure their life with dignity and well ▪ 3 absolute poor families cash
amount of 280,000 riels for
medical treatment at hospital
▪ 360 kg of rice seed (IR 66) for ▪ Based on needed
dry season cultivation were
provided to 35 families
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks

4.3.1 Coordinate with VDCs, VL, RCV ▪ Budget, materials, ERP Program ▪ Not done as no victim affected ▪
to conduct assessment and
select victim families of Emergency
4.3.2 Distribute the emergency respo- ▪ Budget, materials, ERP Program ▪ Support food commodity to 9 ▪ Based on annual VDPs and
nse kit to victims of disaster or absolute poor families in 4 actuality
most vulnerable people target villages of Sroeung
commune and one village of
of Ti Pou commune which
included 480 kg of white rice,
18 bottles of soy sauce, 8
bottles of fish sauce, and 12
packs of salt

131
▪ Provide cash amount 280,000 R
to 3 absolute poor families for
medical treatment at hospital
Theme 5: Project Development, Management and Supervision
OBJECTIVE
Effective and efficient program management and functioning; enhance community development planning and practice
Output 5.1a
Field staff and field operation ▪ Monthly project monitoring on: ▪ 8 time monitors on VDC ▪ Coaching given on the job
appropriately monitored and 12 project management quarterly meeting, education on training to all CDWs and PCs
supported 12 project implementation activities SMCH, proposal writing training, on staff performance and
6 staff performance base line survey assessment, project implementation
SHG training, VDC planning,
VDC workshop. And 14 times
for sport
p checks of CDW's
\activities at target villages
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Remarks

5.1.1a Field visit of Project Manager to ▪ Pm ▪ Project manager monitored ▪ Coaching given on the job
to monitor Pc & CDW at the VDC quarterly meeting, SMCH, training to all project field staff
field level proposal writing training, base- for improve daily projects
line survey assessment, SHG, implementation.
VDC integrated planning, VDC
workshop, and sport checks of
CDW's activities for 14 times

5.1.2a Monthly meeting to reflect the • Pc, CDW • Six monthly meetings with all • Coaching and advice were
work implementation and see project staffs to discuss and given to project staff on
the strength and weaknesses & feedback the implementation of monthly report, work plan,
develop plan for next month VBCD project and planning for achievement, and project
next month activities management

132
Church World Service Cambodia
Log-frame Report: Mid Year FY09
Project Name: The Preah Vihear Village Based Community Development Project

Narrative Summary Objectively Verifiable Indicators Actual Output Variances/ Explanation


Overall Objective:
To enhance the communities' capacity to define their development direction and access to their basic needs, basic social services, sustainable
livelihood opportunities and food security.

Theme 1: Capacity Building for Development Planning


OBJECTIVE
Enhance community's capacity and engage with government institutions and CBOs to define their development direction and manage their affairs
in a participatory and democratic manner
manner.

Output 1.1:
Enhance program coordination with ▪ At least 2 coordination meetings with ▪ a district strategic plan meet- ▪
Provincial Department (PDRD, PDoA, PDRD, PDoH, , PDoWA attended ing organized by Provincial
PDoEYS, PDoH and PDoWA), district office was attended
authorities and CCs ▪ 2 coordination meetings with district ▪ 2 meetings with district gover- ▪ There are several informal
authorities and 3 coordination nor to update the progress meetings between staff and
meetings with commune councils and security and another district authorities have
are conducted meeting with Education Office been conducted instead.

▪ Regular meetings were


conducted between staff and
4 target commune councils

▪ One coordination meetings with ▪ 1 meeting with was conducted


PLAU/POLA are conducted to discuss about strengthening
capacity of CCs and CBOs

133
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
1.1.1 Attend coordination meetings ▪ Budget, Pcs, POs ▪ PO attended 1day meeting, ▪ The meeting was participated
with PDRD, PDoEY PDoA, organized by provincial by NGOs, 6 CCs and all
PDoH and PDoWA governor on district 10-year district offices working in
strategic planning. participated Choam Ksant district.

1.1.2 Organize 2 times meeting with ▪ Budget, Pcs, POs ▪ Staff met district governor ▪ Several discussions and
district authorities & concerning two times officially discussed meetings were also made
district department offices about success and challenges informally
of the project and security
update

▪ Staff met District Education


to discus about book
distribution to high school and
secondary school students
▪ PO and Pc attended District
Integration workshop

1.1.3 Organize 3 times meeting with ▪ Budget, Pcs, POs, Field staff ▪ Staff met commune councils ▪ Communication between
CC of 4 communes in 4 communes on a regular CWS staff and CC in target
basis formally and informally areas are very good and
frequently

1.1.4 Meeting with PLAU for CC ▪ Budget, Pcs, POs ▪ PC and PO met vice-chief of ▪ PLAU support CWS plan
training in target areas PLAU regarding CWS's plan to provide training to CC
to provide training to commune
counselors

134
Output 1.2:
Strengthen leadership among local ▪ 80 VDCs, VLs & CCs attend 3 times of ▪ 20 VDC (10 women), 10 VLs ▪ In Yeang Commune, the
partners and community structure to meeting (1 woman) and 6 councilors meeting could not be
better understand and implement attended 1 quarterly meetings conducted due to raining
community development principles 3 communes that cut off road from the
and processes village to commune hall
and security issue
▪ 18 VDP developed by VDCs and VL ▪ 18 VDP developed by VCD
with support from CWS with back up support of staff
▪ 67 VP developed plan with
support from staff

▪ 88 participants (VDC
(VDC, VL
VL, CC
CC, District
District…)) ▪ Not done ▪ Due to Cambodian-Thai
attend annual planning workshop border tension

▪ 116 VDCs, VLs & CCs (40% women) ▪ 10 VDCs, VLs and CCs (3 ▪ Only 1 course was able to
trained in Leading and Managing women) trained on L&MRO in provide because of
Rural Organization one course Cambodian-Thai border
tension and harvesting

▪ 116 VDCs, VLs and CCs (40% women) ▪ Not done ▪ Due to Cambodian-Thai
trained in project management border tension and
harvesting
▪ 116 VDCs, VLs and CCs (40% women) ▪ Not done ▪ Due to Cambodian-Thai
trained in communication and border tension and
facilitation skills harvesting
▪ 300 vulnerable families are oriented ▪ 276 VP from 18 villages
on community development concept trained on CD concept (self
help concepts)

135
▪ 10 PVH staff trained in Leading and ▪ Not done ▪ Staff were so busy with
Managing Rural Organization other unanticipated training
course on CLTS.
▪ 10 PVH staff trained in PM & E ▪ Not done ▪ CWS called of PVH project
Due to Cambodian-Thai
border tension
▪ 10 PVH staff trained on communication ▪ Not done ▪ Staff already attend commu-
and facilitation skill nication and facilitation in
CHART training courses
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
1.2.1 Conduct 12 meeting ▪ Materials, budget, Pcs, Staff, PCs, ▪ Staff conducted quarterly ▪ Yeang Commune, the
with VDCs, VLs & CCs (3times/
( POs meetings
g with 3 communes eet g cou
meeting couldn't
d t co
conduct
duct
commune/ year) to discuss about success due to raining was cut off
and plan of each village road from village to
within commune commune hall
1.2.2 Assist VDCs & VLs in 18 villages ▪ Pcs, Staff, PCs, ▪ 276 people ( VLs, VDCs,
to develop Village Development POs literacy teachers and villagers)
Plans (VDP) from 18 villages participated in
developing village development
plan of their respective villages
under facilitation of VDC and
support from staff
1.2.3 Encourage VDCs in 18 villages ▪ Pcs, Staff, PCs, ▪ 362 villagers ( 191 women) in
to conduct meeting with villagers POs 10 villages participated in VDP
to discuss and approve VDP presentation and approved
18 VDP in their respective
villages under the facilitation of
VCDs with support of staff

136
1.2.4 Assist 4 commune councils to dev- ▪ PO/PC/CDW ▪ Not done ▪ Time constraints
elop commune development plans
1.2.5 Support budget & materials for CC ▪ PC/CDW, budget, materials ▪ Not done ▪ Time constraints
to implement commune
development plan
1.2.6 Organize annual VDC workshop ▪ Materials, budget, Pcs, Staff, PCs, ▪ Not done ▪ Plan in next semester
with VDCs, VLs, CCs and POs
relevant stakeholder
1.2.7 Provide training course on Leading ▪ Materials, budget, Pcs, Staff, PCs, ▪ PO conducted two days ▪ The remaining course will
& Managing Rural Organization to POs training on L&MRO to 1 CC, be conducted in next
VDCs, VLs and CCs (5courses) 8 VDC (3 women) and 1 VL semester

128
1.2.8 P
Provide
id training
t i i course on Project
P j t ▪ Materials,
M t i l budget,
b d t Pcs,
P Staff,
St ff PCs,
PC ▪ Not
N t done
d ▪ To
T be
b conducted
d t d in
i nextt
Management to VDCs, VLs, CCs POs semester
(5 courses)
1.2.9 Provide training course on ▪ Materials, budget, Pcs, Staff, PCs, ▪ Not done ▪ To be conducted in next
Communication & Facilitation skill POs semester; however, staff
to VDCs, VLs and CCs (5courses) always coach VDCs, VLs &
CCs about facilitation skill

1.2.10 Organize 18 village meetings to ▪ Budget, materials ▪ Staff provided 18 half-day


conduct orientation on CD concept orientations on CD concepts
to 300 vulnerable families to 276 VP from 18 villages.

