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Funded through an English Literacy Civics Education Grant

Obtained from the North Carolina Community College System


9101 Fayetteville Road— Raleigh, NC 27603 — 919.662.3400
Contents
Introduction………………………………………….. 1
Acknowledgements…………………………………....1
Lesson Plans/Projects.……………………………….. 2
Level 1-2 (Lower Levels) ……………………………….……. .3
1. Changes in Life, Sevda’s Story………………………………………………4
2. Feelings and Family, Olga’s Story…………………………………..............14
3. Emergency Wallet Cards ……………………………………………………19
4. The American Flag…………………………………………………………..25
5. To the Library………………………………………………………………..30

Level 3-4 (Intermediate Levels) ………………………………… 38


1. Nothing is Impossible, Karina’s Story…………………………………….…39
2. Life Choices, Elizabeth’s Story ……………………………………………...44
3. First Day in ESL Class, Rosario’s Story………………………………….… 48
4. Accessing Health Care in Wake County………………………………………...65
5. Every Day is Earth Day (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle) …………………………72

Level 5-6 (Higher Levels) …………………………………. …..84


1. Special Mi-Yeok-Kook………………………………………………..……..85
2. Coincidences, Various Stories…………………………………………..…...95
3. Coming of Age, Belen’s Story…………………………………………..….104
4. Misunderstanding, Laura’s Story………………………………………..….110
5. Volunteering and Philanthropy: Andrew Carnegie………………………....117
6. What Does It Mean to be An American? …………………………………..121

Resources…………………………………………….. 136
Community Resources……………………………………………………………….137
Online Resources…………………………………………………………………….139
Volunteering Information…………………………………………...……………….141

Note for Teachers


All levels are approximate, as the make-up of every class is different. Also, many of the lessons can be
used at several levels, especially if they are slightly adapted. Several of the lessons include ideas for
community service projects. Others mention community resources that are available for teachers and
students. A list of additional resources in the Wake County area, as well as other ideas for volunteering, is
located at the back of this booklet.
EL/Civics Lessons, Materials and Projects: 2004-2009
English Literacy/Civics Education is an educational program that emphasizes instruction
on the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, naturalization procedures, civic
participation and US history and government to help students acquire the skills and
knowledge to become active and informed parents, workers and community members.
The Wake Technical Community College EL/Civics program aims to provide adult ESL
students with civic and community resources and information, as well as increase
students’ community involvement through volunteerism.
Over the past five years as part of the EL/Civics grant, Wake Tech ESL instructors have
developed hundreds of lessons that take our students on a journey from the classroom to
the community. Including all of these lessons would have been an impossible task, so the
materials in this book are a small collection highlighting some of the civics lessons they
have created. The contents cover all levels of ESL and are on a variety of topics. We
hope that you find them of interest. If so, we have also provided a CD of the lessons to
better enable you to adapt and print the materials for your own use.
We look forward to continuing EL/Civics Education with our ESL students at Wake
Technical Community College. It is our hope this book and accompanying CD will be a
much used resource for you and your ESL classes.

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the following teachers for their contributions to this publication:
(in alphabetical order)

Cathryn Butzow, Julia Campbell, Karen Cason, Lisa Uribe Ceciliano, Steve Dees, Diana
Hoehne, Meredith Hoffman, Yari Johnson, Michele Lopez, Guzel Nabatova Barrett, Beth
Parent, Ann Ritter, Carron Santos, Marissa Schiffman, and Anne Tekmen.

…and, of course, to our students for their beautiful stories: Sevda, Olga, Karina,
Elizabeth, Rosario, Liliana, Zelmira, Cesar, Teresa Lara, Belen, Laura, and Eunyi.

We are also very grateful to many others, both teachers and students, who have
contributed their lessons, their time and their effort in order to help complete this project.
It was definitely a team effort. Thank you!

Angela Thompson, Project Coordinator


English Literacy/Civics Education Grant
Wake Technical Community College
Basic Skills Department
9101 Fayetteville Rd.
Raleigh, NC 27603-5696
(919) 334-1544
abthompson@waketech.edu

1
LESSON PLANS
AND
PROJECT IDEAS

2
LEVEL
1&2
LESSONS

3
Changesin Life
SetJJa'sStory

Where isshefrom?
Howdoesshefeel?

My nameis Sevda AygUn.I am from Turkey. In NC I

~
am happy~, and I am scared.

becauseI don't knowEnglish.I am embarrassed. about my

English.I am homesick for my family fItt andmy


i~~ ~
mothers bread §:V a,ndcooking. ~~ Before I was sad
~ I like my
but nowI am happy. -.x I like my class. ~((V!,{~

~ ~
teacher and students. I am married. ,6tt I am happy. ~.

4
Picture Dictionary

Point to the pictures you hear:

~
scared
~
.".~~.
~

happy embarrassed homesick

~ \..
¥
"
J"'
..
" "
"
,
...

".~'
~

confused angry in love sad

,,

Pi
surprised nervous bored frustrated

~
""

f",,~

~~,
excited tired

5
Writing:

A. Answer the questions by checking the boxes.

1. Sevda feels:

D happy D mad D embarrassed


D D D
in love sad scared

2. What does she like?

D teacher D friends'
D D
class students

B. Fill in the blanks.

My name is Sevda AygUn.I am from Turkey. In NC I am


and I am . lam becauseI

don't knowEnglish.I am about my English.I


am for my family and my mothers bread and
cooking. Before I was but now I am .I

like my class. I like my teacher and students. I am married. I am

6
Class discussion

Change =
when life is not the same anymore, when life is different.

How do you feel about change?

Do you like change?

When you came to NC, how did you feel?

What do you like about your new home?

What do you miss about your old home?

7
Tell your ownstory

My name is . I am from

When I came to America I was

I was because

In America, I like

I miss

8
Class project

Encourage others who are going through change to


talk about how they feel too.

As a class, make cards for kids or adults in the hospital. In the


cards, have the students includetheir stories to encourage
others to talk about howthey feel as they go through change.
One way to do this wouldbe to end each story with, "Howdo you
feel about change?" If you want to distribute the cards to kids at
Wake Medical Center in Raleigh,you can contact Children's Life
at 350-8832. They willhelp you set up a time to give the cards to
Children's Life so they can distribute them. If you are interested
in givingcards to another hospital, volunteer services can help
direct your call to the proper channels.

Duke RaleighHospital Volunteer Services - 954-3882


Rex Health Care Volunteer Services - 784-3165
Durham RegionalHospitaJ Votunteer Services - 919-470-4150

9
Game 1
Directions:
-+ Each student chooses a game marker.
-+ The first student rolls a die.
-+ Next, they draw a card. They must make a sentence with the pronoun
they
landed on and the emotion that they drew. For example: "They are
happy."
-+ After they make a sentence, it is the next person's tm'n.
-+ The first student to reach the end wins

Game 2
-+ Print out two sets of the playing cards.
-+ Have the students lay the cards out face down.
-+ The students take tm'ns tm'ning over 2 cards and saying what emotions
are on the cards. lfthe cards are the same, they keep the pair. lfthe cards
are different, they put them back on the table face down, and it is the
next person's tm'n.
-+ The game is over when all the pairs are found.

10
t\. t'\ P
'I ."~~
' .' ~" .
..
~~,
.. .. .
~ ---

11
Game markers

~
~ ' .

~ ....
12
START Go ahead 2 Miss one turn
she they
spaces
.[i
~~
Go back 2
he spaces

you
she he

Miss one
Go ahead 2 turn
you
spaces

he END
we

Go back 2
spaces Take the
we Shortcut
we Pass

you
they

Take an extra
turn

Take an extra
she turn they
you

13
Heart of the Community…Part of the Community
Family and Feelings Lesson
Michelle Lopez – ESL Instructor – Level 1 - 2
St. Savior’s Center Supervisor Robin Abdelilah

Objectives
ƒ To learn about family members and feelings
ƒ To identify family members and feelings
ƒ To discuss what students can do to manage homesickness
ƒ To learn about memory boxes and make one

Materials
ƒ Olga’s Immigrant photo and story
ƒ Family practice handout
ƒ Feelings opposites handout
ƒ Sample memory box

Warm up
ƒ Read the story and repeat
ƒ Practice pronunciation of words and sentences
ƒ Define unknown words

Vocabulary Lesson
ƒ Present family members vocabulary
ƒ Verbs to be and to have – present tense

Practice
ƒ Olga’s Story reading comprehension and dictation fill in
ƒ Complete family practice exercises
ƒ Identify feelings in story
ƒ Present and practice feelings opposites

Application
ƒ Discuss what Olga does when she is homesick
ƒ Ask students what they do
ƒ Explain and demonstrate the concept of a memory box
ƒ Brainstorm ideas for what to put in
ƒ Students copy ideas and choose ideas for own box
ƒ Determine who or what items represent
ƒ Have students show their memory boxes to daycare and church groups
and discuss how to make one

Sample memory box ideas – photos, magazine pages, cds/dvds, books,


quotes, poems, letters, ticket stubs, receipts, greeting or post cards, recipes,
food or candy labels, jewelry, clothing, buttons, art work, napkins, favors, etc.

14
Olga

I felt scared when I came to the USA.

Now I feel happy because I have my two sisters

and my husband here. Sometimes I call my mother

in Mexico. I miss my mother and brother and

my nephew. When I am homesick I listen to music.

Please read the story. Then read the following and circle yes or no.

Olga came to the US from Mexico. yes no


She is scared now. yes no
Her mother and brother are here. yes no
Olga’s husband is in Mexico. yes no
Her sisters are here. yes no
She misses her mother. yes no
Olga listens to music. yes no

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Please tear off this section for dictation exercise.

Olga’s story

I felt scared when _____ came to the _________.

Now I feel __________ because I have my two ______________

and my ____________ here. Sometimes I call my ______________

in Mexico. I ________ my mother and _______________ and

my _____________. When I am _________________ I listen to

______________.

15
The Family

Female members Male members both plural

grandmother grandfather grandparents


mother father parents
wife husband
daughter son children
sister brother siblings
aunt uncle
niece nephew
granddaughter grandson grandchildren
cousin cousin cousins

Family Practice
Please read the sentence, underline and fill in.
Example - My mother is here / in my country Mexico .

My mother is here / in my country ___________________ .

My father is here / in my country ____________________ .

My grandmother is here / in my country _________________ .

My grandfather is here / in my country __________________ .

Please fill in the spaces with number words.


Example - I have two sisters and one brother.

I have _________ sisters and ________ brothers.

_________ sisters are here and ___________ are in my country.

_________ brothers are here and ___________ are in my country.

I have ____________ children, ___________ are here and

_________in my country.

16
The Family Matching Game

Please match the female and male family members with correct letter. The first
one has been done for you.

__h__ son a- aunt

____ brother b- granddaughter

____ wife c- nephew

____ grandmother d- husband

____ uncle e- sister

____ grandson f- mother

____ niece g- grandfather

____ father h- daughter

My Family
Please fill in your family member’s name.

My mother’s name is _________________________.


My father’s name is __________________________.
My husband’s / wife’s name is _____________________.
My children’s names are _________________________________
___________________________________ and ____________________.
My sisters’ names are ____________________________________.
My brothers’ names are __________________________________.
I miss my _________________________________________________.

17
Feelings opposites
Please practice saying the opposites with a partner.

A B
happy sad
good bad
easy difficult
bored excited
surprised worried
nervous confident
scared not scared
embarrassed proud
tired not tired
at home homesick
miss not miss

Please say the word you have with a partner.

A B A B

happy --- ----- sad


---- bad good ---
easy --------- ---- difficult
bored ------- ----- excited
--------- worried surprised -------
nervous --------- ------- confident
------ not scared scared --- ------
embarrassed ----- ---------- proud
tired --------- ----- not tired
-- ---- homesick at home --------
miss ---- not miss

18
Emergency Wallet Cards
Adapted from lesson by: Lisa Uribe Ceciliano, Fall 2007, WTCC (COC)

Objective
To familiarize students with what to do in an emergency in which they would deal with police, firefighters,
paramedics or emergency room staff. Also, to create and distribute a wallet card that would contain all
pertinent information necessary in an emergency.

Materials
Oxford Picture Dictionary, p.82 (B,C); p.100,102 (#2,7,8,9)
REALIA: health insurance card, car insurance card, vehicle registration card, police accident report form

Warm-Up/Introduction
Initiate a discussion regarding emergency situations. Discuss interactions students may have had with
police, firefighters, and EMS personnel in the US vs. in their native countries. Discuss problems and areas
of concern.

Content
Using the Oxford Picture Dictionary, teach vocabulary related to emergencies. Discuss 911 and how to ask
for help or how to ask for a translator. Discuss what information accident victims need to have on hand in
students’ native countries.

As a class, brainstorm questions for police/firefighters/EMS/ER staff regarding emergencies so we can


understand what information accident victims need to have on hand in this country to facilitate help from
these first responders. (These questions will be used during the homework assignment.)
**Assign specific questions to specific students and practice asking those questions, focusing on
pronunciation of difficult vocabulary so students will feel comfortable using them during the
homework assignment.

Practice
Role-play a 911 call for a car accident.
Role-play a car accident with a “victim” and a “first-responder.”

Game: “Sentence Add-Along”


The purpose of this is to orally re-create a dialogue by going around the room and having each student add
one new sentence to the conversation. This requires everyone to listen to what has been said by the
previous people so subsequent students can add to the next line.
The teacher begins by saying, “911. What’s your emergency?”
1st student adds, “I had an accident and I need the police.”
Next student adds, “What’s your location?”
Next student adds, “I’m on Western Blvd., near Blue Ridge Rd.”
Next student adds, “Is anyone hurt?”
And so on, until the conversation is complete. The exact wording of each sentence is flexible, as long as the
flow of the conversation is appropriate. As a follow-up, students can write down the conversation in pairs
and re-enact it, each taking one of the roles.

REPEAT this game with an accident involving a “police officer” and a “victim.” The teacher can begin as
the policeman and the students will continue as the victim and the police officer.

Homework (Part I)
Take a field grip to the local police and fire stations. The students will ask their questions to the policemen,
firemen, or paramedics (or EMT). By previously assigning specific questions to specific students, everyone
will have the opportunity and responsibility to speak with each first responder. For example, ‘Maria” will
be assigned at least one question for each the fireman, policeman, and paramedic, thereby asking a
minimum of three questions.

19
As an alternative, students could choose to work in pairs (or trios) to ask their questions to the first
responders. Any student may ask questions that may come to mind during the course of the field trip, but it
will be the job of one group to ask the class questions to the police officer. Another group will be assigned
the fireman, and the third group will be assigned the paramedic. Each group will have enough questions so
that each student within the group will be required to question their “first responder.” In other words, there
will be no “spokesperson” for any group. All members must ask at least 1 question, and the teacher can
supervise this.
By assigning specific questions to specific students (using either method), all students will have the
responsibility to speak with at least one or up to three first responders directly. NOTE: Our class used the
first method, with each student speaking with each first responder.

*When field trips are not a possibility (esp. in evening classes), the teacher can invite the first responders
(police, firefighter, paramedic) to come as guest speakers.

Homework (Part II)


Guest speakers (if available): an NC Trooper and an ER nurse
Arrange a visit by an NC State Trooper who will discuss how students can be prepared to deal with the
State Trooper at the scene of an accident. (It is my understanding that while some students may have had
interactions with local police officers, not many students have had interactions with State Troopers, who
tend to be more imposing and more intimidating…even to Americans.)
Arrange a visit by an emergency room nurse who will discuss what students can do to be prepared for a
visit to an emergency room. What information does the hospital staff need, and what can a student expect
as a patient?
Students will also have an opportunity to ask questions to elicit information to be included in the “Wallet
Card” community service project.

Evaluation (attached)
Fill in the blank (4 sentences)
Circle the correct answer (3 sentences)
True or False (5 sentences)
Name 5 (5 pieces of information)

Community Service Project


Our class project was to create and distribute “Wallet Cards” for use in case of an emergency. We chose
our topic based on a discussion of when situations are difficult due to English. We discussed a variety of
topics, but the one that stood out was interactions involving police, specifically, but expanded to include
emergency workers. As a result of our discussions regarding emergency situations, we came up with the
idea of “compiling” all pertinent information that would be necessary or helpful in an emergency. This
information would be put on a small card that native and non-native English speakers could fill out and
keep in their wallets in case of an emergency.
To determine what information would be important (beyond the usual name, address, and phone number),
the students compiled questions for a policeman, fireman and paramedic.
For the “homework” assignment, we had a North Carolina State Highway Patrol visit our class to discuss
this information. When he was finished, the students asked their assigned questions, in addition to their
own questions which came up during the officer’s visit. We also went on a field trip to the local police and
fire stations so the students could question a policeman, fireman, and EMT. Both the class visit and the
field trip were very informative, and all students participated in questioning the first responders. As a result
of the “homework assignment,” we were able to create a two-sided wallet card to be distributed to students
and their families for use in an emergency. The students visited the other classrooms at our site to explain
and distribute these important cards. It is also our hope that these cards might be made available for
distribution at other sites, perhaps as part of the new student registration process.

20
Example of questions students brainstormed
(*assign each student a question for each category-- to be asked during the field trip, or during a
guest speaker visit)

Questions for Raleigh Police Officer

1. What is your response time?


2. How many languages to officers speak?
3. Do Raleigh police work with immigration?
4. Please explain International Driver’s License.
5. Do you need a license and insurance to operate a moped? / Where can I drive a
moped?
6. What is the speed limit for motorcycles? Do policemen stop motorcycles for
speeding?
7. What happens if I drive alone with only a learner’s permit?
8. Is I.C.E. (In Case of Emergency) helpful on cell phones?

Questions for Raleigh Firefighter

1. What is your response time?


2. How many languages to firemen speak?
3. What happens if there is a false alarm? Do you need to pay for a false alarm?
4. How can I put out a small fire?
5. Where should I put fire extinguishers in my home?

Questions for Paramedic

1. What is your response time?


2. If I need an ambulance, how much does it cost?
3. If an ambulance comes, but I don’t need it, how much is it?
4. Is I.C.E. (In Case of Emergency) helpful on cell phones?
5. What information do you need in an accident?
6. Does the ambulance have blood for transfusions?

Questions for NC State Trooper

1. What is your response time?


2. How many languages to officers speak?
3. What documents do I need to show police in an accident?
4. What if I don’t have a license, or registration or insurance?
5. Do the police work with immigration?
6. If there is a funeral procession, what should I do?
7. Why are there empty police cars parked in lots “everywhere”?
8. Should I call 911 for an Amber Alert? / What if I don’t have documents?
9. Please explain International Driver’s License.
10. If I’m in an accident, should I move my car or leave it where it is?

21
Evaluation

A. Fill in the blanks in the sentences below.

1. I should call _________________ in an emergency.


2. I need to show the police my ________________ and _______________ after an
accident.
3. _________________ is the biggest problem on roads in NC.
4. If I live in NC and I drive a car, I need a __________ ______________.

