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Name: Dana Gawel, Maxine Minaghan, Taylor Pierce, Ashley Barkan UBD Unit Planning Template

Stage 1 - Desired Results Enduring Understanding: Personal choices greatly affect the environment and through personal choices one can help combat the effects of pollution. Essential Questions: What is air pollution, how does it affect our environment, and what can we do in our everyday lives to reduce air pollution? What waste items are recyclable, reusable, placed in a compost pile, or thrown in a landfill? What is a compost pile and how can a compost pile be made? What is a carbon footprint and how does a carbon footprint affect our environment? What are some measures we can take in our everyday lives to decrease our carbon footprints? Grade Level:

4th

Content Areas Addressed (at least 2): Science Language Arts (Writing)/Reading

Common Core and/or Illinois Standards (depending on subject be sure to include all content areas):
Science 4-ESS3-1. Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and their uses affect the environment. 5-LS2-1. Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.

Unit Objectives (label with the assessment number in Stage 2):

Students will be able to write a proposal based on research conducted in class free of grammatical errors, citing at least 3 sources, provides a position statement, a plan, and support for the plan. (2). Students will be able to explain the relationship between humanity and

5-ESS3-1. Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earths resources and environment.

nature as dependent on one another throughout the duration of this unit through class discussion and classroom activities (1). Students will be able to list at least 5 natural resources after the carbon footprint activity completed in class. Students will be able to list 3 specific examples in order to achieve (more) sustainable households by the end of this unit. Students will be able to formulate ideas and write a reflection on how their own personal choices, especially their eating habits, affect the environment by the end of this unit. (3) Students will be able to define and explain new vocabulary and concepts such as compost pile, landfill, and carbon footprint by the end of this unit.

Common Core: English Language Arts CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2a Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2b Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.9b Apply grade 4 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2e Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.7 Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.8 Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources.

Students will be able to participate in group activities and class discussion throughout the duration of this unit.

Students will be able construct a compost pile while working with a group of their peers.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Stage 2 Assessment Evidence (name the three kinds of assessment you have chosen and provide a brief description of these assessments) Assessment #1: Formative Assessment Quiz Students will be given a quiz. Questions 1-3 will be matching terms and definitions. The fourth question will be in the form of short answer, explaining how people and nature have an impact on each other and the relationship between the two. Assessment #2: Summative Assessment Recycling Proposal Students will work in groups to write a formal proposal for a recycling program for their school to be presented to the principal. Students will have to conduct research to decide how to best implement a recycling program at their school. Assessment #3: Authentic Assessment Compost Pile Students will keep a chart listing the different items that they bring for lunch for an entire week. On this sheet they will list the item and mark whether it is something that can be reused, recycled, put into a compost, or thrown in a landfill. After completing this sheet students will write a short reflection of the effect their lunch habits have on the environment. This reflection will include ways they are helping and ways that they are potentially hurting the planet. For each item that might be hurting, students will offer a specific suggestion for how they are going to change their habits to help combat pollution and environmental damage. Stage 3 Learning Plan

Remember: W: (where/what) H: (hook/hold) E: (equip/experience/explore) R: (rethink/revise) E: (evaluate) T: (tailored) O: (organized) How Many Lessons of What Length? Bullet Your Lesson Plans (specify which lesson you will be submitting as a full lesson plan): Reading The Lorax by Dr. Seuss Students write a response to the prompt How could you be the Lorax where you live? Talking about how our personal choices affect the environment in terms of air pollution. Carbon footprint What is it and the effect on the environment Have students calculate their carbon footprint through http://www.cooltheworld.com/kids carboncalculator.php Have students come up with their own ideas on how to reduce their carbon footprints. Then explain and teach other ways on how you can reduce their carbon footprints. Introduce type of objects are recycled, reused and thrown in a landfill Have students categorize different types of objects.

