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Cast Thermite

by Zlwilly on February 15, 2008

Table of Contents

License:

Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike (by-nc-sa)

 

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2

Intro:

Cast Thermite

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2

step 1:

Obtain the Materials

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2

step 2:

Refining

 

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3

step 3:

Refining Part 2

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4

step 4:

Mixing

 

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5

step 5:

Just add water!

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6

step 6:

Casting

 

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6

Related Instructables

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7

Advertisements

 

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8

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8

http://www.instructables.com/id/Cast-Thermite/

License:

License: Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike (by-nc-sa) Intro: Cast Thermite There are plenty of Instructables and

Intro:

Cast Thermite

There are plenty of Instructables and other how-to's on making Thermite , the incendiary mixture that can not only raise, but also burn, eyebrows. (The concept for this

Instructable came from 'the Anarchists Cookbook', and since it doesn't give many details

Thermite, that's how I got started a few years back, but sometimes you just want something rock solid that burns nice and bright/hot.

here's

how I do it.) Now, there's nothing wrong with powdered forms of

That's where Cast Thermite comes in. And the best part is, If you have some thermite on hand already, it's pretty easy to make! If you don't, never fear, for I will be starting at the beginning with nothing but the raw materials.

at the beginning with nothing but the raw materials. Image Notes 1. There's our finished project!

Image Notes 1. There's our finished project!

step 1: Obtain the Materials

So you made it through the intro? Good. There's something that must be said before we go any further. I'm not liable. For anything. Do your homework and be sure you know what safety precautions to take when handling something like thermite, such as not looking at it during ignition since it gives off harmful ultraviolet light! Be smart, treat this stuff with the respect it deserves. It's not flash powder but it's certainly not sugar either. ;-)

Now that that's out of the way, onto the fun part. The preparations!

The first thing to do is understand what thermite is made up of. Most commonly, homemade thermite is made up of iron oxide (rust) and granule or powered aluminum. When mixed together, these two metals create an incendiary capable of reaching temperatures of several thousand degrees. For more info check thermite's Wiki page . So:

What we need:

Fine (0000) Steel Wool (not pictured)info check thermite's Wiki page . So: What we need: Aluminum Some kind of scale Plaster

Aluminum. So: What we need: Fine (0000) Steel Wool (not pictured) Some kind of scale Plaster

Some kind of scaleWhat we need: Fine (0000) Steel Wool (not pictured) Aluminum Plaster of Paris Handling materials (spoon,

Plaster of Paris(0000) Steel Wool (not pictured) Aluminum Some kind of scale Handling materials (spoon, cup, paper, coffee

Handling materials (spoon, cup, paper, coffee can(not pictured) Aluminum Some kind of scale Plaster of Paris Some kind of mold to cast

Some kind of mold to cast your thermite inof Paris Handling materials (spoon, cup, paper, coffee can ) While I'm at it, I'll explain

)

While I'm at it, I'll explain the best way to get a hold of the materials.

Steel Woolexplain the best way to get a hold of the materials. Off to the hardware store!

Off to the hardware store! Honestly though, I buy my steel wool at Walmart unless I can find bulk fine grade steel wool at our nearby Harbor Freight .

Aluminumbulk fine grade steel wool at our nearby Harbor Freight . Well, you could always go

Well, you could always go online and purchase some high grade Aluminum powder like I did. Before I thought to do that, I just ground strips of aluminum foil in a cheap coffee grinder. IMHO, the larger grains made from the coffee grinder method make for brighter and more enjoyable light shows.

Scale/Plaster of Parismethod make for brighter and more enjoyable light shows. Ever heard of Michaels? It's a nice

Ever heard of Michaels? It's a nice little place a lot like Hobby Lobby. Plaster of Paris and the scale can be bought at either of these places, and probably at Walmart as well.

The Moldcan be bought at either of these places, and probably at Walmart as well. http://www.instructables.com/id/Cast-Thermite/

http://www.instructables.com/id/Cast-Thermite/

Use anything you want to, whatever suits your fancy. I use a small ice cube tray. Film canisters would probably work fairly well, as would larger tupperware containers for really big batches. Whatever floats your boat.