B. Circle the correct answer.

1. In an emergency, the response time for police and firefighters is:


a) less than 10 minutes
b) 10 minutes
c) more than 10 minutes

2. If I need an ambulance, the cost is:


a) $100
b) $300
c) $500

3. If the police stop my car, I should:


a) give some money to the police officer
b) be polite to the officer
c) get out of the car and put my hands in the air
d) cry

C. Circle true (T) or false (F) for each sentence.

1. I should continue driving if there is a funeral procession. T F


2. Police officers and firefighters speak many different languages. T F
3. I should call 911 for an Amber Alert. T F
4. It’s ok to drive alone if I have a learner’s permit. T F
5. 911 has translators if I don’t speak English well. T F

D. Name 5 things that the police, firefighters or paramedics need from you:

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

22
Emergency Contact Information Emergency Contact Information
Name: Name:

Address: Address:

Tel. Number: Tel. Number:

Language: Language:

Allergies: Allergies:

Prior Health Problems: Prior Health Problems:

Blood Type: Blood Type:

Date of Birth: Date of Birth:

Emergency Contact #1 Emergency Contact #1


Name: Name:

Relationship: Relationship:

Tel. Number: Tel. Number:

Language: Language:

Emergency Contact Information Emergency Contact Information


Name: Name:

Address: Address:

Tel. Number: Tel. Number:

Language: Language:

Allergies: Allergies:

Prior Health Problems: Prior Health Problems:

Blood Type: Blood Type:

Date of Birth: Date of Birth:

Emergency Contact #1 Emergency Contact #1


Name: Name:

Relationship: Relationship:

Tel. Number: Tel. Number:

Language: Language: 23
Additional Information Additional Information
Health Insurance Co: Health Insurance Co:

Policy #: Policy #:

Tel Number: Tel Number:

Car Insurance Co: Car Insurance Co:

Policy #: Policy #:

Tel Number: Tel Number:

Car Registration #: Car Registration #:

Emergency Contact #1 Emergency Contact #1


Name: Name:

Relationship: Relationship:

Tel. Number: Tel. Number:

Language Language

Additional Information Additional Information


Health Insurance Co: Health Insurance Co:

Policy #: Policy #:

Tel Number: Tel Number:

Car Insurance Co: Car Insurance Co:

Policy #: Policy #:

Tel Number: Tel Number:

Car Registration #: Car Registration #:

Emergency Contact #1 Emergency Contact #1


Name: Name:

Relationship: Relationship:

Tel. Number: Tel. Number:

Language Language
24
~
.,

The American Flag


EL Civics project lesson plan
Beth Parent
Beginning 1

Introduction: The American flag symbolizes our country in so many ways. When we look at it,
we not only think of the country as it is today, but also how it was in the beginning and how it
has developed through the centuries. When we see the red, white and blue, we are reminded of
what our country stands for: courage, purity, justice and freedom.
Knowledge of the flag is important for anyone with a goal of American citizenship
because several of the famous (infamous?) 100 questions are related to the flag, its history and
the U.S. history it represents.

Objectives: Students will learn what the American flag looks like in detail. They will understand
the traditional meanings of the colors on the flag and the reason for the number of stars and
stripes. They will know what the fIrst 13 states were. They will learn what Americans do when
they say the "Pledge of Allegiance" or hear/sing the national anthem. They will also learn
(though not memorize) the pledge and learn how to correctly fold the flag.

Goals: Students will present the information they learn to a higher level ESL class, so not only
10thev have to understand what thev learn. but they also need to have excellent nronunciation in
order to be understood.

Materials: Cloze passage


Completed passage with pledge and quiz
Small American flag for use as visual aid
Large flag for folding

*Introduce new vocabulary word by word with Hangman. After each Hangman puzzle is solved,
write word on the board and give students equivalent in their language. (I'he objective of this
lesson was that the students learn a little bit of the history and meaning of the American flag as
well as the "Pledgeof Allegiance." I didn't wantthe difficultvocabularyto get in the wayof
their understanding, and I also wanted them to learn the new words, but since they are beginning
1 students, they don't yet have the vocabulary needed to have these words explained to them in
English. Therefore, whereas I would normally teach students new words in context, I decided to
teach these words bilingually because the information not the vocabulary, was the mainfocus of
the lesson.)
-bravery
- Courage
- Purity
- Stremrth
-Fairness
-Justice
-Pledge
- Allegiance

25

--t
\l'- ~

- Republic
-Nation
-Indivisible
- Liberty
*Cloze passage completion with dictation. (1removed vocabulary that the students already knew.
1 also took out "there is, " "there are" and "there were" in order to highlight that grammatical
form. They were not required tofill in blanks with any of the new words.)

*Go over answers to fill-ins, having students spell words aloud.

*Hand out comDletedDaral!faDhswith "Pledl!e of Allegiance" included and commehension Quiz


on the back.

*Students take turns reading hand-out aloud. Stop after each paragraph to check comprehension
and make sure students are all together. Answer any questions students have.

*Practice the "Pledge of Allegiance" as a group.

*Students complete comprehension questions. Go over answers as a class.

*Fold the flag (each student gets a chance to practice).

Project: Presentation

The doze passage that students completed in the flag lesson will now become the script
for their presentation. They will create posters (based on their own understanding of the flag,
etc.) to accompany each portion of the script as a visual aid. These posters will be student-
conceived and created with only minimal teacher direction because I want them to convey their
understanding of and take on the information in the presentation, not mine.

26
~
~

The American Flag


The flag of the United States of America has three colors. They are red, white and

blue. Red stands for bravery and courage. White stands for purity. Blue stands for

strength and fairness.

There are thirteen horizontal stripes on the flag. Seven stripes are red, and six

stripes are white. In the top left comer of the flag, there is a blue rectangle with fifty

white stars. There are thirteen stripes because there were thirteen original states. There

are fifty stars because there are fifty 'states today.

The first thirteen states were Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia,

Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, New

Hampshire, Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

When Americans hear the national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner," they

stand up, look at the flag and put their hands over their hearts. They also stand, look at

the flag and put their hands over their hearts when they say "The Pledge of Allegiance."

'"ThePledge of Allegiance"
I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America
And to the republic for which it stands,
One nation under God, indivisible,
With liberty and justice for all.

27

t- .~
The American Flag
The flag of the United States of has

colors. They are and . Red stands for

bravery and courage. White stands for purity. Blue for strength and

fairness.

There are horizontal stripes on the

Seven stripes are red, and six are white. In the top left comer of the

flag, there is a blue with fifty white . There

thirteen stripes because there thirteen original states. There

are fifty stars because there are states today.

The first thirteen were Georgia, South Carolina,

, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey, New

York, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

When Americans hear the national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner," they

-' look at the flag and put their hands over their hearts. They also

stand, look at the flag and put their over their hearts when they say

"The Pledge of Allegiance."

28

\!- ~I
1. What color is NOT on the American flag?
A. Blue
B. White
C. Green
D. Blue

2. Which state was one of the original 13 states?


A. Delaware
B. Michigan
C. Texas
D. Florida

"
J. What is the name of the national anthem?
A. "America the Beautiful"
B. "God Bless Amerioa"
C. "The Pledge of Allegiance"
D. "The Star-Spangled Banner"

4. What does the color white stand for?


A. Clean
B. Purity
C. Toilet paper
D. White people

5. Why are there thirteen stripes?


A. because 13 is a lucky number
B. to represent the first 13 presidents
C. to represent the fIrst 13 states
D. because 13 people made the first flag

6. What do Americans do when they hear the national anthem?


A. They eat chicken.
B. They stand up.
C. They put their hands over their hearts.
D. Both Band C

29
EL/CIVICS Community Service/Volunteer Project Fall 2007

Lesson: “To the Library”; Instructor: Julia Campbell, Wake Tech Community College

Topics:
• Getting a library card
• Checking out a book
• Inviting someone from the community to become a member of the library

Level: 1-2 (Beginners)

Lesson Objectives:

The student will be able to:


• Provide personal information by filling in a public library registration form
• Describe a public library and locate different books
• Learn about library services and programs
• Ask for a library card
• Obtain a library card
• Check out a book
• Write a simple book report
• Complete a project report
• Invite someone from the community to become a member of the library

Materials:

Public library card application form


Public library sample card
Public library floor plan
Public library calendar of events
Public library general information brochures
Book report card
Activity sheet
Project report cloze activity sheet
Sample of children’s picture book, audio CDs, magazines, novels
Transparency of The Oxford Picture Dictionary, p. 4 and p.98
Transparency of All Star 1, page 39

Textbooks:

All Star 1, Unit 2, Lesson 6


All Star 1, Unit 3, Lesson 2
The Oxford Picture Dictionary, Personal information, p.4
The Oxford Picture Dictionary, A Library, p. 98

Warm up

The teacher will show students her library cards and ask them what it is. Then she will project a picture of a
library and ask if they have ever been to one in America. The instructor will tell students about the
importance of public libraries and the variety of programs and services that students can find in different
library branches. She/he will then tell students that they will visit the nearest public library, obtain a card,
and check out a book. Finally, the teacher will encourage students to bring a friend or family member to the
library and repeat the same procedure they did in their field trip. The teacher will make clear that before
that big day, students will go over a series of steps and preparations.

30
Content

The teacher will:


• Introduce “library” vocabulary from picture dictionary and other resources, such as All Star 1
(parts of a library and library sections)
• Introduce a real public library card application form and teach how to complete it with personal
information
• Introduce ways of asking for personal information (Wh questions: What’s your name? Where do
you live?) and library information (Where are the videos?)
• Circulate the public library general information brochure
• Teach how to ask for a specific place or section in the library (Is there a…? Are there…? Yes,
there is. It’s next to/near/in the back of the… Where is/are the…?)
• Distribute public library events calendar to discuss various programs taking place at the library
• Show a library floor plan and teach different sections
• Talk about types of books and areas of location
• Inform students about renewal and returning procedures
• Set a due date for students to bring their books, audio CDs, etc. and book report card to be shared
in class
• Divide the class into pairs and hand in an activity sheet
• Gather feedback about the civics project
• Encourage students to bring friends or family members to the library so they can also become
members

Practice/Games

• Practice vocabulary by completing the Oxford Picture Dictionary workbook page


• Listen and repeat new vocabulary
• Review vocabulary by playing hangman on the board
• Write words next to the correct picture (All Star 1)
• Listen to new vocabulary and match it with the corresponding picture in their books
• Read sentences in each picture of about library procedures (All Star 1)
• Fill in a library application form
• Asking and answering about personal information (pair work) through role-playing
• Describe a library and its different sections through the dictionary transparency or library brochure
• Ask and answer where library material is located (Where are the computers? Is there a children’s
book section?) through a library floor plan or All Star 1 transparency.
• Exchange information on the calendar of events and choose their favorite program
• Browse different book genres and library material and say where it can be located
• Read library return and renewal procedures
• Write a brief book report and share it with the rest of the class
• Get in pairs and complete an activity sheet
• Provide feedback about the civics project
• Bring family members or friends to the library so they can also become members

Evaluation

Students will:
• Show the instructor their new library cards
• Bring a book, audio CD, or any other library material that they’ve checked out
• Complete their book report
• Share their book project with classmates
• Complete the activity sheet
• Complete a project report

31
Homework

Students will:
• Visit the nearest public library and obtain a library card
• Locate and check out a book
• Ask for assistance (if necessary)
• Share their experiences when they helped a friend or family member get a library card

Reflection

This community project arose from the need for my level 1-2 to be able to check out books for themselves
and their family. The need to be able to obtain a library card came about when I taught my students one of
the lessons from the book All Star 1. Their interest grew even more when the instructors from Motheread
started their program and suggested students visit a library. Thus, for this particular civics project, I really
did not need to present my students with visual assessment tools to decide on a community project.
I brought a series of material to the class to prepare students before getting their library cards. Student
learned what a card application form was and how it had to be filled out. They also learned what services a
library offers and the different sections one can profit from. Students had access to sample cards, calendar
of events, programs, and a variety of books.

I contacted the Information Services Librarian, JoeAnne Stephens, who gladly booked a day for my
students to visit Southeast Regional Library. The day of the fieldtrip, my students obtained their library
cards and participated in a library tour. I could see their excitement when I told them they could check out
the book of their choice. I assisted some students in finding specific books in their native language and also
on specific subjects for kids.

The following day, my students completed a book report on the books they checked out. Finally, we
decided to give back to our community by bringing a family member or a friend to the library. For those
students who do not have transportation, I decided that informing friends or family about the library service
was also an important civic responsibility.

I encouraged those students who are not Wake County residents to go to their local library and repeat the
same procedures they practiced at Southeast Regional Library. Finally, my students completed a report of
their experience of visiting the library and participating in the civics project for Wake Tech Community
College. I feel that from now on, the public library will not be an inaccessible place for my students. I know
they will now have the freedom to walk around, explore different sections, participate in programs, and
why not, volunteer for one of the library programs.

32
33
34
35
36
Name: ___________________ Date:_______________

PUBLIC LIBRARY PROJECT: BOOK REPORT

Check out a book with your new library card and complete the following book report:
• TITLE:___________________________________________________________
• AUTHOR:________________________________________________________
• ILLUSTRATOR:___________________________________________________
• CHARACTERS OR TOPIC:__________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
• LIBRARY SECTON:________________________________________________
• Five words I learned and want to share (write their definition or just draw a picture):

Name: ___________________ Date:_______________

PUBLIC LIBRARY PROJECT: BOOK REPORT

Check out a book with your new library card and complete the following book report:
• TITLE:___________________________________________________________
• AUTHOR:________________________________________________________
• ILLUSTRATOR:___________________________________________________
• CHARACTERS OR TOPIC:__________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
• LIBRARY SECTON:________________________________________________
• Five words I learned and want to share (write their definition or just draw a picture):

Name: ___________________ Date:_______________

PUBLIC LIBRARY PROJECT: BOOK REPORT

Check out a book with your new library card and complete the following book report:
• TITLE:___________________________________________________________
• AUTHOR:________________________________________________________
• ILLUSTRATOR:___________________________________________________
• CHARACTERS OR TOPIC:__________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
• LIBRARY SECTON:________________________________________________
• Five words I learned and want to share (write their definition or just draw a picture):

37
LEVEL
3&4
LESSONS

38
Your Future Goals: Nothing is Impossible

Before you read the story

Look at the picture. Where is she?


What can you guess about her?
Read the title. Do you agree?
Name two things that are impossible.
Name two things that are very difficult but not impossible.

NOTHING IS IMPOSSIBLE

My name is Karina. I come from Mexico. I came to New York in 2000, but now I
live in Raleigh. In the United States, I have worked at a child care center, cleaned
houses, and was a dental assistant in a laboratory. In my country, I was a nurse for
three years. I liked my job. I miss my country, my parents, and my brother.
Now, I study English. I like to come to my class every day. My teacher is so nice.
I am learning a lot of words in ESL class. I want to go to Wake Tech Community
College. I will study to be a nursing assistant. I have one child. He is four. I love
him. I want to get a better future for me and my family. I feel happy now.

39
A. PRONUNCIATION PRACTICE Read the first paragraph aloud to a partner. Your partner
will read the second paragraph to you.

B. QUESTIONS ABOUT THE STORY: Ask your partner these questions. Write the answers.

1. Where is Karina from?


2. How long has she been in the United States?
3. What was her job in Mexico?
4. What were her jobs in New York?
5. What job does she want in the future?

C. VOCABULARY Find the word in the story that is the same or almost the same.

1. little person _____________________


2. tooth related _____________________
3. helper _____________________
4. university _____________________
5. science room _____________________

D. DICTATION: Have a partner read any three sentences from the story. Write them below,

1. ________________________________________________________________________

2. ________________________________________________________________________

3. ________________________________________________________________________

E. ASK YOUR PARTNER: Jobs . . . past, present and future

Fill in the chart about yourself, below. Then ask four other people about themselves. (Don’t
forget, a stay-at-home mom or homemaker IS a job!) Write their answers.

Sample questions: What did you do in your country?


What do you do now?
What do you want to do in the future?
Anything else?

40
Name In the past, I was... Now, I’m... In the future, I
want to...
You

F. THINK ABOUT IT: In order to get the job you want, you have to be prepared. Write three
things you must accomplish before you can get the job you want in the future. Then decide if
each item is easy, difficult, or impossible. Why? Share with a partner.

In order to _________________________, I have to.... Easy Difficult Impossible


(Example: In order to be a nurse, I have to...)
1.
2.
3.

41
G. LISTENING: What about my teacher?

Listen to your teacher talk about her jobs, past, present and future. Fill in the chart as he or she
talks. Add as much information as you can.

In the past, I was. Now, I’m... In the future, I want


to...

Share your information with another classmate. What did you miss?

H. ASK YOUR TEACHER: With your partner, write two questions to ask your teacher about
her jobs, past, present or future.

1.

2.

42
I. INTO THE COMMUNITY

1. Think of two or three of your friends who speak very little English and are not in an ESL
class.
2. Interview them using the charts below.
3. Ask them how they feel about their future in the U. S.
4. Bring the interview information back to class.
5. Compile the findings on a big chart on the board.
6. Compare their answers with the answers of the ESL students. Discuss. How can you help your
friends who don’t speak English?
Name of In the past, I was.. Now, I’m... In the future, I
friends want to...

Easy Difficult Impossible


In order to _________________________, I have to....
(Example: In order to be a nurse, I have to...)
Friend 1

.
Friend 2

Friend 3

EL/CIVICS EDUCATION PROJECT, KAREN CASON


WAKE TECH COMMUNITY COLLEGE, March 2007

43
Life Choices: Elizabeth’s Story
Lesson Plan

Purpose:
a) to involve students in the discussion of advantages and disadvantages of moving to another
country (or city);
b) to help students use the vocabulary and grammar of the lesson while comparing their
lifestyles in "BEFORE" and "NOW" situations.

Materials: handouts; vocabulary game strips, and prizes for winners.

I. Warm-up
1. Did you come to America with your family or alone?
2. Did you feel depressed (stressed out, nostalgic, frustrated) during your first days, months
or years in the US? What can cause stress? How do you fight stress? Does it help to:
. smoke more than usual?
. work out
. walk in the park
. drink alcohol
. sleep more than usual
. listen to cheerful music (to sad melancholic songs)
. take medicines or herbs
. take drugs
. read books and magazines as much as you can
. watch TV a lot
. talk to your friends
. call your relatives who stayed in your country or do something else?

II. Pronunciation practice:


Forty (40) - fourteen (14);
Thirty (30) -thirteen(13);
Fifty (50) -fifteen (15);
Ninety (90) -nineteen (19) etc.

The teacher writes two columns of these numbers on the board. Half of the class reads one
column, the other half reads the other column. Both groups clap their hands to accentuate the
stressed syllables.

III. Reading: The teacher reads the text "Life Choices" and asks the students to read it
out loud one by one.

LIFE CHOICES by Elizabeth Sandoval Alanis (Mexico)

I lived in Mexico happily with my family and my dreams. I married when I was just fourteen.
Then I graduated from high school and never thought of coming to the USA. But sometimes life
changes people's plans.