1.2.11 Support local initiatives(community ▪ Materials, budget, Pcs, PCs, POs ▪ Not done ▪ Need was identified and
meeting hall, community road, construction will be made
culverts, bridge…) in next semester

137
Output 1.3:
Vulnerable families are able to plan and ▪ 54 VP families trained on household ▪ 90 VP were trained on families ▪ There are more VP than
manage household resources leading to planning and family assessment assessment and planning by expected and most of them
to improve overall living condition staff expressed their high interest
to participate in the process
▪ 36 VP families in 18 villages are able to ▪ 67 VP developed their house- ▪ Other 23 VP were in and out
develop their household and implement hold plan about home garden the village that make staff
their household plan and were supported by CWS difficult to follow up
▪ 108 VDCs, VLs and interested villagers ▪ Not done ▪ Due to Cambodian-Thai
trained on family assessment border tension and
harvesting

Activities CWS's
CWS s Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation

1.3.1 Coordinate with VDC to select 54 ▪ Materials ▪ 90 VP were sleeted in ▪ 5 VP were selected from
VP families coordination with VDC and VL each villages
through the process of
participatory wealth ranking.
1.3.2 Provide 3 training courses on ▪ Budget, materials ▪ Staff conducted training course ▪ expressed their high interest
family assessment & household on household assessment and to participate in the process
planning to 54 vulnerable families planning to 90 VP in their own
respective villages
1.3.3 Cooperate with VDCs to assist 54 ▪ PC, budget ▪ Staff supported 67 VP to ▪ The remained in 23 VP
VP families to develop household develop their respective committed to develop their
planning family plan. family plan in next semester
1.3.4 Support & monitor 36 VP families ▪ PO/PC/CDW, materials, budget ▪ CWS distributed various ▪ 70 of them planted seed
to implement household plan vegetable seeds to 67 VP who and able to harvest
have their household plan and vegetable
23 VP who were selected

138
1.3.5 Support & encourage 36 vulnerable ▪ PO/PC/CDW, budget ▪ Staff meet 90 VP on a regular
families to implement household basis and encourage them
plan to improve their living condition

1.3.6 Conduct workshop on family asse- ▪ PC/CDW, budget, materials ▪ Not done ▪ Due to Cambodian-Thai
ssment to 108 community people border tension and
(VDCs, VLs, villagers) harvesting
Output 1.4:
Improve literacy and numeracy ▪ 12 literacy trained teacher(30%women) ▪ 12 literacy teachers (1 women) ▪ 4 literacy teachers completed
among 9 target communities are able to facilitate literacy class trained and 8 (1 women) will only one module and this
manage the literacy classes make them not qualify enough
in next semester to facilitate the class.

▪ 100 literacy students (50% women) are ▪ Not done ▪ Staff could not access to
able to read, write and calculate number Yeang and people were
▪ 8 literacy classes consist of 160 ▪ Not done busy with harvesting
students (50% women) functioned

▪ 300 people (200 students) participated ▪ Not done ▪ Time constraints


in International Day of Literacy
▪ 18 mobile libraries are functioned and ▪ 18 mobile libraries were ▪
benefited to 540 readers setup in 18 villages and
540 reading books were
provided
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
1.4.1 Coordinate with District NFE officer ▪ Pc/CDW, budget ▪ Not done ▪ Classes did not start yet
to monitor 4 old literacy classes
and 8 new classes (12 classes)

139
1.4.2 Coordinate with VDC & literacy ▪ CDW, materials ▪ 56 illiterate people registered ▪ 3 class will begin
teachers to identify and register for 3 classes in February 2009
literacy students for 8 classes
1.4.3 Provide school materials for running ▪ CDW, Pc, budget, materials ▪ CWS provided materials to 3 ▪ Staff should not deliver
8 literacy classes consist of 160 literacy classes material to other classes
students (50% women) in Yeang

1.4.4 Support stipend to 12 literacy ▪ CDW, Pc, budget ▪ Not done ▪ See above point
teachers to process 12 literacy
classes on a monthly basis.

1.4.5 Cooperate with District Education ▪ CDW/Pc/PO, budget, materials ▪ Not done ▪ The classes are not running
Office conduct quarterly meeting yet
with literacy teachers (4times/year)

1.4.6 Cooperate with District Education ▪ CDW/Pc/PO, budget, materials ▪ Not done ▪ Time constraints
Office to organize International Day
of Literacy with 300 participants

1.4.7 Enhance 18 mobile libraries and ▪ CDW/Pc/PO, budget, materials ▪ 540 reading books cover ▪ In average about 10 people
provide education books to those topics such as home garden, read books per months
libraries for 540 readers malaria, dengue fever , drug
and HIV/Aids distributed to
18 libraries.
▪ 18 bookshelves made for 18
villages

1.4.8 Support District Education Officer ▪ CDW/Pc, budget ▪ Not done ▪ No literacy class run yet
to attend monthly meeting on NFE
in Phnom Penh

140
Theme 2: Meeting Basic Need and Building Self-reliant, Sustainable Livelihoods
OBJECTIVE
Improve access to basic social services and amenities and improve overall food security of vulnerable people.
Output 2.1
Improve overall community health ▪ 30 TBAs trained in education and coun- ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
status and individual health condition selling on pre & post natal care to the
communities
▪ 720 people from 18 villages were aware of ▪ Not done ▪ TBAs were not trained yet
birth spacing, mother & child health care
▪ 43 VHVs trained in education on primary ▪ 14 VHVs in 3 commune ▪ Postponed the training
health care, avian, influenza, dengue trained on primary health care, in Yeang due to security
fever and HIV/ AIDS to the communities dengue, malaria, diarrhea and problem at the border tension
pneumonia
▪ 810 people from 18 villages are aware of ▪ See World AIDS Day output
HIV/AIDS and sexual transmitted
diseases prevention
▪ 810 people from 18 villages are aware of ▪ 113 people from 3 villages ▪ More awareness raising
dengue fever, malaria and avian influenza of Yeang commune attended will be conducted in next
prevention 3 half-day awareness raising semester
events on malaria, dengue,
AI prevention

▪ 300 people aware of HIV/AIDS ▪ 270 people participated in


through World AIDS Day World Aids Day (183 students
(93 women) 55 villagers (28
women), 14 teachers (1
woman) and 18 government
officials)

141
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
2.1.1 Cooperate with HC staff to provide ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Not done ▪ Next semester
refresher course to 30 TBAs
2.1.2 Support trained TBAs from 18 ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Not done ▪ TBAs were not trained yet
villages to provide awareness on
birth spacing, mother & child
health care to 720 people (40p/vill)
2.1.3 Cooperate with HC staff to provide ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ Staff provided 2-day refresher ▪ 2.1.3, 2.1.4, 2.1.5 were not
refresher training to 43 VHVs on course to 14 VHV (8 women) done due to boarder tension
HIV/ AIDS, dengue fever, malaria on diarrhea, dengue fewer between Cambodia and
and primary health care and acute respiratory Thailand
2.1.4 pp VHVs to provide
Support p awareness ▪ CDW,, budget,
g , materials ▪ Not done
on HIV/AIDS & STD to 810 people
from 18 villages
2.1.5 Support VHVs to provide awareness ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ VHV conducted awareness
on primary health care, malaria, raising on primary health care
dengue fever and avian influenza to 370 pregnant women,
prevention to 810 people from and lactating mothers
18 villages
2.1.6 Cooperate with HC/OD to organize ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ CWS cooperated with district ▪ Due to time constraints
World AIDS Day with participation authority and OD organized only one commune was
of 300 people a World AIDS Day campaign able to get the campaign
to 270 people.
Output 2.2
Improve knowledge and practice of ▪ 1,100 families applied nutritious food ▪ 450 people (430 mothers) ▪ Postponed the training
target communities on nutrition, and for children and family members after participated awareness in Yeang due to security
health status of malnourished under awareness raising raising event on nutrition and problem at the border and
5 year children. how to feed children harvesting

142
▪ 14 VHVs (8 women) trained on
primary health care
▪ 26 VHVs (15 women) refreshed
their understanding on
nutrition and MCH activities
▪ 270 malnourished children under 5 years ▪ 450 children have accessed
old from 18 villages have better health to nutrition food prepared by
their mother and VHVs
▪ 523 infants (265 girls) have ▪ Children under 2
better health through MCH
commodities.
▪ 121 lactating mother, 128
pregnant women and 43 VHVs
25 women) have better health
through MCH commodities
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
2.2.1 Provide refresher training on ▪ PO, CDW, budget ▪ Staff in cooperation with HC ▪ 2.2.1 & 2.2.2 wasn't done
nutrition to 43 VHVs staff conducted a 2-day in Yeang commune due to
training course on primary border tension between
health care to 14 VHVs Cambodia and Thailand
(8 women)
▪ Staff conducted a 2-day ▪ see above
refresher training course on
nutrition for 26 VHVs (15
women)
2.2.2 Support VHVs to provide education ▪ CDW, budget, materials ▪ VHV educated 370 mothers
nutrition to 1,100 families in participated in CSB distribution
18 villages about nutrition

143
2.2.3 Cooperate with VHVs to provide ▪ CDW, budget, seed ▪ CWS provided seed to 105 ▪ We target only the most
seeds to parents of 270 children parents of 105 of children malnourished children in this
under 5 to improve nutrient food < 5years in 6 villages to im- semester
supply prove their health
2.2.4 Coordinate with VHVs to provide ▪ PO, CDW, budget ▪ Staff cooperated with mothers
nutrient food to improve health of and VHVs prepared nutrition
270 children under 5 in 18 villages food and feed 450 children < 5
2.2.5 Cooperate with VHVs to provide ▪ CDW, budget ▪ Staff cooperated with mothers
ingredients of nutrition food for and VHVs provided ingredients
mother of malnourished children such as egg, oil, vegetable and
under 5 years meat for preparing each village
▪ Under WFP SMCH, CWS ▪ Food delivery to 6 villages
di t ib t d 22,737kg
distributed 22 737k off CSB,
CSB in
i Yeang
Y commune
18,298kg of rice, 2,849kg of was not done from August
sugar and 1,207kg of oil and to November 08 because of
benefited to 523 infant (265 road condition was so bad
girls) from 7-24 months, 498
mothers of infants, 121
lactating mother, 128 pregnant
women and 43 VHV (25 w)
Output 2.3
Improve access to safe water and ▪ 180 families from 11 villages benefited ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
household sanitation to reduce from 25 open wells construction
incidence of water-born diseases ▪ 15 wells committees are able to ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
in target communities maintain & repair 15 hand pumps
▪ 90 families from 7 villages benefited ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
from 8 hand pumps construction