1 hour (1st lesson)

1 hour (2nd lesson)

30-45 minutes (3rd lesson)

30-45 minutes (4th lesson)

30 minutes (5th lesson) -Students will write down what they had for

Introduction of Lunch Chart and Reflection

lunch daily. This will take 5 minutes each day and on the final data collection students will complete the reflection

Students categorize what is in their lunch each day Write a reflection on how their lunch habits affect the environment Creating a compost pile (observation recorded everyday) Submitting a full lesson plan Students design recycling programs for school Introduction of Student Project Students write a formal proposal for principal Students are given time to complete this in class but expected to do work outside of class Writing workshop on formal letters Lesson on Plagiarism and where to Research

1 hour (6th lesson)-Full lesson plan attached

1 hour (7th lesson)

30 minutes (8th lesson) 30 minutes (9th lesson)

LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE Grade Level/Subject: 4th grade, Science and Language Arts (Writing) Prerequisite Knowledge: Students will be already logging what they are eating for lunch everyday. Students will begin to realize how much waste they are creating from just their lunches and start to think of ways to reduce their waste. Approximate Time: 55 minutes What Lesson is this in your Unit: Students will construct a compost pile to learn about more solutions on how to be less negatively impactful on our environment. This is the 6th lesson in the unit, directly following the lesson introduction of the lunch chart and reflection.

Enduring Understandings: Personal choices greatly affect the environment and through personal choices one can help combat the effects of pollution. Essential Questions: What waste items are recyclable, reusable, placed in a compost, or thrown in a landfill? What is a compost pile and how can a compost pile be made? Student Objectives: Students will be able to define and explain new vocabulary and concepts such as compost pile and landfill. Students will be able to reflect on their own personal choices and their effects on the environment. Students will be able to construct a compost pile and be able to place appropriate materials into the compost pile throughout the unit. Common Core/Illinois Standards: Science: 5-ESS3-1. Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earths resources and environment. Writing: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. Bibliography: "Classroom Composting." Earthday Network. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Nov. 2013. <http://files.earthday.net/lesson%20plans/bobbybigfoot/ESMS_Classroom_Composting.pdf>. "Composting: a guide to making compost at home, using compost tumblers, bins & other composters." Eartheasy: Solutions for a Sustainable Living. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Nov. 2013. <http://eartheasy.com/grow_compost.html>. Materials/Resources/Technology: (Amount of each material varies by class size and class size is unknown at the moment) Each class will be split up into groups of 3-4 and each group will construct a compost pile. -newspaper to place underneath the compost pile when constructing Each group will need: -pair of large scissors -a ruler -pen or pencil to poke holes in the bottle with -2-Liter clear and empty bottle

-One sandwich bag full of organic food waste like vegetable peels, fruit peels, seeds, coffee grounds and filters, eggshells, nutshells, and other food scraps. Do not use dairy or meat products because they will smell. (Earthday, pg. 3) -One sandwich bag full of organic garden waste like grass clippings, sawdust, wood chips, straw, leaves, weeds, paper, and other garden wastes. (Earthday, pg. 3) -A few small non-biodegradable items like glass, aluminum foil, and Styrofoam. -Two pounds of rich, dark, healthy soil. (Earthday, pg. 3) **Depending on the class you can have the students bring in these materials from home! This would be done a week in advance!** Implementation: Time 15 minutes Opening of lesson: (Objectives, hook, behavior expectations) -Students will be expected to be actively listening and participating while also following classroom expectations. Students will be expected to be listening and not talking when the teacher or their classmates are talking. When working in groups students are expected to talk at a low talking voice and do not argue or fight with their classmates. When students are not following these expected behaviors, clips will be moved on the behavior chart. -In order to hook the students, the teacher will ask the students what they had for lunch that day or what they are going to have for lunch that day. The teacher will take and record student responses on the board categorizing items into two three columns. Students will not know how the teacher is categorizing their responses but as students respond they will be challenged to try and figure out how the teacher is categorizing their responses. These columns will be landfill, recycling, and compost pile. The teacher will ask further clarification question such as did you put this in a container, did you put this in a plastic bags, does this food come in a cardboard container, or any question that will help the teacher categorize the food items into these three columns. - After about 6 minutes the teacher will ask for guesses as to how he/she is categorizing what they ate for lunch. Teacher will take student responses for about 3 minutes and then finally reveal what the categories are explaining that why each food product fell into that category. ie: Teacher will explain that organic foods such as bananas and orange peels can go into a compost pile. Items such as plastic bags, straws, any of their leftover food, napkins, paper plates, and cups go into landfills. Finally, items such as bottles and cardboard juice boxes can be recycled.

