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March 12 18, 2013
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@UniverseMetro, @UniverseCampus
Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah
B y T R E N T C H R I S T I A N S E N
From his iconic mustache to his hilarious blog, BYU mens volleyball setter Ryan
Boyce is a leader on the court and a unique individual off of it.
Boyce, a senior, stays within the bounds of the Honor Code by maintaining a well-
groomed mustache. His facial hair has been a dening feature of the No. 1 BYU team
for over a year now.
Ive been growing the mustache for a year and a half, almost two years probably,
Boyce said. I think its just a part of me now.
Fans of the BYU team have noticed Boyce and his mustache this season and
embraced both. Fans and supporters come to the game with fake mustaches of their
own and signs supporting the facial hair.
People close to Boyce have noticed it too. They love it, even if they give him a hard
time about it. One of those people is his coach, Chris McGown.
The most common joke is that it makes him look like a 40-year-old man, McGown
said. I told him, Dude, Im a 43-year-old man, and you dont look nearly as good as I
do with that mustache. I think it makes him look 53.
Boyce realizes the mustache makes him look older but doesnt think hed look that
much younger without it.
Id look a little bit younger, I guess, Boyce said. Id probably look 60 years old
instead of 80 years old.
Another person close to Boyce is teammate Taylor Sander. Sander loves the mus-
tache but isnt interested in growing one himself because he isnt married and still
needs to woo a companion. He said a mustache might deter a potential spouse from
being interested.
Im not going to grow one myself, Sander said. Hes married Im not, so Ive got
to keep that in mind.
Boyce said when he rst started growing the mustache, he did it as an experiment
to see if he and his wife would like it. He compared it to shaving your head over the
summer. A year and a half later he still likes it, and his wife now approves of it, so it
has stayed.
Tara Boyce, his wife, and perhaps the person whose opinion counts the most, didnt
always approve of it, though.
After his dad randomly had health problems and had to go to the hospital for some
little thing, Ryan decided, kind of as a joke, to grow out his mustache in support of his
dad, Tara Boyce said. It was hideous for a really long time. It was disgusting, and I
hated it. I kept telling him he should shave it after his dad got out of the hospital. And
then he kept it, and one day he said to me, Tara, its just a part of me now.
It has grown on Tara Boyce since then, so to speak.
When Ryan told me his mustache was a part of him, I said, OK, Ill accept that part
of you, Tara Boyce said. Now I cant imagine him without it.
Its difcult for Ryan Boyce, or any of his teammates to imagine what he would look
like without the mustache, too.
See MUSTACHE on Page 3
The Secret Nap Society creates napping culture
B y K AY L E E D E W I T T
A student has stayed up until four
in the morning working on a research
paper. With an hour before her next
class, its the perfect time for a power
nap. It doesnt seem worth the trouble to
walk home, so she begins the search for
that ideal place to snooze. Luckily, The
Secret Nap Society can assist students in
their quest for napping perfection.
The Secret Nap Society is a website
created by a BYU student that informs
students about the best spots to nap on
campus and allows them to rate the
spots as well as share their own nap-
ping venues.
Nathan Haines, a senior from Sandy,
started the website a year ago. He said
his dad gave him the idea for the nap
society when he was in high school.
I thought that was a really cool idea
because I enjoy taking naps and a lot of
my friends do too, so I felt this urge to do
something about it, Haines said. Now
were in college and I had some extra time,
so I threw this together as a fun project,
almost like a fun experiment to see how
involved I could get other nappers.
Anyone can submit a nap spot through
the website. When submitting a spot, stu-
dents enter a code name, email address,
a brief description of the spot and the
building where the spot is located.
See NAP on Page 3
Professors find success
B y E E C H I E N C H U A
Professors at Brigham Young Uni-
versity have generated more than $1
billion in revenue and company val-
uation in the past three years, both
in university and personal earnings.
Some of the revenue-generating
products, however, have been years
in the making.
BYU professors generate hun-
dreds of millions in revenue for
various startups and patents that
have taken off, giving BYU students
a glimpse of what might be in their
future one day.
Qualtrics
Scott Smith gets to live his dream
every day. A former marketing profes-
sor at BYU, Smith is the co-founder of
Qualtrics. Forbes reported that the sur-
vey software company turned down an
offer to be bought for $500 million earlier
this year. The valuation of the company,
Smith said, should hit $1 billion in the
fairly short term.
Smith rst came up with the idea to
develop a survey engine in 1987 to help
him with his own research work.
If youve ever done a paper-and-
pencil survey, it takes you months to do
something like that, and the rst survey
See PROFESSORS on Page 3
MUSTACHE
The
Photo by
Whitnie Soelberg
Photos by Sarah Hill
Fans hold up signs and cheer on the Cougars and the stache during a game in the Smith Fieldhouse.
Photo by Chris Bunker
Scott Smith, a former BYU professor,
started Qualtrics.
Devotional,
Sister Rosemary M. Wixom
11:05 a.m.,
Marriott Center
Martin B. Hickman Lecture,
7 p.m.,
250 Kimball Tower
Digital Dialog and the
Feedback-Centered Classroom,
12 p.m,
WSC 3211
English Symposium,
All day
JFSB
Honor Choir,
1111:50 a.m.,
5519 WSC
Emeriti Education Day,
10 a.m.-2 p.m.,
Varsity Theatre and 3280 WSC
Free with registration
French Guest Lecture,
11 a.m.,
B037 JFSB
BYU Hunger Banquet,
6:30 p.m.,
WSC Ballroom
Alice Louise Reynolds Lecture,
2 p.m.,
HBLL auditorium
Premarital Workshop,
4-6 p.m.,
252 MARB
Annual Russell B. Clark
Gerontology Conference,
through Thursday
7 p.m.,
Hinckley Center and B190 JFSB
House of Learning Lecture,
2 p.m.,
HBLL auditorium
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THE UNIVERSE CALENDAR MARCH 12 18
2 The Universe, March 12 18, 2013
WEATHER
TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
UNIVERSE ONLINE
Continue reading these stories and more at universe.byu.edu
Sources: National Weather Service, BYU Astronomy Department
Utahs plan to maintain enrollment
Students options between attending college
and serving a mission is making it difcult for
universities to retain students and revenue.
Utah lawmakers recently submitted a bill
making it possible for school presidents to offer
in-state tuition to high-performing students not
from Utah to ll a revenue gap caused by the
high number of college-aged students serving
missions.
Enrollment is down at nearly all of Utahs col-
leges and universities.
Story continues at unvr.se/13Lu5XY
Photo by Elliott Miller
Utah legislators are working to address the
drop in college enrollment.
AP
Mark Zuckerberg unveiled a new look for
Facebooks news feed.
Facebook re-vamped
Brace yourselves, I hate the new Facebook
statuses are going to start popping up.
Mark Zuckerberg, one of the founders of Face-
book, announced today the new and improved
news feed of the popular social media site. The
tagline? Goodbye clutter. Hello bright, beauti-
ful stories.
The main changes revolve around a more
visually-appealing news feed on users main
page bigger photos and easy navigation to dif-
ferent feeds.
Story continues at unvr.se/Yfzwq3
Local organization is raising
awareness of Utah sex trafcking
A woman whose mother was the fourth gener-
ation of a chain of sex trafcking victims spoke
at the J. Reuben Clark Law School on Feb. 26.
Without (my mother) and her strength, I
would have been the fth generation trafcked
in my family, said Larsen, who came to BYU
representing the Salt Lake City-based aware-
ness organization she co-founded called Back-
yard Broadcast.
A report was issued in 2009 by leading advo-
cacy group Shared Hope International.
Story continues at unvr.se/WaL0OX
Provo police end burglars
six-month crime spree
Police arrested 22-year-old Travis Draper and
26-year-old Austin Warden on Feb. 15 after a K9
unit followed footprints leaving the scene of an
in-progress burglary through the snow and to
the back door of the suspects residence.
Provo Police ofcer Rasmussen obtained a
warrant and found information in the residence
that led him to Warden. In his information
search Rasmussen found 15 items, claimed by
the robbery victims, that had been pawned by
Warden.
Story continues at unvr.se/ZmtJjc
Carry on your pocket knife:
TSA loosens item restrictions
The Transportation Security Administration
announced on Wednesday, March 6, that it will
be loosening its carry-on item restrictions.
Passengers can now carry on their ski poles,
hockey sticks, lacrosse sticks and up to two golf
clubs.
Passengers can also carry a small pocket-
knife as long as it ts certain restrictions:
1. It has to be shorter than 2.36 inches (6 cen-
timeters) and skinnier than one-half inch at its
widest point.
Story continues at unvr.se/ZxLai7
AP
TSA announced on March 6 that passengers will be allowed to carry small pocket knives on
airplanes starting April 25.
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New legislation could be a step in the wrong
direction for Utahs pollution problem
B y S A M A N T H A V A R V E L
A number of bills have been
proposed to tackle Utahs dire
pollution problem, but some
argue that the only bill passed
thus far could be a step in the
wrong direction when it comes
to cleaning up Utahs air.
Currently, clean-air vehicles
are permitted in Utahs High
Occupancy Vehicle lanes with
the one-time purchase of a $10
C decal. HB23, passed with
bipartisan support, will set
a cap on the number of these
green vehicles permitted in
HOV lanes, limiting the count to
6,000 in attempt to reduce trafc
and preserve the ofcial intent
of the lanes, which is an incen-
tive to carpool.
Organizations like the Alli-
ance for a Better Utah feel
strongly the bill will have a
negative effect on Utahs already
dismal air quality by removing
motivation for Utah citizens to
purchase green cars.
A statement released by the
Alliance for a Better Utah reads,
Clean air remains a priority
among Utahns. Our state legis-
lators need to consider the col-
lateral damage that even simple
bills like HB23 have on our abil-
ity to breathe clean air. State leg-
islators should be encouraging
the use of clean air technology,
not penalizing it.
Utah drivers of hybrid cars,
like Genene Cluff of Midway,
agree.
Obviously a hybrid is more
money, and I
really think
that if people
are wil ling
to pay a little
more for their
vehicle t o
help out our
envi ronment
they should
be rewarded
in some way,
Cluff said. The
HOV lane is denitely a reward,
and if they limit or take that
away, then that really dimin-
ishes the incentive therein.
Maryann Mart i ndale,
executive director of the Alli-
ance for a Better Utah, said she
has yet to see a bill that has been
proposed in a proactive attempt
to x Utahs pollution problem.
Instead, HB23 and SB 191, which
raises speed limits on major
highways, have been brought
to the table, both of which could
worsen air quality. Martindale
called these bills counterpro-
ductive to the need to try to do
something for clean air.
Martindale said she did not
have reason
to believe that
Utah legisla-
tors had even
considered the
air damage
HB23 could
bring with it.
I don t
think they
even reviewed
the air quality
component to
this, she said.
The bills sponsor, Rep. Ste-
phen Handy, R-Layton, said the
Utah Department of Transpor-
tation asked him to promote
the bill in an effort to prevent
overcrowding in HOV lanes,
which were originally designed
to accommodate carpooling. He
explained that contributing to
Utahs pollution was in no way
the intention of the bill.
The bill has nothing to do
with the state not wanting to
promote the driving of clean-
fuel vehicles. We want as many
of those as we can, Hardy said.
Hardy explained that while
UDOT already monitors the
number of regular vehicles
with purchased passes for the
HOV lane by adjusting tran-
sponder prices, it has no con-
trol over how many clean-air
vehicles occupy the lanes. This
bill, according to Hardy, is an
attempt to develop a similar
measure of green vehicles.
Currently, there are 4,600 reg-
istered clean-air vehicles using
Utahs HOV lanes, with about
80 more coming in each month.
The 6,000 cap, when reached,
would provide an opportunity
for UDOT to reevaluate whether
green vehicles should be per-
mitted in the lanes at all.
Theyre trying to balance
it back and forth to achieve the
integrity of the lanes for which
they were built, which is car-
pooling, Hardy said.
But instead of limiting the
clean-air vehicles, Martindale
said the number of purchased
HOV passes should be limited
by legislators.
Theyre turning their backs
on cars that are actually helping
the environment and giving
them this perk of driving in this
lane in favor of all of these single-
driving cars, which very many
of them could easily be SUVs just
because they purchased a permit
to drive, she said. We think
thats the wrong approach to it.
Photo by Elliott Miller
New legislation may limit the number of green vehicles allowed in
HOV lanes.