My country is wonderful, but some places are dangerous. My older son was attacked when he
was 13 and he almost died. His father, who was working in the US at that time, came back to

44
Mexico and wanted to take us to the USA with him. I said, "OK, you can take our sons but I am
going to stay here, I am planning to go to the university."

However, I could not part with my sons. I followed my family. When I came here, I was very
unhappy for two years. Everything was so different. I got stressed.

But now I feel different. I like North Carolina. I have many goals again and I have the pportunity
to reach them. Sometimes I think God gave me another chance to stay with my two sons and my
husband. When I look into my older son's eyes, I thank God for giving me that chance to be with
my family in America.

IV. Comprehension Which sentence is correct? Circle a) or b).

1. a) Elizabeth married at the age of 14.


b) Elizabeth married at the age of 40.
2. a) Elizabeth has one son.
b) Elizabeth has two sons.
3. a) She was happy in Mexico and didn't want to move to the USA.
b) She was unhappy in Mexico and always dreamt of moving to the USA.
4. a) Her younger son was attacked when he was 13.
b) Her older son was attacked when he was 13.
5. a) Elizabeth wanted to study at the University in Mexico.
b) Elizabeth wanted to enter a university in the USA.
6. a) Now Elizabeth is glad that she followed her family.
b) Now Elizabeth is sorry that she moved to the US.

V. Vocabulary Game

Print and cut out the sentences below. Distribute the strips of paper among the students. While
students read the definitions one by one, their classmates try to find the words in the text "Life
Choices". The student who is the first to give a correct answer, gets the strip of paper from the
student who asked the question. The person with the most strips at the end of the game is the
winner. If there is a tie between 2 students, the teacher asks one more question and gives a prize
to the winner (a pencil, a postcard, a stamp, a candy, an eraser, a bookmarker or such like). The
best prize is always a bag of small things that the benevolent winner can share with the other
players).

1. What is the antonym (opposite) of "to divorce"? - to marry


2. What is the synonym of "to finish school"? -to graduate
3. What is the synonym of "to return from some place"? - to come back
4. What do we call a male child in a family? - a son
5. What is the synonym of "a target, an objective, a purpose? - a goal
6. What is the synonym of "to wish, to desire"? - to want
7. What is the synonym of "not the same"? - different
8. What is the synonym of "a male spouse"? - a husband
9. What is the synonym of "a possibility"? - an opportunity
10. What is the synonym of "to get separated, to say good-bye"? - to part
11. What is the synonym of "unhappy, tired and upset"? - stressed
12. What is the opposite (or antonym) of "to leave"? - to stay
13. What is the part of the body that makes it possible to see? - eyes.

45
VI. Grammar exercise

Working in groups of 3 or 4, write out in three columns all the regular, irregular and modal verbs
that you can find in the text “Life Choices."
Regular Irregular Modal
live stay be have can
marry plan think feel could
graduate part come get
change follow take think
attack like say give
die reach go
work look
want thank
pick up

Write your own sentences using as many verbs from this list as you can. You have 10 minutes.
Switch your paper with your partner, correct each other's sentences and read them to the class.
The group votes for the best sentence. The teacher gives the prize.

VII. Fill-in the blanks

I lived in Mexico happily with_____ family and my dreams. I married when _____ was
just fourteen. Then I graduated _____ high school and never thought of _______ to the USA. But
sometimes life ________ people's plans.

My country is wonderful, but some _________ are dangerous. My older son was ________when
he was 13, and he ________ died. His father, who was working in _____ US at that time, came
back ______Mexico and wanted to take us _____ the USA with him. I said, " _____, you can
take our sons, _____I am going to stay here. _____ am planning to go to the University."

However, I could not part with _____ sons. I followed my family. _____ I came here I was very
unhappy _____ two years. Everything was so _________. I got stressed.

But now I feel different, I like ________ Carolina. I have many goals again _____ I have the
opportunity to reach _____. Sometimes I think God gave me chance to stay with my two ______
and my husband. When I look _____ my older son's eyes, I thank _____ for giving me the
chance _____ be with my family in America.

VIII. Discussion

In groups of 3-4 students discuss the following questions:

1. Is it easier or more difficult to achieve your goals in the US than in your country?
Why or why not?
2. Do you think Elizabeth made a good decision?
3. Would you sacrifice the chance to get a university education in order to keep your family
together?
4. Do you think it is important to teach teenagers martial arts so that they could protect

46
themselves if attacked?
5. Do you think teenagers should be allowed to carry weapons like knives and guns to protect
themselves?
6. Have you ever been attacked by robbers or hooligans in the streets or in some other place?
7. Was there a lot of violence and crime in the town /city/village in which you used to live
before you moved to the US? Is Raleigh/Cary/Apex a safe place to live and grow children?
8. Are there places in Raleigh that you would not allow your teenager to go to without
adults?
9. What can you do if you are attacked by robbers?
10. Can anyone here show us a few self – defense moves?

************************************************************************

Suggestions for Civics Projects

A project related to the above material could deal with informing students about the availability
of services provided by local martial arts schools. For example, three (responsible) students get
the task of finding addresses and phone numbers of some of those schools in their phone books
and providing their classmates with the information and directions. The rest of the group visits
those sites or calls them and finds out about the cost of training, schedule of classes, and the age
range of students attending those schools. It would be a good idea to assign 2 - 3 students to visit
one school so that they can cooperate while presenting the information to their classmates, and
telling them about their impressions. Perhaps someone could come to the class from one of these
schools to give students more information. The class could then create a brochure of the various
martial art studios in the area and distribute them to other classes, family and friends.

Another possibility would be a discussion about symptoms of depression, ways of treating it, and
places one can turn to for psychotherapeutic help, e.g.

Capital Area Psychological Services, 220 West Millbrook Rd, Raleigh, (919) 870 8151
Triangle Pastoral Counseling, Inc. ~ www.TriPastoraICounseling.org; (919) 8459977.

Students could call those organizations and find out who is eligible, what kind of insurance is
accepted, etc. Then they could present the information to another group of students, e.g. level 3 or
4 students. Also, having a speaker come to the class from one of those agencies would be
informative. The class could invite other classes to come hear the speaker as well.

47
ENLISH LITERACY/CIVICS PROJECT
Lesson Plan - Low Intermediate
by Cathryn Butzow
Spring 2007

"ROSARIO'S STORY"
FIRST DAY IN ESL CLASS

TOPICS

. Feelings experienced in English language learning


. Ways to practice English

LANGUAGE FUNCTIONS

. Describing feelings and emotions


. Comparing before and after

LANGUAGE STRUCTURES

. Modal - "I feel when. . ."


. Contrasting present tense and past tense verbs (feel/felt)
. "Yes,I do" and"No,I don't."
ACADEMIC SKILLS DEVELOPMENT

.. Describing
Listening
. Reading
. Writing
. Speaking/Discussing
. Brainstorming
. Guessing
. Comparing

48
MATERIALS NEEDED

. Interview Sheets
. Copies of "Rosario's Story"
. Listening to the Story Worksheets
. Understanding the Story Worksheets
. Vocabulary Lists
. Vocabulary Words and Pictures Cards
. Masking Tape
. Crossword Puzzles
. When Do You Feel Worksheets
. How About You Writing Project Worksheets
. Action! Application Worksheets

49
TEACHING NOTES

WARM-UP ACTIVITY

As students enter the classroom give them each an interview sheet and
instruct them to interview several students and fill in their answers on the
chart.

INTRODUCTION

Do you remember the very first time you went to an English class in the
United States? Do you remember how you felt? What did you think?
Share how you as a teacher felt on your first day of teaching ESL. Talk
about how you feel now.
Encourage students to share.

READING - "ROSARIO'S STORY"

Have students read the story silently to themselves.


Ask them to circle any words they do not understand.
Have students look the new words up in a dictionary.
Discuss these words.

UNDERSTANDING THE STORY

Have students read the sentences and mark true or false. Have them check
their answers with a classmate.
Go over the statements and make sure students understand what makes a
statement false.

THINK ABOUT IT - DISCUSSION

Have students discuss their reactions to the questions relating to "Rosario's


Story" .

DICTATION

Read aloud and have the students complete the cloze activity.
Have them complete the dictation activities on the worksheets.

50
INTRODUCE VOCABULARY

Have students look over the interviews they did at the beginning of the class.
Especially focus on the word~ that describe how students feel about learning
English. Ask them how they feel about learning English.
Write any vocabulary words that describe feelings on the board as they
mention them.

What word describes how Rosario probably felt on her first day of English
class? (nervous) Why did she feel nervous?

What word describes how Rosario felt about English class when she went
home? (excited) Why did she feel excited?

Have the students give you other words that express emotions they might
feel in English class.

Pass out the vocabulary lists to the students. Go .over each word on the list
using the vocabulary words and picture cards.

excited lonely
scared embarrassed
bored happy
interested tired
frustrated calm
confused nervous
worried proud

Pantomime vocabulary words and have the students guess the feeling you
are expressmg.

CHARADES-VOCABULARY PRACTICE

Give each student a word card and have them act out the feeling for the class
to guess.
Have students practice the following format as they guess:
Student: "Do you feel ?"
Charade Player: "Yes, I do." or "No, I don't."
Teacher: "How does he/she feel?"
Class: "He/she feels "

51
VOCABULARY CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Work with the students on two or three of the crossword puzzle entries.
Then give the students ten mi,nutes to complete the puzzle.
Monitor their progress.

Have a student read the clue, give the word, and spell the word aloud.

CROSSWORD PUZZLE KEY:

I feel embarrassed when I don't know the answer.


I feel worried when I am arriving late to class.
I feel lonely when I don't know anyone in my class.
I feel confused when I don't understand the directions.
I feel frustrated when my teacher doesn't answer my questions.
I feel happy when I see my friends in class.
I feel calm when I know my teacher.
I feel tired when I go to class after working all day.
I feel excited when I can talk to my American friend in English.
I feel proud when I can speak English at the store.
I feel scared when no one around me speaks my language.
I feel nervous when I have to speak English on the telephone.
I feel interested when the lesson is about something I like.
I feel bored when the lesson isn't about something that interests me.

GRAMMAR

Go over the grammar point on the bottom of the vocabulary sheet.


Feel is irregular in the past tense.

WHEN DO YOU FEEL. . . ? WORKSHEET

Go over the first three sentences together with the class.


Have students complete the remaining sentences and share their answers
with a partner. .

Call on individual students to share one sentence with the class.

52
VOCABULARY CONCENTRATION GAME

Divide the class into two teams.


Choose 12 of1the 14 vocabuh~,rywords and tape them face toward the board
in three rows of four words each.
Demonstrate how to play the game - turning over two cards in an attempt to
locate a match.
Keep score on the board.

WRITING

Have students think about their "before" the first English class experience
and the "after" (or "now") attending ESL classes.
Have a student read the directions for the "before" story.
Have another student read aloud the directions for the ~'after" story.
Make certain students understand the difference.
Refer to "Rosario's Story" again. ,

How did Rosario feel before her first ESL class? ,(nervous)
Write on the board: Rosario felt very nervous on her first day of
class.
How does Rosario feel about English class now? (excited)
Write on the board: Rosario feels excited about learning English now.
Point out the difference in verb tense.

Monitor students as they work on their paragraphs.

Ask for volunteers to read their stories aloud to the class.


Give positive feedback.

APPLICATION -ACTION PLAN

Use the worksheet: Action: Improving Your English Speaking


Discuss how Rosario practiced speaking English.
Brainstorm with the class discussing ideas for how to improve English
speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills.
Then have them discuss further with a partner.
They are to choose four ways they like.
They are to choose one method to implement during the week.

53
Possible ideas for improving English speaking:
Watch TV in English.
Go to movies in English.
Listen to music in Eng~ish.
Listen to American radio stations.
Attend English classes regularly.
Review English lessons at home in between classes.
Find an American friend who wants to help you practice English.
Find a friend who speaks more English than you and practice
speaking in English.
Don't be afraid to try to speak English in stores and restaurants.
Practice speaking English at work.
Get a library card and check out books to read.

RELATED CIVICS PROJECT

Students will work together to create a pamphlet advertising Wake Tech


ESL classes. They will distribute these pamphlets to friends, apartment
housing offices, restaurants and businesses in their communities inviting
non-English speakers to attend. ESL classes.

Incorporated in the design of these pamphlets will be pictures drawn by


students expressing feelings they experienced in coming to classes and
learning ESL.

Each student will write a one or two sentence message with a positive
message of his/her English language learning experience using feelings
and emotions vocabulary.

The pamphlets will be written in English and translated into the native
languages of the students.

54
#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6
STUDENT'S What country How long have How long have How did you How do you feel Why do you
NAME are you from? you been in the you been feel on your about English want to learn
United States? coming to first day of class now? English?
English classes? English class?

55
ROSARIO'S
STORY

My First English Class in the Unites States

My flame is Rosario Rivera. I'm from Mexico. I came to the United


States in September 2005- I was very nervous.

I remember my teacher named Michele. She acted so friendly. It was


difficult to understand because I didn't know how to speak any English.
My teacher smiled all the time. Her class was dynamic. We listened to
music every Wednesday. We played Bingo sometimes.

I felt very excited after the class. When I went to my home, I


remembered and repeated the lesson from the class. I like to learn and
speak English.

56
UNDERSTANDING THE STORY

Read the story. Read the sen~encesand check true or false. Check your
answers with a classmate.

T F

0 0 1. Rosario came to the United States from South America.

0 0 2. Her teacher was a man who was always smiling.

0 0 3. The class listened to music every day.

0 0 4. The students played games in class.

0 0 5. Rosario liked the teacher because she was very serious.

0 0 6. Rosario understood everything the teacher said.

0 0 7. Rosario likes to learn English.

0 0 8. Rosario practiced English at home after class.

THINK ABOUT IT

Think about the story. Discuss the following questions with your
classmates.

.:. How did Rosario's emotions about learning English change?


How did she feel the first day of class?

.:. Look at the picture of Rosario.


How do you think she feels about English class today?

.:. Why did her feelings change?

57
LISTENING TO THE STORY

A. Listen to the story.


B. Listen again and write the missing words.

Rosario's Story

My is Rosario Rivera. I'm Mexico. I came to the

United in September 2005. I was very

I remember my named Michele. She acted so

. It was difficult to understand I didn't

know how to any English. My teacher all

the time. Her was dynamic. We to

music every Wednesday. We Bingo sometimes.

I felt very after the class. When I to my

home, I remembered and the lesson from the class. I

like to learn and speak

C. Show your answers to your partner. Do you agree? Look back at the
story. Check you answers.
D. Read the story to a partner. Listen as your partner reads to you.
E. Cover the story. Your partner will read two sentences from the story.
Write them below. Check your sentences.

58
VOCABULARY LIST
FEELINGS

bored interested
calm lonely
confused nervous
embarrassed proud
excited scared
frustrated tired
happy worried

A. Feelings in the Present

How do you feel?


I feel embarrassed.

How does he feel?


He feels nervous.

Why does he feel nervous?


Hefeels nervous because today is hisfirst day in English class.

When do you feel embarrassed?


I feel embarrassed when I don't know the answer.

B. Feelings in the Past

How did you feel?


I felt lonely.

How did they feel?


They felt lonely.

Why did you feel lonely?


I felt lonely because all my friends and family were in Mexico.

When did we feel bored?


Wefelt bored when the lesson was too easy.

59
WHEN DO YOU FEEL ...?

Think about when you feel different emotions. Complete the sentences. Share your
sentences with a classmate. Some sentences are in the past and some are in the
present.
)

1. I feel bored when the lesson is too easy.

2. I feel calm when

3. I felt confused when

4. I feel embarrassed when

5. I felt excited when

6. I feel frustrated when

7. I felt happy when

8. I feel interested when

9. I feel lonely when

1O.I felt nervous when

11. I felt proud when

12. I feel scared when

13. I feel tired when

14. I felt worried when

60
HOW ABOUT YOU?

The "Before" Story

Write four or five sentences about how you felt on the fIrst day of English
class in the United States. Remember to use past tense verbs.

The "After" Story

Now write four or five sentences about how you feel about learning English
today. Remember to use present tense verbs.

61
ACTION: IMPROVING YOUR ENGLISH SPEAKING

How did Rosario practice speaking English?

Discuss with a partner ideas for improving your English.


Write four ways you can learn to speak English better.
---,

Put a check ( J) by the idea you are going to work on this week.
Talk to your partner about your idea.

1.

2.

3.

4.

62
HOW DO YOU FEEL?

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5. I feel when I can speak English at the store.
6. I feel when no one around me speaks my language.
7. I feel when I go to class after working all day.
9. I feel when I don't know the answer.
11. I feel when I don't understand the directions.
12. I feel when I can talk to my American friend in English.
Down
1. I feel when the lesson is about something I like.
2. I feel when I am arriving late to class.
3. I feel when the lesson isn't interesting.
4. I feel when my teacher doesn't answer my questions.
8. I feel when I have to speak English on the telephone.
10. I feel when I don't know anyone in my class.
13. I feel when I know my teacher.

63
VOCABULARY LIST
FEELINGS
VOCABULARY CARDS TEACHER KEY

bored (A) interested (H)


calm (B) lonely (I)
confused (C) nervous (J)
embarrassed (D) proud (K)
excited (E) scared (L)
frustrated (F) tired (M)
happy ~G) worried (N)

A. Feelings in the Present

How do you feel?


I feel embarrassed.

How does he feel?


He feels nervous.

Why does he feel nervous?


He feels nervous because today is his first day in English class.

When do you feel embarrassed?


I feel embarrassed when I don't know the answer.

B. Feelings in the Past

How did you feel?


I felt lonely.

How did they feel?


They felt lonely.

Why did you feel lonely?


I felt lonely because all my friends and family were in Mexico.

When did we feel bored?


Wefelt bored when the lesson was too easy.

64
Heart of the Community ... Part of the Community
English Literacy/Civics Education Project
Community Service - Volunteer Project

Instructor: Yari Johnson, Athens Drive High School, Level 4 ESL Class

Overview: Health care is an important part of American life and community. My goals
in this project were to (a) introduce the language and vocabulary associated with health
care, (b) familiarize students with the Wake County health care options, (c) help students
understand available health resources and how to access them, i.e., make appointments,
(d) and share their newly acquired knowledge with the community by creating a webpage
that explains the available health care options in Wake County and the steps needed to
choose a doctor and then make an appointment.

Lesson Plan: Health Care in Wake County


Objective: For students to become familiar with resources provided by the local health
care system and to get practice in stating needs and asking questions about health care
and doctors.

Preparation and Materials:


1. Printouts with pictures of doctor's offices and hospitals.
2. Phone books.
3. Map of city.

Warm-up/Introduction:
(1) Ask a volunteer to talk about a recent trip to the doctor. Encourage others to speak
about their own experiences in the US and contrast this with their own country. Use this
as a segue into the vocabulary warm-up activity (2).
(2) Have the class divide into two groups. Ask each group to come with as many
hospital/medical related vocabulary words as they can in 5 minutes. Then have each team write
their list on the board. Award the winning team.