-The category of a compost pile will be explained and defined. Compost pill will be defined as a collection of organic and kitchen refuse set up so that it decomposes for use in fertilizing. The teacher will also make sure to explain what decompose and fertilize mean. 30 minutes Procedure: Assembling the Compost Pile 1. Place students into groups of 3-4. 2. Have students cut a door in the side of the bottle with scissors. This cut should be 5 inches high and 3 inches wide. (Have students measure with their rulers) Explain to students that this is the opening for adding materials and removing compost. The teacher will walk around helping each group create the door to their compost. 3. Punch a FEW holes (small holes with pencil tip) at the top of the bottle with the tip of the pencils. Explain to students that they cannot make a big hole in the bottle because it will cause a mess. Tell students to discuss with their group why they think our compost needs holes in it. Share answers and it should be explained that these holes serve as aeration for the compost. 4. Instruct students to first add the dirt to their liter bottle. Then add their bag of organic garden waste, then add their bag of vegetable scraps, coffee grounds or eggshells. Ask students why they think these types of items can go in a compost pile. Have students discuss with their groups and not report out the the class yet. 5. Once all objects are placed in the compost pile have the students close the door and secure with a piece of duct tape. Have students set the compost bin on a sunny window. Ask students to discuss with their group on why a compost pile needs to be by a window and why we have to check the compost piles moisture? 6. Have one group member check the compost piles daily. Have one student roll each compost pile daily to mix and aerate the compost. Critical Thinking Questions: -Why do we poke holes in the top of the compost pile? -Why can/cannot certain items go in a compost pile? -How can creating a compost pile help our environment? -What do you think will happen to the items in the compost pile over time? Accommodation for Individuals:

-Students will be placed in flexible groups placing students at high achieving levels and students that may struggle more on content in the same groups. This grouping of students will allow the higher achieving students to help the lower achieving students succeed and learn in a group setting. -Students on behavioral plans will be monitored closely in groups. Groups will be assigned specific jobs such as cutter of the bottle, person placing items in the bottle, hole poker, and taper. Students on behavior plans will be either assigned the task of taping or placing the items into the bottle. The importance of both of these jobs will be shared with the students and this enables these behavior struggling students to engaged in the lesson and feel important. It also takes away these students using a sharp object, which if they are violent, may cause further problems in the classroom. 10 minutes Summary/Closing: -Students will be asked to discuss the questions that were prompted in their groups: -Why do we poke holes in the top of the compost pile? Student responses include: in order to get air. Prompt student to tell more about WHY the compost pile to have air -Discuss what will happen to the item in the compost pile over time? Responses: get smaller, disappear Re-explain the word, decompose, and ask them why they think this occurs -How can creating a compost pile help our environment? Student responses may include: less pollution, less waste Discuss what less waste would mean (smaller landfills). -Then ask why they think large landfills are a problem? If students need prompting, ask students to think back to the carbon footprint activity they did earlier in the unit and to think about the gases released into the air. Could a landfill emit harmful gases and who thinks they know what those gasses are? answer: greenhouse gasses and methane gas (students know this word from their carbon footprint unit) other answers to why landfills are bad: take up space, releases methane a gas that is flammable -Finally tell students that they can help the problem of landfills by creating a compost pile like we did today!

Assessments: Student assessment during this specific lesson will be gauged by student response in discussions at the beginning and end of class. Also, student assessment will be addressed in areas of behavior expectations during discussions and when working in groups. Also, visually each groups compost pile will be checked to see if it was completed accurately. In the future students will finish completed their lunch logs, which they will turn in for completion. Also, students will be given a reflection prompting asking students to discuss what they have learned about their own eating habits and how they can eliminate waste and better the environment. The rubric for this reflection is posted below under Assessment #3. This correlates to this specific lesson because students can talk about how they can create a compost pile to eliminate waste.

Authentic Assessment #3 :

My Environmental Lunch Log-Where Does My Food Go?