Finally, you say. I've got everything you told me to get. Let's get started!

got everything you told me to get. Let's get started! Image Notes 1. Alcoholic beverages and

Image Notes

1. Alcoholic beverages and family games, like batteries, are not included.

2. This is what the steel wool will look like after it has been refined into the iron oxide grains that we need.

3. The aluminum I purchased on the internet is in this bag.

step 2: Refining

Time to start refining our materials.

Steel WoolYou did buy the right kind of steel wool, right? The best kind is usually labeled as "0000" which is the finest grade I've ever found. This stuff burns the easiest and is usually less wasteful than the heavier grade steel wool.

Take the steel wool out of it's packaging and place it in a container suitable for oxidizing substances

the container. Don't worry about packing it full. As it burns you will be able to crunch it down and add more on top. After lighting it, (a regular match works fine), you'll have to move some air through it to make sure the fire spreads. If you're only doing this much, just blowing on it should be sufficient.

(burning

things.) Pull them apart a little bit before you put them in

Once it has burned and cooled off, rub the tougher chunks and strands of steel wool along something with small holes to make sure the pieces you collect are fairly small.

It also helps keep out the excess pieces that wouldn't burn so you can re-burn them or use them in your next batch.

I rub the burnt steel wool over an old window screen that I cut out and wrapped in duct tape. In doing this I end up with a much finer product.

duct tape. In doing this I end up with a much finer product. Image Notes 1.

Image Notes

1. Did you know you can buy a pack of 300 matchbooks very cheap at your

local convenience store?

2. Super fine steel wool, rated at 0000, works best for making thermite.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Cast-Thermite/

thermite. http://www.instructables.com/id/Cast-Thermite/ Image Notes 1. Load a container up with steel wool and have

Image Notes 1. Load a container up with steel wool and have at it, light 'er up. Try to make sure it burns as completely as possible.

Image Notes 1. Just cut some screen out of an old window and poof! Free

Image Notes

1. Just cut some screen out of an old window and poof! Free strainer of iron

oxide!

2. Filtered.

3. Not filtered.

step 3: Refining Part 2

2. Filtered. 3. Not filtered. step 3: Refining Part 2 Image Notes 1. The consistency of

Image Notes 1. The consistency of my Iron Oxide after filtering it.

This next step is not necessarily required, depending on how fine your burnt steel wool, (now called iron oxide), is, but as I am something of a perfectionist I like my chemicals to be as fine as I can get them.

If you have a ball mill similar to the one below, this step will be simple for you. Toss your iron oxide into whatever container you use along with some grinding media and away you go!

If, on the other hand, you do not have a fancy shmancy ball mill, no big deal. A Mortar and Pestle will get the job done just as well.

So will a coffee can full of iron oxide and some grinding media. All you have to do is shake it capable of breaking up the particles that you are trying to refine.

A lot. By grinding media I mean something small, hard, and round, that is

So, if you opted to go through with this step, use one of these methods to crush the iron oxide. Unless you get it ground to a powder it clumps together a little bit, but don't worry about it, because that's about the consistency that I use it at, and it still works. It doesn't have to be perfect by a long shot, just do what you can and move on.

be perfect by a long shot, just do what you can and move on. Image Notes

Image Notes

1. If you have a ball mill, it makes grinding chemicals a lot easier. Don't worry

though, there are other ways.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Cast-Thermite/

chemicals a lot easier. Don't worry though, there are other ways. http://www.instructables.com/id/Cast-Thermite/
Image Notes 1. Coffee cans are great for storing storing chemicals that don't need to
Image Notes 1. Coffee cans are great for storing storing chemicals that don't need to

Image Notes

1. Coffee cans are great for storing storing chemicals that don't need to be

sealed away from moisture, plus they can double as a grinder.

2. My grinding media. They're a bunch of ceramic balls we have been finding out

in our garden for years.

step 4: Mixing

Now, assuming you either ground your own aluminum or bought some off of the internet, it's time to start mixing our materials.