Lesson/Practice:
1. Hand out the hospital and doctor office pictures. As a transition have students
write the words from the lists on the board near the respective items on their
pictures. Go over any words/items that were not already listed.
2. Create a Pro/Con list about using a hospital versus a small clinic.
3. Read "Dialogue: Making an Appointment" and go over associated vocabulary
lists (See Handouts).
4. Have' students complete "Answer the Questions" and "Fill in the Blanks" by
themselves (See Handouts).
5. Pre-teach "wh" questions as needed. Have students work together in pairs or
groups to find the appropriate question for asking about the following:
a. finding a general practitioner, hospital, clinic, etc ..
b. making an appointment
c. getting treatment for someone with limited English ability
6. Have students partner up and role-play making an appointment at a doctor's office.

65
7. Using groups of three, have students look for doctors/hospitals near their house in
phone books.
8. Use the map of the city (or draw a map) to show where the nearest hospital
location is and other locations around the county.

Evaluation: Have students create a list of questions to ask people in the community
about doctors and health care.

Practice Outside of Class (see Handouts): to be completed after the lesson, within one
week.

ELS/Civics Community Service Project - Spring 2008


Athens Drive High School, Level 4 ESL Class

Instructor: Yari Johnson


Participating Students: Cecilia, Them, Ching-Yu, Hong Van, Quy, Jose, Santos

Project: Accessing Health Care in Wake County

Summary: My students chose this topic during an open brain-storming session. Based on
previous lessons and class conversations, students chose topics relating to the topic which
interested or appealed to them. All topics were listed on the whiteboard. Students assessed class
interests in and feasibility of each topic. Finally, students voted and chose health care (and more
specifically how to find a hospital and make an appointment to see a doctor).

In order to learn about this topic, our class collectively came up with a questionnaire with 4
questions that each student would bring into the community and share with people. Students went
out and gathered advice on finding doctors and general health. Afterwards, students discussed
what they had learned and chose a civics project to share their knowledge with the community.
Two students suggested building a webpage for the community with links to information in
different languages and guides to Wake County hospitals. Then our class worked to build a
simple webpage that offered language practice and links to hospitals
(www.geocities.comlformosan80).

A total of seven students participated in the entire process. 11 other students participated in part
of the project. Currently, a total of 31 people were impacted through our community project. This
number will rise as our website continues to receive new visitors in the future.

66
Making an Appointment
Dialogue

Receptionist: Dr. Johnson's Office.


Rodolfo: Yes, I'd like to make an appointment to see Dr. Johnson, please.
Receptionist: Is this your first visit?
Rodolfo: Yes it is.
Receptionist: Okay. Could I have your name please?
Rodolfo: Yes. My name is Rodolfo Sanchez.
Receptionist: And may I ask who referred you to our office?
Rodolfo: Uh, I drove past your office yesterday.
Receptionist: Okay. How about the day after tomorrow on Wednesday at 4:00 o'clock?
Rodolfo: Uh. Do you happen to have an opening in the morning? I usually pick up my
kids from school around that time.
Receptionist: Okay. Urn ... how about Tuesday at 8:00 A.M. or Thursday at 8:15 A.M.?
Rodolfo: Uh, do you have anything earlier, like 7:30?
Receptionist: No. I'm sorry.
Rodolfo: Well, in that case, Thursday would be fine.
Receptionist: Okay. Could I have your phone number please?
Rodolfo: It's 947-5497.
Receptionist: All right. And what's the nature of your visit?
Rodolfo: Uh ...
Receptionist: Yes sir.
Rodolfo: Well, to tell the truth, I fell from a ladder two days ago while painting my house, and I
sprained my ankle when my foot landed in a paint can. I suffered a few scratches on my
hands and knees, but I'm most concerned that the swelling in my ankle hasn't gone down yet.
Receptionist: Well, did you put ice on it immediately after this happened?
Rodolfo: Well yeah. I just filled the paint can with ice and ...
Receptionist: And so after you removed the paint can ... Sir, sir, Mr. Sanchez, are you
still there?
Rodolfo: Well that's part of the problem. Uh, the paint can is still on my foot.
Receptionist: Look, Mr. Sanchez. Please come in today. I don't think your case can wait.

67
Vocabulary

• refer someone or something to (verb): directed or pointed to


- My brother referred me to this doctor.
- Please refer to page 74 in your textbook. You will find more information on
heart disease on that page.

• happen (verb): have the chance or possibility of something


- I think he happens to know a doctor who might be able to help you. Give
him a call.

• nature (noun): purpose


- What is the nature of your problem?

• sprain (verb): twist suddenly


- I need to see a doctor today. I think I sprained my knee when I slipped on the
ice outside of my apartment.

• case (noun): special situation circumstances


- Wow. That looks like a bad cut. In this case, you'd better see a doctor and
get stitches. That cut won't heal well by itself.

Answer the Questions

1. What is the man's name?


A. Russell
B. Rodolfo
C. Ronald

2. From the conversation, how did the man probably find out about Dr. Johnson?
A. He saw the office on his way home from work.
B. A friend referred him to Dr. Johnson's office.
C. He found Dr. Johnson's number in the phone book.

3. What time does he schedule an appointment to see Dr. Johnson?


A. Tuesday
B. Wednesday
C. Thursday

4. Why does the man want to see the doctor?


A. He hurt his knee when a tall ladder fell on him ..
B. He injured his ankle when he fell from a ladder.
C. He sprained his hand when he fell off the roof of his house.

5. What does the receptionist suggest at the end of the conversation?


A. The man should put some ice on his injury.
B. The man needs to come into the office right away.
C. The man ought to take it easy for a few days.

68
Fill In the Blanks

Receptionist: Dr. Johnson's Office.


Rodolfo: Yes, I'd like to make an appointment to see Dr. Johnson, please.
Receptionist: Is this your first (1) _______________ ?
Rodolfo: Yes it is.
Receptionist: Okay. Could I have your name please?
Rodolfo: Yes. My name is Rodolfo Sanchez.
Receptionist: And may I (2) _______________ who referred you to our office?
Rodolfo: Uh, I drove past your office yesterday.
Receptionist: Okay. How about the day after tomorrow, on Wednesday at 4:00 o'clock?
Rodolfo: Uh. Do you happen to have an (3) _______________ in the morning? I usually pick up
my kids from school around that time.
Receptionist: Okay. Urn ... how about Tuesday at 8:00 A.M. or Thursday at 8:15 A.M.?
Rodolfo: Uh, do you have anything (4) _______________ , like 7:30?
Receptionist: No. I'm sorry.
Rodolfo: Well, in that case, Thursday would be fine.
Receptionist: Okay. Could I have your phone number please?
Rodolfo: It's 947-5497.
Receptionist: All right. And what's the (5) _______________ of your visit?
Rodolfo: Uh ...
Receptionist: Yes sir.
Rodolfo: Well, to tell the truth, I fell from a (6) _______________ two days ago while painting
my house, and I sprained my ankle when my foot landed in a paint can. I (7)
_______________ a few scratches on my hands and knees, but I'm most concerned that the
swelling in my ankle hasn't gone down yet.
Receptionist: Well, did you put ice on it immediately after this happened?
Rodolfo: Well yeah. I just (8) _______________ the paint can with ice and ...
Receptionist: And so after you removed the paint can ... Sir, sir, Mr. Sanchez, are you still there?
Rodolfo: Well that's part of the (9) _______________ Uh, the paint can is still on my foot.
Receptionist: Look, Mr. Sanchez. Please come in today. I don't think your (10) _____________
can wait.

69
Accessing Health Care in Wake County
An English as a Second Language (ESL) Civics Project,
Wake Technical Community College

HOMEWORK

Your job is to meet with AT LEAST one person and ask them about health care in the
Triangle Area (Raleigh, Cary, Durham, Apex, Garner ...).

Here are a few sample questions:

1. What is a good way to find a new doctor?


2. Can you recommend any hospitals or doctors?
3. How do you make an appointment?
4. Do you have any general advice for me?

________________________________________________________________________
Dear Participant,

The Level 4 Adult ESL class at Athens Drive High School is attempting to complete a
Civics Project on Health Care in the Triangle Region. Your cooperation is greatly
appreciated. Each student is trying to collect answers about Health Care that will be used
to teach English and will serve as a focus for their own Volunteer Project. Please sign on
the line after answering the student's questions. Thank you for your cooperation.

Sincerely,

_________________, Instructor

Participant Signature: _____________________________________________

70
II
THE HOSPITAL
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UNIT 1 PWPL( AND PLACES
l 16

71
Every Day is Earth Day
Adapted from. “Every day is earth day” – lesson from Guzel Nabatova-Barrett
October 2008; Site: St. Saviour Church; Level 5-6

Purpose: Students will be able to use the information, vocabulary and grammar patterns
presented in class to prepare for the first experience of community work: cleaning up an area of
Durant Nature Park. The purpose of the project, “Every Day is Earth Day,” is:
a) to make students more environmentally aware,
b) to provide the students with the statistics which they should share with their co-students,
neighbors, friends and family members in order to involve them in activities that would
reduce pollution, save energy, and propagate the idea that keeping our streets, parks, and
neighborhoods clean requires some conscious effort on the part of each and every one of
us.
Materials: handouts, posters (8 ½ x 11 papers), pictures, game

Lesson plan

Warm-up:
Look at the posters: What are they about? What are the concerns expressed by the author of those
posters? Recycling: What do you know about recycling? Why is it necessary? Do you know
what can and cannot be recycled?
Pronunciation and spelling:
Words from the texts on posters: environment, businesses, government organizations, dedicated,
implemented, throughout, efforts, efficiently. beautification.

Practice 1: Have students take the “Earth Quiz” and discuss it.

Practice 2: Students read the text on “Composting “ and do the vocabulary exercise. Check the
exercise and lead the students in a discussion of the text.

Practice 3 Introduce vocabulary: to run out of space/ to dispose of / to take action .


Students fill out the chart in groups of three. If not sure, use the "Acceptable materials for
recycling" handed out as reference. Compare the answers with those of other teams.

Practice 4 : "Demand-Supply” game: collector and items for reuse, donation, or recycling.
Hands-on English, vol. 18, No.1, p.4. (Explanation attached.)

Assessment: Through questions and the "definition - word" game, students look through the
handouts and give definitions to the words that should be guessed by their classmates.

Review of today’s activities and explanation of the homework.

Homework : write a few short paragraphs describing what you did on the field trip to the
park. Comprehension check during all activities is carried out through oral answers and teacher-
supervised interaction between students. On-going evaluation and correction is being done
throughout each practicing sequence.

72
When rainforests are slashed and burned, it affects every one of us.
It releases carbon into the air that we breathe. It changes our climate.
Deforestation accounts for 20% of all carbon emissions, which is twice the
amount that all the cars, trucks and planes in the world emit, combined.
Join Team Earth on conservation.org and help stop climate change, even if
it’s just once acre at a time. Or we’ll all feel it.

73
74
EVERY DAY IS EARTH DAY

A. Pre-Reading

Work with a partner. Take the Earth Quiz and discuss your answers. Check them against the
answers at the bottom of the page.

Earth Quiz

1. Every year the United States produces enough solid waste to fill a line of
garbage trucks which would reach _________________________.

a) from New York to Los Angeles b) around the world c) halfway to the moon

2. The world population has __________________________ since 1950.

a) more than doubled b) tripled c) quadrupled

3. Close to __________________________________ square kilometers of rain


forest are destroyed each year.

a) 160,000 b) 100,000 c) 300,000

4. ____________________________ percent of the energy used by businesses


worldwide comes form fossil fuels (oil, natural gas).

a) 90 b) 75 c) 60

5. At the current rate of use, the world’s known oil reserves will last _____________
years.

a) 100 b) 50 c) 35

6. Americans throw away enough food every day to feed the entire population of
________________ for one day.
a) New York City b) Canada c) Hawai’i

Most people are surprised by the answers to this quiz. Discuss these questions in a small group.

1. What information from the quiz surprised you most?


2. What information did you already know? How did you know about it?

Answers: 1.c, 2.a, 3.a, 4.a, 5.c, 6.b

75
B. Reading & Vocabulary

Write the number of each underlined word next to its definition, listed at the end of the text.

COMPOSTING

One job many environmentalists 1 have today it to find different ways to dispose of waste,
or trash, rather than throwing it all in landfills. Many landfills 2 are filled to capacity; others are
limited in their use. Of all the waste in the United States, 25 percent is organic 3 plant matter
which can actually be recycled. So rather than throwing table scraps 4 and other natural waste into
landfills, people are looking for ways to use them more productively.
One of the ways environmentalists have supported is composting 5, the process of taking
plant matter, breaking it down, and turning it into a nutrient 6-rich organic material.
Microorganisms 7 break down, or decompose 8, the plant matter with the help of sunlight and
water. The sunlight and water keep the material warm and moist 9, which helps the decomposing
process. Because the material, called compost, is high in nutrients, individuals as well as large-
scale agricultural operations use it to fertilize 10 gardens and crops.

_____ a. add something to soil to improve its quality


_____ b. leftover food
_____ c. decay, or break down into its smallest parts
_____ d. a place to dispose of trash; a dump
_____e. living organisms seen only through a microscope
_____f. natural
_____g. people who study our surroundings
_____h. the changing of plant matter into organic matter used to improve soil quality
_____i. vitamins, proteins, and minerals
_____ j. wet

76
C. Activity

More and more people and communities are changing their habits in order to protect
the environment. One reason for this change is that space in landfills is running out
and the disposal of waste has become difficult. As a result, the practices of recycling,
reusing, and reducing waste are becoming more commonplace. In some countries the
technology for disposing of, or getting rid of, waste has actually become big business.
Individuals have also taken actions to reduce landfill waste; for example, people are
recycling newspapers and donating clothes to charities. In addition, some people take
leftover food and turn it into rich garden compost, an excellent fertilizer for vegetable
and flower gardens.

Think about your home. How are the following items commonly disposed of? Check
(√) the category that best describes the disposal method you use. Work in small
groups to share your answers.

ITEM IN THE TRASH RECYCLE/DONATE OTHER (reuse, compost)

Newspapers

Bottles

Cans

Used computer paper

Glass

Aluminum foil

Leftovers (non-meat)

Batteries

Cereal boxes

Old toys, furniture

Tires

Clothes

*This lesson was adapted from: English, Andrew K, and English, Laura Monahon. (2003). “From Trash to Treasure”, North
Star: Focus on Reading and Writing, High Intermediate. Pearson-Longman. pp. 98-101.

77
Acceptable Materials for Recycling

DON’T FORGET to “REDUCE” and “REUSE”!

* Recycling is very important, but reducing the amount you use and reusing items (rather
than throwing them away) is even better! For example:
Many beauty and cleaning products are now available in dispensers that can be refilled from bulk bottles or
flexible pouches. As much as 80% of the packaging waste can be saved when you purchase shampoos,
hand soaps, lotions and detergents this way. ** (In other words, buy in bulk and reuse the containers!)

Proper Preparation Is Important for Recycling


The following items are collected for recycling in Raleigh's curbside program:

• Glass food and beverage containers


• Food and beverage cans
• Aluminum foil and trays
• Plastic bottles
• Plastic beverage rings
• Gable top cartons
• Aseptic drink boxes
• Newspaper and all inserts
• Magazines and catalogs
• White paper, including junk mail
• Corrugated cardboard pieces no larger than 3' x 3' in size
• Paperboard, chipboard and paper tubes

Raleigh residents can help collection crews by preparing the recyclable materials as described below before
placing them in the recycling bin:

Unbroken glass food and beverage containers should be lightly rinsed. Glass food and beverage
containers are the only glass products the City collects for recycling. Items such as plate or window glass,
light bulbs, mirrors, dishes, glassware and ceramic materials cannot be recycled through Raleigh's
program.

Metal food and beverage cans should be lightly rinsed. Please place the lids of steel food cans inside the
can for safety. If possible, please crush your beverage cans before depositing them in the recycling bin.
Aluminum foil and trays must be completely free of food debris to be recycled. If the aluminum foil or
trays have any food residue, please dispose of them in the trash. In the melting process the foil will be
destroyed before the food is burned away. Steel and aluminum food and beverage cans and aluminum foil
and trays are the only metal products the City collects for recycling. Items such as metal oil cans or metal
containers for non-food products cannot be recycled through the Raleigh's programs. (Wake County
Convenience Centers and Multi-Material Drop Off Centers have scrap metal boxes for recycling other metal
items.)

All plastic bottles and soft plastic beverage rings can be recycled in the City's programs. Plastic
BOTTLES should be rinsed lightly. To help save space, please crush the bottles, before putting them in the
recycling bin. Plastic bottles are the only plastic containers the City collects for recycling. A bottle is
defined as having a "neck" that is narrower than its base and usually has a screw on type lid. Items such as
plastic yogurt cups, margarine tubs, food service trays and flower pots, cannot be recycled
through Raleigh's recycling programs. We also cannot accept plastic bottles that previously
contained hazardous liquids such as oil, chemicals or pesticides. If the container has the poison symbol on
it, please place it in the trash.

78
Gable top cartons should be rinsed lightly and have their caps removed and discarded. Examples of gable
top cartons include milk, juice and laundry detergent cartons.

Aseptic boxes are commonly called drink boxes and products often include juice, milk and soup. Please
remove the straw and discard it before placing it in the recycling bin.

Newspapers and all inserts, magazines and catalogs, and WHITE paper should be removed from plastic
bags or sleeves before placing in the recycling bin. White paper includes all white junk mail you
receive (any color of printing or designs on white paper is acceptable), white envelopes (including window
envelopes), and white copy and fax paper, printed or blank. (Hint: many colored papers look like they
are colored but are actually white. Make a tear in the paper, if the jagged edge shows white, it is actually
white paper and is acceptable!) Paper clips should be removed from paper but staples are okay. Please,
no phonebooks, colored paper or envelopes, checkbooks, books, carbon paper, paper with adhesive
backing, napkins, tissues or other paper products. And please, NO UNOPENED MAIL - it may contain
items such as colored paper, promotional stickers or product samples, which could make our material
unacceptable for recycling. Do you have shredded paper? Please place shredded paper inside a brown
paper bag, staple it closed and mark "shredded paper" on the bag before placing it in the recycling bin. Do
not put loose shredded paper in the recycling bin where it can litter your neighborhood if the wind picks up or
when the bin is being emptied by the crew.

Paperboard, chipboard, SBS board and paper tubes should all be flattened to conserve space in the
recycling bin and on the recycling truck. (SBS stands for solid bleached sulfate and simply refers to the
white layer manufacturers put on the gray or brown paperboard so they can make their product attractive to
the consumer.) Examples of paperboard and chipboard include cereal, pasta, toothpaste or beer boxes.
Remove any linings such as those containing cereal from the paperboard boxes before flattening them.
Tubes include those from paper towels or toliet paper but please be sure all product is removed from the
tubes before placing them in the recycling bin.