Lunch Item Day of Week: M, T, W, Th, F Reuse Recycle Compost Landfill

Rubric to Assess Reflection of Compost Pile

CATEGORY Compost Suggestions

4 Ideas were expressed in a clear and organized fashion. Included a specific suggestion for improvement of habits.

3 Ideas were expressed in a pretty clear manner, but the organization could have been better. Includes specific suggestions for most of compost items.

2 Ideas were somewhat organized, but were not very clear. It took more than one reading to figure out what the letter was about. Minimal suggestions included for

1 The letter seemed to be a collection of unrelated sentences. It was very difficult to figure out what the letter was about. No reflection on suggestions for

ways to change behavior related to compost pile. Sentences & Paragraphs Sentences and paragraphs are complete, wellconstructed and of varied structure. All sentences are complete and wellconstructed (no fragments, no run-ons). Paragraphing is generally done well. Reflection includes an introduction and conclusion that are relatively cohesive, but one or two components are lacking. Writer makes 1-2 errors in grammar and/or spelling. Most sentences are complete and wellconstructed. Paragraphing needs some work.

improvement was included in reflection. Many sentence fragments or run-on sentences OR paragraphing needs lots of work.

Salutation and Closing

Includes a strong introduction and conclusion for reflection that helps to set up description.

Introduction and conclusion of reflection are lacking several components.

Introduction and conclusion are very poorly written or nonexistent in reflection.

Grammar & spelling (conventions)

Writer makes no errors in grammar or spelling.

Writer makes 3-4 errors in grammar and/or spelling

Writer makes more than 4 errors in grammar and/or spelling.

Recycling Proposal Rubric (Assessment #2)

CATEGORY Position Statement

4 - Above Standards
The position statement provides a clear, strong statement of the authors\' position on implementing a recycling program. Includes 3 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, reallife experiences) that support the recycling proposal. The writer anticipates the reader\'s concerns, biases or arguments. Includes a detailed plan of what the recycling program would look like at the school at the daily level. Plan could be implemented realistically. Students have at least three sources that are cited correctly in MLA citation. Authors make

3 - Meets Standards
The position statement provides a clear statement of the author\'s position on implementing a recycling program.

2 - Approaching Standards
A position is present, but does not make the author\'s position clear.

1- Below Standards
The position does not make any logical sense.

Support for Position

Includes 3 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement.

Includes 2 pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement.

Includes 1 or fewer pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences).

Plan

Includes a plan of what the recycling program would look like at the school. Plan may be slightly unrealistic but should still be very plausible.

Includes a plan of what the recycling program would look like at the school but is not fully thought out. Plan does not seem very doable.

Includes a very minimal plan of what the recycling plan would look like at the plan. May not make sense or be practical.

Sources

Students have at least three sources but they are not cited correctly.

Students have only two or less sources. The sources are correctly cited in MLA formatting.

Students have only two or less sources. The sources are not cited correctly.

Grammar &

Authors make 1-2

Authors make 3-4 errors in

Authors make more

Spelling

no errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.

errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.

grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.

than 4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.

Assignment Sheet for Recycling Proposal 20 Points In groups of four students will research, plan and write a proposal to be given to the principal to implement a recycling program. Currently no recycling program exists and as we have learned this is only damaging our Earth! Students will need: A position statement: Why should the principal care about recycling? Possible counter-arguments- Why would people not want to implement a recycling program at the school? At least three pieces of evidence: Why does the school need a recycling program? Can include statistics, facts, examples of other schools programs. At least three sources cited using MLA formatting Students will be expected to work on some of this at home but will also be given class time to complete the assignment. Due December 18th

Quiz
(Assessment #1) Place the letter with the correct definition next to the correct term. _________ Pollution _________ Recycling _________ Carbon footprint

A. Amount of carbon dioxide emitted by consumption of fossil fuels B. Presence of a substance that is poisonous or harmful to the environment C. Process of converting waste into reusable material Do people and nature have an impact on each other? Why or why not. ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________

Answer Key
Matching definitions
1. B 2. C 3. A

Short Answer Portion


In order for students to receive full credit answers will include at least two of the following: people are a part of nature; people use the earths resources to survive; humans do give back to nature (such as exhaling carbon dioxide) Short answers must include (or demonstrate understanding) that the relationship between people and nature is also a balance.