I dont think they even


reviewed the air quality
component to this.
Maryann Martindale
Executive director,
Alliance for a Better Utah
March 12 18, 2013 Volume 66, Issue 26 universe.byu.edu
152 BRMB, BYU, Provo, Utah 84602
EDITOR
Rebecca Lane

SECTION EDITORS
Sara Phelps
Natalie Sivertsen
CAMPUS
Robin Rodgers
Kurt Hanson
METRO
Stephanie Lacy
OPINION
Carlie Ellett
Kelly Haight
SPORTS
Charles Beacham
Megan Adams
LIFE, ETC.
Madeleine Brown
Alex Hoeft
DIGITAL
COPY EDITORS
Cassidy Wadsworth
Laura Thomas

PHOTOGRAPHERS
Chris Bunker
PHOTO CHIEF
Sarah Hill
Whitnie Soelberg
Elliott Miller

SENIOR REPORTER
Scott Hansen
DESIGNERS
Jenn Cardenas
Rebekah Harris
Lauren Prochelo
James Gardner
Brad Davis
Brett Bertola

PRODUCTION
Thomas Busath
Macie Bayer
CIRCULATION
Devin Bell
Nathan Allen
PROGRAMMERS
Bobby Swingler
Eric Bowden
WEB CONTENT
Kristina Smith

ADVERTISING SALES
George Saadeh
Corey Noyes
Spencer Mallen
Jesse Bringhurst
Courtney Morris
ACCOUNTING
Aron Procuniar
Steen Sargent
Kaitlyn Turner
RECEPTIONISTS
Ashlie Lewis
Natalie Zollinger
SPECIAL SECTIONS
Britania Busby
Miranda Facer
PROF ESS I ONAL STAF F
DIRECTOR
Steve Fidel
BUSINESS MANAGER
Ellen Hernandez
DESIGN MANAGER
Warren Bingham
FACULTY ADVISER
Joel Campbell
T
he Universe is an official publication of
Brigham Young University and is produced as
a cooperative enterprise of students and faculty.
It is published as a laboratory newspaper by the
College of Fine Arts and Communications and
the Department of Communications under the
direction of a professional management staff.
The Universe is published weekly except dur-
ing vacation and examination periods.
The opinions expressed do not necessarily
reflect the views of the student body, faculty,
university administration, Board of Trustees or
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
Copyright 2013 Brigham Young University.
For more news, including audio and video, visit
universe.byu.edu

letters@byu.edu
News 801-422-2957
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Fax 801-422-0177
The Universe, March 12 18, 2013 3
NEXT: UNI VERSI TY FORUM
This devotional will also be broadcast in the JSB Auditorium.
TODAY
UNIVERSITY DEVOTIONAL
Tuesday, March 12, 11:05 a.m.,
Marriott Center
Ron Chernow
Pulitzer Prize-
Winning Author of
Washington: A Life
Selected speeches available at http://speeches.byu.edu
March 19, 11:05 a.m.
Marriott Center
PLAN NOW TO ATTEND.
Sister Rosemary M. Wixom
has been the general president
of the Primary of The Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
since April 2010. She is the twelfth
general president of the Primary,
which serves approximately one
million Latter-day Saint children
up to age twelve in countries
around the world.
She succeeded Cheryl C. Lant,
who had served in the position
since 2005. Wixom selected Jean A.
Stevens and Cheryl A. Esplin as
her counselors.
Sister Wixom was born in
Ogden and raised in Salt Lake
City. She attended Utah State
University, where she received a
bachelors degree in elementary
education.
She has served on the Primary
general board, the Young Women
general board, and with her
husband as he served as president
of the Washington D.C. South
Mission from 2006 to 2009.
She and her husband, B. Jackson
Wixom, are the parents of six
children.
Rosemary M. Wixom
Primary General President
Nina Subin
Brigham Creek
Butter
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Prices Efectve March 13-19, 2013
Meat
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C.O.N.E. Store Hours
Mon.-Thurs. 7:00 am - 11:00 pm
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MUSTACHE
Boyces mustache
popular among fans
Continued from Page 1
I dont remember seeing him
without it, so its just something
were so used to, Sander said. It
ts his personality. Hes a tough
guy. It seems to t him really
well.
McGown thinks Ryan Boyce is
stuck with the mustache now.
It started as a joke, you know,
Im going to grow a mustache
type thing, and its taken over and
become larger than life, this per-
sona unto itself, McGown said.
He cant cut it off at this point.
Its who he is, and its funny that a
mustache denes him now.
Ryan Boyce is ne with that
because he has no plans to shave
it, even after graduation.
Josh Hawkins, an English
major, is a self-described big-time
fan of the volleyball team. He has
been to every volleyball match
this year and even had the oppor-
tunity to be the honorary coach
for a game. He has a lot of respect
for Ryan Boyce for being himself
and sporting his mustache.
More power to him, Hawkins
said. I can respect a man who
sticks to his guns. I appreciate
that he is his own person and
doesnt do what everyone else
thinks. Thats cool; thats very
admirable. I love that attribute
you dont need to conform to some
great standard and get rid of your
personality to be the best people
can be.
Ryan Boyce isnt someone to
care a lot about receiving atten-
tion, but he appreciates the sup-
port of the fans of his mustache,
of the team and of volleyball.
Just enjoy yourselves, come
to the games, Ryan Boyce said.
If youre supporting mustaches,
awesome. If not, come anyway.
The message Ryan Boyces
mustache sends to his fans is sim-
ple: be yourself, stay true to who
you are and you will be happy.
Youve got to take life seri-
ously, but at the same time youve
got to have fun with it, Ryan
Boyce said. At times you get frus-
trated or you get a little down or
things arent going your way, but
life is life. Its going to throw you
curve balls and its going to hit
you in the face once in a while, but
if you can nd some good stuff and
concentrate on that, lifes good.
NAP
Students share top
napping locations
Continued from Page 1
Haines said the society has
a unique way of recruiting.
After submitting a nap spot on
the website, a student receives
an email in which he or she is
given a mission to nd a stack
of recruiting letters and a candy
bar that is hidden on campus.
From there, the agent is sup-
posed to distribute the recruit-
ing letters to people he or she
nds sleeping on campus, who
hopefully nd the letter about
The Secret Nap Society and
spread the word.
Haines said he is not using
The Secret Nap Society just to
make a club but to inspire a nap-
ping culture at BYU.
Theres a whole under-
ground culture of people taking
naps on campus, Haines said.
Some people can, some people
cant. But for those who do it, I
feel that theres a way we can
help others out as far as nding
good spots.
The site allows students to
rate nap spots on darkness
level, noise level, accessibility
level and overall nap experi-
ence. It also offers things such
as pillows and earplugs for sale
to enhance napping experi-
ences, according to Haines.
Taft Memmott, a sopho-
more from Susanville, Calif.,
found out about The Secret
Nap Society from a co-worker
and entered a nap spot on the
site. He accepted the mission to
hand out recruitment letters to
nappers.
The rst time I was really
nervous because I didnt want to
wake the people up, Memmott
said. Its way more fun when
its covert and clandestine.
Memmott said he is an avid
napper on campus when time
allows it, and he hopes The
Secret Nap Society will bring
a greater diversity of napping
spots to BYU.
I know sometimes you have
a favorite napping spot and
there is already someone sitting
there or napping there, and you
have to go nd another spot,
Memmott said.
Chloe Jensen, a senior from
Westminster, Colo., submit-
ted a review of a napping spot
in the Joseph Smith Building
that is usually open and quiet.
She said she decided to share
her napping spot since she is a
senior.
Haines said napping is impor-
tant to rejuvenate and refresh
students.
Its a lot healthier to take a
short nap in a good spot that is
relatively dark and quiet than
trying to stay awake during a
whole two-hour class, he said.
To find a napping loca-
tion on the BYU campus, visit
secretnapsociety.com.
Photo by Sarah Hill
A student naps on the third oor of the Joseph Smith Building.
PROFESSORS
BYU inventions
prove successful
Continued from Page 1
that we collected online, within
48 hours, our data was in the
computer, he said. All coded
in there. All of the sudden the
light clicks on and youre like,
this is something wonderful.
Its quick, its easy, its more
accurate.
Smith wanted to share it with
the world and, with the help and
eventual leadership of his sons,
started Qualtrics in 2002.
The company has grown rap-
idly and more than doubled its
ofce space to 80,000 square feet
in the past year. The company
estimates that 70 percent of its
employees are BYU graduates,
Liz Tanner, communications
director at Qualtrics said.
Corporate culture takes after
other technology startups, with
open spaces, catered lunches
and the odd dog wandering
around every now and then.
Conference rooms are named
after various cartoon charac-
ters, which also feature the
characters themselves on the
walls of the rooms. If you need a
break, there are massage chairs
readily available in the center of
the ofce.
The company was recently
ranked by Forbes as one of
Americas Top 25 Most Promis-
ing Companies. Ryan Smith, the
companys CEO, was also listed
as one of Americas Most Prom-
ising CEOs under 35.
Pzer
Daniel L. Simmons, a chem-
istry professor at BYU, was a
major contributor in the devel-
opment of a drug called Cere-
brex, which treats arthritis
and inammation. In May, the
Associated Press reported that
BYU and Pzer Inc. agreed to
an out-of-court settlement,
which awarded Simmons and
the university $450 million.
The lawsuit originated over a
dispute between Simmons and
Monsanto, which was acquired
by Pzer.
The university originally
fought for a 15 percent royalty
on the sales of the drug, which
would have amounted to an esti-
mated $9.7 billion.
As part of the terms of the set-
tlement, the university plans to
create and endow a chair to rec-
ognize the work Simmons did to
contribute to the advancement
of human health, the Associ-
ated Press reported. Simmons
is now working on developing a
new version of the drug.
Millenniata
When professor Barry Lunt
was looking at family photos
one day, he realized just how
hard it would be to store them
over a long period of time,
whether physically or digitally.
Because digital hard drives
only last for a few years, Lunt
wanted to nd a solution to have
his family memories treasured
for years to come.
Lunt developed the M-DISC, a
product that stores data for up to
1,000 years.
The company was born after
a year and a half of research.
Started in 2007, Lunt and his
partners were able to get inves-
tors readily and had over 200
people invest in the company.
Learn more about Millenni-
ata and other companies cre-
ated by BYU afliates , such
as T-Splines and BYU Tech-
nology Transfer Office, at
universe.byu.edu.
Photo by Chris Bunker
Scott Smith, a former BYU professor, started Qualtrics, which was valued at $500 million last year.
See page 18 for #Ygram pic-
tures of people sleeping.
4 The Universe, March 12 18, 2013
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Read a book, get a Slurpee
B y S T E P H A N I E P R O B E R T
A Provo 7-Eleven is now offer-
ing a sweet incentive for local
children to read more books.
The store at the corner of 300 S.
and Freedom Boulevard. has a
program allowing children to
take home a book home, read it
and return it for a free Slurpee
or treat.
The program has only been
underway for a few weeks, but
the word is spreading quickly.
Local children who do not live
close to a library now have a new
location to get reading material.
Todd Hansen, the 7-Eleven fran-
chise owner, is involved in this
program for that exact reason.
Hansen said he had never read
a book cover to cover and was the
typical high schooler who read
half the book then nished the
accompanying book report by
watching the movie version.
However, he has always been an
active member of the commu-
nity and has always looked for
ways to help improve it. After
meeting with representatives of
the United Way, Hansen knew
encouraging children to read
would be his next act of service.
Hansen started avidly read-
ing about nine months ago and
knows how much it has changed
his own life. He felt that children
need this same empowering feel-
ing for their own growth.
I do this program because
leaders are readers, Hansen
said.
The overall goal of Hansens
program is simply to get more
books into homes.
I want to get as many books
in homes as we can. If a book sits
on your shelf long enough, you
will eventually pick it up and
read it. If I can get people to have
enough books in their house,
then they will probably start
reading, Hansen said.
Hansen is the only 7-Eleven
that currently has this pro-
gram, which is supported by the
7-Eleven corporation. In addi-
tion, the media have given the
program lots of attention. Han-
sen has been interviewed by
numerous media outlets in Utah,
along with the Albany Times,
San Francisco Chronicle and
newspapers in Ohio and Seattle.
The program has been running
for about six weeks, and Hansen
said the store gives out about 30
books a day.
Hansen has received some
criticism for rewarding children
with the famous sugary drink,
but he assures parents it is not
about the reward, and there are
many options.