144
▪ 240 families benefited from 35 well ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
aprons construction
▪ 30 families benefit from 8 family ponds ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
▪ 200 VP families can access to clean ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
water from 200 bio-sand filters
▪ 900 families from 18 villages improved ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
water and sanitation condition
▪ 50 families from 18 villages benefited ▪ 2 latrines constructed and ▪ Planned more in next
from 50 latrines benefited to 2 families semester
▪ 750 school children & teachers from 3 ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
secondary and primary schools drink
clean water from 15 biosand filters
▪ 750 school children and teachers from ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
3 schools improved hygiene & sanitation
▪ 12 HC staff of 2 Health Centers can ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
access to clean water from 2 biosand
filters
▪ 300 people are aware of clean water ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
using through participation in World
Water Day
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
2.3.1 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW, budget ▪ Staff cooperated with VDCs ▪ Those 5 well will be
families who will benefit from 30 selected 43 families to benefit constructed in next quarter
open wells construction to 5 open wells
2.3.2 Cooperate with VDCs to construct ▪ CDW, materials, Pc ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
25 open wells for 180 families in
11 villages

145
2.3.3 Cooperate with VDCs to form & ▪ CDW, materials, Pc ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
train well committees
2.3.4 Construct 8 hand pumps for 90 ▪ CDW, materials, Pc ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
families in 7 villages (drilling and
installation hand pump)
2.3.5 Cooperate with VDCs to select 240 ▪ CDW, materials, Coordinators ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
families to benefit from 35 well
apron construction
2.3.6 Support materials to 240 families to ▪ CDW, materials, budget ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
upgrade 40 wells aprons
2.3.7 Coordinate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
families who benefit from 8 family
ponds
2.3.8 Support FFW to 30 families to dig ▪ CDW, materials, Pc ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
8 family ponds
2.3.9 Coordinate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
vulnerable families to benefit
from biosand water filters
2.3.10 Coordinate with VDCs to provide ▪ CDW, materials, Pc ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
education on water filter mainte-
nace to 200 VP families
2.3.11 Support 200 families in constru- ▪ CDW, materials, molds, PO ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
cting bio-sand filter
2.3.12 Support and cooperate with VHVs ▪ CDW, materials, PO ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
to educate clean water & sanitation
to 900 people from 18 villages

146
2.3.13 Cooperate with VDCs to select 50 ▪ CDW, materials, ring molds, Pc, PO ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
people from 18 villages to construct
latrines
2.3.14 Support 50 families to construct ▪ CDW, materials, molds, Pc, PO ▪ CWS support 2 families to ▪ cont' next semester
50 household latrines construct 2 latrines.
2.3.15 Cooperate with District Education ▪ CDW, materials, Pc, PO ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
Office to identify number of school
to receive water filters
2.3.16 Support teachers to construct 15 ▪ CDW, materials, molds, Pc, PO ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
bio-sand filters for 3 schools with
750 teachers and students
2.3.17 Cooperate with HC to educate ▪ CDW, materials, Pc, PO ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
clean water to 750 teachers &
students
2.3.18 Support HC staff to construct 2 ▪ CDW, materials, molds, Pc, PO ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
bio-sand filters for 2 HC
2.3.19 Cooperate with HC to organize ▪ CDW, materials, Pc, PO ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in March 22, 2009
World Water Day with 300
participants
Output 2.4
Children of vulnerable families have ▪ 90 school children (60% girls) from ▪ 90 school children (49 girls)
the necessary materials to attend vulnerable families are encouraged from 11 primary schools in
primary schools to attend school by providing school 18 target villages and 4
necessary materials commune received school
materials
▪ 80% of 90 supported children ▪ Not done ▪ The school year just
(50 girls) passed grade started in October 2008

147
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation

2.4.1 Cooperate with VDCs to select 90 ▪ CDW, PC, PO ▪ Staff cooperated with VDCs ▪ Staff also worked with
children(60%girls) from VP families selected 90 children from poor school teachers, parents of
to receive educational materials families to receive school these children to encourage
materials from CWS them to support education
of these children
2.4.2 Provide educational materials to ▪ Budget, education material package ▪ Staff cooperated with VDCs
90 children of VP families and teachers provided school
(60% girls) materials to 90 children (49
girl) from 11 primary schools
2.4.3 Cooperate with teachers & VDCs to ▪ CDW ▪ Not done ▪ However, from day to day
motivate
ti t parents'
t ' children
hild to
t enco- work
k staff
t ff h
has ttalked
lk d tto
urage their children to attend parents to encourage
school the children to study
and attend school regularly
2.4.4 Cooperate with teachers to monitor ▪ CDW ▪ Staff cooperated with teachers
study situation of 90 supported to support and monitor the
children selected schoolchildren
Output 2.5
Improve agricultural productions, food ▪ At least 70% of 108 livestock trained ▪ 38 families from 6 villages ▪ More trainings will conduct
security and house hold income among families improved their livestock raising trained on chicken and duck in next semester. It couldn't
vulnerable people, self-help/interest technique & increased number of raising, and 20 trainees conduct due to border
group in target communities livestock reviewed 500 ducklings dispute and harvesting
▪ At least 60% of 54 fish raising trained ▪ 33 people from 12 villages ▪ They showed interest in
families start to raise fishes trained on fish raising raising fishes. Fingerling will
be distributed in the 3rd
quarter of 2009

148
▪ 24 SRI trained farmers practiced SRI ▪ Not done ▪ Time constraints due to
techniques in their paddy field border tension
▪ At least 90% of 96 trained farmers on ▪ 190 of 195 households planted ▪ See 2.5.12
home garden have home garden in their vegetable
their plots
▪ 50 families in 12 villages ▪ This is new initiatives of
revived 180 mangos and 20 staff in promoting fruit trees
jackfruit tree which were planting in the community
grown by staff during their free
time in office

▪ 18 selected demo farmer (9 in FY08) ▪ 3 new model farmers were ▪ No model farmer guideline
implement IFM with technical/ materials/ selected designed
seeds from CWS
▪ At least 60% of 270 participants improved ▪ Not done ▪ No IFM guideline designed
knowledge on IFM yet
▪ 34 SHG with 408 members formed ▪ 188 interest villagers (127 ▪ Due to Cambodian-Thai
and functioned women) in 12 village border tension and
were introduced SHG concept harvesting that the project
▪ 2 SHGs were formed with could not reach the planned
29 members (24 women) in target
Kok Sralao village
▪ 102 member of 34 SHG committees are ▪ Not done ▪ Due to Cambodian-Thai
able to prepare bookkeeping and border tension and
maintain the group performance harvesting
▪ 18 SHG (8 SHG in FY08) used CWS' ▪ Not done ▪ The formed SHG did not
WCA to run business for increasing their function yet
family income

149
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation

2.5.1 Cooperate with VDCs to select vul- ▪ CDW ▪ Staff cooperated with VDCs ▪ The training conducted in
nerable families for animal raising selected 38 people for chicken planting season, The rest
training courses(108 families) and duck raising training will provide next semester
2.5.2 Provide 7 training on fowl alternative, ▪ Budget, CDW, Pc course
livestock raising to 108 families ▪ PC and staff conducted 1-day ▪ More training will be in next
training course on chicken semester as time
and duck raising to 38 people constraints due to border
from 6 villages tension and harvesting
▪ CWS provided 500 ducklings ▪ 2 model farmers get 100
the trained 20 families ducklings to raise
253
2.5.3 P
Provide
id vaccines
i off lilivestock
t k tto ▪ B
Budget
d t ▪ Staff
St ff vaccinated
i t d 400 ducklings
d kli ▪ 100 ducklings
d kli died
di d after
ft
108 trained families (Vaccines) against new castle disease one months long raised
2.5.4 Cooperate with VDCs to select 54 ▪ CDW ▪ Staff cooperated with VDCs ▪ The training conducted in
families for fish raising training selected 33 families in 12 planting season, The rest
courses villages for fish raising training will provide next semester
2.5.5 Provide 2 fish raising training ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Staff provided 3 fish raising
courses to 54 families training courses to 33 families
2.5.6 Provide fingerlings & materials to ▪ Fingerling, pond construction materials ▪ Not done ▪ In high raining season
54 trained families the trained beneficiaries
did not raise fish yet
2.5.7 Cooperate with VDCs to select 24 ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Not done ▪ Time constraints due to
families for SRI training border tension
2.5.8 Provide training on SRI to 24 farmers ▪ Budget, CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Not done ▪ See 2.5.7
2.5.9 Support 24 families to practice SRI ▪ Budget, CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Not done ▪ See 2.5.7
in their field

150
2.5.10 Cooperate with VDCs to select 96 ▪ CDW ▪ Staff cooperated with VCD
families for home garden training selected 90 vulnerable families
to receive vegetable seed
2.5.11 Provide 4 training on home garden- ▪ Budget,CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Staff provide instruction to ▪ Formal training will be
ing to 96 families single 195 family on vegetable provided in next semester
planting techniques
2.5.12 Provide vegetable seed & materials ▪ Budget, CDW ▪ Staff distributed vegetable ▪ 70 families have harvested
to 96 trained families seeds to 90 VP in 18 villages their vegetable for
consumptions and selling
▪ Provide vegetable seed to ▪ The provision is made due
105 mothers with under to those 105 mothers have
five children in 7 villages to severe malnourish
promote their 105 children under 5
malnourished children

2.5.13 Cooperate with VDCs to select ▪ CDW ▪ Staff cooperated with VDCs ▪ No model farmer guideline
9 model famers selected 3 new model farmers designed

2.5.14 Provide IFM training to 18 model ▪ Budget, CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Not done ▪ No IFM guideline designed
famers (9 in FY08) yet

2.5.15 Provide seed and materials to ▪ Seed, fingerlings… and other materials ▪ Staff provided seed to 3 model ▪ See 2.5.14
18 demo farmers farmers and provided 100
duckling to 2 of them

2.5.16 Conduct 9 Farming Days in 9 diffe- ▪ Budget, CDW, Pc ▪ Not done ▪ See 2.5.14
rent places for 270 families in
cooperation with PDoA

151
2.5.17 Support to form 34 new SHGs ▪ CDW ▪ PC and project staff conducted ▪ Due to Cambodian-Thai
and stationeries awareness raising on SGH border tension and
concept to 188 interested harvesting thus the project
villagers (127 women) in 12 could not reach the planned
villages. target

▪ 2 SHGs were formed with


29 members (24 women) in
Kon Sralao village

2.5.18 Provide 5 training courses on book ▪ Budget, CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Not done ▪ Due to Cambodian-Thai
keeping to 34 group with 102 border tension and
committee members harvesting