What we are looking for here is a ratio, (by weight, not volume), of 3 parts iron oxide, 2 parts aluminum, and 2 parts plaster of paris.

I just went by what would fit best in my mixing container. 60 grams of iron oxide, followed by 40 grams of both aluminum and plaster of paris. (Divide 60 and 40 grams by 20 and you get the original ratio, 3:2:2.)

Once you have the right amount, mix the three together thoroughly. The metals tend to sink and 'stick' to the bottom, so make sure to mix it as well as you can until it is one uniform color. In most cases it should look solid gray.

can until it is one uniform color. In most cases it should look solid gray. http://www.instructables.com/id/Cast-Thermite/

http://www.instructables.com/id/Cast-Thermite/

can until it is one uniform color. In most cases it should look solid gray. http://www.instructables.com/id/Cast-Thermite/
step 5: Just add water! Now that your cast thermite powder is mixed, make sure

step 5: Just add water!

Now that your cast thermite powder is mixed, make sure you have your molds ready, then go ahead and add some water.

You'll want to add plenty of water. As you mix be sure to scrape the bottom of the container you are using, as some of the thermite will be rather stubborn, and won't want to join the rest of the crowd. If you think you added too much water because your thermite is really soupy, don't worry. As it dries the extra water will be pushed to the top and you can just drain it off.

If all goes well, it should end up looking something like the picture below.

Oh yea, one more thing. Once you've done this, you have less than ten minutes to pour the thermite into the mold, so be SURE you are ready to continue before you mix in the water.

SURE you are ready to continue before you mix in the water. step 6: Casting This

step 6: Casting

This is it! The final step!

Take that nice gooey thermite that you worked so hard on and carefully slop it into whatever you are using as a mold. This ice cube tray worked very well as I wanted something small and reusable. Since the shape of the ice cube tray is larger at the 'bottom' I didn't have any trouble removing the cubes.

Keep in mind how the thermite will harden inside an object when you are deciding what you want to use as a mold. Something like a bottleneck vase for flowers would never work unless you planned on breaking the vase off of the cast thermite once it had dried.

Once it has solidified, (it should only take about a half hour to 45 minutes to), pour off the water and remove it from the mold. According to the anarchist cookbook, these will have to dry in the sun for a week, more or less depending on the size of the cast. Alternately you can place them in a oven or dehydrator to dry them much faster, probably in a matter of a few hours, which is the method I use.

Whatever you do, dont put them in your microwave. I doubt they would ignite, but as they are basically chunks of metal, I don't think your microwave would appreciate it. Once again, I'm not liable! Be smart!

As for ignition, thermite requires extremely high temperatures. If it was normal powdered thermite that we were talking about a magnesium sparkler would do the trick, but not for cast thermite. This requires something like the heat from a propane torch, (don't try it, you would have to be far too close to ignite it.) I use something called First Fire Mix. Google it or check back in the near future, as my next instructable will be on making a basic igniter for thermite.

That's it, you're done! If you need any help, check back or comment/pm me, I would be more than happy to help. This is my first instructable, so let me know how I did!

http://www.instructables.com/id/Cast-Thermite/

Comments

50 comments

Comments 50 comments Add Comment view all 232 comments 4 0 0 0 6 9 5

4000695 says:

Apr 24, 2009. 5:20 PM REPLY

HI SORY about the two comments but this hit me when I closed the page. Thermite is two medals that comdukt electricity so running a lot of current threw them will cos a lot of heat. That should cos them to bern.

them will cos a lot of heat. That should cos them to bern. m r .

mr.space says:

(removed by author or community request)

May 25, 2009. 12:24 PM

by author or community request) May 25, 2009. 12:24 PM 4 0 0 0 6 9

4000695 says:

May 29, 2009. 11:22 AM REPLY

I have dyslexia so it is hard to spell for me, But it is nice that people like to tare me down. Thanks for making my life harder.

like to tare me down. Thanks for making my life harder. k n o t m

knotmuch says:

I too have dislexia.