We give out bananas, apples,
oranges, balloons, high ves,
whatever they want. Ill do what-
ever it takes to reward someone
for engaging in a good activity.
The largest key to success is rec-
ognition, Hansen said.
Amy Hall, a 7-Eleven
employee, supports this new pro-
gram and says she enjoys com-
ing to work every day to see the
excitement in the kids. The chil-
dren do not have to report back
on the book, but employees will
often talk to them about what
they read. Hall says she loves
hearing from children of all
ages. She noted the older kids are
usually more willing to give a
summary, whereas the younger
children need to be prompted.
For Hall, the excitement never
gets old.
Its so much fun. I love kids,
so I love to see them so excited.
You can just see them brighten
up and bounce over to the
books, Hall said.
For many children, the
reward of a treat is not even the
best part of the experience.
Some children are more
excited for the Slurpee, but there
are a couple that dont even hear
me when I say Slurpee, they just
see the books and run over with
excitement, Hall said.
Hall and Hansen would like to
see this program not only imple-
mented in all 7-Elevens, but in
as many local businesses as will
support it.
Emma Corbett, an elementary
education major from Southlake,
Texas, is currently a rst grade
teacher in the Provo School Dis-
trict and thinks this program
will be a needed boost for chil-
dren who choose to get involved.
I think this is a wonderful
idea. Students need literacy sup-
port from more than just their
teachers and parents, Corbett
said. It is encouraging for them
to see others in the commu-
nity outside of the classroom
encouraging the importance of
reading,
Corbett is eager to spread the
word because she feels her stu-
dents and their parents would
be excited to get involved. Cor-
bett says most of her curricu-
lum is based around reading.
With more rigorous reading
programs being implemented at
schools, Corbett is often worried
for children who are struggling
to keep up. She thinks anyone
who encourages children to
read is giving them a valuable
resource.
We need much more support
from outside the classroom. I
praise people like Todd Hansen
who see the need to encourage
literacy in our community, Cor-
bett said.
Hansen encouraged BYU stu-
dents to get involved by donat-
ing books to the local United
Way, or to local 7-Elevens. He
hopes his own involvement, and
the support of the community,
can improve literacy locally. He
hopes children will nd the joy
of reading even more sweet than
a Slurpee.
Firehouse Subs helps
strengthen community safety
B y S A M A N T H A G I L B E R T
Firehouse Subs Public Safety
Foundation recently awarded
the Utah County Sheriffs
Department with a much-needed
$10,300 grant.
Early Wednesday, March 6,
members of the media and an
assortment of public safety of-
cials gathered at Firehouse Subs
of Orem, who was recognized
for its generous philanthropic
effort.
The Firehouse Subs Public
Safety Foundation was set up
to assist efforts among local law
enforcement and public safety
ofcials so they can further pro-
tect citizens. The Firehouse Subs
restaurant chain acquires cus-
tomer donations, which they give
back to the community through
local public safety efforts.
Through the donations of the
foundation, Will Page, the Fire-
house Subs Orem store owner,
headed up a specic effort to
purchase a new dog to add to the
local K9 unit in Utah county. The
dog was a much needed asset to
the county police force.
The Firehouse Subs founda-
tino raises money a few differ-
ent ways. First, workers will ask
customers to round up to the
nearest dollar as an extra dona-
tion toward the foundation. Also,
each individual franchise can
recycle large pickle bins for sale
to customers and use that money
toward foundation efforts. These
small actions end up building up
a large sum of money that can
help local public safety ofcials.
Utah is one of the foundations
best fundraising states in the
country.
Robin Sorensen, co-founder
of Firehouse Subs, spent many
years as a reman. He later
decided that he wanted to enter
the food business but still wanted
to contribute to the community.
It was then that the idea of a pub-
lic safety foundation was born.
We started for one reason
to make an impact in the commu-
nity, Sorensen said.
Robin Peters, executive direc-
tor of the foundation, said the
philanthropic opportunities
are what make the company so
great. Every time we are able
to go into the community and
give back its such a great
experience.
Page explained the great
deal his store was able to make
with the Utah County Sheriffs
Department. The efforts of the
franchise allowed the Sheriffs
department to purchase a police
dog worth around $10,500.
During the award meeting,
Page announced, Weve decided
that today we will match any
donation up to $1,000.
Lt. Mike Brower of the Utah
County Sheriffs Department
said, Were very humbled for
this opportunity. Weve been
down a dog for several years.
A demonstration of training
efforts and what the police dogs
do closed out the event. Fire-
house Subs continues to donate
to public safety sectors across
30 states.
Peters said its about saying
thank you. Its about taking little
steps to help the people who sac-
rice their lives for every citizen
in the community.
Photo by Chris Bunker
Sargent Matthew Higley introduces the newest member of their
K-9 team, Meatball, at Firehouse Subs in Orem.
The Universe, March 12 18, 2013 5
Natalie
MacMaster
With BYU Folk
Music Ensemble
One of the most
versatile and excitiing
young musicians on the
folk and Celtic music
scenes today
Tues, Mar 19, 7:30pm
$13-35
de Jong Concert Hall
Chamber Orchestra
Kory Katseanes, conductor
BARTK: Music for Strings,
Percussion and Celesta
MOZART: Symphony
No. 83, La poule
Thurs, Mar 21, 7:30pm
$6-10, de Jong Concert Hall
Mens Chorus
Rosalind Hall, conductor
Fri-Sat, Mar 22-23, 7:30pm
$6-10, de Jong Concert Hall
Buckaroo
Cowboy poetry In Motion
dancEnsemble
Pam Musil, artistic director
With cowboy poets Paul
Bliss, Brooksie Brooks
& Dan Bradshaw and
a live cowboy band.
Fri, Mar 22, 7:30pm
Special guest
Hot Club of Cowtown
$6, Dance Studio Theatre, RB
Buckaroo Ball
Fri, Mar 22, 9:30-11:30pm
$6-8, 2206 RB
Sat, Mar 23, 2:00 & 7:30pm
$6, Dance Studio Theatre, RB
Cyrano de Bergerac
Aquila Theatre Company
New Yorks Aquila Theatre in a fresh
take on Edmond Rostands classic play
Tues, Mar 12, 7:30pm
$12-19, de Jong Concert Hall
Nrityagram Dance Ensemble
Samhara
Regarded worldwide as one of Indias
foremost dance companies, Nrityagrams
acclaim stems from the groups ability to
create and communicate powerful
imagery and captivating
movement through Odissi
dance and live music.
Thurs, Mar 14, 7:30pm
$12-19, de Jong Concert Hall
The Servant
of Two Masters
By Carlo Goldoni
Directed by Stephanie Breinholt
Mayhem and misadventure ensue
in this madcap comedy
Previews Mar 20-21, 7:30pm
Mar 22-23, 26-29, 7:30pm
Apr 2-5, 7:30pm
Sat Matinees
Mar 23 &30, 2:00pm
ASL interpreted Thurs Mar 28
$8-15, Pardoe Theatre
Jazz Ensemble
Jazz Is in The Air
Mark Ammons, director
Tues, Mar 26, 7:30pm
$6
de Jong Concert Hall
For tickets, visit BYUarts.com or call the
BYU Ticket Offce at (801) 422-4322.
Visit BYUarts.com for a complete performance calendar including free events.
a book of mormon lecture s eri es
25 Years of Research
What We Have Learned About the Book of Mormon Text
Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship Laura F. Willes Center for Book of Mormon Studies
L. Tom Perry Special Collections, Harold B. Lee Library
third lecture
of a three-Part series by
Professor Royal Skousen
Tuesday, March 12, 2013
The Nature of
the OriginalText
7:00 Pm
assembly hall
gordon b. hinckley center
byu camPus
New BYU/SA presidency gets down to business
B y C A R L A D A S I L V A
Its not all Rock the Vote
parties and Voting Kick-off
breakfasts for Brandon Beck
and Erika Nash. After their big
BYU/SA presidential win, they
got right to work.
Though they are not taking
ofce until spring term, for now
Beck and Nash are appointing
initiative managers who can
start implementing their goals
and create a foundation for when
they take ofce.
We are setting up meetings
with Mayor (John) Curtis, Ath-
letics, University Communica-
tions and others who will be key
in the process of getting our ini-
tiatives fullled, Beck said.
As president and vice presi-
dent, respectively, Beck and
Nash want to work during their
time in ofce towards one com-
mon goal: elevating the BYU
experience for as many students
as possible.
Erika and I want to make
sure that the changes we make
through our
initiatives will
ensure that the
BYU experi-
ence is second
to none, Beck
said. We hope
that BYU will
become an even
more energized
and spirited
place where it
is easy to get
involved and
stay informed.
Beck and Nashs strongest
initiatives were created around
bringing BYU students together.
The initiatives include: creat-
ing an involvement hub to
make it easier for students to get
involved in BYU/SA, BYU-ify-
ing Provo to make it feel more
like a college town, having a
big end-of-year celebration and
addressing predatory towing.
After winning the election,
Beck and Nash said they were
grateful for
their amazing
campaign team
and all the hard
work every-
one put into
it. Nash didnt
expect their
campaign to
have so many
supporters.
We had no
idea so many
students would
rally behind
our cause, Nash said. We owe
everything to our campaign vol-
unteers and the time and energy
they contributed.
Nash also commended
Amberly Asay and Austin Jones
on their campaign.
Amberly and Austin ran an
impressive campaign, and it was
a privilege working alongside
them, Nash said. We appreci-
ate the time and effort contrib-
uted from both sides and know
that BYU will be a better place
because of it.
Students who wish to get
involved are invited to go to
the BYU/SA ofce where of-
cials will help them nd a place.
Having BYU/SA ofces turn
into the involvement hub will
make it easier for students to
get involved and have a greater
impact on the student body.
I would love to see students
actively take ownership of their
BYU experience and give us feed-
back about what they would like
to see changed in the organiza-
tion and on campus, Beck said.
The moment I decided to make
the BYU experience better for
others it became better for me.
For more information, contact
studentleadership@byu.edu or
go to room 3400 at the Wilkinson
Student Center.
Female cadet thrives in Army ROTC
B y C A R I N D E L O S S A N T O S
Anna Savages Army Physical
Fitness Test scores are among
the best in the BYU Cougar Bat-
talion. She sets the standard of
excellence, even among the male
cadets she serves with.
Savage, a junior from Highland,
is one of 36 women among 266 men
in her battalion and is proof that
women can excel as soldiers in
todays Army. The Army recently
announced that women will be
allowed into combat positions
previously open only to men. It is
a change Savage embraces.
Savage joined the BYU Army
ROTC program her freshman
year on a four-year scholarship.
Like many cadets, Savage strug-
gled to pass her rst physical t-
ness test. David Jungheim, the
ROTC scholarship and enroll-
ment coordinator, remembers
her efforts.
I was immediately impressed
at the happy, positive attitude
that she had, Jungheim said. It
wasnt this doom and gloom that I
failed my rst PT test. I should
just give up now. She knew
what she had to do, and she did it.
Savage passed the tness test
on her third try. She worked hard
to improve her score and now con-
sistently earns a 300, the highest
possible score for the test.
Savage has continued to
improve both her physical and
military skills. She has earned
notable awards, including exceed-
ing standards at the Bataan
Memorial Death March, partici-
pating in the winning Ranger
Challenge Team, being the Best
Overall MSII (2
nd
year) cadet
and earning the German Armed
Forces Prociency Badge.
As a female in the male-domi-
nated ROTC program, Savage said
it is hard not to stand out. How-
ever, the attention she receives has
been positive and encouraging.
I really love the environment
here, Savage said. I feel like
each cadre (instructor) has been
a mentor to me. Theyve all shown
me their own perspectives and all
taught me a lot.
ROTC cadets are required to
wear their uniforms regularly
for classes. Savage remembers
her rst few times in camouage.
Youre definitely not cam-
ouaged when youre wearing
camo, Savage said. You stick
out like a sore thumb, especially
as a female in the uniform because
people are like, Whoa, never seen
that before. So its denitely an
interesting experience.
As a freshman, she signed up
for the Ranger Challenge Team.
Ranger Challenge is like a varsity
sport for the Army ROTC and is
comprised of talented, dedicated
cadets who meet ve times a week
to increase their physical capabili-
ties and military skill.
Lt. Col. Dewey Boberg,
professor of military science and
head of the BYU Army ROTC pro-
gram, said Savage has a can-do
attitude that rubs off on those with
whom she works.