2.5.19 Provide WCA to 18 groups ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator, CWS ▪ Not done ▪ See 2.5.17 and 2.5.18
(10 SHGs in FY08) WCA (Loan)

2.5.20 Cooperate with VDC to select 15 ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator ▪ Not done ▪ Due to Cambodian-Thai
VP families for small business border tension

2.5.21 Grant support to 15 VP families for ▪ CDW, CIG Coordinator, budget ▪ Not done ▪ See 2.5.20
small business
Theme 3: Strengthening Civil Society
OBJECTIVE
Strengthen target community understand and practice peace building and restorative justice
Output 3.1
Community key persons (CCs, VDCs, ▪ 104 VDC, VL, VHV & CPV trained on ▪ 9 CPV introduced their roles
VLs, elderly, monk) play an active role in Peace Concepts and responsibility

152
peace building, responding to conflict & ▪ 11 VDC, 6 VL and 2 CPV ▪ 3 more courses will be
utilizing LCP approaches in their received a 3-day training conducted in next semester
communities course on peace concept
▪ 18 VDC, trained on LCP ▪ Not done ▪ Due to Cambodian-Thai
▪ 24 CCs strengthened capacity on ▪ Not done border tension
Peace Building

▪ 20 CPV strengthened capacity on LCP ▪ Not done ▪ Due to Cambodian-Thai


border tension
▪ 24 CCs trained in accountability ▪ Not done ▪ Will be conducted after
training to staff
▪ 10 project staffs trained in accountability ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in Feb. 09
▪ 300 people increased knowledge on ▪ Not done ▪ Due to Cambodian
Cambodian-Thai
Thai
how to reduce domestic violence in border tension
their communities
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation
3.1.1 Conduct 5 training courses on ▪ Budget, materials, Peace Pc, PC, ▪ PC-Peace in coordination with ▪ 3 more courses will be
Peace Concept to key people Team A, Team B project staff provided a 3-day conducted in next semester
(1course for CPV, 4 courses for training course on peace
VDC, VL) concept to 11 VDC, 6VL and
2 CPVs

3.1.2 Provide 2 training courses on LCPs ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, Pc, ▪ Not done ▪ 3.1.2-3.1.8 was not done
to VDCs, CPVs Team A, Team B due to boarder tension be-
tween Cambodia and
3.1.3 Provide refresher training on peace ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, Pc, ▪ Not done Thailand
building to 24 CCs Team A, Team B

153
3.1.4 Provide training on LCP to 24 CCs ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, Pc, ▪ Not done ▪
Team A, Team B
3.1.5 Provide 3 days training on ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, ERP PC ▪ Not done ▪ Will be conducted after
Accountability to 24 CCs training to staff
3.1.6 Cooperate with DoWA to organize Budget, materials, Peace PC, PC, ▪ Not done ▪
White Ribbon campaign CDW
3.1.7 Cooperate with DoWA to organize ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, PC, ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in March 2009
International Women Days with CDW
300 people
3.1.8 Cooperate with CC in Yeang to ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, PC, ▪ Not done ▪ see 3.1.2 above
provide 2 trainings courses on CDW
gender to 42 VDC and VL
3.1.9 Coordinate with DoEYS to organize ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, PC, ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in Jun. 09
International Children days with CDW
250 people (180 students)

3.1.10 Provide Peace books to 3 schools ▪ Budget, Peace PC, Pc, ▪ CWS provide 222 peace
in target areas CDW related books to 3 schools
with 657 students (328 girls)
and 30 teachers (8 women)
3.1.111 Coordinate with DoWA to provide 3 ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, Pc, ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
training courses on Domestic CDW
Violence to 75 VDC, VL in 3
communes

3.1.12 Support 4 people to join Peace ▪ Budget, materials, Peace PC, Pc, ▪ CWS supported two CPVs
related activities in Phnom Penh CDW (one woman) to attend
(dhammayietra, white ribbon day…) Youth and Reconciliation
conference organized by YFP

154
Theme 4: Emergency Response and Preparedness
OBJECTIVE
To ensure meeting basic needs of the most vulnerable people and victims of the emergency in the provinces are met (prioritizing the target
communities) and to enhance community capacity to prepare and respond disaster within their communities.

Output 4.1
Red Cross Volunteers (RCVs) are ▪ 36 RCV trained on CBDRR and planning ▪ 20 RCVs trained CBDRM ▪ Yeang commune wasn't
actively functioning, and commune and are able to conduct HVCA in their Village and Planning conducted due to rainfall
village disaster preparedness plans (4day, 2courses)
developed and implemented in target ▪ 18 villages have HVCA ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
communities ▪ 18 villages have Disaster Prepared plan ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester
integrating into the existing village
development plan

▪ 8 CCDM member, 18VL trained on ▪ Not done ▪ CCDM was not formed yet
CBDRR and planning (1couses)
▪ CCDM quarterly meeting conducted ▪ Not done ▪ CCDM was not formed yet
regularly with the participation of at least
20 member (commune chief, VL, Chief
of cluster school, HC, RCV, commune of
police)

▪ At least 720 people in 18 villages (40 ▪ Not done ▪ Due to border tension, staff
people /village) raised awareness on could not support RCVs to
disaster preparedness by 18 public event conduct awareness raising
(1 in each village) by RCV

▪ At least 2 villages implement DRR ▪ Not done ▪ Planned in next semester


measure under leadership of RCV & VDCs

155
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation

4.1.1 Provide training on CBDRR, HVCA ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW, ERP Pro. ▪ Staff conducted a 3-day ▪ 1 course in Yeang commune
and Planning to 36 RCV (2 courses: training course on CBDRM will be conducted in next
1 in Yeang and 1 in office) and Planning to 20 RCVs quarter

4.1.2 Support 36 RCV in conducting ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW ▪ RCV had planned but not ▪ No HVCA support material
HVCA in their respective villages in done and due to border tension
association with VLs and VDC.
4.1.3 Assist RCV to develop disaster ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW ▪ Not done ▪ No HVCA result yet
preparedness plan integrating into
VDP
4.1.4 Provide training on CBDRR and ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, PO, CDW ▪ Not done ▪ No CCDM was formed yet
planning to VLs and CCDM
4.1.5 Organize semester full member ▪ Budget, materials, CDW ▪ Not done ▪ No CCDM was formed yet
meeting of CCDM
4.1.6 Support RCV to provide awareness ▪ Budget, materials, CDW ▪ RCV had planned but not ▪ Due to border tension, staff
on DRR to 720 interested people done could not support RCVs to
conduct awareness raising
4.1.7 Support RCV to provide echo ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, PO, CDW ▪ RCV had planned but not ▪ see 4.1.6.
training on Disaster Preparedness done
to key interested people in their
respective villages.
4.1.8 Support RCV & VDC to implement ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, PO, CDW ▪ RCV and VDC have not ▪ See 4.1.3.
micro project in at least 2 villages identified micro project yet.

156
Output 4.2
Improve capacity of RCV to provide ▪ 36 RCVs are equipped first Aid kit ▪ Not done ▪ All RCVs have already
first aid services to emergency equipped the kit by CRC
victims and most vulnerable people
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation

4.2.1 Coordinate with CRC to provide ▪ Budget, materials, ERP Program ▪ Not done ▪ All RCVs have already
refresher training on CBFA and equipped the kit by CRC
support first aid kids to 36 RCVs
Output 4.3
Respond to basic needs of vulnerable ▪ 270 families received emergency kits ▪ Not done ▪ No emergency/disaster
people and disaster victims of emergen- when there is emergency strike occurs
cy in a timely manner and ensure their their life and well
well-being
being
lives with dignity and well being.

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation


4.3.1 Coordinate with VDCs, VLs, RCV to ▪ Materials, Pc, CDW, ERP Pro ▪ Not done ▪ No emergency/disaster
conduct assessment and select occurs
victim families of Emergency
4.3.2 Distribute the emergency response ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW, ERP Pro. ▪ Not done ▪ No emergency/disaster
kit to victims of disaster or most occurs
vulnerable people.
4.3.3 Cooperate with PRC to support ▪ Budget, materials, Pc, CDW, ERP Pro. ▪ Not done ▪ No emergency/disaster
budget or emergency kits to victim occurs
families in target district/ province

157
Theme 5a: Project Development, Management and Supervision
OBJECTIVE
Effective and efficient program management and functioning; enhance community development planning and practice
Output 5.1a
Monitor and support field staff and ▪ Monthly project monitoring on: ▪ 2 program officers conducted ▪ 2 program officers were
field operation in appropriate manner 12 project implementation activities at least 5 on-going field visits assigned to support field
10 staff performance within 6 months office on a regular basis by
▪ 3 monthly staff meetings spending about 2 weeks of
conducted within 6 months each PO at PVH

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/ Explanation

5.1.1a Field visit of Program Officers ▪ POs ▪ 2 program officers monitored


to monitor Project Coordinator the project on a monthly basis
and CDW performance and provide necessary
support to make the project
become effective
5.1.2a Monthly meeting to reflect the • POs, Pc, CDW ▪ PO and PC conducted regular ▪ Some times it was done
work implementation and see monthly reflection meeting with weekly
the strength and weaknesses & all staff
develop plan for next month

158
Church World Service Cambodia
Logical Framework Report Mid Year FY09
Project Name: Svay Rieng Water and Sanitation Cooperation Project

Narrative Summary Objectively Verifiable Indicators Actual Output Variance/Explanation


Overall Objective:
To expand the coverage of improved water supplies and sanitation facilities to underserved population of Romeas Haek and Rumduol District,
Svay Rieng Province, and to improve health and hygiene practices related to water borne diseases and sanitation.