Please fasten the tie straps over all the recyclable materials to avoid littering. (Need new straps? Call us at
831.6890 and we'll drop a new set in the mail to you.)

Corrugated cardboard is cardboard with two flat single layers sandwiched around a wavy layer. It is
usually used to make shipping type boxes. Cardboard boxes must be completely flattened, not just stepped
on and squished down. All packing material must be removed, including any glued on Styrofoam liners. It
must also be reduced in size to pieces no larger than 3' x 3' in size. The reason for this limitation is that
is the size of the opening on the recycling trucks. Pizza boxes are NOT ACCEPTED for recycling
because they usually have food contamination! No paper product with food contamination is
acceptable. Cardboard that is not prepared according to these guidelines will not be collected.
Please do not tie rope or string around the cardboard. Prepared cardboard can be placed in the recycling
bin, stacked on top of other materials in the recycling bin, stacked under the recycling bin, or stacked
alongside the recycling bin. If you have a lot of cardboard, and do not want to reduce it to 3' x 3' pieces, you
can remove packing materials, flatten it and take it to one of the City's drop off recycling centers.

Recycling Advantages:

• Reduces pollution
• Saves natural resources
• Saves energy
• Saves money
• Saves landfill space

Is your recycling bin getting heavier to tote to the curb these days? Raleigh Recycling offers a handy bin
carrier that allows you to roll it to the curb. Check it out at Recycling Bins for Purchase.

*** Vacation time is fast approaching for most families. Don't take a vacation from recycling! Wherever you
go in the U.S. you can call 1.800-CLEANUP or visit earth911.org, enter the local zip code (find in the phone
directory) and voila!, they will tell you where the closest recycling center is. ***

Information is from the following website:

www.raleighnc.gov/portal/server.pt/gateway/PTARGS_0_2_306_202_0_43/http%3B/pt03/DIG_Web_Content/category/Re
sident/Garbage_and_Recycling/Recycling/Cat-1C-20041130-143715-Preparation_of_Recycling.html

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NC Litter Laws
On January 1, 2002, the General Assembly of North Carolina signed into law Senate Bill 1014, entitled: An
Act to Strengthen The Littering Laws (G.S. 14-399-effective 3-01-02).

In summary, the law defines intentional and unintentional littering and associated penalties ranging from
$250 upwards with required community service, court and attorney fees.

The law is comprised of sixteen sections which cover a broad category of areas such as in part: definitions,
penalties, exemptions, enforcement authority, tarping requirements, mowing contractors from highway
right-of-ways, littering signs on interstates and semiannual reporting requirements to the Governor.

NC Litter Laws
On January 1, 2002, the General Assembly of North Carolina signed into law Senate Bill 1014, entitled: An
Act to Strengthen The Littering Laws (G.S. 14-399-effective 3-01-02).

In summary, the law defines intentional and unintentional littering and associated penalties ranging from
$250 upwards with required community service, court and attorney fees.

The law is comprised of sixteen sections which cover a broad category of areas such as in part: definitions,
penalties, exemptions, enforcement authority, tarping requirements, mowing contractors from highway
right-of-ways, littering signs on interstates and semiannual reporting requirements to the Governor.

NC Litter Laws
On January 1, 2002, the General Assembly of North Carolina signed into law Senate Bill 1014, entitled: An
Act to Strengthen The Littering Laws (G.S. 14-399-effective 3-01-02).

In summary, the law defines intentional and unintentional littering and associated penalties ranging from
$250 upwards with required community service, court and attorney fees.

The law is comprised of sixteen sections which cover a broad category of areas such as in part: definitions,
penalties, exemptions, enforcement authority, tarping requirements, mowing contractors from highway
right-of-ways, littering signs on interstates and semiannual reporting requirements to the Governor.

NC Litter Laws
On January 1, 2002, the General Assembly of North Carolina signed into law Senate Bill 1014, entitled: An
Act to Strengthen The Littering Laws (G.S. 14-399-effective 3-01-02).

In summary, the law defines intentional and unintentional littering and associated penalties ranging from
$250 upwards with required community service, court and attorney fees.

The law is comprised of sixteen sections which cover a broad category of areas such as in part: definitions,
penalties, exemptions, enforcement authority, tarping requirements, mowing contractors from highway
right-of-ways, littering signs on interstates and semiannual reporting requirements to the Governor.

83
LEVEL
5&6
LESSONS

84
;;

SPECIAL MI-YEOK-KOOK
By Eunyi Han

In Korea, all women who deliver babies eat Mi-Yeok-Kook or seaweed soup for one
month. This traditional Korean soup is nutritious and is believed to be good for the
woman's after birth recovery and breast milk production.

Usually mothers or mothers-in-law make the soup, but for those who don't want to
bother, there are some special businesses that make it. They provide everything necessary
to care for the new mother's and child's health.

Before getting married, my mother made this soup very often. She knew my familyloved
it and that it was known to be good for one's health. After I got married, I made Mi-
Yeok-Kook for my husband. He loves to eat, but he doesn't really know how to cook. In
fact, most Korean men don't cook.

Seven years ago, I had arrived in the USA. I was nine months pregnant. Before leaving
Korea, I was really worried about having no one to take care of me after giving birth.
Fortunately, my husband was there fur me. When I delivered my baby, he did everything
for me. He even prepared Mi-Yeok-Kook. I was really surprised. I asked him how he
was able to make it. He said that he called his mother for the recipe. When I tasted his
soup, it didn't taste very good, but that didn't really matter. He made it for me, and it was
the best Mi-Yeok-Kook I could have ever had. I ate all of it and gave my husband a very
strong and appreciative hug.

I knew that my husband took a long time making this soup. I knew it was difficultfor
him, and I knew that he felt sorry that my mother wasn't there to care for me. He was
genuinelyworried about my health and my well being and had decided to make an effort
to continue the Korean tradition and offer me our Mi-Yeok-Kook after giving birth to our
child. I was impressed with him. He had made me happy, and I knew he was happy, too.

When my other children were born in the USA, my husband didn't prepare Mi-Yeok-
Kook again. By then, I had made many Korean mends, and he knew they would be able
to make a proper Mi-Yeok-Kook for me during this time. He knew that I was less lonely
and less aftaid to be so far from Korea. He also knew that I would be just fine.

My husband may have stopped making Mi-Yeok-Kook for me, but he has never stopped
showing me how much love a husband can have for his wife and his children, especially
when it counts the most.

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--;.

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Reading Comprehension
Answer the questions.
1. What traditional Korean soup is prepared for women who have just given birth?

2. Why is it given to them?

3. Who usually prepares the soup?

4. Why did Eunyi's mom prepare the soup for her family?

5. What can't Eunyi's husband do?

6. When did Eunyi come to the USA?

7. What was her main concern at the time?

8. Who was there for her during her time of need?

9. What did he do?

10. Who did he call in Korea?

11. How did Eunyi feel about what he did?

12. Why did he do it?

13. What happen when Eunyi gave birth to her other children?

14. Why didn't her husband prepare Mi-Yeok-Kook again this time?

15. How did Eunyi feel about her husband not preparing Mi-Yeok-Kook again?

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Reflection
Discuss the following questions with your classmates. Then share your thoughts with
your class.

1. What kinds of food do you .havethat have a special use or significance? How do
you use them, for example, one's health, lose weight, heal an injury, improve blood
flow, maintain one's youth, etc.? Why are they used this way? How do you feel
about the way these types offood are used?

2. What traditions or customs exist in your country that involve food? Do you think
some of these traditions or customs are sillyand without credibility? Explain.

3. Why do you think many men in Korea don't cook or cannot cook? Should they?
Who should teach them? How about your country? Do men in your country
cook? Why or why not?

4. Would you have had the same reaction as Eunyi if your husband or wife had done
something similar? Why or why not? Have you ever been surprised by someone's
actions? When? What happened?

5. What do people do in your country before, during, after the birth of a child? What
customs or traditions do you follow? Are there any superstitions to be aware of in
your country related to what happens before, during, and after the birth of a child?
Explain.

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Dictation
Mi-Yeok-Kook is a traditional Korean seaweed soup.
This soup is prepared for special occasions such as the birth of a child.
After giving birth to a new baby, mothers are served this soup.
It is considered nutritious.
Seven years ago, Eunyi came to the USA with her husband.
She was nine months pregnant.
She worried about not having anyone to take care of her after giving birth.
Her family remained in Korea.
When Eunyi gave birth, her husband surprised her.
He took care of her.
He even made the traditional seaweed soup.
She was impressed.
Her husband doesn't know how to cook.
He got the soup recipe from his mother in Korea.
He decided he would try to make it for Eunyi.
He had made Eunyi very happy.
When Eunyi gave birth to her other children, her husband didn't prepare the traditional
soup.
Eunyi had made many Korean friends by then.
He knew they could prepare the soup better than he could.
However, he never stopped showing Eunyi how much he loved and cared for her during
these special times in their lives.

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Dictation: Listen and write what you hear. Fill in the empty spaces.

1. Mi-Yeok-Kook traditional Korean seaweed

2. - soup for occasIons as the birth

3. After birth to a , mothers this soup.

4. It nutritious.

5. , EunYI to the USA

6. - pregnant.

7. She - not having to of her


birth.

8. in Korea.

9. Eunyi , her surprised -.

10.

11. traditional seaweed

12. impressed.

13.

14. recIpe Korea.

15. would Eunyi.

16. EunYI

17. When Eunyi children,


the traditional soup.

18. Eunyi Korean then.

19. could he could.

20. However, Eunyi how much


, special times

90
~'

Dialogue
Choose one ofthe dialogues to write about with a partner. Then perform it in :trontof the
class.

1. Write a dialogue between Eunyi and her mother. Eunyi is explainingto her mother
what her husband has done for her.

2. Write a dialogue between Eunyi's husband and his mother. Eunyi's husband is
explainingto her why he needs her Mi-Yeok-Kook recipe.

3. Write a dialogue between Eunyi and her husband. Eunyi is thanking her husband
for everythinghe has done for her during this time.

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Survey
Find out who likes and dislikes the following items. Engage in conversation by asking
follow-up questions:

1. Who likes to eat soup? Who doesn't?


2. Who likes to cook? Who doesn't?
3. Who thinks about what and how they eat? Who doesn't?
4. Who likes mothers-in-law? Fathers-in-Iaws? Who doesn't?
5. Who loves to eat? Who doesn't?
6. Who thinks their mother is a good cook? Who doesn't?
7. Who calls their mother often for help or advice? Who doesn't?
8. Who is lucky to have someone to care for them and their needs? Who isn't?
9. Who is happy? Who isn't?
10. Who has many friends? Who hasn't?
11. Who never stops showing love to those he/she loves? Who does?
12. Who has children? Who hasn't?
13. Who is married? Who isn't?
14. Who believes in traditions? Who doesn't?
15. Who is or has familymembers who are American? Who isn't? Who hasn't?

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Recipe
Here is an example of a recipe. Find a traditional recipe from your country that you would
like to share with your class. Write down your recipe. Include your ingredients and your
instructions on how to prepare your dish. Use imperatives and be specific. Then write a
brief summary of its significancein your country. Explain why you chose this recipe and
how and when it is used in your country. Ifpossible, prepare and demonstrate this dish
in front of your class. Have your classmates taste it and give their comments.

Mi-Yeok-Kook Recipe
Ingredients:
~ cup dried seaweed (buy seaweed specificallyfor this type of soup)
4 cups water
1T minced garlic
1T sesame oil
3T Gook Ganjang (Korean soy sauce)
1/31b.beef(strip steak or shin bone meat or stew meat)
1I2lb.tofu cubes (optional)
2 oz. Asian mushrooms (optional)
~ cup chopped onions (optional)

Optional items are not considered the traditional ingredients or way of preparing this
soup.

Soak seaweed in water for 20 minutes. Then cut into smallpieces.


Heat soup pot. Add oil. Saute meat, garlic,and (onions) until brown.
Be careful not to bum garlic. It will taste bitter.
Add seaweed and saute for another five minutes.
Add water, (mushrooms), and Gook Ganjang. Bring to a boil.
Then reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes.
Add (tofu cubes).
Salt to taste and serve.

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After the class recipe lesson, introduce the project
idea of putting together a class cookbook. Students
could submit two or more recipes each. They could also
include an ethnic store/supermarket directory of Wake
County at the back of the book. This directory would
be quite useful in finding the necessary ingredients
for each recipe in the book.

Then they would have to decide on how to put the


cookbook together: How the cookbook would be
designed, how many cookbooks they would like to make
and sale, how much it would cost, how much money they
would need to begin this project, and finally how much
money they would like to raise from the sale of their
cookbooks for an organization such as The Foodbank or
an organization of their choosing. It would be the
students' way of giving back to the community.

Students could donate the initial start-up money


themselves or wait until the overall total sale of the
profits of the cookbook sale, in order to be
reimbursed, or they could have a food fair/bake sale
with their school and charge for the food they would
be serving, in order to raise the necessary funds for
this project.

I see that another facet of the story is pregnancy. Perhaps the two ideas can come together with
resources or organizations that explain and help with nutrition in general or prenatal nutrition
specifically. One government program"is called "Women Infants and Children (WIC)". If you
"google" it, I'm sure you will find a wealth of information. You may also notice that there are signs
on the grocery store shelves for WIC. It may be helpful for students to connect with this service or
simply be aware of the items highlighted as particularly healthy. It would be beneficial to connect
others at their sight or in their community with this information.

94
Coincidences
Pre-reading
What is a coincidence?
Has a strange coincidence ever happened to you or to someone you know?
What happened?

Jigsaw reading

Story 1
Liliana’s Story
When I was in Madrid, Spain, I was
visiting a great museum, the Prado. I was
surprised because there were many artists
beginning their careers by painting replicas of
famous artworks. I was amazed by a specific
painting of Rembrandt and its replica. When I
approached the artist, she was an old classmate. I
didn’t know that she had become a great artist.

Story 2
Artemisa (1634) , by Rembrandt,
from The Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain

La Universidad Nacional de Cordoba University was Argentina’s


first university. It opened in 1613.

Zelmira’s Story
I’m Zelmira. I’m from Argentina. One week I was playing Scrabble online with a
person from Argentina. He began using biochemical words, so I asked about his job. He
wrote, “I’m a biochemist.” I asked where he studied, and he wrote, “I studied at Cordoba
University.” “What a great coincidence. So did I!”, I wrote. We had the same teacher and
studied at the same time. This was a good surprise, and now we continue to chat about
our profession and our teachers.

95
Comprehension (story 1 and 2)

What is the Where is the What was the What was the
author’s author from? author doing when coincidence?
name? the coincidence
happened?
Story
1

Story
2

Story 3
Cesar’s Story
When I was young in Mexico, I asked my father if I could go to a
party, but he wouldn’t give me permission. I was sad, but I responded,
“Ok.” Later the phone rang, and I answered. It was my friend who asked
me to go to the party. I said, “Oh!” I thought fast. I had one idea about
how to go to the party. “I will talk with my father again. I’ll ask him if I
can go with you and sleep at your house tonight.”
When I asked my father, he let me go to my friend’s house. But I didn’t sleep at
my friend’s house. I went to the party with my friends. Later, when I was dancing on the
dance floor, I saw my father dancing with my mother right in front of me, at the same
party! I was amazed. So were they! That was my big coincidence.

Story 4
Teresa Lara’s Story
When I was working in Mexico in a factory, my friend’s brother
arrived from the U.S. That year, we began dating. Later we became a
couple. One day, he asked me to go with him to visit one of his cousins,
who I didn’t know. When we arrived at his cousin’s house I was worried
because I knew the house. When his cousin came out to open the door, I
recognized him. He was my ex-boyfriend.

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Comprehension (story 3 and 4)
What is the Where is the What was the What was the
author’s author from? author doing when coincidence?
name? the coincidence
happened?
Story
3

Story
4

Role-play
With a partner, choose one of the four coincidence stories and write a dialogue between
two of the characters in the story. For example, 1) what did Cesar and his parents said to
each other when they saw each other at the party or 2) what did Teresa Lara and her ex-
boyfriend (and her new boyfriend!) say to each other?

Listening
How much of Cesar’s coincidence story do you remember? Read Cesar’s story below and
try to fill in the blanks. (Do not look back at the reading.) Then listen to the story to
check your answers.

When I was young in Mexico, I asked my father if I could go to a __________,

but he didn’t give me __________. I was sad, but I responded, “Ok.” Later the phone

__________, and I __________. It was my friend who __________ me to go to the party.

I said, “Oh!” I thought fast. I had one idea about how to go to the party. “I will

__________ with my father again. I’ll ask him if I can go with you and __________ at

your house tonight.”


97
When I asked my __________, he let me go to my friend’s _________. But I

didn’t sleep at my friend’s house. I went to the _________ with my friends. Later, when I

was ___________ on the dance floor, I saw my father dancing with my ___________

right in front of me, at the same party! I was ___________. So were they! That was my

big ___________.

Grammar

Direct and Indirect Speech


Direct speech tells exactly what someone said (or wrote, or thought), using quotation
marks. We often use indirect (reported) speech when we are telling (or reporting) about
what someone said. With indirect speech, you don’t have to use the exact words that a
person said. You can paraphrase.

Look at the examples of direct and indirect speech below. What differences do you see?

Direct Cesar said, “I will talk with my “I am a biochemist,” he wrote.


speech father.”

Indirect Cesar said (that) he would talk with He wrote that he was a biochemist.
speech his father.

Changing direct to indirect speech (general rules)


1) We usually change present tense verbs to past tense. (We “go one back in the past.")
present simple → past simple
present continuous → past continuous
present perfect → past perfect

Example
Brad: “Molly feels a little sick.” → Brad said that Molly felt a little sick.
Brad: “Molly isn’t coming tonight.” → Brad said that Molly wasn’t coming tonight.
Molly: “I’ve been sick for 2 weeks.” → Molly said that she’d been sick for 2 weeks.

*However, if the sentence is still true now, you can keep the present tense. For example,
if Molly is still sick, you can keep all three sentences in the present tenses.

Fill in the chart below with irregular the simple past forms. Three are done for you.
will → would am/is → have/has →
can → could are → know →
may → might do/does → go →

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2) We don’t usually change the simple past (but it is possible to change it to past perfect).
Example:
Wendy: I went to the grocery store this morning.
→ Wendy said that she went to the store this morning.
(Also possible: Wendy said that she had gone to the store this morning.)

3) We use the infinitive (to + verb) with tell (commands) and ask (requests)
Example
Rachel (to her son): Close the door, please. → She asked him to close the door.

4) Don’t forget to change the pronouns, if necessary.


Example
Eric: “I’m going home.” → Eric said that he was going home.

Exercises
Here are some examples of indirect speech from the coincidence stories. Change them to
direct speech.

1) My friend asked me to go to a party.

__________________________________________________________________

2) I asked where he studied.

__________________________________________________________________

Change these examples of direct speech to indirect speech.

3) He wrote, “I studied at Cordoba University.”