(She) signed up for (Ranger
Challenge) right away and imme-
diately had a positive impact on
the other cadets on the Ranger
Challenge team, Boberg said.
She kept pushing them a little
harder, pushing them a little fur-
ther, consistently improving. And
I would say in the two and half
years shes been here, thats been
her story.
As Savage looks forward to her
career as an ofcer in the Army,
she is glad the Army is giving
women the opportunity to serve
in combat positions. Combat posi-
tions generally have a higher
physical standard because the
work is more physically demand-
ing than are other positions.
The Army is currently working
to establish gender-neutral stan-
dards for those positions. Savage
is excited for the change but hopes
they dont lower the standards for
women.
I dont want a free pass, Sav-
age said. I dont want to get any-
thing just because of my gender.
If Im going to do something like
that, I want to be able to do it on the
same level and scale that (males)
are doing it. It would be extra
hard, but it would be worth it.
Boberg believes Savage has the
commitment and capability that
would make her successful in a
combat role.
Its really strong women like
Anna Savage that go into those
branches, Boberg said.
For her part, Savage is enjoying
her ROTC experience and the ben-
ets that have come as a result of
the training she has received.
I denitely have seen myself
change a lot since this program,
Savage said. I feel more con-
dent, (I am a) much better leader,
I feel more in control of my life.
Basically, it has influenced
everything.
Photo by Chris Bunker
Brandon Beck and Erika Nash were announced the winners of the
BYU/SA election March 5 in the Varsity Theatre.

We had no idea so
many students would
rally behind our cause.
Erika Nash
BYU/SA vice president elect
Photo courtesy BYU Army ROTC
Cadet Anna Savage, center, as the acting rst seargent of the BYU Army ROTC at the Presidential Review
in November 2012.
Police Beat
TRESPASSING
Feb. 28 An individual banned from the university was found on
campus at the Marriott Center. University Police escorted the indi-
vidual from campus and issued a citation for trespassing.
Mar. 1 An individual banned from the University was discovered
on campus at Heritage Halls. The individual was escorted from the
campus by University Police and cited for trespassing.
ASSAULT
Mar. 2 University Police responded to the Richards Building after
a basketball game resulted in a brief physical altercation. Police
discovered that one of the individuals involved had obtained ac-
cess to the Richards Building facilities and amenities through
fraud. This individual was cited for theft of services and banned
from the campus for 72 hours.
THEFT
Mar. 1 A backpack and its contents were stolen from a locker at
the Wilkinson Student Center.
Mar. 2 An iPad was reported stolen from the WSC after the owner
left it unattended. The crime is still under investigation.
STALKING
Mar. 9 An individual reported seeing the same person near the
Harold B. Lee Library several times in suspicious circumstances.
BYU SAS; 2 in; Any color; Ellen Hernandez; 6cols
6 The Universe, March 12 18, 2013
[ ISSUES & IDEAS ]
[ VIEWPOINT ]
Lack of hometown loyalty
Let me start off by saying that I
love Las Vegas.
Ive called Sin City my home since
fifth grade, and, despite the blazing
hot weather and the worldliness of
The Strip, I have the best memories
growing up there.
But heres the thing: I
have no hometown loyalty
when it comes to sports.
BYU is the best; Gonzaga,
Utah and UNLV are the
worst.
My mom says I have a
black- and-white, al l- or-
nothing personality I
either absolutely adore
something, or I cant
stand the sight of it and
I wholeheartedly agree.
If I have a favorite team,
theres no room for any
other. Such is the case with BYU.
Im completely obsessed with
this school. From my arrival back
in the fall of 2009 to now, every
moment has prepared me with
awesomeness to handle lifes little
chal lenges, and that includes
sports. I was inches away from
the TV screen in September of 09
when BYU beat No. 3 Oklahoma at
Cowboy Stadium. I waited in a tent
for every single basketball game
during Jimmermania and was there
when he rained down 52 points
against New Mexico during BYUs
last Mountain West Conference
Tournament. And I squirmed with
happiness in the press box when
Kyle Van Noy scored not one but
two defensive touchdowns against
SDSU in the 2012 Poinsettia Bowl at
Qualcomm Stadium.
Becoming a Cougar was an
inevitable calling card of mine, and
Ive fully embraced it.
So it doesnt really click in my
head when I talk with friends who
say yeah, they like BYU and all,
but if their home team plays the
Cougars, its home team all the way.
Its insulting to me that someone
can switch loyalties so easily. I get
it youve grown up in one location
all your life, living and
dying by the success of the
sports teams in your area,
especial ly the nearest
university. Thats great,
really, so why dont you just
go to your home school?
BYU is my favorite school
and is home to my favorite
college sports teams, so
attending this institution
is merely an added bonus.
I may be from Vegas, but I
dislike UNLV more than
any school out there. Yes,
I have some good buddies
who go there (most of my graduating
high school class, actually), but I do
not like the school, especially its
sports teams, one bit.
Funny enough, that hostility
didnt begin until I actually came
to BYU. Before it had just been
indifference.
I can peg the beginning of my
dislike of the Runnin Rebels down
to one particular instance: Exactly
three years ago to the day, March 12,
2010, UNLV beat BYU in Vegas at the
Thomas and Mack Center 70-66. I was
there, and it stank. The only things
I can really remember about the
game were the jeering Reeeh-bels,
Reeeh-bels cries from 70 percent of
the crowd and the long walk to the
car afterwards.
My Facebook status later that
night properly expressed my
feelings: Im going to throw myself
off of the Empire State Building and
pray that I land on a UNLV fan.
Yes, UNLV fans arent too fond
of BYU fans, but its the animosity
to all the schools they play that
really gets me. In December 2011, I
went to a UNLV game against some
not-so-great school from central
Arkansas. The opposing team wasnt
going to win, and everyone knew it.
Despite that obvious fact, upon the
introductions of the other school,
the entire Rebel student section
turned its back to the court, and
each student raised his or her hand,
f lipping off the opposing team.
Vegas lack of professional sports
teams means that my fanhood is
spread abroad: Im a Green Bay
Packers fan, a San Francisco Giants
fan and, once I was accepted to BYU,
a Cougars fan.
I have friends who are currently at
the Y and hate it. Maybe its my full-
blown loyalty for everything I love,
but I would not attend a school that
I did not like. My happiness is very
important to me, and I avoid things
that stand in its way.
There are also the students who
couldnt care less about sports and
team loyalty thats totally fine. I
may not fully understand your lack
of interest, but Im sure you have
passions of equal caliber in other
subjects.
Maybe somewhere deep in my soul,
Im just bummed that I dont have a
hometown team to happily cheer
for, but my devotion is 100 percent
committed to Brigham Young and
his merry band of Cougars.
Alex Hoeft is a web editor at The
Universe. This viewpoint represents
her opinion and not necessarily those
of BYU, its administration or The
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints.
ALEX
HOEFT
[ VIEWPOINT ]
Root, root, root for the home team
June 19, 2000.
I remember it perfectly, even
though I was only 8 years old. My
dad was sitting right next to me at
the beginning of the game but was
soon pacing around the living room,
unable to sit still. They were losing
but were always within five points.
And then came the glorious fourth
quarter. They ended up
winning by five, and
my family was running
around the living room,
shouting for joy. My mom
wasnt even mad when our
cheering woke up my baby
sister.
It was the first time
in my life that the Los
Angeles Lakers were NBA
champions, and I couldnt
remember ever feeling that
good before.
Theres a good chance
that Celtics and Jazz fans
have al ready stopped
reading, but Im hoping theyll hear
me out. This is not a pro-Lakers
viewpoint, I swear. But I grew up
in the City of Angels. Both of my
parents were born and raised there,
and three of my grandparents are
Los Angeles natives. From a very
young age I was taught to be a Laker
fan, a Dodger fan, a Galaxy fan, a
Kings fan and even a Sparks fan.
So why, just because Ive moved to
Utah, should anything change?
The majority of students in Provo
have uprooted themselves and
traveled across at least one state
boundary to attend BYU. Some have
grown up watching BYU sports;
others embrace the blue and white
upon arrival. Im not going to argue
that supporting your school is bad
its great. I encourage it. But if
youre going to be a Cougar, go all
in. Once youve left Provo, remember
the university you attended and dont
simply move on to whatever team
happens to be closest.
This lack of loyalty that is so
prevalent in sports bothers me. I
hear people say all the time that
theyre Lebron James,
Kobe Bryant or Russell
Westbrook fans, and
theyll root for whichever
team their favorite player
represents. You cant be a
Heat fan just because you
love Lebron. Caring only
for individual players is
boring and unrewarding.
Cheering for the best team
in any league is not being
a fan; its bandwagoning,
and theres no place for it
in sports.
Remember in 2005 when
Johnny Damon signed with
the New York Yankees? Red Sox fans
were furious. Hed gone on the record
saying he would never don those
pinstripes, no matter how much
money they offered him. But instead
of remaining in Boston, the Red Sox
poster boy joined the citys biggest
rival and, with that decision, lost
all the love hed gained in Boston.
You have to respect those fans. They
know that loyalty isnt about the
players; its about the team.
Case in point: I have pictures
of Derek Fisher signing my first
Lakers shirt when I was in fifth
grade. I cherish the time he spent
in LA, and I frequently go back and
watch his 0.4-second shot against
the Spurs it still makes me giddy.
Last season I was heartbroken when
he was traded. It was as if my family
cast off a brother. But as much
as it pains me to see Fish bounce
from team to team, I cant root for
his success anymore. I hated his 10
points against the Lakers, because
now hes just an opponent.
Soccer fans are another great
example of dedication. Real Salt
Lake fans are spread throughout
Utah, and they love their team more
than anything. However, when it
comes time for the World Cup, the
fans who stand united at Rio Tinto
Stadium turn against each other,
because tradition and heritage take
precedence over current location.
RSL fans who root actively against
Landon Donovan during the MLS
season have no trouble cheering
him on when his jersey represents
the United States, because in that
setting, the U.S. is their team.
Others turn against Salt Lake
players because theyre rooting for
a different country. It all goes back
to loyalty.
Support your home team. Dont
be a fair-weather fan. If your team
is playing terribly, hope the best for
them anyway. Winning and losing
with your team is part of the process.
You cant enjoy a win nearly as much
if you havent been distraught after
a tough loss. Trust me, I know Im
a Lakers fan.
Megan Adams is a life editor at The
Universe. This viewpoint represents
her opinion and not necessarily those
of BYU, its administration or The
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints.
MEGAN
ADAMS
I vote for
no elections
About this time of year, BYU breaks
from its traditional Blue and White
to dawn some neon shades of differ-
ent primary colors to advertise for
BYU/SA presidential candidates.
Undisclosed amounts of campus
resources are then given to the
candidates to print expensive post-
ers and yers that will only be in
the intended recipients hand for
an average of 5 seconds before they
nds their way into a pocket, not to
be discovered until laundry is done
a week later.
When campaign representatives
stop students, they recite three plat-
form points akin to what you might
hear at a grade school election. But
what really is the difference between
the candidates? Vote for them,
they say, theyll give you a vend-
ing machine! Does that mean the
other campaign is morally opposed
to vending machines? Chances are
they also think a vending machine in
the library is a good idea and might
even pursue it if elected, but they
were forced to come up with a plat-
form different than their opponents
and as such cannot openly endorse
the idea.
If the elections were partisan, they-
would require candidates to focus on
the application of ideologies instead
of a promise of shallow policies. But
this is something BYU/SA seems
to be uncomfortable with because
there is a focus on staying positive
and not attacking the opponent and
not focusing on differences. Even if
this unique BYU view of politics and
elections was changed, there would
still be the problem that candidates
really are not that different.
On top of all of that, students,
in general, recognize the need for
BYU/SA and are grateful for what it
accomplishes, but they do not really
have a preference for who is leading
the organization. Just look at dismal
voter turnout in the past and the fact
that the average student cannot even
name the current BYU/SA president.
So save the universitys money
and let the president be selected in
house. When there is no real differ-
ence in core values between candi-
dates, the best candidate is the one
who is the best communicator and
most effective leader. These qualities
are hard to show when there is only
an insignicant amount of previous
experience to run on.
Much like the process for hiring a
CEO, let a candidate selection board
be created to interview candidates
and then make the best selection
based on those signicant qualities.
This way, we are guaranteed to get
the best person for the job, not just
the person who has the most friends
to hand out candy.