I would suggestion two things

1) take your time and plan what you want to say 2) I sometimes use word or other word processing programs. I type in what I want to say, hit the spell check, and once everthing is correct copy

and paste.

Jun 3, 2009. 9:07 AM REPLY

=)

is correct copy and paste. Jun 3, 2009. 9:07 AM REPLY =) 4 0 0 0

4000695 says:

I have a speech to text program but it is broken :( But thank you for the edvise.

Dec 26, 2009. 9:34 AM REPLY

But thank you for the edvise. Dec 26, 2009. 9:34 AM REPLY R I V 3

RIV3RFr0G says:

i am dislexic to and it is hard

May 30, 2009. 2:35 AM REPLY

i am dislexic to and it is hard May 30, 2009. 2:35 AM REPLY w i

wizodd says:

Sep 25, 2008. 7:55 PM REPLY

This is NOT a good idea! It will work well with fairly course aluminum, but aluminum powder gets touchier and touchier around water as it gets finer. A mix of very fine (100mesh&finer) can ignite by getting damp. This risk is higher with ultra fine (black) aluminum, and the addition of magnesium will increase the likelyhood. The resulting cubes will burn a little cooler because they will use up some energy to turn the plaster back into powdered (anhydrous) form-- though probably not noticeably so. The addition of sulfur to make thermate, also lowers the ignition temperature to well below the melting point of aluminum. It is not a good idea, for the same reason, to keep mixed thermite powder on hand--moisture can set it off spontaneously (it is also illegal in many places.) Always store fuels (like aluminum) away from oxidizers (iron oxide) in cool dry places. There are a number of different formulations for termite and related incendiaries. Some are designed to cut, some to weld, some to set fires. It won't normally explode, but if you contaminate the mix with other things, anything

can happen. A little bit of a stronger oxidizer might cause part of the batch to explode--sending molten iron spraying in all directions. Such a device could be

made by surrounding a small HE charge, or even a glass vial of water

very short time. In or under water this makes a spectacular (albeit dangerous) show. Most such experimentation should be done at a good distance. Be

careful about setting it off on the ground too

One thing that the mixes can do is put out a LOT of heat in a very small space in a

if

you have a porous rock and it hits the molten iron, it may explode if it has any water soaked into it.

N o w a n d t h e n s a y s :

Nowandthen says:

Dec 6, 2009. 11:58 PM REPLY

Are those Incendiary Termites like "Fire Ants"?

l o o p y c a r 2 7 s a y s :

loopycar27 says:

Sep 9, 2009. 2:25 PM REPLY lol good ppoints though some i wouldnt have thought about

i dont think werre exactly boy scouts here even though noone likes molten iron to the face helpful

Z l w i l l y s a y s : Sep 26, 2008.

Zlwilly says:

Sep 26, 2008. 3:54 AM REPLY

Yes, moist aluminum is more likely to ignite. (Weird, huh?) However, a slurry of aluminum, iron oxide, and plaster of paris has never burned my house down. Yes, this isn't quite as potent as regular thermite. But it is still pretty interesting, in some cases more so that the powder alone. (If you still believe that thermite can burn through an engine block, please try it for yourself. It's nowhere near the first time that a commonly known fact has been VERY incorrect.) NO one added sulfur to thermite. At least not in my Instructable. I'm not making flash powder here, please read the whole instructable in its entirety. Don't keep mixed thermite on hand? Assuming that's true, it's a good thing I don't. Assuming it's not, are you SURE you aren't confusing the safety precautions of flash powder with thermite? If you meant some of these points (such as the salver comment) to be a general statement, rather than directed at this Instructable, my apologies. ;-) The last 2 points you made are very good, thermite does have some interesting reactions with water! My main point being that experience has led me believe that this is a perfectly safe experiment to perform. Thanks to your warnings I may be a little more wary, but until I have reasons to believe otherwise, I will continue with my thermite excursions in the same manner. Cheers!