Theme 1: Capacity Building for Development Planning

OBJECTIVE
Develop community capacity to engage with Government institutions define their development direction and manage their affairs in
a participatory and democratic manner

Output 1.1:
Enhance program coordination • At least 2 coordination meetings • 4 coordination meetings with • Cooperation was finished acco-
with sectoral forums: provincial with PDRD, PDEYs, PDoH PDRD was conducted to rding to CWS has no support
(PDRD, PDEYs, PDoH, PDAFF), PDAFF discuss cooperation budget for PDRD staff's
district authorities and CCs. agreement allowance which was requested
by PDRD after MoU for FY09
was signed
▪ 4 coordination meetings with • Not done • Planned in next semester
district authorities (2times/ district)

▪ 20 coordination meetings with CCs • 5 coordination meetings • Planned in next semester


(4 times/ commune) conducted in 5 communes
on CWS's exit plan

159
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Explanation
1.1.1 Attend meetings /relationship • Not done • Planned in next semester
with provincial department and
other relevant offices (PDRD, • Project Coordinator,
PDAFF, PDEYs, PDoH) Program Officer
1.1.2 Organize semester meeting with • Not done • Planned in next semester
district authorities and related
district officers to share the • Budget, Pc, PO
achievements and planning for
and next semester / year
1.1.3 Conduct quarterly meeting with • CCs, VLs,WSUGs 38(F8) • Regular meetings will be in next
Commune Councils in 5 attended meeting in Bos Mon, semester
commune to strengthen the • Budget, Pc, PO Pong Toeuk, Daung and Tras
coordination and supporting commune hall of RomeasHek
and Rumduol districts
1.1.4 Project Coordinator met repre- • PM and PC conducted 4 • Cooperation was finished accor-
sentative or director of PDRD to coordination discussion with ding CWS has no support budg-
strengthen the implementation • Pc, CDW PDRD Director on MoU et for PDRD staff's allowance,
of WatSan activities in target which was requested by PDRD
communities after MoU for FY09 was signed.
1.1.5 Monthly meeting with CWS • 6 monthly meetings conducted
staff, PDRD staff and CDFs with 7 CWS staff and 6 CDFs
for quality program implemented • Pc, CDWs, Budget
Output 1.2: • 3 CC (1 W), 29 VL (3W), 202 • Village Development Planning
Strengthen leadership among local WSUG members (83 women) and Simple Proposal Writing
partners to better understand the • 75 CCs & VLs (40% women) train from 42 villages in 5 communes course was provided instead of
community structures and better CD concept were introduced village proposal CD Concept as it is necessary
implementation of community development through 8 training after CWS exit from the village
development process and principle. courses
• 75 CCs & VLs (40% women) trained • Not done • Time constraint of PO
in leading and managing rural
organization

160

CWS's Inputs
Activities: Actual Activities Variance/Explanation

1.2.1 Provide 3 training courses on • Pc, PO, Materials and Budget • Not done • Planned in Apr. 09
Leading and Managing Rural
Organization to 35 CCs, 40 VLs
from 20 villages in 5 communes.
1.2.2 Provide 3 training courses on • PO, Pc, Materials, Budget • Project staff provided 8 training • Village Development Planning
CD Concept to 35 CCs, 40 VLs courses on Village Development and Simple Proposal Writing
from 20 villages in 5 communes & Simple Proposal Writing course was provided instead of
3 CC (1 woman), 29 VL (3 CD Concept as it is necessary
women), 202 WSUG members after CWS exit from the village
(83 women) from 42 villages in
5 communes.

Output 1.3
Vulnerable families are better able to • 60 vulnerable people from 20 • Not done • This planned activity is cancelled
plan and manage household villages in 5 communes trained in due to the Project focuses on
resources. developing & implementing family implementing exit plan.
planning
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Explanation
1.3.1 Support CDFs in monitoring 60 • CWS staff • Not done • This planned activity is cancelled
vulnerable families on household due to the Project focuses on
planning practice implementing exit plan.
Output 1.5:
Successful withdrawal of CWS • 20 VLs & 10 CCs are able to • Not done • Planned in next semester
from selected communities; continue WatSan activities in 20
hand-over of selected programming handed over villages
to local actors (CCs, and VLs)

161
CWS's Inputs
Activities: Actual Activities Variance/Explanation

1.5.1 Conduct workshop to review • PM, PO, PC, Pc, CDW, Budget • Not done • Planned in next semester
all guideline related to WatSan
program
1.5.2 Coordinate with VL, CCs, WSUG • PO, PC, Pc, CDW, Budget • Not done • Planned in next semester
PDRD to join assets count for
handing over in 20 villages
1.5.3 Coordinate with PDRD to hand • PM, PO, PC, Pc, CDW, Budget • Not done • Planned in next semester
over CWS' assets to CCs and
20 VLs to manage

Theme 2: Meeting basic need and building self-reliant, sustainable livelihoods


OBJECTIVE
Improve access to basic social services and amenities and improve overall food security of vulnerable people
Output 2.3 • 40 hand pumps constructed and • Not done • This planned activity is cancelled
Improved access to safe water and benefit to 120 families in 20 villages due to the Project focuses on
household sanitation; reduce implementing exit plan and as
incidence of water borne diseases it is not primary need of the
in the target communities target group in FY09
• 50 hand pumps upgraded and • Not done • This planned activity is cancelled
benefit to 50 families in 20 villages due to the Project focuses on
implementing exit plan
• 20 WSUG established with 100 • 24 WSUG were formed in 24 • 4 WSUGs are formed as it was
members (40% women) to maintain villages with 120 members (56 delayed from FY08.
repair & provide education on water women)
& sanitation among communities
• 800 families benefit directly from • 10 bio-sand filters constructed • Planned in next semester
800 bio-sand filter construction and installated which benefited
to 10 families consisting of 47
people (27 women), 17 children
(7 girls) in Bos Mon Leu Village
in Rumdoul District

162
• 1000 educated people will have • Not done • Planned in next semester
good health by using safe water &
practicing family & individual hygiene
• 60 families benefit from 60 latrines • Not done • Planned in next semester
construction

• At least 110 families trained on • Not done • This planned activity is cancelled
well maintenance and pump due to the Project focuses on
repairing (120 from hand pump implementing exit plan
construction & 50 families from
upgrading wells)
• 480 school children and 20 teachers • Not done • This planned activity is cancelled
from total of 775 school children & j
due to the Project focuses on
25 teachers practice using clean implementing exit plan
water regularly after receiving
education
• 300 people participated in World • Not done • Planned in Mar. 09
Water Day

CWS's Inputs
Activities: Actual Activities Variance/Explanation

2.3.1 Collaborate with PDRD and local • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Not done • This planned activity is cancelled
authorities to orient role, due to the Project focuses on
responsibility and how important implementing exit plan
of WSUG to people in target vill.

2.3.2 Collaborate with PDRD and local • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Staff, CDF and VL facilitated • 4 WSUGs are formed as it was
authorities to facilitate the WSUG the election of 24 WSUGs in delayed from FY08.
election in 20 target villages. 24 villages in 3 communes
in RomeasHek and Rumduol
District

163
2.3.3 Collaborate with PDRD to • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Not done • Planned in next semester
provide training on role and
responsibilities of WSUG and
WatSan Action Plan to WSUG
members in 20 villages
2.3.4 Collaborate with PDRD and local • Pc, CDW, Documents • Staff in cooperation with VL, CC • There's no cooperation with
authorities in selecting beneficia- and CDF selected 710 bio-sand PDRD due to cooperation was
ries to benefit from 40 hand filter beneficiaries and 140 latrine finished
pumps, 50 well aprons, 800 beneficiaries through village
bio-sand filters and 60 latrines planning and need assessment
process with villagers
2.3.5 Collaborate with PDRD in • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Not done • This planned activity is cancelled
constructing new 40 hand due to the Project focuses on
wells which benefited to 180 implementing exit plan
families
2.3.6 Collaborate with PDRD to • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Not done • This planned activity is cancelled
repair and upgrade 50 wells due to the Project focuses on
which benefited to 50 families implementing exit plan
in 20 villages
2.3.7 Collaborate with PDRD to select • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Staff, CDF and VL selected 710 • See 2.3.4
800 people to construct and bio-sand filter beneficiaries and
demonstrate 800 bio-sand filters installed 10 bio-sand filters for
in 20 villages 10 families in Bos Morn Leu
Village.
2.3.8 Collaborate with PDRD to • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Staff, CDF and VL 140 latrine • See 2.3.4
motivate 60 people to construct beneficiaries in 20 village in 5
60 latrines in 20 villages communes.
2.3.9 Collaborate with PDRD to • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Not done • There's no cooperation with
educate 110 people on well PDRD due to cooperation was
maintenance, clean water used finished, and this made time
and sanitation constraints of Project staff

164
2.3.10 Collaborate with PDRD to • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Staff provided 6 awareness • 20 more beneficiaries will be
provide training on latrines courses on latrine operation and trained in next semester
construction, latrines use and maintenance to 120 selected
maintenance to 60 families beneficiaries in 19 villages of 5
communes
2.3.11 Collaborate with PDRD to • Pc, CDW, Budget • Staff and CDF provided 1 training • More training will be done before
provide training on bio-sand course on bio-sand filter construc- filter construction in next
filter installation, how to use and tion and maintenance to 22 (8 semester
maintenance bio-sand filter to women) beneficiaries in Prey
800 families from 20 villages Tayorn village
2.3.12 Collaborate with PDRD to • Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Not done • Planned in next semester
educate 1000 people from 20
villages on Water and Sanitation
2.3.13 Collaborate with PDRD to • CDW, Budget, Materials • Not done • Planned in next semester
provide awareness on WatSan
to 800 teachers and school
children (25 teachers) from
5 schools in target areas
2.3.14 Collaborate with PDRD and • CDW, Pc, Budget, Materials • Not done • This planned activity is cancelled
teachers to monitor and due to the Project focuses on
evaluate on WatSan practice implementing exit plan
in 5 schools in target areas
2.3.15 Collaborate with PDRD and • PO, Pc, CDW, Budget, Materials • Not done • Planned in Mar. 09
local authorities in celebrating
World Water Day with 300
participations

Output 2.5
Improve agricultural production, food • At least 90% of 160 families received • Not done • This planned activity is cancelled
security and household income among training on vegetable growing have due to the Project focuses on
vulnerable people and interest group home garden implementing exit plan
in target communities

165
CWS's Inputs
Activities: Actual Activities Variance/Explanation

2.5.1 Collaborate with CDFs, WSUG, • CDW, budget, materials • Not done • This planned activity is cancelled
VL in selecting 160 VP in 20 due to the Project focuses on
villages to train on vegetable implementing exit plan
growing in the community
2.5.2 Provide training on vegetable • Pc, CDW, budget, materials • Not done • This planned activity is cancelled
growing to 160 VP (5 courses) documents due to the Project focuses on
implementing exit plan