__________________________________________________________________

4) “This is a great coincidence,” wrote Zelmira.

__________________________________________________________________

Story-telling
Now think about a coincidence that happened to you (or someone you know). If you
can’t think of something from your life, you can think of a coincidence you read in a
book or saw on television. You can even use your imagination and make one up!

Find a partner and tell them your story.

Writing
Write down the coincidence story that you told your partner. Try to use at least one
example of direct and one example of indirect speech.

Civics Project
How can you share your stories with others?
As a class, decide on a way to share the stories that you’ve told.
99
Civics Lesson - Spring 2007

COINCIDENCES - TEACHER’S NOTES


Picture sources: (all websites accessed on February 20, 2007)
Rembrandt painting: http://museoprado.mcu.es/i71.html
Universidad de Cordoba (Argentina): http://www.timeforkids.com/TFK/specials/goplaces/argentina/cordoba.html
Dancing Couple: http://www.school-clip-art.com/dance_clipart.shtml (free clip art for teachers)
House: http://www.school-clip-art.com/house_clipart.shtml (free clip art for teachers)

Pre-reading

Discuss the meaning of the word “coincidence” as a whole class. Depending on the
level of the class, you might put these definitions on the board:
A coincidence:
1) A sequence of events that although accidental seems to have been planned or
arranged. http://education.yahoo.com/reference/dictionary/entry/coincidence
2) An apparently chance or unlikely event which creates an unexpected and
significant situation, www.longman.co.uk/tt_seceng/resources/glosauth.htm

This can be done as a whole-class discussion. Later in the lesson, the students will be
asked to tell their “coincidence story” to a partner.

Jigsaw reading

The aim of a jigsaw reading is for students to read and comprehend a text, and then be
able to communicate that information to someone else. It involves reading, writing,
listening and speaking skills.

Divide the class into 2 equal groups, group A and group B. Students in group A will read
stories 1 and 2; students in group B will read stories 3 and 4. Ask them to fill in the
comprehension chart as they read. When they have finished, they should find another
student in their own group (A or B) with whom they can check their answers.

Now have all the students from group A pair up with a student from group B, so that
everyone has a new partner. Students should share the information from the stories they
read. Their partner should write the information down in the blank spaces in their grid.
They should tell their partner the whole story, but they do not have to fill in all the details
in the chart – just the main points of the story. Ask students not to look at the stories that
they were not assigned. They should ask clarification questions if they do not understand
something their partner tells them. (If there is an odd number of students, there can be a
group of 3 and each student can tell just one of the stories.)

100
Comprehension - Answer Key
What is the Where is the What was the What was the
author’s author from? author doing when coincidence?
name? the coincidence
happened?
Story Liliana Spain (This is Visiting an art She was watching an
1 not definite, but museum (the artist copy a painting of
it’s likely, since Prado) in Madrid Rembrandt, when she
she and the realized that the artist
artist had gone was an old classmate.
to school (*You can also teach
together and them the phrase “It
they were both turned out”…to be an
in Spain.) old classmate, etc.)
Story Zelmira Argentina On the computer, The person she was
2 playing scrabble playing with had gone to
online (in the U.S.) the same university at
with someone from the same time – and had
Argentina had the same teacher.
(It turned out that the
person had gone to the
same university…)
Story Cesar Mexico Dancing at a party He saw his parents at a
3 party that he was not
supposed to go to.
(His father told him not
to go to a party, but he
lied to his father and
went anyway.)
Story Teresa Lara Mexico She was visiting her Her boyfriend’s cousin
4 boyfriend’s turned out to be her ex-
cousin’s house (her boyfriend.
ex-boyfriend’s
house)

Role-play
For the role-play, students can choose from the two example situations or they can
choose from the other two stories. They can write the dialogue in pairs (or in threes, for
ex., with Teresa Lara, her ex-boyfriend and her new boyfriend, or with Cesar and both his
parents). When they’ve finished, they can perform their role-play for the class. After
doing the grammar exercises on direct indirect speech, students can come back and
change some of the dialogue to indirect speech.

Listening
This activity is part cloze test, part dictation. The first part of the activity acts as a sort of
cloze exercise. It also helps them to mentally prepare for the words they will hear in the
listening. Students use the listening (partial dictation) to check their answers.

101
Answer Key
1) party 6) idea 11) party
2) permission 7) talk 12) dancing
3) rang 8) sleep 13) mother
4) answered 9) father 14) amazed
5) asked 10) house 15) coincidence

Grammar
Students may also know indirect speech as reported speech. You can tell students that
they are other rules involving indirect speech, but these are some of the most important
ones.

Changing direct to indirect speech (general rules)


You may especially want to go over the first three verbs with the students, since they may
be less familiar with them. You may also want to review other common irregular verbs.

will → would am/is → was Have/has →had


can → could are → were know → knew
may → might do/does → did go → went

You may also want to go over the difference between say and tell, i.e.,
- Use tell + person you were talking with:
I told him (that) we weren’t going.
- Use say when you don’t need to say who you were talking with:
I said (that) we weren’t going.
- You can also use say + to + person you’re talking with:
What did you say to her?

Exercises
Possible answers
1) “Do you want to go to a party?”
2) “Where did you study?” (Also, “Where do you study?”)
3) He wrote that he studied at Cordoba University.
4) Zelmira wrote that it was a great coincidence.

After they’ve finished the grammar exercises, students can find more examples of direct
speech in the coincidence stories and change them to indirect speech, or vice versa
(indirect to direct).

Examples from the stories: (some are slightly adapted)


Indirect Direct
Story 1 none None
Story 2 “I’m a biochemist.”
I asked about his job. (*more difficult, i.e., “I studied at Cordoba University.”
What is your job? What do you do for a “This is a great coincidence.”
living?, etc.) “So did I.” (*You may simply want to
teach this one: She said that she had
I asked where he studied. (studied there) too.)

102
Story 3
I asked my father if I could go to a party. “I’ll talk with my father again.”

My friend asked me to go to the party. “I will ask him if I can go with you.” (more
difficult, since it already incorporates
indirect speech)
Story 4
He asked me to go with him to visit one of None
his cousins.

Story-telling (Speaking)
Ask students to try to find a different partner than the ones they’ve worked with earlier in
the lesson. This activity is a segue into the writing.

Writing
If you prefer or if there is not enough time, this can be done as homework.

Civics Project
As a follow-on civics project, students could host a “Community Story Exchange”: a
story-telling night where students share their stories with others. This could be done at a
local community center, a library, a nursing home, or a school, for example. You could
also suggest they invite members of a "Toastmasters" club or other groups interested in
speaking or storytelling. See the website http://www.toastmasters.org/find/default.asp to
find Toastmasters clubs in the area.

103
Coming of Age, Belen’s story
Level 5-6, WTCC, Fall 2006

LESSON PLAN
1. Before reading
THINK: What does “coming of age” mean? How do you celebrate “coming of age in your country/culture?

2. Now read Belen’s story

3. After reading

a) Writing for Understanding:


Don’t look! Cover the story and listen and write as your teacher dictates. Your teacher will ask you and a
partner to write your sentences on the board.

b) Questions for Understanding:


Now answer the 20 questions on the following pages. You may do this with a partner or individually.
(Teacher – you can ask these questions orally and have students write them down as further dictation
practice, or you may want to give them in written form.)

4. Using the Language

a) Grammar Point
- for, during and while
b) Expand a Sentence/Ask a Question
- practicing writing longer sentences and asking questions

5. Writing Practice
Students write about the “coming of age” customs in their countries. Encourage them to use the
grammar points they’ve just been working on (for, during and while), as well as question-formation

6. Speaking Practice

a) In Your Own Words and Making Questions Practice


Students tell about their customs to the class. The class asks questions as appropriate. Focus on the form
(correct grammar) of the questions, as well as the meaning.
b) Let’s Talk
Pair work. Students get to express their own opinions on two statements, one-on-one.
c) Report
Additional speaking practice. Doing this sort of activity frequently often helps students become more
comfortable talking in front of others.

CIVICS PROJECT
A class could focus on identifying places in the American system that have legislated age requirements. For
example, at what age can you drive, vote, marry, begin work, etc.
Other requirements specifically relating to children might be included. For example, age requirements in
connection with car seats, or how old a child must be before he/she can be left home alone for short
periods.
Learning where to get answers, compiling this information, comparing it with practices in their country,
and disseminating it to others might be a helpful project for students.

104
In Mexico we celebrate Quincianera. This is a party to celebrate when a girl
becomes a woman at 15 years of age. I had a Sweet 15 party in Mexico. My
parents gave me a great party.

They paid for everything: the food, the drinks, the musicand the cake. My
mombought me a beautiful pinkand white dress and a flower bouquet, shoes
and jewelry.

My party started whenthe priest of the church gave me the blessing.


There were a lot of people in the church, and I was so excited because there
were flowers all around the church.

After the ceremony we went to the reception hall. The Mariachi band was
waiting for me. They sang the traditional mananitas, a traditional birthday
song. Mariachi music consists of trumpets, drums, guitars as well as harps
and violins. The men wear black suits, hats, and their pants are laced with
silver and gold buttons. Everybody was happy eating, drinking and dancing.
The musicians played Spanish music like sa/sa, rhumba, meringue and
ranchero.

My father opened the dance at 6:00 p.m. and we waltzed. He was crying
because he was happy. He danced with me and the people made a circle
around and joined us. We finished the waltz at 8:00p.m. and we cut the
cake.

Finally, they gave me permission to dance alone with my friends. I had a lot
of presents: jewelry, shoes and dolls. The people continued dancing all
night, but before that, my father took the microphone and thanked everyone
for coming. He reminded them to pay their bills. He repeated that two or
three times. I was embarrassed, but everybody was laughing because they
understood that he drank too much.

The party finished at 4;00 a.m. We were very tired, but happy.

Be/en Ange/es
October, 2006

105
QUESTIONS FOR UNDERSTANDING:

Don't look! Without looking at the story, answer these questions that your
teacher will ask you.

1. At what age does a girl become a woman in Mexico?


2. What is Quincianera? Why do you think Belen calls it her 'Sweet 15."
party?
3. Who are the hosts of the party, and what do they pay for?
4. What did Belen's mother buy for her?
5. Howdid the party start? .
6. Why was Belen excited when she saw the church?
7. Where was the party held?
8. Describe Mariachi music.
9. Describe Mariachi players.
10. What did the band do for Belen?
11. Why was Belen's father crying while he danced with Belen?
12. Besides 'happy,' how do you think he was feeling?*
13. What did Belen need permission to do?
14. What presents did Belen receive?
15. Besides thanking the guests, what did Belen's father say?*
16. Howdid Belen feel about her father's speech?
17. Did the quests feel the same way? Why not?
18. How much do you think the party cost?
19. What time did the party finish?
20. What do you think Belen did after the party?

106
*GRAMMAR POINT:

'Besides" means "plus," "in addition to." Look at these examples:

Besides milk, I need butter andpotatoes at the store.


Who do you like besides The DaveMatthews Band?
We didn't have time to go anywhere besides Disneyland

Note: "Beside" is different from "besides." "Beside" means "next to."


Example: Put the napkin on the left besIde the dinner fork.

Challenge! Write your own:

*GRAMMAR POINT:

Look at these sentences:

We danced for five hours.


The band played while we danced
While thanking the guests, my father reminded them to pay their bill.
I talked with many people during the party

I talked to my mother on the phone for one hour.


I talked to my mother while I got ready for the party
While dressing for the party, I thanked God for my kind parents.
I was so tired I slept during the afternoon.

107
*Use 'for" to tell "how long."
*Use "during" + noun
*Use "while" + noun and verb or "while" + verbing

PRACTICE:

Besides for while during

My father cried dancing with me. We danced two


hours, then he gave me permission to dance with my friends.
jewelry, I received gifts of shoes and dolls. My parents planned my
party seven months. It was a lot of work, but the
celebration, we all had so much fun!

EXPAND A SENTENCE/AS.K A QUESTION

Challenge! Use your imagination to make longer sentences. Work in small


groups.

Example:
We celebrated my fifteenth birthday with a ceremony at the
church and a wonderful dance and dinner...at the reception hall.

New sentence becomes:

We celebrated my fifteenth birthday.with a ceremony at the church and a


wonderful dance and dinner at the reception hall from 6p.m.until4a.m.

Now ask each other questions.

Example;
Which birthday did they celebrate? Where was the ceremony? What was
after the ceremony? Where was it held? How many hours did they dance?

108
,, -

WRITING PRACTICE:

Please describe the customs regarding 'coming of age' in your country. Tell
about your celebration. Spend the next 30 minutes writing good, long
sentences. Try to use your new grammar points! Ask your teacher if you
need help.

IN YOUR OWN WORDS and MAKING QUESTIONS PRACTICE:

Please come to the front of the class and tell us your story. Don't read!
~ Your fellow students will ask you questions!

LET'S TALK:

Find your partner and discuss:

Fifteen is old enough to havf! a serious boyfriend.

It's okay to spend so much money on a party for coming of age.

REPORT:

Come to the front of the class and report on each other's opinions.

COMMUNITY IMPACT: Heart of the Community/Part of the Community

Project: Using your own photos if possible, make large poster with graphics
and short explanations of "coming of age" in your countries. Carry the
poster to each class and explain your customs. Ask local library to display
your poster for a month or so. Ask librarian if there is a children's reading
group that you can give a presentation to. Ask the librarian and children
what U.S. custom regarding coming of age is.

109
"

~~:e

Learning From Misunderstandings

T-
~
.. ~~-
--_~R
Laura Franco-Martinez is an ESL student at Wake Tech Community College

!]I READ IT LAURA'S STORY


I am Laura when I was twenty years old I came at the US and found very
different costumes between the Mexico and US sometimes it was funnies
and sometimes I feel confuse and sometimes it is very problems because
misunderstandings happened every time and I will tell you same stories
about that.

When I came for the first time at a store for buy some clothes I was
very confuses whit sizes and what products are expenses and what are
chips because in Mexico the many is PESOS and in US is DOLLARDSand one
dollar are ten pesos.

I bought same lines for my bed and they were a different size the may
bed and I went to the store for change the lines more bigger size bat at
the time I not spoken English.

One day I went to the burger king and I said "I would like to eaten the
first burger" and the person listened "the fish burger" not "the first
burger" I know this is not the best way for order food but when you
don't know ENGHISH, maybe you can eaten the fish burger, but I don't
like the fish burger but it is OK.

TALK ABOUT IT h~ e-\

4t Have you ever had a misunderstanding like this?


4t What causes misunderstandings for you when learning English?

110
, "

IIED~GEXCEUENCE
GET IT WRITERIGHT!
Read the story again. Each word that is bolded is a word that the writer uses that does
not make sense in the sentence. Please choose the correct word from the word list to
replace the incorrect words in the story. You will use each word at least once and some
words will be used more than once.

WORD LIST:
about cheap expensive linens than
all of confused funny money that
the customs have my to
but DOLLARS heard some to a
caused eat 1S speak went

LAURA'S STORY

I am Laura when I was twenty years old I came at - the US and found

very di fferent costumes between the Mexico and US

sometimes it was funni es . and sometimes I feel confuse

and sometimes it is ve ry problems because

misunderstandings happened every --- time and I will tell

you some stories about that.

When I come for the first time at a store for

buy some clothes I was very confuses whit

sizes and what products are expenses

and what are chi ps because in Mexico

the many is PESOS and in US is DOL LARDS

and one dollar are ten pesos.

I bought some lines for my bed and


they were a different size the may bed and

111
.,',

1 went to the store for change the 1 i nes more

bigger size bat at the time 1 not spoken


English.

One day 1 went to the burger king and 1 said "1 would like to eaten

the first burger" and the person 1 istened


"the fish burger" not "the first burger" 1 know this is not
the best way for _order food but when you don't know ENGHISH

, maybe you can eaten the fish burger, but 1

don't li ke the fi sh burger but it is OK.

PUNCTUATION PERFECTION! ? : .!? : .! ? : .!? : .!? :.!?


Using the correct punctuation and capitalization makes aOstory more understandable while
reading. Please choose the correct punctuation and capitali~ation for the rewritten story
below and write it in the blue blanks provided. Be sure to discuss with your teacher the
yellow highlighted corrections that'were further made to the story.

1 am Laura -- ---hen 1 was twenty years old--l came to the U_S- and
found very different customs between ~ Mexico and the U_S- --ometimes
it was funny and sometimes I fee+ felt confused and sometimes it caused
problems because misunderstandings happened all of the time-- GAd I will
tell you some stories about that.
When I went for the first time to a store to buy some clothes--I was
very confused about sizes and what products are expensive and what are
cheap because in Mexico the money is PESOS and in the US it is DOLLARS
and one dollar GPe is ten pesos.
I bought some linens for my bed but they were a different size than my
bed--GAd I went to the store to change the linens to a bigger size--
but at the time 1 did not speak English.

One day I went to ~ --urger --ing and I said-- "1 would like to have
the first burger--" but the person heard "the fish burger" not "the
first burger--" 1 know this is not the best way to order food-- but when
you don't know ENGLISH, maybe you can eat the fish burger, but I don't
like the fish burger ut-- that is OK.

112
. .:

FINAL DRAFT
Compare the corrections you made above to the corrected story below.

LAURA'S STORY

I am Laura. WhenI was twenty years old, I came to the U.S. and found
very different customs between Mexico and the U.S. Sometimes it was
funny and sometimes I felt confused and sometimes it caused problems
because misunderstandings happened all of the time. I will tell you some
stories about that.

When I went for the first time to a store to buy some clothes, I was very
confused about sizes and what products are expensive and what are cheap
because in Mexico the moneyis PESOSand in the US it is DOLLARSand one
dollar is ten pesos.

I bought some linens for my bed but they were a different size than my
bed. I went to the store to change the linens to a bigger size, but at
the time I did not speak English.

One day I went to Burger King and I said, "I would like to have the
first burger," but the person heard "the fish burger" not "the first
burger." I know this is not the best way to order food, but when you
don't know ENGLISH,maybe you can eat the fish burger, but I don't like
the fish burger. But, that is OK.

When Laura doesn't feel like eating at Burger King, she enjoys making
tortillas with her sister-in-law, Teresa.

113
'.

~~
~ff
4 WRITE ON! ~.
U~ewhatyou have learned about choosing the right words, punctuation, and capitalization
to write about your or a friend's misunderstanding story. When you are finished, have
your teacher check it over.

'S STORY

114
- .-

. 0,.

LISTEN UP!

Being able to listen carefully is


very important in preventing
misunderstandings. At times,
English can be difficult to
understand for non-native
speakers because many English
words sound similar. Let's
practice speaking and
pronunciation with the following
exercise:

WHAT'S YOUR NUMBER?

NUMBERS WORDS

0 berry
J: abeet
S teat
3 abeep .