J o n n y K a t a n a s a y s

Jonny Katana says:

Jul 14, 2009. 11:09 PM REPLY

Engine blocks are made from either cast iron (melting point = ~1200 C), aluminum (mp = 660 C), magnesium (mp = 650 C), or an alloy of the latter two.

Considering that:

A: Thermite is used to weld things like railroad tracks (which are made of steel that's far thicker than any part of an engine block) together. B: Thermite burns at around 2500 C, hotter than the melting points of all the aforementioned automotive engine block materials. C: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aOPOaeooTXw

I would wager that a large quantity of thermite would indeed burn through an engine. However, I grant you that it would have to be a very large amount of thermite to burn through the block of anything bigger than that Peugeot piece of trash :D

s n e a k y s h i t n l s a y

sneakyshitnl says:

Oct 22, 2009. 6:19 AM REPLY

Will Steel wool(000) do the job?

S e v e r i n R s a y s : Aug 6,

SeverinR says:

Aug 6, 2009. 12:37 PM REPLY

where can you get mag ribbon?

6, 2009. 12:37 PM REPLY where can you get mag ribbon? l o o p y

loopycar27 says:

ebay you can find 75ish feet for 7$ but as for a reaal store i dont think theyre are any

Sep 9, 2009. 2:22 PM REPLY not that ive seen anyways id try a hobby store maybe?

l o o p y c a r 2 7 s a y s :

loopycar27 says:

Sep 9, 2009. 2:20 PM REPLY

hey whaat kind of alluminum did you use in thaa coffee grinder sorry to be too picky but i wanna know like pop tabs and a wire cutter of a trip to home depot

to

get some aluminum rod

l o o p y c a r 2 7 s a y s :

loopycar27 says:

Sep 8, 2009. 1:38 PM REPLY

if

this whole thing works i love you

Radioactive_-Chemist101- says: Jan 24, 2009. 8:15 AM REPLY

Jan 24, 2009. 8:15 AM REPLY

a better way to get iron oxide is by the electrolosis of a salt water solution with some iron rods. Not graphite. Then filter the muck and let it dry. Grind it up in

a pestle and mortar and there powdered iron oxide.

 
o c t a v i a n 2 3 4 s a y s

octavian234 says:

Sep 4, 2009. 12:30 AM REPLY

nice icon

c h r i s k a r r s a y s : Aug

chriskarr says:

Aug 28, 2009. 10:24 AM REPLY

That is a 'better' way to get iron oxide, if you're looking for efficiency from cost/time/end-product mass Vs. beginning mass. There is one thing that you did not consider, though, and that is the fact that when you make iron oxide via electrolysis you do not have an end product of Fe2O3 which is the best iron oxide to use for thermite mixtures.

which is the best iron oxide to use for thermite mixtures. T h e I d

The Ideanator says:

Whats wrong with Fe3O4? it has more oxygen, shouldn't that let the thermite burn better?

Oct 1, 2009. 5:32 AM REPLY

let the thermite burn better? Oct 1, 2009. 5:32 AM REPLY c o o l s

coolsciencetech says:

I dont believe you can make Fe3O4

Oct 5, 2009. 2:49 PM REPLY

R s m a s t e r s a y s : Rs master says:

i

didnt think that you could make h2o2 but i was worng

Dec 5, 2009. 10:30 PM REPLY

The Ideanator says: T h e I d e a n a t o r s a y s

Oct 5, 2009. 3:53 PM REPLY

I

did through water electrolysis . When you get to the drying part, evaporate it as heating it(in a propane grill) turns most of it back into Fe2O3.

(pic: red is the grilled, black is evaporated)

http://www.instructables.com/id/Cast-Thermite/

c o o l s c i e n c e t e c h
c o o l s c i e n c e t e c h

coolsciencetech says:

oh kk nvm

Oct 7, 2009. 12:10 PM REPLY

unaffiliatedperson says: Aug 17, 2009. 3:25 PM REPLY

Aug 17, 2009. 3:25 PM REPLY

did ur cubes work? also did u add lighter fluid to the steel wool to burn it?