Theme 3: Strengthening Civil Society


OBJECTIVE
Strengthen community understanding and practice of peace building and restorative justice

Output 3.2:
3 2:
Key persons in the community VL, • 80 CCs, VLs, WSUG, elders, monks • Not done • This planned activity is cancelled
WSUG, CDF, CCs, old persons and WSUG, VDCs, CDFs trained on due to the Project focuses on
monks play an important role in Local Capacity for Peace/ Peace implementing exit plan
peace building, conflict resolution building (4 courses)
and use the LCP methodology in
their community
Activities: Actual Activities Variance/Explanation

3.2.1 Provide 4 training courses on • P.C, P.O, CDW, Materials, Budget • Not done • This planned activity is cancelled
LCP /peace building to 80 CCs, due to the Project focuses on
VLs, WSUG, monks, old persons, implementing exit plan
VDC, CDFs from 20 villages

166
Theme 5: Project Development, Management and Supervision
OBJECTIVE
Effective and efficient project management and functioning; enhance community development planning and practice
Output 5.1:
Field staff and field operation ▪ Monthly project monitoring on: • Regular project monitoring by PC •
appropriately monitored and 6 project management is done 6 times a month
supported 12 project implementation activities • 3 visits conducted by PM, PC • Field monitoring visit will improv.
5 staff performance and PO to support developing in next semester to ensure exit
exit plan and project management plan is properly implemnted

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/Explanation


5.1.1 Regularly field visit of Project • Pc, Pos, CDW, Vehicle • Pc conducted regular monthly
Coordinator to monitor CDW project monitor to support and
and cooperation partners in encourage the staff operation
project implement
5.1.2 Monthly meeting to reflect the • Pc, CDW • Pc conducted regular monthly
work implementation and see staff meeting to identify staff
the strengths & weaknesses and challenges and strengths and
develop plan for next month develop monthly plan
5.1.3 Monthly field visit to follow up and • PCs, Pos • Not done-PC and PO focused • Time constraints of PO and PC
improve skill acquisition their support to KPT and PVH especially during Cambodia-
VBCD Project. Thailand border tension
5.1.4 Collaborate with PDRD in • Pc, PO, CDW, documents, budget • Not done • Planned in Feb. 09
evaluating new target area and
to assess the working size
5.1.5 Coordinate with Program Staff • Pc, PO, CDW, materials, budget • Not done • Planned in Mar. 09
to develop activities and budget PM
Plan for FY 2010
5.1.6 Regularly visit for project • PO and PM, Vehicle • PM, PC and PO conducted 3 • Field monitoring visit will be
management visits to support developing improved in the next six months
exit plan and project to ensure exit plan is properly
management implemented

167
Church World Service Cambodia
Logical Framework FY09 Mid Year Report
Project Name: Partnership Program Office

Narrative Summary Objectively Verifiable Indicators Actual Outputs Variance/Remarks


OVERALL OBJECTIVE:
To strengthen the institutional capacity of CNGO partners and ensure the effectiveness of the project implementation

Theme 1: Capacity Building of CNGOs and Ecumenical Partners and Provide Small Grants to CNGO Partner
OBJECTIVE. 1
Strengthen the capacity of holistic • CNGO & Small Project fund recipients
CNGO partners and small project practiced necessary organizational
fund recipients to facilitate systems and technical capacity to
program that will effectively and carry out effective community
sustainably improve the living development interventions in support
condition of the most vulnerable of the most vulnerable
Output 1.1
Matured organizational capacity • Strategic plan of KCC/CSF developed • KCC, CC& CSF developed • Over plan
for CNGO & Ecumenical Partners their strategies
• At least one holistic partner CSF/KCC • KCDA develops strategy in
developed strategic plan next quarter
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/remarks
1.1.1 Support the partnership project • Program and Project staff, budget, • KCC, CC &CSF developed • KCDA will developed in the
KCDA & KCC to training materials their strategies next report period
develop strategic plan for partner

Output 1.2
CNGO partner matured in technical • Partners developed project • CSF was able to draft activities • CSF made four proposals
capacity for four projects
• Partners obtained M and E skills • None • Training in the next period

• Partners reviewed their HR policies • None • HR Training was cancelled

168
• Problem solving skill of partner • None • Problem solving training
staff improved was cancelled
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/remarks
1.2.1 Conduct training on Project • Program and project staff, budget, • None • Training in the next period
Monitoring & Evaluation for all CWS M&E Staff
partners
1.2.2 Conduct training on Human • Program and project staff, budget, • None • HR Training was cancelled
Resource & Staff Management materials
to all partners
1.2.3 Conduct training on Problem • Program and project staff, budget, • None • HR Training was cancelled
Solving for all partners materials
Output 1.3
Increased Advocacy & Awareness • 3 CNGOs received small grant • None • The program had limited
Raising activities in partner's targets budget available
• Partners conducted Human Rights • None • This will be done next period
Child at risk, Women's Day,
Peace Building
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/remarks
1.3.1 Provide small grants to CNGO • Program staff and budget • None • This will be done next period
partners to implement activities
including Child at risk, women,
and peace building
Theme 3: Management and Supervision
OBJECTIVE
Provide overall management, • Partnership projects are smoothly • Over 90% of the project • Few recommendations
supervision and capacity building implemented activities completed as plan were made for improvement
to partnership program field staff;
develop & strengthen mechanism, • 4 holistic partners are able to develop • Five partners developed their • The program and project
practice, guideline and tools that will phase-out plan with their community phase-out plan will follow up the phase-out
improve the partnership program & plan
lead to enhanced outcomes • 4 holistic partners are able to design • 6 holistic partners developed
project, proposal and report their proposals to submit to
CWS last 6-months

169
Output 3.1
Improved capacity of CNGO • 12 visits to holistic partners • Program reports • Time available
partners to plan, implement, at least two times per partner/ year
monitor, assess & report outcomes

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/remarks


3.1.1 Visit partners at least two times • Program staff, budget and time • The program staff visited two • Some visits were accompany
per year to monitor outputs and times to KORCD,KCDA, KNTO donors
feedback CFEDA during the period
3.1.2 Support partners for exposure • Program staff, budget and time • None • Too small budget available
visits to other partners
3.1.3 Support partners to attend • Program staff, budget and time • None • Advised the project to send
other training/workshop their partners to attend the
training on peace building
314 O
3.1.4 Organize
i the
th Partnership
P t hi • Program
P staff,
t ff budget
b d t • None
N • This
Thi will
ill be
b done
d in
i May09
M 09
Reflection workshop for partners

Output 3.2
Improved program implementation • At least 2 visits to project field office • Two visits to BTB&BTM office • Staff meeting & donor visits
at field level; and improved staff per year and three times to KPT office
management and development
• Feedback and recommendation from • None • None
partners documented

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/remarks


3.2.1 Visit field office and feedback • Program staff, budget • None • July 08 - June 09
for the management & program
implementation
Output 3.3
Improved program management • At least 3 program meetings/year • One full program meeting • The 2nd meeting delayed
and coordination conducted
• At least 7 meetings with POG/year • Attended four POG Meetings • POG was also delayed

• At least 7 meeting with SMT/year • Attended five SMT meetings • One SMT meeting delayed

170
• At least 7 meetings with other NGOs • 4 meetings with NGO-GPP& • Missed one NGO-GPP
NGO-Forum meeting
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/remarks
3.3.1 Conduct program meetings • Program staff, budget • One full program meeting • One full program meeting
conducted was delayed due to the tight
schedule
3.3.2 Attend POG & SMT Meeting • Program staff • Attended four POG Meetings • Two POG meetings delayed
and five SMT meetings
3.3.3 Attend the meeting with other • Program staff, budget • Meeting with 2 NGO-GPP • None
NGOs (partners, donors, meetings and NGO-Forum
network) for two times

Output 3.4
Better informed programming & • Target groups satisfied with Partner's • The 1st Monitoring of CWS • None
practice as result of periodic service was done by M&E officer
evaluations of CNGO partners • Evaluation for partners not • This will be done next period
done
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/remarks
3.4.1 Coordinate for internal or • Program/project staff, time, budget • None • This will be done next period
external M&E to partners FMER staff
3.4.2 Support the project staff to • Program/project staff, time, budget • The project staff already took • The program staff will help
develop the follow up actions this action follow up the strategic plan

Output 3.5 • CAT reviewed • The program staff already • discussed next meeting
Defined partnership strategies and proposed revisions in draft
developed necessary tools for • Training Need Assessment Tool (TNA) • TNA tools already commented • discussed next meeting
monitoring & assessing program developed by the program staff
capacity
• Partnership Operating Guideline • Proposed revisions already • discussed next meeting
reviewed drafted

171
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/remarks
3.5.1 Review CAT • Project/program staff • Proposed revisions already • All proposed revisions will be
done in draft discussed in the next meeting
3.5.2 Develop TNA Tools • Program staff • TNA tools already commented • TNA tool will be discussed in
by the program staff the next program meeting
3.5.3 Review Partnership Operating • Project/program staff, budget • Proposed revisions already • This proposed change will
Guideline drafted be discussed in the next
meeting
Output 3.6
Improved profiling & promotion • 2 Donor coordination meetings • One meeting with MekongPlus • MekongPlus is one of CFED
of CNGOs partners to other donors in late November 2008 donors
for resource mobilizations • 2 proposals submitted to other donors • CSF submitted 4 proposals • UNESCO, FAO and ANZ
to UNESCO, FAO, ANZ Royal called for proposals

Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/remarks


3.6.1 Coordinate meeting with other • Program and project staff, budget • Meeting with MekongPlus • CWS finance office staff
donors Mplus, AusAID, Hiefer, for a global financial review undertook financial review
and NGOs meeting/forum of CFED before they give new
funding support to CFED
3.6.2 Support partners to develop • Program and project staff, budget • Program staff assisted CSF • three proposals to UNESCO
project proposals developed 4 proposals to FAO, and FAO approved
UNESCO, ANZ Royal Bank
Output 3.7
Staff development; effective • Program staff possess OD skills • OD Program officer assisted • This on-job training give OD
training and mentoring of field office KCC, CC &CSF to develop staff improved their skills
staff; enhanced capacity building of their strategies
program office staff • Program/project staff improved skill • The partnership program • The program manager
of project management manager involved in the did actual work in designing
development of project project for partners

172
Activities: CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variance/remarks
3.7.1 Provide on-going coaching to • Program staff • Provide coaching for OD staff • Ongoing
program and project staff on the on the strategic planning for
OD & Project Management partners

3.7.2 Support program & project • Program/project staff, budget • The program manager and • None
staff to learn necessary skills project manager BTB&BTM
through internal & external attended the gender and
training/ workshop advocacy training with the
Advocacy and Policy Institute

173
Church World Service Cambodia
Logical Framework FY 2009 Mid- Year
Project Name: Battambang and Banteay Meanchey Partnership Project
Project No.