Brian Anderson
Provo
[ Readers Forum ]
Tweet Beat
#BYU
Leave your comments at universe.byu.edu.
@RebekahArnesen
Quote of the day: we
arent tools we promise
#BYU#greatrstimpression
@miyawilson808
i just saw a dude wearing a
Taylor Swift RED t-shirt...
even the men are obsessed
with @taylorswift13at #BYU
@aletts01
You know its almost spring
again when you can nally
wear one jacket to go outside
#byu#goodbyewinter
@sazzafrazzle
The two guys next to me
are using this class as
naptime.#sweetdreams
#polisci #byu
@De_Gallego
Why do I keep feeling like to-
day is Thursday? #somuchto-
do #byu #study #midterms
@mmillerberg
Reason 253 that I love #BYU:
Trashing the Camp playing
in the Cougareat!
@kaeshultz
spring break #byu style: the
weather warms up a bit for
a few days so you dont have
to wear a jacket walking in
between classes. #noparka
@taylordanjones
#Byu is the closest thing
to mckinley high on #glee.
Always some sort of group
singing on campus.
@jensen_jess100
Professor just asked someone
to play a VHS...no one knew
what to do #byu #21century-
problems
@LRDoogie
all the BYU grass nappers
have emerged anew. #wel-
comeback #byu @theBYU-
problems
@BrandonPerazzo
532 calories in one #BYU
mint brownie. I wish I would
have known that 15 minutes
ago, I would have
reconsidered.
@emily_skidmore
My professor literally just
said the most important
thing we should learn in this
class is that cows eat 600-750
lbs per month. #BYU
@_LRMm
Just trying to avoid hearing
about spring break existing
#byu
@rpiip
Just saw a kid run his head
into the door at the JSB as
his #friend tried to stop him
from opening the door. #hi-
larious #school #byu #owned
@krobi93
Finally saw a proposal at
BYU. It was mine. It was also
fake, unfortunately. #BYU
@danger_dale
Just saw a girl putting on her
self tanner in the bathroom
in the Eyring. Priorities.
#byu #Mormongirls #Utah-
winter
@haleywalter22
I think Im gonna start giv-
ing participation points for
dating! -my Book of Mor-
mon Professor #matchmaker
#byu
Sports
& RECREATI ON
Page 7
@DUSportsDesk
universe.byu.edu/sports
March 12 18, 2013
BYU rugby, lacrosse thriving mostly on the road
BYU tennis: Sisters
compete together
Where are they now:
BYU footballs Steve Brady
B y S T E P H A N I E L A C Y
Steve Brady will tell you he was
never one of the big stars on the BYU
football team. Its simply a part of
his natural modesty. But he will tell
you being part of the team has had a
great impact on his life.
Football has taught Brady some
of lifes greatest lessons and contin-
ues to help him through lifes big-
gest challenges.
He wont bring it up, but most BYU
fans remember him as a fiercely
competitive defensive back who
played alongside his twin brother,
Mark. He played in the Miracle
Bowl, and both he and his brother
eventually signed as free agents
with the Denver Broncos, but an
injury cut Steve Bradys profes-
sional career short.
I never really played for (the
Broncos), Brady said. I got cut and
then they brought me back, and so I
just practiced with them. I never got
to play in a game.
Football, however, remains an
important part of his life. He uses
what he learned from the game to
help others, particularly young men
who are struggling to find their way
through life.
Since graduating from BYU,
Brady has worked as a physical
trainer and football coach striv-
ing to help people overcome their
difficulties.
Ive worked a lot with teenagers,
and I love it, Brady said. I have had
the opportunity to meet and work
with some really great kids.
Brady and his wife, Sue, earned
undergraduate degrees in psychol-
ogy at BYU and went on to pursue
careers helping troubled teens.
I worked with troubled teens for
about 10 years at a residential treat-
ment facility called Provo Canyon
School, Brady said. My wife still
works there. She loves her job; she
doesnt take her work home with her
as much and I did, so I got out of it.
Although he no longer works at
the residential facility, Brady con-
tinues to work with teen boys as
he helps coach the football team at
Pleasant Grove High School.
Right out of college, I coached at
Timpview High School for a while
and then I got out of coaching and I
worked, Brady said. Then I started
coaching my sons Little League
team and the coach asked me to start
helping out. By the time my son was
in high school, they asked me to
start helping out coaching at Pleas-
ant Grove, and I have been doing
that ever since.
Bradys passion for helping people
with their physical well-being was
largely inf luenced by the death of
his grandmother.
I started out studying account-
ing in school, and then I was going to
get into this area but it was different
back then, so I didnt like it, Brady
said. But then my grandmother
passed away and she was a great
lady, but she didnt eat healthy and
she had a heart attack. She was (in
her) early 70s; she had a lot of life left
to live, and she didnt get to live it.
Since then, Brady has dedicated
his time to helping people get back
into shape and lead healthier lives.
That moment kind of twisted my
arm to get into this field, Brady
said, referring to his grandmothers
death. Thats the kind of people I
like to work with, to help people
change their lives.
Brady is currently the first coun-
selor in a freshman ward bishopric
See BRADY on Page 9
Photo by Elliott Miller
Beau Rich throws the ball during last Saturdays game against Utah State. The lacrosse team plays only seven home games this season.
B y S P E N C E R W R I G H T
Attending BYU wouldnt seem the
norm for two devout Catholics from
Southern California whose parents
immigrated to the United States from
Vietnam. But that hasnt stopped the
Trans sisters from making an impact
on campus.
Desiree Tran, a junior and exercise
science major, and Nicolette Tran, a
freshman still deciding on her major,
have been making the most of their
unlikely journey to BYU and their time
together on the womens tennis team.
The sisters began playing tennis 10
years ago Desiree as a 9-year-old
and Nicolette as a 7-year-old. They just
wanted to pick up a sport, and since
their parents were always playing ten-
nis, it seemed like a natural t.
It was at this time the Trans would
also move to Murrieta, Calif. This
turned out to be a decisive move for
their tennis future and their future
decisions to come to BYU.
Moving is never easy, and for kids
trying to acclimate to a new city, nd
new friends and get used to a new
school, it can be especially difcult. The
Trans made the most of the opportunity
and found a friend at their elementary
school named Meghan.
Meghan turned out to be Meghan
Sheehan-Dizon, who is currently a
sophomore at BYU and a member of the
BYU tennis team who has a personal
52 record this season.
Meghan said she played (tennis) and
told us we should come, Desiree Tran
said. So, we went to the tennis club
with her, and thats how we got more
into tennis.
Like most kids, they picked up the
game to have fun and pass the time.
It was fun to play, even for Nicolette,
who seemed to have a knack for falling
down.
I just remember some stories, Nico-
lette Tran said. I used to fall a lot on the
tennis court. Id just run backwards and
trip and fall.
The more they played tennis and the
better they got, the less the sisters fell
and the more they realized their futures
might lie in tennis.
The improvement wasnt lost on the
Trans parents. They were the rst to
support Desiree and Nicolette Tran in
their tennis ambitions and did every-
thing they could to help.
When I was in sixth grade my par-
ents asked us, Do you want to go pro?
and we were like, Yeah, Desiree Tran
said. Thats when we became home-
schooled. So we had two tennis courts at
our house, and we even lived in Argen-
tina for ve months just to train and
practice for tennis.
Desiree and Nicolette Tran enter-
tained the prospect of playing
See SISTERS on Page 9
Photo courtesy Desiree Tran
Sisters Desiree and Nicolette Tran both play on the BYU womens tennis team.
Womens Tennis vs. BYU Hawaii
2 p.m., Honolulu, Hawaii
Mens Tennis vs. New Mexico
Noon,
Outdoor Tennis Courts
Baseball vs. San Diego
6 p.m.,
San Diego, Calif.
Womens Volleyball vs. Idaho
State
Noon,
Pocatello, Idaho
San Diego State Track
Invitational
All day,
San Diego, Calif.
Baseball vs. San Diego
1 p.m.,
San Diego, Calif.
Womens Gymnastics
Washington Tri-Meet
7 p.m.,
Seattle, Wash.
Womens Golf BYU Entrada
Classic
All day,
St. George
Baseball vs. San Diego
6 p.m.,
San Diego, Calif.
Womens Tennis vs. Hawaii
11 a.m.,
Honolulu, Hawaii
unvr.se/Wz6ffu
unvr.se/W8bkJ
unvr.se/15CxiXT
unvr.se/YlfmI5
unvr.se/YlejI9
unvr.se/13K5vWX
unvr.se/Zn27xS
unvr.se/XvTUaA
unvr.se/YOAiI8
unvr.se/WaCglq
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SPORTS CALENDAR MARCH 12 18
B y R A P H A E L M A G R E
Athletes fight for an edge over their
opponents on and off the field, but the
greatest advantage of all depends on
where these battles take place.
BYU rugby and lacrosse combine for 34
games in a three month season, yet only
12 of those games are at home. Only 35
percent of their seasons are spent in front
of a home crowd where the advantage is
in their favor. This is terribly low when
compared to the better-known sports on
campus. Mens basketball had 53 percent
of its games in the Marriott Center this
past season, while the football team had
an even 50 percent of its games in LaVell
Edwards Stadium. However, mens vol-
leyball has had an impressive 61 percent
of its season played in Provo.
We put in a lot of work throughout the
year that the BYU community doesnt get
to see, sophomore lacrosse player Mike
Fabrizio said. They really just dont
know. When we are at home they finally
get to see how much work and effort we
have been putting in.
Playing at home is not only a privi-
lege, but an advantage. An advantage
the rugby and lacrosse teams dont often
have.
These student athletes have a hard
time juggling school, work, sports and for
some, their families. It is incredible to
think that on top of these responsibilities
they must pay to play the sport they love.
Academical ly it is chal leng-
ing, TJ Allred, senior rugby player,
said. I guess practice makes perfect.
See ROAD on Page 9
8 The Universe, March 12 18, 2013
You are invited to attend...
UBAs
Broadcasting
Job Fair
March 20th, 2013 9am-1pm
University of Utah Student Union Ballroom
NOTE: No costParking not validated
Learn about careers in Radio and Television including:
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Semester
in Salt Lake?
Its not exactly Study Abroad, but if youre in Salt Lake
for the summer, take a few classes at the BYU Salt Lake
Center. Like Econ 110, Bio 100, Chem 105, Engl 311 and
many others. Classes are small and personal, getting there
is a breeze, plus you have the new downtown to play in.
Think of the BYU Salt Lake Center as just another
classroom on campus, except its closer to The Gateway,
City Creek Center, and a lot of great concerts.
What did you do this summer?
Now you have a good answer.
Check us out at slc.byu.edu
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[ Tweeting Cougars ]
NYAC narrowly defeats BYU
rugby in physical game
B y R A P H A E L M A G R E
BYU rugby faced the New
York Athletic Club in one of the
most physical games the Cou-
gars have ever played.
NYAC narrowly defeated
BYU 2216 on Saturday at South
Field. This game was titled the
Champions Challenge, but this
physically straining game truly
was a war, as the top collegiate
team faced the top semi-profes-
sional team in the United States.
It was a great opportunity
to play a big and quality team
like BYU, NYAC anker Neil
McMillan said. They are a
great physical side that are
coached really well.
The game kicked off with both
sides hitting hard and building
upon each others intensity.
Three people were down and
injured in the rst seven min-
utes of the game, including BYU
freshman halfback Jonathan
Linehan, who was carried off the
eld. The intensity kept building
as the Cougars made it down to
NYACs side of the eld. Junior
center Paul Lasik kicked a pen-
alty kick through the uprights to
give BYU an early 30 lead.
Linehan is a crucial piece of
the puzzle; losing him was huge,
senior hook Ray Forrester said.
This was a very physical game,
and that is when the mental part
of the game comes in. You can
never be too tough.
However, NYAC red back
with more intensity scoring two
trys in the the last 15 minutes of
the half. At the half, BYU was
down 123.
The second half started with
the fans on the edge of their
seats, tense and fully engaged.
BYU again scored the first
points of the half with a pen-
alty kick shortening the lead
to 126. However, NYAC again
took advantage of the small mis-
takes BYU made and created big
results scoring two more trys in
the second half. This raised the
score to 226.
They are a very strong
team, senior lock TJ Allred
said. We had a lot of opportuni-
ties that we just let slip away. We
needed to be more aggressive.