4 cbeat
5 lied
. very
7 ablp
8 taate
9 Fred

StepJ:: Write down your telephone number in both numbers and words.
For Example: 740-8936 = ship, cheat, berry. taste, Fred, sheep, very

MY NUMBER IN NUMBERS: - - - ----


MYNUMBERIN WORDS:

Step2: Now, ask a classmate to say their phone number to you in words,
but you write down the corresponding numbers. After you have written
down their number, check to see if you are right. Repeat with two other
classmates.
CLASSMATE'S NAME NUMBER__- . ----
CLASSMATE'S NAME NUMBER__- . ----
CLASSMATE'S NAME NUMBER__- . ----

115
'<

SAY IT CLEAR!

The following is a listof commonlyconfused words in English. Choose 5


words randomly and dictate them to your partner. Have your partner
check to see if they were right. Then, have your partner randomly
choose 5 of the words and dictate them to you. Check to see if you are
correct. Were you able to understand each other, or did you have a
misunderstanding? Give yourself a star if you were right and an X if
you were incorrect.
keys bum share load
ki.ss bomb chai.r road
throughout van pray very
threw out ban play berry

WORDS DICTATED WORDS DICTATED * x


TO MY PARTNER TOME

--
--
--
--
MY TOTAL CORRECTI

LAURA SAYS:
GO~!J) ~~~~
MOW,TAItE IT ~O 11'BBftt1l!BTSt
You can contribute to your community by helping to prevent
misunderstandings. Brainstorm with classmates some common
misunderstandings caused by cultural differences. Create a booklet
with illustrations that celebrates cultural differences aimed at
elementary-aged children. Then, create some skits that act out how
these differences can be prevented. With classmates, travel to a
local elementary school to perform your skits in an effort to raise
cultural awareness in youngsters and teach them how to handle
misunderstandings effectively. Pass your booklets out at the end of
your presentation so that they can share the message with others!

116
Lesson Plan
Volunteering and Philanthropy: Andrew Carnegie

EL/CIVICS Community Volunteer Project


Lesson Objective:
Students will learn about some of the charitable organizations and volunteer opportunities
in Raleigh, NC. Students will also learn some of the history and vocabulary related to
philanthropist, Andrew Carnegie. Students will interview a native speaker about their
volunteer experience and collect food items for The Food Bank of Central & Eastern NC.

Warm Up I Introduction:
People give money to charities to help others. Ask students these questions:

What are some local charities in Raleigh?


Have you ever volunteered?
What types of charitable organizations are there in your home country?
Do you enjoy volunteering?
Why do people volunteer?
Have you ever made a contribution or gift to a charitable organization?

Content:
After discussion / warm up, review the story about Andrew Carnegie. Review some of the new
vocabulary and practice pronunciation:

Carnegie Gospel
Charity Philanthropy
Colonel Temple
Essay Volunteer
Foundation Wealth
Giving

Have students get in pairs and practice reading the story. After students have read, have them
answer the 5 questions (in pairs) on the Worksheet handout, Activity A.

Review students' work for proper evaluation.

Review the local charities under Activity B. Have students guess what each one does and then
give a brief explanation of what each charity does. Explain the activity and then have students get
back hi pairs and decide how much money they'd like to give each charity. Review together.

Homework
1) Interview a native English speaker about their volunteer experience. Use some of the questions
we discussed in class, e.g., Have you ever volunteered? Where? Do you enjoy volunteering?
Why do people volunteer? Have you ever made a contribution or gift to a charitable
organization?
2) Explain what a food drive is and pass out the most needed items list. Have students ask friends
& neighbors for items on the most needed list and get every student to bring in at least 5 different
food items. Schedule a time the class can go over to a Food Bank location (or drop-off site) and

117
donate the food they have gathered. Ideally this could be a field trip where they would tour the
site.

Evaluation/Suggestions for future use of this lesson.


A good lesson with a good text that the students enjoyed reading. Might want to add more
opportunities for verbal practice during the lesson. The students were excited and glad to
donate the food items to the Food Shelter.

Descriptive summary (civics service project and lesson )


As a class we brainstormed ideas on community service projects. I suggested a few along with
many ideas from the students. From there, we chose the community service project that gave the
students the most opportunity to learn about volunteer organizations in their own community as
well as provide an opportunity to donate to a very important local charity.

The students read about one of the more famous philanthropists, Andrew Carnegie, during the
lesson. This gave them opportunity for vocabulary & pronunciation practice during the lesson.
After answering a few questions about Andrew Carnegie, I explained the various volunteer &
charity organizations here in Raleigh. The students then decided how much money they would
give to each organization if they had $10,000,000 to give. Each student shared with the class how
much they would give to each organization and why.

For the homework assignment, each student went out into their community and interviewed
a native English speaker about their volunteer experience. They also were assigned to bring
and or collect food items for the Food Bank of Central & Eastern NC. The food drive was quite
successful. I hope the food and household items that were brought in by the students will touch
many people in the community.

118
Reading
Andrew Carnegie

Andrew Carnegie was an immigrant from Scotland. He came to Pittsburgh in 1848 at


age 13. He lived in the East End of the city . When he grew up, Ie founded a company in
Pittsburgh, the United States Steel Corporation, which became the largest company in
the world. He also became the richest man in the world.

He worried that he had too much money. He wanted to give money back to the
community. In 1889 he wrote an essay called "the Gospel of Wealth" that was published
in a magazine. This essay described how he thought people should make gifts.

Andrew Carnegie didn't go to college. As a young adult, he was allowed to read books
from the private library of Colonel Anderson. At this time, libraries were small and hard to
find. Because he learned so much from reading Colonel Anderson's books, Andrew
Carnegie created the Carnegie Library to make sure everyone could go to a library for
free.

Andrew Carnegie gave away much of his money to support libraries, parks, museums,
music, and education. When he died in 1919, he had given away $350,000,000. He
gave the rest of his money, $30,000,000, to a foundation in New York City that still exists
today.

Andrew Carnegie, with his wife Louise, in East Liberty in 1914.


Photo from Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh.

Activity A

1. Where was Andrew Carnegie from?

2. What company did Andrew Carnegie found?

3. Why did he want to fund libraries?

119
4. What places in Pittsburgh are named after Andrew Carnegie?

5. If you were the richest person in the world, what would you do with the money?

Activity B:

Be a Philanthropist:
You have $10,000,000 to give away to local charities. How much would you give to each
of the following charities? How much do you give to each and why? Talk about what
each charity does.

Charity: Amount Donated:

American Cancer Society $ ____________________


American Red Cross $ ____________________
Food Bank of Central & Eastern NC $ ____________________
Make a Wish Foundation $ ____________________
American Lung Association $ ____________________
Marine Toys for Tots Foundation . $ ____________________
Guiding Eyes for the Blind $ ____________________
Scholarship America $ ____________________

Most-Needed Items for the Food Bank

The following list includes the food items most needed by the hunger relief agencies served by
the Food Bank. Please choose plastic containers or canned items rather than glass.

• Canned tuna or chicken, packed in water


• Canned stews and pasta with meat (easy on salt and fat)
• Peanut butter
• Canned fruits in light syrup, natural applesauce
• 100% juice in cans or boxes (no glass, please)
• Canned vegetables, tomatoes, tomato sauce
• Soups with meat and/or beans, meal-in-a-can (easy on salt and fat)
• Cereals and cereal bars (easy on sugar and fat)
• Pasta, spaghetti, macaroni, noodles
• Packages of dry beans

For the safety of those we serve, the Food Bank is unable to accept open packages, homemade
food items, perishable foods, or items with expired dates.

120
~,-<

Diana Hoehne
Wake Tech- Saint Saviors, Level 5/6
~

LESSON OBJECTIVE: WHAT DOESIT MEANTO BE AN AMERICAN?


LEARNINGABOUTTHE NATURAUZATIONPROCESS THROUGHART, POETRYAND SONG

MATERIALS: All materials are included within the lesson plan.


WARM-UP: Activity 1- Citizenship Test- How much do you know? What do you need to leam?
CONTENT: (See LessonBelow)
PRACTICE GAME: Activity 3: Citizenship FlashcardsGame
EVALUATIONS/ STUDENT WORK: See Activity 7: Project and Actvity 6: Reflections

Activity 1: CmZENSHIP TEST: To become a United States citizen, you need to learn about the history
of the United States and how its govemment works. Knowing about your new country is a very important
part of being a good citizen. The United States has a rich, interesting history and a unique system of
government. Learning more about the United States as you prepare to naturalize will help make your
journey toward U.S. citizenship more meaningful. During your naturalization interview, you will only be
asked the short Questions and Answers. The following questions will help you see what kinds of questions
are asked on the Citizenship Test.

How much do you know already? What do you need to leam?


Divide the class into 2 groups. Give each group one sheet of the questions to see how many of the
questions they can answer. Walk between groups to help and check answers. Students will use these
questions for "STUMP THE TEACHER" game (see activity 3)

Activity 2: THENATURALIZATION
PROCESS
1. Go over the definition for students:
DEflNmON: Naturalization is the way immigrants become citizens of the United States. If you were not
~ born a citizen, you must be naturalized to become one.

2. READING: THE NATURALIZATION PROCESS

The United States is a nation of immigrants. Throughout our history, immigrants have come here seeking a
better way of life and have strengthened our nation in the process. Deciding to become a U.s. citizen is one
of the most important decisions in a person's life. If you decide to apply for naturalization, you show your
commitment to the United States. You also show your loyalty to its Constitution and its people. When you
are naturalized, you agree to accept all of the responsibilities of being a citizen. In return, you are rewarded
with all the rights and privileges that are part of citizenship.

RESPONSIBlLmES OFCmZENSHIP:
. countries
give up prior allegiances to other

. support and defend the Constitution


and the laws of the United States
. swear allegiance to the United States
and serve the country when required

Citizens have a responsibility to participate in the political process by registering and voting in elections.
Serving on a jury is another responsibility of citizenship. Finally, America becomes stronger when all its
citizens respect the different opinions, cultures, ethnic groups, and religions found in this country. Tolerance
for differences is also a responsibility of citizenship.

3. USENATURILIZATION PROCESSHANDOUT-What Should I Expect from the Naturalization


Process? Have students learn about the Naturalization Process from the sheet and discuss reasons why
people would choose to become USCitizens.

' " 4. READAND DISCUSS:The Oath of Allegiance

121
The Oath of Allegiance
' /
I hereby declare, on oath,
that I absolutely and entirely renounceand abjure all
allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince,
potentate, state, or sovereignty, of whom or which I
have heretofore been a subject or citizen;
that I willsupport and defend the Constitution and
laws of the United States of America against all
enemies, foreign and domestic;
that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same;
that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States
when required by the law;
that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed
Forces of the United States when required by the
law;
that I willperform work of national importance under
civilian direction when required by the law; and
that I take this obligation freely, without any
mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God.

What do you think of the oath?


Could you make these promises?

5. Discuss this quote:


"America has never been united by blood or birth or soil. We
are bound by ideals that move us beyond our backgrounds, lift us above our interests and teach us what it
means to be citizens. Every child must be taught these principles. Every citizen must uphold them. And
every immigrant, by embracing these ideals, makes our country more, not less, American."

- President George W.Bush


" /

Discuss this quote:


What does it mean- "America has never been united by blood, birth, or soil?"
What does Bush mean by, " And every immigrant, by embracing these ideals, makes our country
more, not less, American."

Activity 3: CITIZENSHIP TEST- STUMP THE TEACHERGAME: Divide the students into 2 groups. The
groups will compete against each other to try to guess the correct answer to the questions from the test. A
player from the first team stands next to the teacher and the other team chooses a question from their test
sheet to ask the student. If the student can't answer, they can use 1 of 3 "ASK YOUR TEAM"cards. If the
team can't help, then the teacher can guess. If the teacher guesses right, she gets a point. If neither the
student or the teacher can guess correctly, the questioning team has "STUMPED THE TEACHER" and gets
the point, and so on for the other team. The extra set of test questions can be used by either team during
the game. They are "wild card" questions because no one looked for the answers to these questions- the
answers can be found on the teacher's answer key. The team at the end with the most points gets a treat.
Hopefully the teacher doesn't get the most points!

Activity 4: LEARNING ABOUT AMERICA THROUGH POETRY AND SONG: LISTENINGI


COMPREHENSIONFor each piece, discusshow it illustrates what it means to be an American.

THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER


Oh, say, can you see, by the dawn's early light,
What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming?
Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight,
O'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming?
And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there.
0 say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave
" /

O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

122
History: In 1814, about a week after the city of Washington had been badly burned, Britishtroops moved
~
up to the primary port at BaltimoreHarbor in Maryland.Frances Scott Keyvisited the Britishfleet in the
Harbor on September 13th to secure the release of Dr. WilliamBeanes who had been captured during the
Washington raid. The two were detained on the ship so as not to warn the Americanswhilethe RoyalNavy
attempted to bombard Fort McHenry.At-dawn on the 14th, Key noted that the huge Americanflag, which
now hangs in the Smithsonian'sAmericanHistoryMuseum,was stillwaving and had not been removed in
defeat. The sight inspired himto write a poem entitled Defense of Fort McHenry;later the poem was set to
music that had been previouslycomposed by a Mr.Smith.The song was immediatelynoted as an inspiring
song that should be the national anthem of the United States of America.It was accepted as such by public
demand for the next century or so, but became even more accepted as the national anthem during the
WorldSeries of Baseball in 1917 when it was sung in honor of the brave armed forces fighting in the Great
War. The WorldSeries performance moved everyone in attendance, and after that it was repeated for every
game. Finally,on March3, 1931, the AmericanCongress proclaimed it as the national anthem, 116 years
after it was first written.

I'M PROUDTO BEAN AMERICAN


If tomorrow all the things were gone, I'd worked for all my life.
And I had to start again, with just my children and my wife.
I'd thank my luckystars, to be livinhere today.
, Cause the flag stillstands for freedom, ~nd they can't take that away.
And I'm proud to be an American,where at least I know I'm free.
And I wont forget the men who died, who gave that right to me.
And I gladlystand up, next to you and defend her stilltoday.
, Cause there ain't no doubt I love this land,
God bless the USA.

From the lakes of Minnesota, to the hills of Tennessee.


Across the plains of Texas, From sea to shining sea.
~ From Detroit down to Houston, and New York to L.A.
Well there's pride in every American heart,
and its time we stand and say.

That I'm proud to be an American,where at least I know I'm free.


And I wont forget the men who died, who gave that right to me.
And I gladlystand up, next to you and defend her stilltoday.
, Cause there ain't no doubt I love this land, God bless the USA.

"In Flander's Fields" By Lieutenant John McCrae


In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago


We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:


To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

~ McCrae uses vivid imagery to convey to the reader the sense of death. The first image he uses is also the

123
most famous: the poppies that "blow between the crosses, row on row." The poppies are used not only
because they do really grow in Flanders fields, but also because their brilliant read colour is representative
" /

of blood, and, if the reader knows that the crosses used were white, they are a contrast against the crosses.
Their colour, that of blood, is put against white, the colour of innocence, representing that the blood shed
was the blood of the innocent. McCrae also provides the image of larks "still bravely singing" above the
battle field in order to demonstrate to the world that nature is indifferent to the affairs and suffering of men
and also to represent hope that the world can return to normal in the future and singing can be heard once
again. He also mentions, however, that these larks are "scarce heard amid the guns below" to demonstrate
to the reader that hope and nature are drowned out be war and violence and the good and pure things in
life forgotten. Another image McCrae provides is that of the soldiers who had recently died feeling dawn and
watching "sunset glow." He provides this image in order to relate that these soldiers were real people and
that they felt peace and enjoyed life. It also shows how their peaceful existence was shattered by war. One
of the final images in the poem is that of the torch being thrown form the "falling hands" of dying soldiers to
the living. This is a powerful image because the torch is connotative of victory, and the suggestion is that
victory is now the responsibility of the living. It also gives the image of a dying request; the soldiers' last
request is that Canadians and other allies "take up [their] quarrel with the foe."

McCrae also presents two very powerful messages in his poem. The first is that the dead soldiers were real
people who "lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow." They were not abstractions; they were not pawns in some
high-stake chess game played on an international stage. They "loved, and were loved." In other words, they
had girlfriends, wives mothers, and other. people who were important to them, and they were important to
other people because they were husbands, sons, and brothers. The second message McCrae stresses in his
poem is that these soldiers have done all they can; not only the responsibility to win the war now fall to the
reader, but the reader must now also honour the memory of these fallen men by winning the war. "If ye
break faith with us who die, we shall not sleep, though poppies grow." Their mission will never be finished if
those left to read the poem do not continue it.

Because of these beautiful images and powerful messages, "In Flander's Fields" endures as a memory of
The Great War and a warning against future war.
" /

Activity 5: LEARNING ABOUT AMERICA THROUGH ART: Have students guess the "freedom
illustrated in each picture. Discuss:

~
"L ~
NORMAN ROCKWELL'S FOUR FREEDOMS: Freedom of Speech, Freedom from Want, Freedom of Worship,
Freedom from Fear

" /

124
~

...

ROSIE THE RIVETER


During WORLDWARII, there was a shortage of manpower at home and women responded to the
government's pleas for women to help "Win the War at Home" by joining the workforce. The women were
called Rosies and helped to build the planes, ammunitions, and computers that helped to win WWlI. When
the war was over, the women were expected to give up their jobs to their returning men.

The Signing of the Constitution- Howard Chandler Christy


Depicts the importance of the signing of the Constitution and the sacred birth of the first modern democratic
nation. It expresses the integrity, determination, and hard-won unity of the framers who sacrificed personal
gain for the good of the nation and their hopes for the future.

125
' /

The Raising of the Flag - Joe Rosenthal, World War II

One of the bloodiest battles of WorldWar II. "In that moment, Rosenthal's camera recordtrlthe soul of a
nation." In 36 days of fighting there were 25,851 US casualties (1 in 3 were killed or woundtrl). Virtually
all 22,000 Japanese perished. Discuss that even though this battle was deadly, the men still had the courage
to display the flag amidst the fighting.

Activity 6: READINGI COMPREHENSION:Faces of America Immigration Stories

STORY1: Dong G. Nguyen - Vietnam


" " Shortly after his birth in 1973, Dong G. Nguyen's home," Nguyen remarked. "I am thankful for the
parents and his nine brothers and sisters fled opportunity this great country has granted me,
Vietnam and came to the United States as and willdo my best to assist if ever asked by our
refugees from their war-torn nation. Describing government. With a strong faith in God and hard
the challenges his close-knitfamilyfaced when work,anything is possible. This is truly a land of
they first arrived here, Mr.Nguyen recalled, "We opportunity."
were refugees in a new country with nothing but
hope for a better life. Myparents raised my
brothers and sisters on a job that paid $3.15 an
hour. Through hard work and a strong faith we
were able to build a better lifefor ourselves."
Inspired by his parent's tireless work ethic, Mr.
Nguyengraduated from the Kansas University
Schoolof Pharmacy at age 23, and became a
registered pharmacist. Settling in Lenexa,
Kansas, Dong married his college sweetheart and
started a family of his own and has three young
daughters.