Narrative Summary Objectively Verifiable Indicators Actual Output Variances/Explanation


Overall Objective:

Theme 1: Capacity building of holistic CNGO partners


OBJECTIVE
Strengthened capacity of CNGO ▪ CNGOs and small project fund ▪ CFEDA, KNTO, ADOVIR & ▪ The programs benefited
partners and small project fund recipients have the necessary KCDA expand their ICDP directly to 4,643 families
recipients to facilitate effective and organizational system and technical to benefit more poorest families (22,524 persons) and
sustainable programs that will improve capacity to carry out effective in 59 remote villages in BTB
BTB, indirectly to 4,658
4 658 families
the living condition of the most community development BTM & OMC. (23,185 persons).
vulnerable. interventions in support of the
vulnerable.
Output 1.1
Emerging organizational capacity ▪ FY 2009 grants were approved and ▪ FY 2009 grants were disbursed ▪ 100% achieved as planned.
for 2 newly engaged CNGO partners disbursement provided to 4 partners to 4 partners (KNTO, CFEDA,
and maturing organizational capacity (CFEDA, KNTO, ADOVIR & KCDA) ADOVIR & KCDA).
for 4 established CNGO partners. to implement ICD program in remote
villages.
▪ 2 new CNGOs selected as holistic ▪ Not done ▪ This will be considered in
partners. the second semester.
▪ Governing board of CFEDA, KNTO ▪ Non functional governing ▪ CFEDA will form a new
& ADOVIR were strengthened. board of CFEDA was governing board while
dissolved. KNTO & ADOVIR was
encouraged to have
regular board meeting.

174
▪ KCDA obtained 3 year-strategic ▪ ▪ This was planned in the
plan and proposals. second semester.
▪ KCDA obtained financial, ▪ KCDA obtained financial ▪ Continue to assist KCDA
administration & staff policies/ guideline. to develop admin & staff
guidelines. policy/guideline.
▪ KCDA is able to develop village ▪ KCDA is able to prepare ▪ 50% achieved as planned.
profiles and monitoring forms. village profile. Continue coaching KCDA
on program monitoring.
▪ Capacity needs of KCDA and 2 new ▪ Capacity building plan of ▪ 30% achieved as planned.
partners assessed and capacity KCDA developed. Capacity needs of new
building plan developed partners will be assessed
when they are selected.
▪ 4 partners (CFEDA, KNTO, ADOVIR ▪ Not done ▪ This is rescheduled in the
& KCDA) assessed organizational second semester.
performance by using CAT.
▪ V, M, G & core values of 2 new ▪ Not done ▪ This will be done when
partners defined. new partners selected.

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation


1.1.1. Assist & assess proposals ▪ Holistic grants ▪ ▪ This was planned in the
and plan of CFEDA, KNTO, ▪ Project and Program staff second semester.
ADOVIR & KCDA for FY 2010. ▪ Transportation
1.1.2 Select 2 new holistic CNGO ▪ Training fund, materials. ▪ Not done ▪ This will be considered in
partners. ▪ Training room. the second semester.
1.1.3 Prepare agreements and ▪ Grants of USD 23,497 was ▪ Grants of USD 20,000 was
disburse grants for CFEDA, disbursed to KNTO & CFEDA. disbursed in June 2008 to
KNTO, ADOVIR, KCDA & 2 KCDA & ADOVIR for FY'09
new CNGO partners. first semester program.
1.1.4 Conduct partnership meeting ▪ Not done ▪ Will be conducted when
with 2 new partners and explain new partners selected.
partnership operation guideline.

175
1.1.5 Conduct financial monitoring ▪ Conducted monthly financial ▪ Continue; monthly for
for 6 partners (monthly for new monitoring/coaching for CFEDA & KCDA and every
partners and every two months ADOVIR, CFEDA, KNTO and two months for KNTO &
for ADOVIR, CFEDA & KNTO). KCDA ADOVIR.
1.1.6 Provide coaching, mentoring ▪ Provided coaching to CFEDA ▪ Continue to assist CFEDA
regarding meeting of governing to restructure their organization in the formation of a new
board. management & to dissolve non- governing board.
functional governing board.
▪ Advised and encouraged ▪ Continue in the second
ADOVIR, & KNTO to organize semester.
regular board meeting.
1.1.7 Provide mentoring, coaching ▪ Provided regular coaching/ ▪ Will continue
and field monitoring regarding mentoring & field monitoring
organizational
g strengthening
g g& to CFEDA, KNTO, ADOVIR &
program implementation. CFEDA.
1.1.8 Provide coaching to KCDA staff ▪ Not done ▪ This was planned in the
to develop 3 years-strategic second semester
plan.
1.1.9 Provide coaching to KCDA staff ▪ Provided coaching to KCDA ▪ Assistance of KCDA in
to develop financial, staff to develop finance preparation of admin & staff
administration & staff policies/ guideline. policies is rescheduled in
guidelines. the second semester.
1.1.10 Provide coaching to KCDA staff ▪ Provided coaching to KCDA ▪ Coaching KCDA to prepare
to develop village profiles & staff to prepare village profiles monitoring form will be
monitoring forms. of their target village. done in the second
semester.
1.1.11 Conduct capacity assessment ▪ Conducted capacity ▪ Capacity needs of new
needs for KCDA and 2 new assessment needs and partners will be assessed
partners & prepare capacity prepared capacity building when they are selected.
building plans. plan for KCDA.
1.1.12 Conduct CAT to evaluate ▪ Not done ▪ This is reschedule in the
organizational growth of 4 second semester.
partners.

176
1.1.13 Provide coaching to 2 new ▪ Not done ▪ This will be done when
partners to define V, M, G and new partners selected.
core values.
Output 1.2
Emerging technical capacity among 2 ▪ At least 2 training courses (LCP ▪ 3 training courses on ▪ 100% achieved as planned.
newly CNGO partners, maturing assessment & conflict resolution Participatory Rural Appraisal ▪ Partner staffs increase
technical capacity among 4 established etc) provided to 40 CNGO (PRA), basic computer knowledge/skill and apply it
CNGO partners. partner staff (20 staff/course). maintenance system, and self to improve their program.
help group & small business ▪ 3 sets of computer under
management were organized DIPECHO Project were
& provided for 37 partner staff donated to CFEDA, KNTO
(16 women) from 4 CNGOs. & KCDA.
▪ At least 10 training courses & ▪ 9 training courses (6 training ▪ 90% achieved as planned.
workshopsp regarding
g g Community y courses & 3 refresher training)
g) ▪ 8 more trainingg courses
Based Disaster Risk Mitigation on CBFA, CBDRM, and will be organized in Jan &
(CBDPM) organized for 20 partner Commune Development Feb 2009.
staff, and 230 persons (RCVs, VHVs, Planning were organized for ▪ Within this semester the
VCs, VDCs, CCs, district & 200 participants (67 women) project focused in
provincial government staff. The of RCVs, VCs, VDCs, VHVs, implementation of the
project supported by DIPECHO. CCDM, DCDM, PCDM, CNGO CBDRM project.
partner & CWS staff and
RC Counterparts from target
areas of KCDA, CFEDA, &
KNTO in BTB, BTM & OMC.
▪ At least 2 workshops related to ▪ Not done ▪ This is rescheduled in the
program implementation organized second semester.
for 30 partner staff.
▪ One exposure visit organized for 12 ▪ Not done ▪ This is rescheduled in the
CNGO partner staff. second semester.
▪ Internship organized & facilitated ▪ ▪ This was planned in the
for 4 CNGO partner staff. second semester.

177
▪ At least 15 CNGO partner staff & 15 ▪ 9 partner staff (4 women) from ▪ Partner staffs increase
CCs supported to attend relevant 4 partners were arranged and knowledge & apply it to
training & workshops, organized by supported to attend training improve their program.
Partnership Program office. on basic finance management.
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation
1.2.1 Organize and provide training & ▪ Budget ▪ Provided a three-day training ▪ KCDA conducted PRA in
training follow-up to partner ▪ Project and Program staff on PRA to 10 staff from 4 9 target villages and KNTO
staff. ▪ Transportation. partners. conducted PRA in 4 new
▪ Training materials/documents. ▪ Organized a two-day training target villages.
▪ Training room. on basic computer maintenance ▪ Partners improve their
to 8 staff from 4 partners. computer maintenance
▪ Organized a five-day training system and their SHG
on SHG & small business program.
management for 19 staff from
4 partners.
▪ Training follow-up were
provided to CFEDA, KNTO,
KCDA, & ADOVIR to apply the
learning into practice.
1.2.2 Coordinate with relevant stake ▪ Coordinated with ER staff, ▪ The training were provided
holder to organize training & BTB & BTM RC, CFEDA, by ERP staff, BTB & BTM
workshops related to CBDRM. KNTO & KCDA to organize PRC, NCDM & MOP.
9 training courses in target ▪ Participants have increased
area of 3 CNGO partners and gained knowledge
(CFEDA, KNTO & KCDA) in regarding CBFA, CBDRM
BTB, BTM & OMC. and CDP. Training follow
▪ Organized a refresher training up will be provided to the
of three- days and a training of participants.
five-days on CBFA in BTM and ▪ Provided 42 First Aid kits to
in Samlout district, BTB for 46 42 RCVs.
participants (21 women) of 42

178
RCVs, and 3 partner staff and
a RC Counterpart from
28 target villages of 3 partners.
▪ Organized two training courses
of five days and two refresher
training of three days on
CBDRM in BTM & in Samlout
district, BTB for 80 participants
(28 women) from RCVs, VHVs,
VLAs, VCs and VDCs in 28
villages of 3 partners.
▪ Organized two training courses
of three days on CBDRM in
BTB and in BTM for 45
participants (5 women) of
CCDM, DCDM & PCDM from 8
communes, 6 districts & 3
provinces.
▪ Organized a training of four days
on CBDRM and commune
development planning in BTM
for 29 participants (13 women)
from 4 partners, CWS, & RC
Counterparts.
1.2.3 Organize & facilitate program ▪ Not done ▪ This is rescheduled in the
related workshops. second semester.
1.2.4 Organize and facilitate ▪ Not done ▪ This is rescheduled in the
exposure visit for partner staff. second semester.
1.2.5 Organize internship for ▪ This was planned in the
CNGO partner staff. second semester.
1.2.6 Coordinate with Program office ▪ Coordinated with Program ▪ Continue to support partner
to support partner staff & CCs staff and supported 9 partner
to attend training & workshops. staff to attend relevant training.