B i l l d o 2 2 s a y s : Jun 26,

Billdo22 says:

Jun 26, 2009. 12:59 PM REPLY

i

dont think i burned mine properly. the burnt steel wool is still magnetic. what am i doing wrong?

burnt steel wool is still magnetic. what am i doing wrong? G l u e y

GlueyMcGee says:

it's still iron oxide if it's magnetic you have Fe3O4 magnetite or black iron oxide

Jul 27, 2009. 1:28 PM REPLY

magnetite or black iron oxide Jul 27, 2009. 1:28 PM REPLY k r u s e

kruser495 says:

is it really rust that you get when you burn it?

Feb 15, 2008. 8:36 PM REPLY

J o n n y K a t a n a s a y s

Jonny

Katana says:

Jul 14, 2009. 11:21 PM REPLY

Because iron is a transition metal, and thus has multiple oxidation states, there are various forms of iron oxide. What is commonly known as rust is hydrated iron (III) oxide, while the heat-oxidized powder left after burning steel wool is most likely iron (II,III) oxide. Fortunately, they both work well for thermite.

Z l w i l l y s a y s : Feb 15, 2008.

Zlwilly says:

Feb 15, 2008. 8:47 PM REPLY

Well, Wikipedia (my 2nd favorite website) says "rust is the oxidation of steel or iron at very slow rates." I'm no chem major so I'm not sure if this exactly constitutes rust, but I think it does. Thanks for the comments!

rust, but I think it does. Thanks for the comments! k r u s e r

kruser495 says:

did your thermite mix work when you used the burned steel wool?

Feb 15, 2008. 8:49 PM REPLY

you used the burned steel wool? Feb 15, 2008. 8:49 PM REPLY Z l w i

Zlwilly says:

Feb 15, 2008. 8:59 PM REPLY

Do you mean in powdered form or in solid? It worked both ways actually. I remember back when I used to burn out DC wall-warts daily trying to build up enough Iron Oxide to make thermite using the nail in salt water method. Steel Wool is so much better.

nail in salt water method. Steel Wool is so much better. E T W o l

ETWolverine says:

I have seen thermite reactions that used plaster of paris instead of iron oxide. So

about the iron oxide? Or do I still need the iron oxide to make this work. Also, my understanding is that 4th of July sparklers burn at about 1,000 to 1400 deg. C. Isn't that hot enough to start the reaction? Finally, can I add a fuse to the molds before they solidify (like a toothpick sticking out of an ice cube)? Thanks in advance.

Jun 19, 2009. 10:44 AM REPLY can I just add aluminum to plaster of paris and then mold it and forget

add aluminum to plaster of paris and then mold it and forget E v i l

Evilblaze says:

You can read from the gypsum thermite here: http://evilblaze.extra.hu/

And a sparkler is enough hot to light the plaster/aluminum or the "normal" thermite.

Jun 21, 2009. 11:42 AM REPLY

the "normal" thermite. Jun 21, 2009. 11:42 AM REPLY G r m g u n n

Grmgunner says:

Apr 5, 2008. 9:14 AM REPLY

if we dont purchase our aluminum powder online can we just cut up cans and then break them up in a coffee grinder? and then to get the powder finer do what we did to the iron oxide? like with the ball mill? or will the coffee grinder get the job done fine?

E 3 P O s a y s : You should be able to find

E3PO says:

You should be able to find aluminum powder in any paint store.

Jun 6, 2009. 10:01 AM REPLY

powder in any paint store. Jun 6, 2009. 10:01 AM REPLY u r b o s

urbosssez says:

Apr 11, 2008. 8:31 PM REPLY

sorry coffee grinders hate aluminum foil trust me ive tried it atleast 10 times (cuz im too stupid to ever learn that it will never work) all it does is ball up the aluminum foil into small metal spitballs and the powder that it does produce usually gets carried up by the air and smells HORRIBLE if u do try this be sure to wear goggles

s e x p i s t o l s r u l e 6

sexpistolsrule666 says:

Jul 11, 2009. 12:42 AM REPLY

you should tear off smaller strips of foil. or get a better grinder. or just order some real alluminum powder

Z l w i l l y s a y s : Apr 12, 2008.