At a special ceremony in Kansas City during


Citizenship Day, Nguyen, now 32, became a u.s.
Citizen. "This is the only place that I have lived in
and I'm happy to finally be able to call it my

Story 2: Pelageya Ilchenko - Russia century-long journey through life is the story of
It goes without saying that anyone who is 101 how she became a proud American citizen.
years old probably has a few good stories to tell. Born in 1903, IIchenko and her five siblings were
' / The most recent chapter of Pelageya IIchenko's orphaned when she was nine years old. Being

126
the oldest daughter, she supported the family
/
through the BolshevikRevolution,the starvation
in 1933, and WorldWar II, which took the lives
of three of her brothers. "Starvation, devastation,
fear, death, and patriotism- everything had
mixedtogether," IIchenko recallsof her years
livingin the Soviet Union.

"I decided to be a citizen of this country because


only here I could feel myself a truly happy
person," says IIchenko, who naturalized on
Citizenship Day, September 17, 2004 in
Vancouver Washington, "...AIII can do (to repay
the American people) is bring them before God in
my prayers. America is my peaceful refuge."

Margaret Mak - Singapore a lawyer, but I told him to help someone who
Living on the tiny Asian island of Singapore, needed it. I could do this myself." A successful
Margaret Mak came to the United States to study private banker working in the San Francisco area,
Rnance at San Francisco's Golden Gate. Margaret became a U.S. citizen at a special
University. Like many other talented foreign outdoor naturalization ceremony at the
students who travel to the U.S. for higher Immigrant Point Overlook in San Francisco's
education, Margaret started a new life in Presidio.
America. "I came here to study," Mak said, "But
love and patriotism got me to stay." Love for her
husband, David Lichtman, and their son, Michael,
now 11, and an appreciation for the unique
liberties and freedoms enjoyed by every
J American combined to make Margaret one of our
newest citizens. "Inalienable rights for everyone
is a foreign concept for women in Singapore,"
Mak said. "America gave me freedom of
thought." Yet, despite her newfound sense of
independence, Margaret wasn't sure what to
expect during her road to citizenship, "You hear
that immigration people are tough," Margaret
recalls. "But the officer was so welcoming. I hired

COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS:
Story #1 Why did Dong Nguyen's family flee Vietnam?
What is Nguyen most thankful for in America?

Story #2 Why did Pelageya IIchenko decide to become a UScitizen?

Story # 3 What originally brought Margaret Mak to the United States?


What made her decide to stay?
What did Mak think of the immigration process?

REFLECTIONS:Write a reflection about your experience here in America. What do you like
about living here? What makes this country great? What does being an American mean to
you?

Activity 7: COMMUNITY PROJECT: WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE AN AMERICAN? presentation to


Saint Saviors CitizenshipClasses at 12:30 March 23, 2006. Students need to prepare for the project.
Students must choose a song/ painting/poem/photograph that reminds them of what it means to be an
American. They need to choose the picture/ song/ photograph/ painting and make a poster/ presentation
-./
speech that explains what it means to be an American through their chosen art form. Also, one student can
choose to be the HOSTand they can introduce the projects.

127
OFFER EXAMPLE CHOICES for PROJECT

J
-Star Spangled Banner
-Proud to be an American
-Photographs of 9/11
-Rosie the Riveter
-Norman Rockwell's 4 Freedoms
-own idea

EXAMPLE OF A PROJECT: Lee Greenwood's PROUD TO BE AN AMERICAN

Student would play the song for the audience and then discuss how the song illustrates what it
means to be an American:

The lyrics in the song, "I'm Proud to be an American" by Lee Greenwood talk about what it
means to be an American. Greenwood sings, "I'm proud to be an American where at least I
know I'm free." Everyone came to America looking for freedom. Though we all come from
different countries and are of different nationalities, we are all united under the same ideals of
freedom- life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. These ideals are so strong that we will give
up our lives fighting for them. In the song, Greenwood sings, "and I won't forget the men who
died, that gave that right to me." He continues to say that he would gladly stand up next to his
fellow Americans and fight for our country to this day. He loves America and says, "God bless
the USA:' I think that Greenwood captures the feeling of pride that is in the heart of every
citizen who knows what it means to be an American.

-------- Office of Citizenship web site at:


http://uscis.gov/graphics/citizenship/index.htm

128
, ; "'

The Oath of Allegiance


I hereby declare, on oath,
I
/ that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all
allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince,
potentate"state, or sovereignty, of whom or which I
have heretofore been a subject or citizen;
that I will support and defend the Constitution and
laws of the United States of America against all
enemies, foreign and domestic;
that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same;
that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States
when required by the law;
that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed
Forces of the United States when required by the
law;
that I will perform work of national importance under
civilian direction when required by the law; and
that I take this obligation freely, without any
mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God.

THESTARSPANGLEDBANNER
Oh, say, can you see, by the dawn's early,light,
What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming?
Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight,
O'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming?
And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was stillthere.
0 say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

I'M PROUDTO BEAN AMERICAN


' / If tomorrow all the things were gone, I'd worked for all my life.
And I had to start again, withjust my children and my wife.
I'd thank my luckystars, to be livinhere today.
, Cause the flag stillstands for freedom, and they can't take that away.

And I'm proud to be an American, where at least I know I'm free.


And I wont forget the men who died, who gave that right to me.
And I gladlystand up, next to you and defend her still today.
, Cause there ain't no doubt I love this land,
God bless the USA.

From the lakes of Minnesota, to the hills of Tennessee.


Across the plains of Texas, From sea to shining sea.
From Detroit down to Houston, and New York to L.A.
Well there's pride in every American heart,
and its time we stand and say.

That I'm proud to be an American,where at least I know I'm free.


And I wont forget the men who died, who gave that right to me.
And I gladlystand up, next to you and defend her stilltoday.
, Cause there ain't no doubt I love this land, God bless the USA.

' /

129
"In Flander's Fields" By Lieutenant John McCrae
In Flanders fields the poppies blow
--/. Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago


We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:


To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

~ ~~

#
~
~
NORMAN ROCKWELL'S The Four Freedoms

Rosie the Riveter The Signing of the Constitution- Howard Chandler Christy

130
The Raising of the Flag at Iwo Jima- Joe Rosenthal

STORY1: Dong G. Nguyen - Vietnam


Shortlyafter his birth in 1973, DongG. Nguyen's and I'm happy to finally be able to call it my
parents and his nine brothers and sisters fled home," Nguyen remarked. "I am thankful for the
Vietnam and came to the United States as opportunity this great country has granted me,
refugees from their war-torn nation. Describing and will do my best to assist if ever asked by our
the challenges his close-knitfamilyfaced -when government. With a strong faith in God and hard
they first arrived here, Mr. NguyenrecaUed,"We work, anything is possible. This is truly a land of
were refugees in a new country with nothing but opportunity. "
hope for a better life. Myparents raised my --
brothers and sisters on a job that paid $3.15 an
hour. Through hard work and a strong faith we
were able to build a better life for ourselves."
Inspired by his parent's tireless work ethic, Mr.
Nguyengraduated from the Kansas University
'" School of Pharmacyat age 23, and became a
registered pharmacist. Settling in Lenexa,
Kansas, Dong married his college sweetheart and
started a familyof his own and has three young
daughters.

At a special ceremony in Kansas City during


Citizenship Day, Nguyen, now 32, became a U.S.
Citizen. "This is the only place that I have lived in

Story 2: Pelageya Ilchenko - Russia "I decided to be a citizen of this country because
It goes without saying that anyone who is 101 only here 1 could feel myself a truly happy
years old probably has a few good stories to tell. person," says IIchenko, who naturalized on
The most recent chapter of Pelageya Ilchenko's Citizenship Day, September 17, 2004 in
century-long journey through life is the story of Vancouver Washington, "mAil I can do (to repay
how she became a proud American citizen. the American people) is bring them before God in
Born in 1903, IIchenko and her five siblings were my prayers. America is my peaceful refuge."
orphaned when she was nine years old. Being
the oldest daughter, she supported the family
through the Bolshevik Revolution, the starvation
in 1933, and World War II, which took the lives
of three of her brothers. "Starvation, devastation,
fear, death, and patriotism- everything had
mixed together," IIchenko recalls of her years
living in the Soviet Union.

./ '\

131
~' ~ , ~. ~

Margaret Mak - Singapore a lawyer[ but I told him to help someone who
Living on the tiny Asian island of Singapore[ needed it. I could do this myself." A successful
j Margaret Mak came to the United States to study private banker working in the San Francisco areal
Finance at San Francisco's Golden Gate Margaret became a U.S. citizen at a special
University. Like many other talented foreign outdoor naturalization ceremony at the
students who travel to the U.S. for high~r Immigrant Point Overlook in San Francisco's
education[ Margaret started a new life in Presidio.
America. "I came here to study/, Mak said[ "But
love and patriotism got me to stay." love for her
husband[ David Lichtman[ and their son[ Michael[
now 11[ and an appreciation for the unique
liberties and freedoms enjoyed by every
American combined to make Margaret one of our
newest citizens. "Inalienable rights for everyone
is a foreign concept for women in Singapore/'
Mak said. "America gave me freedom of
thought." Yet, despite her newfound sense of
independence[ Margaret wasn't sure what to
expect during her road to citizenship[ "You hear
that immigration people are tough/, Margaret
recalls. "But the officer was so welcoming. I hired

_/

~ 132
What Should I Expect From
the Naturalization Process?
Preparing to Apply
• Read A Guide to Naturalization.
• Complete the Naturalization Eligibility Worksheet.
• Get an “Application for Naturalization” (Form N-400).
• Visit our website at www.uscis.gov.

Completing Your Application and Getting Photographed


• Complete your application.
• Get 2 passport-style photographs taken.
• Collect the necessary documents.
• Send your application, passport-style photographs, documents, and fee (DO
NOT SEND CASH) to the appropriate Service Center.
• Keep a copy of everything you send to USCIS.

Getting Fingerprinted
• Receive an appointment letter from USCIS.
• Go to the fingerprinting location.
• Get your fingerprints taken.
• Mail additional documents if USCIS requests them.
• Wait for USCIS to schedule your interview.

Being Interviewed
• Receive an appointment for your interview.
5
• Go to your local USCIS office at the specified time.
• If requested by USCIS, bring identification and provide additional
documents. It is recommended that you also bring 2 additional passport-style
photographs to your interview.
• Answer questions about your application and background.
• Take the English and civics tests.
• Receive a decision.

Taking the Oath


• Receive a ceremony date.
• Check in at the ceremony.
• Return your Permanent Resident Card.
• Answer questions about what you have done since your interview.
• Take the Oath of Allegiance.
• Receive your Certificate of Naturalization.
133
31
Final Civics Items (History and Government) for the Redesigned Naturalization Test

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT
A: Principles of American Democracy
1. What is the supreme law of the land?
2. What does the Constitution do?
3. The idea of self-government is in the first three words of the Constitution. What are these words?
4. What is an amendment?
5. What do we call the first ten amendments to the Constitution?
6. What is one right or freedom from the First Amendment?
7. How many amendments does the Constitution have?
8. What did the Declaration of Independence do?
9. What are two rights in the Declaration of Independence?
10. What is freedom of religion?
11. What is the economic system in the United States?
12. What is the “rule of law”?

B: System of Government
13. Name one branch or part of the government.
14. What stops one branch of government from becoming too powerful?
15. Who is in charge of the executive branch?
16. Who makes federal laws?
17. What are the two parts of the U.S. Congress?
18. How many U.S. Senators are there?
19. We elect a U.S. Senator for how many years?
20. Who is one of your state’s U.S. Senators?
21. The House of Representatives has how many voting members?
22. We elect a U.S. Representative for how many years?
23. Name your U.S. Representative.
24. Who does a U.S. Senator represent?
25. Why do some states have more Representatives than other states?
26. We elect a President for how many years?
27. In what month do we vote for President?
28. What is the name of the President of the United States now?
29. What is the name of the Vice President of the United States now?
30. If the President can no longer serve, who becomes President?
31. If both the President and the Vice President can no longer serve, who becomes President?
32. Who is the Commander in Chief of the military?
33. Who signs bills to become laws?
34. Who vetoes bills?
35. What does the President’s Cabinet do?
36. What are two Cabinet-level positions?
37. What does the judicial branch do?
38. What is the highest court in the United States?
39. How many justices are on the Supreme Court?
40. Who is the Chief Justice of the United States?
41. Under our Constitution, some powers belong to the federal govt. What is 1 power of the federal government?
42. Under our Constitution, some powers belong to the states. What is one power of the states?
43. Who is the Governor of your state?
44. What is the capital of your state?
45. What are the two major political parties in the United States?
46. What is the political party of the President now?
47. What is the name of the Speaker of the House of Representatives now?

C: Rights and Responsibilities


48. There are four amendments to the Constitution about who can vote. Describe one of them.
49. What is one responsibility that is only for United States citizens?
50. What are two rights only for United States citizens?
51. What are two rights of everyone living in the United States?
52. What do we show loyalty to when we say the Pledge of Allegiance?
53. What is one promise you make when you become a United States citizen?
54. How old do citizens have to be to vote for President?

134
55. What are two ways that Americans can participate in their democracy?
56. When is the last day you can send in federal income tax forms?
57. When must all men register for the Selective Service?

AMERICAN HISTORY
A: Colonial Period and Independence
58. What is one reason colonists came to America?
59. Who lived in America before the Europeans arrived?
60. What group of people was taken to America and sold as slaves?
61. Why did the colonists fight the British?
62. Who wrote the Declaration of Independence?
63. When was the Declaration of Independence adopted?
64. There were 13 original states. Name three.
65. What happened at the Constitutional Convention?
66. When was the Constitution written?
67. The Federalist Papers supported the passage of the U.S. Constitution. Name one of the writers.
68. What is one thing Benjamin Franklin is famous for?
69. Who is the “Father of Our Country”?
70. Who was the first President?

B: 1800s
71. What territory did the United States buy from France in 1803?
72. Name one war fought by the United States in the 1800s.
73. Name the U.S. war between the North and the South.
74. Name one problem that led to the Civil War.
75. What was one important thing that Abraham Lincoln did?
76. What did the Emancipation Proclamation do?
77. What did Susan B. Anthony do?

C: Recent American History and Other Important Historical Information


78. Name one war fought by the United States in the 1900s.
79. Who was President during World War I?
80. Who was President during the Great Depression and World War II?
81. Who did the United States fight in World War II?
82. Before he was President, Eisenhower was a general. What war was he in?
83. During the Cold War, what was the main concern of the United States?
84. What movement tried to end racial discrimination?
85. What did Martin Luther King, Jr. do?
86. What major event happened on September 11, 2001 in the United States?
87. Name one American Indian tribe in the United States.

INTEGRATED CIVICS
A: Geography
88. Name one of the two longest rivers in the United States.
89. What ocean is on the West Coast of the United States?
90. What ocean is on the East Coast of the United States?
91. Name one U.S. territory.
92. Name one state that borders Canada.
93. Name one state that borders Mexico.
94. What is the capital of the United States?
95. Where is the Statue of Liberty?

B: Symbols
96. Why does the flag have 13 stripes?
97. Why does the flag have 50 stars?
98. What is the name of the national anthem?

C: Holidays
99. When do we celebrate Independence Day?
100. Name two national U.S. holidays.

http://www.uscis.gov/files/nativedocuments/M-693.pdf

135
RESOURCES

136
137
138
Online Resources
Here are a few online resources we’ve discovered. We hope they are of use to you.

1. EL/Civics Resources
EL Civics for ESL students: a wealth of information and fun for both teachers and students

www.elcivics.com

A series of free online courses to assist teachers in creating interesting, effective ESL lessons in these areas:
U.S. history and government, civic engagement, and the naturalization process.

www.elcivicsonline.com

2. Citizenship and Naturalization Resources

New (Redesigned) Naturalization Test (as of 2009)


http://www.uscis.gov/files/nativedocuments/M-693.pdf

A Guide to Naturalization
http://www.scribd.com/doc/3071851/M476?page=2

3. Health Resources
MEDLINEplus.gov
Brought to you by the National Library of Medicine, MEDLINEplus is an extensive clearinghouse of
information on over 700 health topics from libraries, government agencies and health-related organizations.

Features:
o If you can’t find it here, you probably won’t find it anywhere
o Interactive tutorials, body maps and surgery videos
o Medical encyclopedia and medical dictionary
o Drug and herbal databases
o Also available in Spanish (http://medlineplus.gov/spanish/)

www.MayoClinic.com
Although the website address is a .com, this site is owned by the not-for-profit Mayo Foundation for
Medical Education and Research and is a joint venture between Web specialists at the foundation and
medical experts from the Mayo Clinic.

Features:
o Medical information presented in reader-friendly magazine format
o Articles organized by symptoms, complications, treatment & prevention
o Q&A with Mayo Clinic specialist
o Health tools (symptom checker, self tests, videos)

www.Healthfinder.gov
Developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and other federal agencies, Healthfinder
is a good place to start your search because it doesn’t produce overwhelming results on each topic.

139
Features:
o Succinct information – provides mostly fact sheets and overviews
o Resources targeted for different age and ethnic groups
o Handy consumer guides and printable brochures on many topics
o Also available in Spanish (http://www.healthfinder.gov/espanol/)

www.MedHelp.org
Non-profit organization that provides consumers with access to online support groups and physician-
monitored forums.

Features:
o Question & answer forums that allow patients to submit questions to physicians
o Database of more than 1,200 online patient support groups

NORD, http://www.rarediseases.org/
The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of voluntary health organizations
dedicated to helping people with rare diseases find information and support.

Features:
o Good place to try if you’ve been unsuccessful elsewhere
o Provides contact information for organizations (including research) that can offer more guidance
on the topic

Philly Health Info www.phillyhealthinfo.org


Philly Health Info offers resources on a variety of health topics, including specific diseases and conditions,
health and wellness, and medication information. Health topics range from information about cancer and
hypertension to foot health and alternative medicine.

In Other Languages:

NSW Multicultural Health Communication Service mhcs.health.nsw.gov.au

The New South Wales (Australia) Multicultural Health Communication Service website contains
information on a wide variety of health topics. The website is searchable by language or topic, and can be
used to find information on topics including disease, nutrition, mental health, women's health needs, and
health services. When searching by language, you can choose from: Arabic, Armenian, Assyrian, Bengali,
Bosnian, Chinese, Croatian, Czech, Dari, Farsi/Persian, Filipino, French, German, Greek, Hindi,
Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Khmer/Cambodian, Koori, Korean, Kurdish, Lao, Macedonian,
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Tamil, Tatum, Thai, Tongan, Turkish, Ukrainian, Urdu, or Vietnamese. Enter a language in the search box
and you will find the available articles in that language.

Women's Health Resources in Other Languages www.4woman.gov

This website created by the Department of Health and Human Services offers some articles in Spanish and
Chinese. While the site is directed at women's health concerns, many of the topics covered are important
for men's health as well. Some of these concerns are: healthy aging, stroke, diabetes, breastfeeding, healthy
pregnancy, stress, healthy diet, blood pressure, and obesity.

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