179
Output 1.3
Developing practice among 2 newly ▪ CFEDA, KNTO and KCDA ▪ Capacity of CFEDA, KNTO & ▪ 60% achieved as planned.
engaged CNGO partners & maturing increased capacity in building KCDA on CBDRM project CWS supports CFEDA,
practice among 4 established CNGO capacity and support communities increased. KCDA & KNTO to
partners. regarding CBDRM in their target implement CBDRM project
villages. (DIPECHO project) in 40
villages in BTB, BTM &
OMC provinces.
▪ Under DIPECHO project; micro ▪ ▪ This was planned in the
project grants were provided to second semester.
CFEDA, KNTO and KCDA to
support communities regarding
CBDRM.
CFEDA KNTO & ADOVIR are able
▪ CFEDA, ▪ Not done ▪ Priority was given in
to use LCP tools to assess their building their capacity on
program. PRA, SHGs,& basic
computer.
▪ ADOVIR increased capacity to ▪ Capacity of ADOVIR ▪ 75% achieved as planned.
strengthen community structure & to increased. ADOVIR officially handed
prepare phase out plan from old over community school,
target villages. ponds and roads to
communities in Boeng
Snoul village with
recognition from local and
district authorities, CCs,
and Commune and District
Education representatives.

180
▪ KCDA increased capacity in ▪ KCDA increased capacity in ▪ 60% achieved as planned.
implementation of ICD program support SHGs, RCVs,
activities such as support SHGs, community forestry, working
need let CBOs, CCs and community with VCs, VDCs & CCs.
changed agents etc.

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation


1.3.1 Provide training & coaching ▪ Holistic grants ▪ Organized training for partner ▪ Continue coaching.
to CFEDA, KNTO & KCDA staff ▪ Project and Program staff on CBFA, CBDRM and CDP. ▪ 81 RCVs (40 women)
related to capacity building & ▪ Transportation ▪ Provided coaching to partner selected and supported.
support to communities on Training fund/ materials. staff to explain CBDRM
CBDRM. program among CCs, VCs,
VDCs, villagers in 40 villages
and to support them to select
2 RCVs in each village
(1 man and 1 woman).
1.3.2 Provide micro project grants to ▪ This was planned in the
CFEDA, KNTO & KCDA to second semester.
support communities regarding
CBDRM projects.
1.3.3 Provide training & coaching to ▪ Not done ▪ Priority was given in
to CFEDA, KNTO, KCDA & building their capacity on
ADOVIR staff regarding LCP PRA, SHG & basic
assessment in their program. computer. The plan is
rescheduled.
1.3.4 Provide coaching to ADOVIR ▪ Provided mentoring and ▪ Continue coaching
staff regarding strengthening of coaching to ADOVIR related to
community structure and community structure
phase out plan from old target strengthening & phase out
villages. plan from target villages.

181
1.3.5 Provide coaching & support ▪ Provided training & coaching ▪ Continue training follow-up
to KCDA to implement ICD on PRA, SHGs, CBDRM and coaching.
program such as SHGs, support activity, working with VCs,
CCs, & need let CBOs etc. VDCs & CCs.

Output 1.5
Resources mobilized in support ▪ At least one CNGO partner received ▪ Not done will continue
of CNGO partners. fund from other funding agency.

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation


1.5.1 Share funding information & ▪ Project and Program staff ▪ Shared relevant funding ▪ Continue sharing the
establish link between CNGO information to CNGO partners. information
partners and potential donors
donors. ▪ Introduced CFEDA leader to
funding partner of MAG.

Output 1.6
CNGOs, CBOs, CCs etc are to ▪ At least 3 small projects approved ▪ Not done ▪ The grant will be disbursed
implement small projects in support of and implemented (peace building, in the second semester.
the most vulnerable in their community development, food
communities. security, community pond & HIV
focused program etc).
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation
1.6.1 Conduct appraisal of proposal ▪ Project and Program staff ▪ Potential small grant partners ▪ Appraisal of proposal will
and field assessment. ▪ Fund for small project were met to discuss proposal be done in the second
preparation. semester.
1.6.2 Prepare agreement and grant ▪ Not done ▪ Will be done after grant
disbursement. approved.
1.6.3 Monitor project implementation ▪ Not done ▪ Will be done after grant
approved.

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Output 1.7
Vulnerable people provided emergency ▪ At least USD 1,500 made available ▪ Not done ▪ Appropriate request was
relief through CNGO partners. and disbursed through CNGOs for not received.
emergency relief.

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation


1.7.1 Conduct assessment of ▪ ER fund. ▪ Not done ▪ Appropriate request was
emergency situation, prepare ▪ Project staff not received.
for response and monitoring ▪ Transportation.
Output 1.8
Increase public awareness raising ▪ At least USD 400 contributed to ▪ Not done ▪ Appropriate request was
activities through CNGOs & Govt. CNGOs and Govt.Dept for organizing not received.
Departments. of awareness raising events.

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation


1.8.1 Support partners (CNGOs, Govt ▪ Fund. ▪ Not done ▪ Appropriate request was
Depart) to organize the public ▪ Materials and transportation. not received.
awareness events such as ▪ Project staff
International Women's Day, etc
Theme 3: Management and Supervision
OBJECTIVE
Improved program design, monitoring
and evaluation; effective and efficient
implementation; enhanced program
outcomes
Output 3.1: Improved capacity of ▪ Regular visits by project manage- ▪ CNGO partners improved ▪ 100% achieved as planned.
CNGOs to plan, implement, monitor ment staff to CNGO partner management & programmatic Will continue
assess and write report (monitoring of organizational capacity. They manage their
functioning; implementation of org & implement program
activities; problem solving and more effectiveness and more
strategizing; mentoring of partners) beneficial to the target groups.
every two months.

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Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation
3.1.1 Visit and meeting by PM/ DPM ▪ Project and Deputy Manager ▪ Project manager provided ▪ Will continue
to CNGO partners office & field regular meeting/visit to 4
partners (every two months) to
mentor them regarding program
planning & implementation.

Output 3.3: ▪ Regular staff meeting and planning ▪ Monthly staff meeting & ▪ 100% achieved as planned.
Improved program management/ (monthly meeting) planning conducted.
coordination
Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation
3.3.1 Conduct staff meeting & planning ▪ Project staff ▪ Conducted staff meeting & ▪ Continue staff meeting &
planning. planning.

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Church World Service Cambodia

Log- frame Mid-year report FY09


Project Name: Partnership Project - Kompong Thom

Narrative Summary Objectively Verifiable Indicators Actual Out put Variences/Remarks

OVERALL OBJECTIVE:
Theme 1: Capacity Building of CNGOs and Ecumenical Partners
OBJECTIVE: Strengthen the capacity ▪ Holistic CNGO partners and small
of holistic CNGO partners and small project grant recipients have the
project grant reciptients to facilitate necessary organizational system &
program that will effective and technical capacity to carry out
sustainably improve the living condition effective community Development
of the most vulnerable by supporting the vulnerable

Output 1.1: Matured organizational ▪ VMG and core values of new CNGO ▪ CIDC has V,M,G and core ▪ CIDC was selected as
capacity for KORCD and new reviewed value. partner and received fund
holistic partner on December 2008.
▪ Governing board of CNGOs ▪ KORCD conducted board ▪ KORCD conduct the meeting
strengthened meeting twice a year with two board members
and consulted the third member
by phone.
▪ Financial, administrative, staffing ▪ Administrative, staffing policy ▪ Admin and staffing policy
policy of new partner documented of KORCD were revised. The have been improved and
in place and strengthened new partner CIDC created reflect the current situation
the organizational policy & change within the org.
▪ Strategic plan, annual plan and ▪ CIDC have three year-strategic ▪ CIDC received fund amount
proposal documents and report plan, six months plan and US$7,090 to implement
proposal document in place the project in December 2008.
for new partner in place

▪ Implementation, monitoring and ▪ KORCD staff conducted the ▪ KORCD staff conducted

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reporting on time routine monitoring their project field monitoring four days
in 10 villages and report on time. per week and they write the
report to their supervisor.
▪ KORCD and new partner assessed ▪ KORCD and CIDC will ▪ It will be done in May 09
by using CAT assess their organization
in the next semester.

Activities CWS's Inputs Actual Activities Variances/Explanation


1.1.1 Facilitate to review VMG for ▪ Budget, project staff and materials ▪ Not done ▪ CIDC has VMG in place, it
new partner will be reviewed next year.

1.1.2 Support KORCD and new partner ▪ Budget and materials ▪ KORCD conducted the Board ▪ KORCD will review structure
to organize Board meeting and meeting on 7 August 2008. on January 09, after the
Training ( two times per year) recommendation of Board
and Partnership staff.
1.1.3 Provide coaching to new partner ▪ Budget, materials and project staff ▪ Two KORCD staff (Director ▪ The financial report of KORCD
staff and strengthen KORCD on & Account) attended Financial is acceptable and documents
finance, admin, bookkeeping Management training conduc- and policy are in good order
and staffing system ted by Partnership Program. filing.
▪ Provided coaching on admin
tasks to KORCD admin staff
admin staff of KORCD
1.1.4 Facilitate to review/develop strate- ▪ Budget, materials, p