BYU wasnt ready for how
aggresive a team NYAC is, and
the game came to a halt again
when junior anker Kyle Sum-
sion was escorted off the eld by
an ambulance with 10 minutes
left in the game.
With little time left on the
clock, the Cougars played with
urgency and aggression scor-
ing a late try with three min-
utes left. The score was 2211
and with one last burst of speed
BYU scored a try with 20 sec-
onds left on the clock but not
enough time to BYU to even the
score. The game ended 2216 in
favor of NYAC in a high pace,
high aggression and high inten-
sity game.
We learned a lot of things
this game, BYU coach David
Smyth said. We learned our
boys are not going to back down,
not ever.
@paulcherrington
@TomHolmoe coach littlewood
is a great hire. Looking forward
to the growth of byu baseball
@Kaysha_M
I just saw the baseball boys and I
tried to take a picture but this girl
thought it was a picture of her so I
had to put my phone down. #BYU
@bholmesays
@byurugby where can we buy those
awesome jerseys that were worn
today? #BlackOnBlue #Awesome
@ArgyleChristi
BYU Rugby is by far the hot-
test team on campus
@geoffjBYU
Watching this #BYU vs Cal Baptist
volleyball match on BYUtv. These
two teams are wearing nearly identi-
cal uniforms very odd looking.
@trimomm
You could build a lego city with
all the blocks happening!@byuvol-
leyball Go Cougars! #byutvsports
@dyoung1993
Ok, Id better pay attention to Stake
Conference rather than try and
watch #BYUvolleyball on my phone.
@BeautYdUde
Think Ill make the trek to see the
@BYUvolleyball match tonight. I
wonder if I can hurry and grow a
mustache by then? #byutvsports
@MStirfry84118
Ah I love performing the
#haka! #BYURugby
@_HelloKimi_
Seeeewwwwwww now that
#BYUBasketball is out of the
tournament, is beer served at
the games? @WCCsports
@3amigospr
@HarkTheFranchuk BYU basket-
ball needs a total makeover. Start
with Haws and then a clean slate!.
No one else can play at D 1 level.
@BYUSinger84
Something is seriously wrong
with BYU basketball this
year. Hope Rose xes it.
@nicknewman801
Well, mediocre seasons from #byu
football and basketball Now we
get 6 months to forget about it.
@rtayloracton
This has been the most disappoint-
ing BYU basketball year I can re-
member. So much talent and prom-
ise but they couldnt make most of it
@Andyr936
If theres one thing Ive learned
over the years watching #BYUbas-
ketball its that Dave Rose cant
win a game in Vegas for his life.
@PostJimmer
If I hear one more BYU basketball-
Riley Nelson comparison, I dont
know what Ill do. We get it. Promise.
It was clever. Time for a new line
@iBenBrown
Tyler Heap represents @BYUvol-
leyball well. He was put on the
spot to share his testimony at
our stake conference #PYSASC
Photo by Sarah Hill
BYU brings down a NYAC player on Saturday. The Cougars lost the game 1622.
BYU mens tennis wins second straight WCC match
B y S P E N C E R W R I G H T
The No. 39 BYU mens ten-
nis team defeated No. 47 San
Diego 43 behind the play of
sophomore Francis Sargeant
on Saturday just one week
after suffering two defeats on
the road.
It was great to get a win over
a highly ranked team, BYU
coach Brad Pearce said. San
Diego is a very good team. Its a
great win for this program and
for the guys.
The Cougars started out
earning the doubles point with
two match wins.
With the overall match
still far from being decided,
Sargeant and San Diegos
Clarke Spinosa were battling
back-and-forth on court 3.
Spinosa, ranked No. 82 nation-
ally, won the rst set 64 and
then jumped out to a command-
ing 40 lead in the second set.
It looked like Spinosa was well
on his way to a victory for the
Toreros.
Sargeant though, found a
way to battle back and win
three straight games to take
it to 43. Spinosa won the next
game to take it to 53. Sargeant
then went on a tear that swung
the match in his favor and in
BYUs. He won four straight
games to win the second set
75, and then went on to win the
third set in commanding fash-
ion, 61. The win for Sargeant
gave the Cougars a 31 lead.
I just started to try and get
the ball in the court, Sargeant
said. And point by point I
worked my way back into it and
got some momentum going.
BYU sophomore Keaton
Cullimore scored the winning
point for BYU by defeating No.
112 Uros Petronijeciv in three
sets on court 4.
With the win, the Cougars
remain undefeated at home and
sit atop the WCC at 20.
Besides Sargeant and Cul-
limore in singles play, Kawka,
also picked up a win for the
Cougars.
Kawka was dominant in
his match against Thibaut
Visy, winning 63, 64. Senior
Spencer Smith battled Romain
Kalayjian down to the wire, but
lost in three sets.
The Cougars will be at home
again on March 16 to take on
New Mexico. After that match
the Cougars will continue
their WCC schedule against
San Francisco on March 22 at
home.
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SISTERS
Tran sisters come
to BYU together
Continued from Page 7
professional tennis for many
years and practiced at least six
hours a day. As time passed,
they decided that professional
tennis wasnt something they
really wanted to do. Instead they
decided to keep training, but now
it was to play in college.
For a Catholic family from
California, BYU wasnt the rst
school that came to mind; it
might even have been the last.
When Desiree Tran was a
freshman in high school and
Nicolette Tran was in seventh
grade, they met the Jones family.
It didnt seem like much at the
time, but the Jones family had
two daughters, including Lau-
ren. Now Lauren Jones-Spencer,
the head coach of BYUs womens
tennis team.
I met them over six years
ago, Jones-Spencer said. They
trained with my (younger) sis-
ter, and I was still playing so I
would go out and train with them
as well. Ever since then weve
remained close friends.
BYU might not have been
entertained as an option at
rst, but as Desiree progressed
through high school, the thought
of going to BYU became more of
a possibility.
We kept in touch with (the
Joneses), and I was committed to
another school, Desiree said. I
was going to stay local, and then
Lauren said I should take a look
at BYU.
Desiree ended up taking an
unofcial visit her junior year;
she got a feel for BYU and liked it.
At that time Jones-Spencer
was an assistant coach at BYU,
but soon after she was offered
the head coaching spot, and the
rst player she thought of was
Desiree.
When they asked me to be
the coach, the rst thing I did
was call Dez and say, Hey do you
want to come in early? Jones-
Spencer said. She actually grad-
uated early and came in to play
for me, which was a huge help.
In the end, the Trans and their
parents felt BYU was a great t.
They were already accustomed to
the Honor Code, it was a safe area
and good environment, and BYU
had great academics. It seemed
natural for Desiree Tran two
years ago and now for Nicolette
Tran.
A lot of people ask me, How
do you like it here; how do you
adjust? and I ask, What do you
mean? Nicolette Tran said.
They say, Youre not Mormon,
everyone is Mormon here, and
for me my best friend is Mormon,
so its no different. I t well here.
In their rst season together,
Desiree Tran is 52, and Nicolette
Tran is 61. The sisters have been
pivotal in helping this 2013 Cou-
gar squad get off to its best start
since 2006 when Jones-Spencer
was still playing for BYU.
The best thing is the team,
Desiree Tran said. Were unied
and like sisters.
BRADY
Former BYU player
making a difference
Continued from Page 7
on BYUs campus. Brady and his
wife love working with the youth
in the ward and helping them
with their needs.
My wife and I both have
worked a lot with teenagers,
Brady said. Along with work-
ing at the rehab facility, Sue has
worked a lot in Young Womens
for a while, and now she teaches
the 16-year-old Sunday School
class at church. She loves them,
and they love her.
The Bradys recently experi-
enced a dra-
matic change
in their lives
when, last fall,
Bradys wife
was diagnosed
with colon
cancer.
Its been a
major impact:
your whole
life changes
when you nd
out something
like that,
Brady said.
But Brady says the couple
has seen many blessings come
through the experience.
The love and support from
people has been amazing, Brady
said. Shes doing good now. She
went through
chemo, and
its been a
slow process
r e g a i n i n g
strength, but
shes doing
really well. We
are waiting to
hear what will
happen. They
went in and
removed half
of her colon.
H a v i n g
helped others throughout their
marriage, Brady and his wife
feel thankful that they now have
the support of others through
this experience.
ROAD
The Cougar home
field advantage
Continued from Page 7
We are so used to being on the
road that we just kind of get
used to it. I mean, when you
dont receive a scholarship to
play you have to work together
as a team to succeed.
The lacrosse team com-
petes in the Rocky Mountain
Lacrosse Conference where
it has won eight conference
championships and four
national championships. The
rugby team competes in the
College Premier Division
where it has won two national
championships.
These programs are not sanc-
tioned by the NCAA, but they
still dominate the eld wher-
ever they go. Between the two
teams they have racked up six
national championships since
1997. This season they combine
for a record of 111. Unfortu-
nately, the teams play almost
two thirds of their games on
the road. With all of these road
trips it becomes easy to slack
on school work and on home-
work, but the coaches make
sure these athletes are students
rst.
It is difcult, freshmen
rugby player Jonathan Linehan
said.We are student-athletes.
Student comes rst in that sen-
tence, athlete comes second.
The lacrosse team has
adopted a mentoring program
where the older, more experi-
enced players help the younger
ones with school work. With
this program in place, the
coaches have high academic
expectations for the players.
It almost feels like you are
on vacation, Fabrizio said.
But it isnt. These are work
trips and we have to keep up
with our school work along
with our game preparation.
Our coaches are very good at
laying out our weeks and giv-
ing us specic study time.
The lacrosse team has pro-
duced more than one hundred
Academic All-Americans. BYU
rugby has produced dozens of
All-Americans since 2001 and
a has only lost 20 games in 21
years.
BYUs biggest challenge of
being on the road becomes
its greatest strength when it
comes to home games. In the
past two years, the rugby and
lacrosse teams have not lost a
game in front of a home crowd.
It is all about momentum,
sophomore lacrosse player
Zach Jordan said. Momen-
tum is home eld advantage.
When you have the home fans
behind you, cheering you on the
momentum is right there. Cou-
gar Nation is right there, and
then we bring the energy.
Photo by Elliott Miller
A BYU rugby player runs down the eld against Utah State.
Photo by Stephanie Lacy
Steve Brady talks to his Pleasant Grove High football team on the sidelines after a game.

I have had the


opportunity to meet
and work with some
really great kids.
Steve Brady
Former BYU football player
10 The Universe, March 12 18, 2013
BYU womens basketball defeated in WCC tournament
B y C A R L I E E L L E T T
The BYU womens basketball
team was ousted from the West
Coast Conference tournament on
Saturday afternoon by the Gon-
zaga Bulldogs in a 6243 loss.
Both BYU and Gonzaga strug-
gled at the start of the game
with the rst two possessions
resulting in turnovers for both
teams. Sloppy play resumed on
both sides of the ball throughout
the rst couple minutes. The Bull-
dogs started to clean up their play,
hitting the rst two baskets of
the game. BYU pulled it together
and started to match Gonzagas
intensity.
I was proud of our team, BYU
coach Jeff Judkins said. We
played really well for the rst 15
minutes of the game and then we
let down at the end of the half.
Defense was the only thing
working in the Cougars favor
during the rst half. Keilani Unga
played aggressively on the defen-
sive end of the court, forcing the
Bulldogs post players to make
mistakes. Haley Steed managed
the Cougars on the other side of
the ball, setting up offensive sets
and nding Jennifer Hamson
in the paint. Hamson and Steed
were the high scorers for BYU in
the rst half with just four points
each.
Gonzaga is a really good team
(and) they beat us three times this
year, Judkins said. They have a
very balanced and strong team.
BYU struggled to find an
answer for Gonzagas Shelby
Cheslek who led the game in scor-
ing. Gonzaga shot 46.4 percent
from the eld while BYU only
shot 23.1 percent in the rst half.
In Fridays game, BYU beat the
LMU Lions from the three-point
line, but were only able to go 18
from beyond the arc during the
rst half of play.
Whenever BYU would begin
to chip away at Gonzagas lead,
the Bulldogs would answer with
tough defense and smart plays
on offense. BYU came within one
point with just under four min-
utes to play, but the Bulldogs man-
aged to increase their lead to 11 by
the end of the half. The Cougars
nished the half down by a score
of 3019.
They did a really good job
of taking us out of our motion
tonight, Ashley Gareld said. I
dont think we executed that the
way we wanted to.
The Cougars continued to
struggle at the start of the second
half with two quick turnovers.