Zlwilly says:

Apr 12, 2008. 9:01 AM REPLY

Maybe you have a bad grinder? Or just bad luck? I've used a coffee grinder successfully many times, the trick to getting past the balled up foil is to

continue adding more and more foil strips. As the mass of the total foil increases the grinder

well it "grinds" more efficiently, instead of just throwing

the material around the sides. Goggles and a dust mask would probably be a good idea though. I never had any problems with breathing, but the

smell I DO remember. ;-)

problems with breathing, but the smell I DO remember. ;-) Z l w i l l

Zlwilly says:

Apr 6, 2008. 7:29 PM REPLY

A coffee grinder and some aluminum foil will work fine, just don't run the grinder until it's too hot to touch or you will burn it up. Foil made this way causes

a lot more sparks and light, which I prefer in most cases.

a lot more sparks and light, which I prefer in most cases. c h r i

chriskarr says:

What I used to grind my aluminum was foil in a blender with water. Drying the result is a bit difficult, though.

Aug 26, 2009. 4:35 AM REPLY

E 3 P O s a y s : Jun 1, 2009. 8:03 PM REPLY

E3PO says:

Jun 1, 2009. 8:03 PM REPLY

I know it's fun to try to extract your own materials from household items. I do it all the time just to say that I can. But seriously, ordering the chemicals ground to the right mesh and certified pure from ebay or another distributor is way way way cheaper and much less time consuming than trying to grind your own. It's also safer when you consider how dangerous aluminum is to the human condition if inhaled once airborne or absorbed through the pores.

v i n c e 0 9 s a y s : Apr 14, 2009.

vince 09 says:

Apr 14, 2009. 1:41 PM REPLY

OK so I know you can get aluminum from an etch a sceh, or you can grind up a chunk of aluminum. i dont have an etch a sceh or a chunck of aluminum

handy so, I was wondering if I could use chaff from a B-52 it is very fine aluminum. is almost looks like shiney hair but its aluminum effectively or is it too thin, its like aluminum hair?

could I use that

is it too thin, its like aluminum hair? could I use that S h a m

ShampooRobot says:

my method. get aluminum foil pinch with pliers into a compacted ball grind down into powder. pretty simple.

May 31, 2009. 11:16 AM REPLY

into powder. pretty simple. May 31, 2009. 11:16 AM REPLY v i n c e 0

vince 09 says:

ya I've seen other people do it before but I have this stuff with nothing to do with it lol

May 31, 2009. 12:15 PM REPLY

with nothing to do with it lol May 31, 2009. 12:15 PM REPLY m r .

mr.space says:

The finer the better

May 25, 2009. 12:49 PM REPLY

y s : The finer the better May 25, 2009. 12:49 PM REPLY v i n

vince 09 says:

ok I'll give it a try

May 25, 2009. 5:04 PM REPLY

s : ok I'll give it a try May 25, 2009. 5:04 PM REPLY EragonShadeslayer says:

Aug 1, 2008. 8:33 AM REPLY

It burns easier if you touch a 9volt battery to the wool. This also makes for a great fire starter. (Its amazing what you learn in boy scouts)

fire starter. (Its amazing what you learn in boy scouts) Z l w i l l

Zlwilly says:

Aug 1, 2008. 3:09 PM REPLY

I actually burns better? Or do you just mean that it's easier to light that way? I'm nowhere near my 'lab', so I can't test it to find out. I just use what works for me!

EragonShadeslayer says: May 22, 2009. 5:36 PM REPLY Rotten's right. It does burn better, BUT

May 22, 2009. 5:36 PM REPLY

Rotten's right. It does burn better, BUT it also is easier to light. apparently its such a thin strand that the current overloads like when your lightbulb blows, but theres alot of this & it burns nice & red-hot.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Cast-Thermite/