Rubric Please attach the rubric to your assignment when you submit it. This assignment is worth 15% or 150 points
4-8 UBD Planning Template One major omission of an applicable standard and/or objective. Poor alignment of standards and objectives. 9-12 Minor omissions or mismatches 13-15 All components of UBD planning template are complete. Standards and objectives are appropriate for grade level; are clearly related to each other; address all aspects of learning in actual lesson. Objectives include all required components including the enduring understandings and essential questions.

Objectives

Objectives are not written in ABCD format OR Objectives do not align with the assessment created. The lesson plan is not complete and clear enough to be used by another person; OR topic and/or activity entirely inappropriate for grade level; OR activity has little/no

Objectives are missing one component of the ABCD format.

Objectives are articulated using ABCD format and are aligned with the assessment created.

Lesson Plan

Minor problems with clarity, organization, and/or sequencing; OR Topic and activities might be better for a grade level above or below the one selected; OR

Information is very organized and is easy to follow (plan could easily be taught by someone other than authors). Sequencing is appropriate and logical. Topic and activity(ies) are clearly appropriate for the

relationship to objectives; OR activity has no creativity.

Relationship to one objective not as strong as it could be; OR A little tweaking would have improved activity quality.

grade level. At least two subject areas are clearly and authentically integrated throughout the lesson. The activity includes some creativity; goes Minor problems beyond read the text with references; and do the questions. unclear about one The activity clearly of the materials, facilitates student and/or quality of achievement of the worksheet could be objectives. better. All materials are Special need or listed. Bibliographical accommodation references are written not quite clear. using an appropriate format (including web Critical thinking references). questions lack clarity/are not Worksheets or similar designed to material attached if cultivate used. thoughtfulness in students. At least 2 accommodations included: proposed accommodations are appropriate for the special need and grade level, and are clearly described. Critical thinking questions are thoughtful, clearly articulated, and designed to cultivate thoughtfulness in students.

Assessment #1

Assessment does not align with the objectives created

Minor omissions or mismatches

Assessment aligns with the stated objectives. Appropriate for grade level. Clear instructions that are easy for grade level students to follow. Answer key provides answers to all quiz/test questions as well as states how many points each answer is worth. Rubric provides clear expectations of performance by the students and aligns with the assessment assignment sheet. Students at grade level can understand rubric. Point values are clearly delineated.

Rubric/Answer Key #1

No answer key provided or no rubric provided.

Minor omissions or mismatches

Assessment #2

Assessment does not align with the objectives created

Minor omissions or mismatches

Assessment aligns with the stated objectives. Appropriate for grade level. Clear instructions that are easy for grade level students to follow. Answer key provides answers to all quiz/test questions as well as states how many points each answer is worth. Rubric provides clear

Rubric/Answer Key #2

No answer key provided or no rubric provided.

Minor omissions or mismatches

expectations of performance by the students and aligns with the assessment assignment sheet. Students at grade level can understand rubric. Point values are clearly delineated. Assessment #3 Assessment does not align with the objectives created Minor omissions or mismatches Assessment aligns with the stated objectives. Appropriate for grade level. Clear instructions that are easy for grade level students to follow. Answer key provides answers to all quiz/test questions as well as states how many points each answer is worth. Rubric provides clear expectations of performance by the students and aligns with the assessment assignment sheet. Students at grade level can understand rubric. Point values are clearly delineated. Grammar/Spelling/Neatn ess More than 5 grammar/spelling errors OR UBD template, assessment or rubric have major neatness or 5 or fewer grammar/spelling errors. OR UBD template, assessment or rubric have minor neatness or No grammar/spelling errors. UBD template, assessment and rubric are neat and professional.

Rubric/Answer Key #3

No answer key provided or no rubric provided.

Minor omissions or mismatches

professionalism issues.

professionalism issues.

Additional points (up to 8) may be deducted for grammar and spelling issues. Please proofread. Please note: While the individual submissions are not listed on this rubric, failure to complete them by the due date or in a professional manner will result in a deduction of as much as 15 points from your individual grade.