The Bulldogs continued to put
pressure on the ball forcing BYU
to make mistakes.
I think (Gonzaga was) really
getting out and running, Gar-
eld said. They used our turn-
overs to their advantage.
Hamson got into foul trouble
early and had to come out of
the game just ve minutes into
the second half, leaving Unga
with the bulk of the rebounding
responsibilities. Gareld came off
the bench for the Cougars scoring
three times and providing BYU
with some much needed help on
offense.
We had a few defensive lapses
and we let them score, Hamson
said. We have some things to
work on for next year.
Despite efforts to make changes
to the line-up in order to combat
Gonzagas momentum, BYU was
unable to match the Bulldogs
intensity on both sides of the ball.
BYU ended up turning the ball
over 22 times and only scored 16
baskets from the eld and two
from three-point range. Morgan
Bailey led the Cougars in scoring
with 12 points, followed by Steed
with eight. Both Steed and Unga
led the team in rebounds with
seven each.
Hopefully we will learn from
this and improve as a team and be
ready for next year, Judkins said.
BYU nished the season with
an overall record of 2110 and a
conference record of 115. The
Cougars lose two seniors, Steed
and Unga, for the 201314 season.
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BYU comes up one basket short against San Diego
B y S C O T T H A N S E N
The BYU mens basketball
team gave a herculean effort on
Friday night, coming up just one
basket short against San Diego
in the quarternals of the West
Coast Conference Tournament.
The Cougars rallied from an
11-point decit in the rst half
to take a late game lead, but the
Toreros answered every run BYU
threw at them, winning the game
7269 to advance to the WCC
seminals against Saint Marys
Saturday night.
I thought we competed really
hard, BYU coach Dave Rose said.
I thought we settled in in the sec-
ond half, and found some oppor-
tunities that were good for us. We
just couldnt sustain it. We had
the lead a couple times, and USD
just had an answer every time.
The Toreros were led by soph-
omore guard Johnny Dee, who
had 25 points, and helped seal
the game by hitting ve of his last
six free throw attempts down the
stretch. Sophomore guard Chris-
topher Anderson also contrib-
uted 16 points and six assists in
the game.
We knew they were going
to come out and ratchet it up in
the second half, and they did,
San Diego coach Bill Grier said.
Down the stretch, our guys
dug in and made the plays they
needed to make to win the game.
Were proud of how they fought
today.
The Cougars started the game
slowly, missing six straight shots
including ve layups right under
the basket near the beginning of
the game. They shot just 16.7 per-
cent from beyond the arc in the
rst half. San Diego was able to
capitalize on seven Cougar turn-
overs, turning them into eight
points en route to an 11-point lead.
Despite the slow start, BYU
started the second half fast,
making their rst four shots and
going on a 123 run to take a two-
point lead. From that point on, the
game went back and forth, as nei-
ther team held more than a four-
point lead until late in the game.
Defensively, we were way
more aggressive in the second
half, Rose said. That led to some
baskets in transition, and we got
some energy. We were quicker to
the ball, and rebounded better.
But when it came down to big
possessions, we had empty pos-
sessions. Those are opportuni-
ties you can build your lead and
increase your condence. San
Diego was extremely aggressive
and they made big plays. We just
werent able to overcome it.
Even though Dee made most
of his free throws in the nal
minute, the Cougars still had life
thanks to a clutch three-point
basket from sophomore Matt
Carlino, which cut the lead to
one. After Dee made two more
free throws, Carlinos second
three-point attempt irted with
the rim a few times before nally
spinning out at the buzzer to end
the game.
All the credit in the world to
San Diego, because their game
plan and the way they executed
made it difcult for us to get over
that edge, senior guard Craig
Cusick said. We fully take all
responsibility for that, having a
sub-par rst half. That made it
hard for us to come back.
The Big Three of the Cou-
gars Tyler Haws, Brandon
Davies and Carlino combined for
53 of the teams 69 points in the
loss. Haws and Davies scored 20
apiece, while Carlino added 13
points and seven rebounds.
With the loss in the tourna-
ment, BYU falls to 2111 on the
season and any hope of play-
ing in the NCAA Tournament
for the ninth consecutive year
is virtually gone. However, the
Cougars will almost denitely
have postseason action during
the National Invitation Tourna-
ment later this month.
Photo by Chris Bunker
Brandon Davies shoots over San Diego defender Jito Kok.
Photo by Chris Bunker
BYU guard Tyler Haws tries to get by San Diego defender Ken Ranci-
fer during Fridays game at the Orleans Arena in Las Vegas.
Photo by Chris Bunker
BYU forward Morgan Bailey shoots over Gonzaga defender Shelby
Cheslek during Saturdays game at the Orleans Arena in Las Vegas.
Page 11
@UniverseLife
universe.byu.edu/life
March 12 18, 2013
B y S A R A H J A M E S
T
he Greeks idolized Hercules and Achilles; Amer-
icans look to the heroics of Batman, Ironman,
Superman and Spiderman. Superheroes play an
important role in society, but the reason why is
not always clear.
Several people have sought to explain the interest in superhe-
roes as they study complex nature of superhero ideology.
While studying comparitive studies in grad school,
John Darowski placed special emphasis on the role
that superheroes play in American mythology.
While pursuing his Master of Arts degree at
BYU, John Darowski placed special emphasis
on the role superheroes provide in his gradu-
ate thesis, Batman as American Mythology.
He believes superheroes provide certainty in
uncertain times.
Right now trust in the government is at an
all-time low and big businesses are failing, Darowski said.
Superheroes act outside the bounds of law and offer certainty
that someone will rise up and save everyone where government
and other institutions cannot.
Not only do superheroes give certainty, but they also provide
scapegoats for several societal fears.
Superheroes sublimate the fears and anxieties of the time
period, Darowski said. Society projects those fears and anxiet-
ies onto the villain and the audience enjoys a cathartic experi-
ence of seeing the hero overcome those challenges and leaves the
story with a feeling that individual and the worlds troubles can
be overcome.
Another factor into why Americans love superheroes is the abil-
ity to relate to and project into them as a form of wish-fulllment
fantasy.
In Superman on the Couch by Danny Fingeroth, a book that
explains what superheroes mean to society and the individual,
wish-fulllment fantasy is a powerful need and a main motivator
for reading ction. In the books words: IF ONLY THEY (who-
ever your they may be) KNEW THE TRUTH (whatever that
truth may be) ABOUT ME (whoever you believe yourself to
be) THEYD BE SORRY FOR THE WAY THEY TREATED ME.
Jacqueline Thursby, professor of folklore and English educa-
tion, believes that part of the reason for superhero popularity is
that Americans like imaginative entertainment.
They enjoy the suspension of belief and excitement hero g-
ures in lms offer, Thursby said. We like to see variant presen-
tations of familiar heroes. That is why we dont get bored. It is fun
and refreshing to nd variety in the familiar.
Thursby also believes that superheroes restore hope.
Everyone, at some time or another, needs to be rescued,
Thursby said. It might be rescue from illness, loneliness, too
much work, etc., and hero gures provide temporary escape.
Josh Melara, an avid superhero fan, believes that superheroes
represent a standard to strive for and make ideal role models.
See HEROES on Page 13
Life,
e
t
c
.
1962: Spiderman, created by
Stan Lee, rst appeared in Marvel
Comics Amazing Fantasy series.
Lee wanted to make a superhero
that was relatable to teenagers.
1938: Superman made his
rst appearance in Action
Comics, a predecessor of DC
Comics. It is considered the
rst true superhero comic.
1939: Batman was created in
direct response to Superman
during a superhero fad through
Detective Comics (now DC comics).
1941: Wonder Woman, the rst
prominent female superheroine,
was created in hopes that
she would be a role model for
young children. She made her
debut in All Star Comics #8.
1941: Captain America
was depicted ghting
Adolph Hitler in his
rst debut in Marvels
Captain America Comics.
He continues to be one
of the most patriotic
comic book characters.
Superhero information courtesy Comicvine.com
Culture Me Mine,
7 p.m.,
BYU Museum of Peoples
and Cultures
BYU attendance a tradition
for some LDS families
B y G L E N N R O W L E Y
Attending BYU can be a signicant
part of LDS culture so much so that
some families have spent generations
building their own BYU legacies.
Todd Hollingshead, BYUs informa-
tion manager, said that while the uni-
versity doesnt keep any statistics on
siblings or families who attend BYU,
nding families with multiple BYU
students isnt uncommon.
The other day I saw a tweet from a
student saying that all four of his sib-
lings were attending BYU at the same
time, Hollingshead said.
Shybree Richins, a recreation
management major, said her fam-
ilys connection to BYU stems back
generations. Richins great-great
grandfather was a professor when
the school was known as Brigham
Young Academy, and more than 25
family members have attended the
university since.
My parents met at BYU while
cleaning the Marriott Center, and all
of my siblings have graduated from
here, too, Richins said. Sometimes
I wonder what it wouldve been like
to go to another school, but BYU was
always my dream.
Richins also said the familys
shared experience as Cougars has
had a great impact on her familys
relationships.
I think it has greatly
affected our relation-
ships with each
other, she said. Its
fun because we have
all gone through the
BYU experience. We
all feel very strongly
connected to each
other and to BYU.
M e g a n
Andrus, a
junior from
St. George,
t r a n s -
f e r r e d
to BYU
f r o m
U V U
i n
2 0 1 1 ,
joining 20
other
family members who are BYU alumni
or current students.
Three generations of my family
have gone to BYU, and all my siblings,
their spouses and my husband go
here. So to be honest, I felt a little like
the black sheep of my family, Andrus
said. I just felt that I was somewhat
of an outcast because I started out
at a different university.
Andrus added that the BYU
connection has helped her
family create a special bond.
We all have something in
common, and there is always
something to talk about with
extended family, she
said. I think its
a sense of pride
for us, and I like
running into family on campus.
Rachel Morrey, a recent public
health graduate, said she felt there
was an expectation from her family
to go to BYU.
There was a lot of pressure for
me to go here, Morrey said. Mostly
from my dad, but my mom and older
brothers as well. When I didnt get
in my freshman year, I felt like
a failure. So when I nally
transferred, I felt more
acceptable to my fam-
ily even if it was just
in my subconscious.
I think the fact that I
graduated from BYU
makes my parents
really proud.
Morrey said her
familys devotion
to BYU is a sense
of pride that runs
deep.
My older
brother named
his son Jim-
mer, for good-
ness sake,
she said with a
laugh.
BYU students
combat boredom
through local
events application
B y P A I G E M O N T G O M E R Y
Two students from the BYU Marri-
ott School of Management are deter-
mined to stave off boredom in Provo
and they might just do it.
A collaboration between Julia
Knecht, an information systems grad-
uate student, and Tanner Rhodes, a
business strategy major, resulted
in Planimal.me, a web application
that helps people in Utah Valley nd
events based on their preferences and
interests. The application is set to be
released this month.
Rhodes said the concept behind
Planimal.me had been oating in his
head for nearly two years as he experi-
enced a recurring weekend scenario.
You try to get together with your
friends, you have some free time Fri-
day night, you start texting and call-
ing people, trying to nd something
to do, Rhodes said. A lot of times,
you will just settle on something and
nd out after the fact that one of your
friends went to this amazing event
and you missed out because you didnt
know it existed.
See PLANIMAL on Page 13
Van Gogh to Play Dough,
10-11 a.m.,
BYU Museum of Art
Music Fridays,
12 -1 p.m.,
Education in Zion Gallery,
JFSB
Group for New Music,
7:30 p.m.,
Madsen Recital Hall
Samhara,
Nrityagram Dance Ensemble,
7:30 p.m., de Jong Concert Hall
The Magic Flute,
through Friday,
7:30 p.m., Captiol Theatre,
SLC
Cyrano de Bergerac,
7:30 p.m.,
de Jong Concert Hall
Barbershop Harmony Concert,
7-9 p.m.,
WSC Garden Court
Free unvr.se/YlZiLn
Free unvr.se/15Ap3vv
$12 unvr.se/PrGolN
$10 unvr.se/PrFfIQ
$19 unvr.se/Ziyldv
$15-$93 unvr.se/ZivbXf
&19 unvr.se/10mP0z
$5-$7 unvr.se/ZuqVSo
T
U
E
S
D
A
Y
F
R
I
D
A
Y
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
F
R
I
D
A
Y
T
H
U
R
S
D
A
Y
S
A
T
U
R
D
A
Y
T
U
E
S
D
A
Y
F
R
I
D
A
Y
LIFE CALENDAR MARCH 12 18
Photo courtesy Shybree Richins
For some families, BYU pride starts early.
WHY AMERICA LOVES
12 The Universe, March 12 18, 2013
Netflix, Hulu Plus or cable TV?
B y Z HA NNA MO L DAG U L OVA
If Netflix were a TV net-
work it would be the 15th most-
watched network in the United
States.
Subscription services, like
Netix and Hulu Plus, that pro-
vide on-demand streaming vid-
eos are increasingly popular.
Netix streaming usage is
exploding and is far, far bigger
than traditional media execu-
tives give it credit for, wrote
Richard Greeneld, an analyst
for the investment research
website BTIG, on his blog. Net-
ix had more hours of viewing
in October than FX, HGTV and
History and had more than
twice the viewer hours of CNN,
Discovery, MSNBC and BET.
Netix, Hulu Plus and cable
TV have their advantages and
disadvantages.
Netf lix is a subscription
service that allows viewers to
watch movies and shows on TV,
laptops or mobile devices. The
costs are fairly low: for $8 per
month subscribers get access
to hundreds of movies and
programs.
The Netflix database has
many different movies from
documentaries to TV shows to
foreign movies that are hard to
nd elsewhere. It is accessible
from a number of devices, such
as PS3, Xbox 360, iOS devices
and laptops. Although Netix
positions itself as an addition
to cable TV, many subscribers
nd Netix more satisfying and
have cut cable altogether.
Kristen Reese, a psychology
student at UVU, watches Netix
on her phone.
I love Netix, Reese said.
I can access it from my phone
or watch it at home. It doesnt
have any commercials its
beautiful.
Lauren Wilkes is a Provo
resident from Roseville, Calif.,
who, for many years, had cable
TV and was happy with it.
I used Comcast for several
years, Wilkes said. And then
I decided to try Netix because
my friends told me it has all my
favorite shows. After a week,
I started to wonder, Why do I
still have cable? and if I need
it at all.
However, Netix has its own
shortcomings. Some people
complain that Netix doesnt
have many movies they want
to watch. The service doesnt
have a set update schedule, but
many users notice that updates
happen often, sometimes even
every day.
For those not satised with
Netix, Hulu Plus is another
option. Hulu Plus is a subscrip-
tion service that started more
recently. Its content differs from
Netix; it has different shows
and movies. Those who missed
an episode of their favorite show
can go to the Hulu website and
watch it for free. Access to a
plethora of shows, movies and
TV series costs $8 per month,
but in contrast with Netix,
Hulu Plus is ad-supported,
which annoys many subscrib-
ers. An advantage of Hulu Plus
is that it adds new episodes
almost a day after they were
aired on TV.
According to huluvsnetix.
org, a website that analyzes both
Netix and Hulu Plus, Hulu
Plus can be a better answer for
those who prefer TV programs,
since it has the current seasons,
while Netix usually has past
seasons but has a larger movie
database.
And then there is good old
cable. Cable TV is more stable
than Netix or Hulu Plus, since
it doesnt require an Internet
connection and wont cut out on
viewers during storms like tra-
ditional broadcasts. Cable TV is
the option for people who want
to know what is going on right
now cable TV gives viewers
an opportunity to watch many
live events and shows.
Dallin Gillette, an exercise
science student, prefers cable
TV even though he has Netix
on his phone.
Im not the kind of person
that turns the TV on, especially
during the school year, Gillette
said. But if Im on vacation, I
will turn on the TV to watch a
sporting event. I use cable more
often because I prefer sporting
events over movies. If I want
a movie, I usually borrow it
from someone because Netix
doesnt have all the movies I
want.
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Managing pregnancy and school schedules
B y E R Y N N K E R R I G A N
Wake up, rush to the rest-
room. The joys of morning
sickness. Wobble off to class
and sit uncomfortably. Head to
work. Come home exhausted
for a good nights rest.
Being a pregnant student
can be a difficult task, but
many are up to the challenge.
Laura Black, a BYU senior,
mother of an 18-month-old and
also 31 weeks pregnant with
her second child, described
her feelings of juggling preg-
nancy and school.
Its harder than I thought
it would be, Black said. I
dont think I couldve done it
at another school.
Black and other pregnant
students said dealing with
morning sickness and early
morning classes is difficult,
and they often have trou-
ble getting to early morn-
ing classes. Black also has
another child to take care of
while experiencing morning
sickness.
I cant be sick with another
child, Black said.
Despite the difficulties and
the desire to be a good mother
and a good student, Black is
realistic with her school work
and prioritizes.
I cant put as much effort
as I would like to, Black said.
I need to be okay with a B.
Finding time to do home-
work is not the only difficulty
associated with pregnancy
and attending school. For
some women, food cravings
during pregnancy have been
hard to manage with classes
and crazy schedules.
Kassandra Erickson, a BYU
senior who is 22 weeks preg-
nant, said having food crav-
ings and being so tired two
of the several effects of preg-
nancy can be challenging
while going to school.
I am always craving carbs
like pasta and things like
that and so going to school
makes it hard to find time
to give in to any cravings,
Erickson said in an email.
Erickson also said that
simply staying awake while
studying is difficult.
When I go to study for
an exam, I find that I am so
tired and I can just fall asleep
studying, Erickson said. I
have a harder time being moti-
vated to get my homework and
studying done. I fall asleep
studying a lot and then when I
go to take my tests, I dont feel
nearly as prepared as I should,
and I dont do as well.
Finding the time to eat is
also difficult, because hor-
monal changes in a womans
body usually amount to the
need to eat every two to three
hours.
It is hard
to make time
to eat, Erik-
son said. I
just make
sure that I
pick some-
thing up on
campus or
come home
and eat when
the time is
right. I work
at the MTC
at night and
will usually
not eat din-
ner until about 8:30 or 9 p.m.
But I just have to do my best
with the time Im given.
Stephanie Wilson, a BYU
senior who is 30 weeks preg-
nant, brings snacks such as
grapes, crackers, broccoli and
carrot sticks to school. She
tries to snack in classes where
she is allowed to eat. Wilson
also mentions another aspect
of pregnancy: a kicking baby.
Feeling her baby kicking her
ribs or stomach during class
can be quite distracting.
Now more than ever shes
moving and alive and kick-
ing, Wilson said. Anytime
she wants to.
Aside from all the morn-
ing sickness, tiredness and
food cravings, going to school
at BYU while being pregnant
attracts attention.
Its a good conversation
starter, Wilson said. Its
funny when people say, What,
youre that far along? You
dont look like it, to which
she laughs and says, Yeah,
I do.
Not only does a growing
stomach attract attention
around campus, but dealing
with the stereotype of being
pregnant at BYU is another
concern.
When peo-
ple accuse me
of being a ste-
reotype, to be
honest, I feel
like its what
I should be
doi ng right
now. Its Gods
plan for me,
Wilson said.
This is what
we ( Wi l son
and her hus-
band) were
supposed to
be doing, so if
I fit into a stereotype, then so
be it.
All three women emphasize
the importance of prioritiz-
ing, keeping it simple and not
getting too overwhelmed.
Its definitely possible,
Black said. But dont kill
yourself. Make sure you take
care of yourself.
The rise
and fall of
personal
blogging
B y G L E N N R O W L E Y
Personal blogging has
increased competition from
social networking platforms like
Twitter and Instagram, but con-
tinues to be a major force in social
media.
Karly Barker, a recent BYU
graduate who writes the blog
Good Cheer, said theres still a
place in the social world for per-
sonal blogging.
Blogs are the real base of
all social media, Barker said.
Theyre still the only place you
can use for longer narratives and
genuine storytelling. Sometimes
you just cant get your message
across on Twitter or Vine.
Barker said micro-social plat-
forms need to be used in conjunc-
tion with blogging, instead of
competing with it.
I follow all of my favorite
bloggers on platforms like Insta-
gram and Vine, and it makes me
feel even more inspired by their
creativity and lives, she said.
These other outlets actually keep
me up-to-date, and their posts can
intrigue me enough to read their
blogs. As a blogger, integrating
Twitter, Instagram and Vine
into your strategy can keep you
current but also continue to build
your readership base.
While the use of microblog-
ging apps like Vine has exploded
in recent years, junior Tommy
Dudley just started a personal
blog two weeks ago.
I love Twitter and Instagram,
but its hard to say everything you
want in 150 characters. My blog is
more of a process I might spend
a day or two writing, reading and
editing it, instead of the rapid-re
delivery of sending out a tweet or
posting a status.
Dudley also said he feels the
key to successfully blogging in
2013 is in standing out from the
crowded pack.
For some reason, everyone in
Utah feels the need to start a fash-
ion blog or a newlywed blog, he
said. The over-saturation might
be whats causing the decrease in
blogging over the past few years.
This decrease in personal
blogging has led some students
to abandon their blogs altogether.
Amy McDonald, an American
studies major, posted regularly
on her blog The Old College Try
but said she noticed a change in
the online culture after returning
from her mission in 2012.
Blogging was still really popu-
lar back in 2009, McDonald said.
But when I got back from my mis-
sion, it wasnt the cool thing to do.
I dont even read blogs anymore.
McDonald added that the
aspects of her blog that used to be
unique have been taken over by
other social sites.
The things that made my blog
stand out the pictures and the
creativity are what everyones
doing on Instagram now, she
said. You dont have to carry an
actual camera around anymore
and upload the pictures to a blog.
Its all instantaneous.
Photo by Whitnie Soelberg
Stephanie Wilson stays on top of her schoolwork and tries to keep
healthy to take care of her baby.
Photo courtesy Netix
People are increasingly watching movies and shows through subscribing services like Netix and Hulu Plus.

Its harder than


I thought it would
be. I dont think I
couldve done it at
another school.
Laura Black
BYU senior
The Universe, March 12 18, 2013 13
PLANIMAL.ME
BYU students start
plan-making site
Continued from Page 11
Rhodes said he envisioned an
integrated site, a sort of one-stop
shop appealing to a diverse range
of people looking to have a good
time.
I wanted to build a website
where anyone could create an
event, invite people to it, reach
out to people and create a social
pulse as to whats happening in
the city, Rhodes said.
He immediately thought of
Knecht, an Adobe employee who
was uniquely qualied to bring
what would become Planimal.
me to life.
Her programming skills are
excellent, so I reached out to her,
and as soon as I presented the
idea, she was on board, Rhodes
said.
Knecht created an original
algorithm that allows Plani-
mal.me to list events for users
based on their stated prefer-
ences, as well as other inferred
information.
You log in with Facebook so
it will pull your age and your
interests and then it will ask you
a couple more questions that are
relevant, Knecht said.
Through the support of Provo
City, Planimal.me is slated to
become the ofcial tool through
which local organizations adver-
tise and promote events, adding to
content submitted by individuals.
We dont want to scrape
events from Facebook, Knecht
said. Weve talked to Provo,
and theyre pretty stoked about
it. Theyve talked to the Down-
town Provo association, and
were going to make them venue
accounts so they will be able to
upload and post events.
BYU student Blair Harris said
an app like Planimal .me would
simplify her weekend search for
plans.
I usually look on Facebook
to nd dance invites, or a lot of
people in my ward will just go
to the dollar theater if we cant
nd anything else to do, Harris
said. I would be interested in an
app that gives ideas for things to
do because often I cant think of
things to do in Provo.
Rhodes said Planimal.me is
built to facilitate events of every
kind it doesnt matter whether
youre promoting an organiza-
tions event, or your own acoustic
jam session.
We really want this to be a
grassroots approach, Rhodes
said. You dont have to be Lady
Gaga. You can be whoever you
are big or small, cool or not
cool. We dont care what type of
event it is, we just want Plani-
mal.me to become a social hub
for Provo.
GOING ON
A MISSION?
Come in for a FREE
pre-mission exam
and get 10% OFF
any needed service!
ninth
east
dental
ninth
Short walk from campus
Across from BYU Creamery
and next to Subway
1234 N 900 E Provo
NinthEastDental.com
801
-
921
-
4332
Photo by Lauren Moran
Julia Knecht, a BYU information systems graduate student, created Planimal.me, a web application that
lists events for users based on their interests and preferences.
HEROES
Americas
fascination with
superheroes
Continued from Page 11
Superheros are strong, suc-
cessful, able to make the best
of any circumstance, they get
the girl, they kick butt and they
always come out on top, Melara
said. Thats like every guys
fantasy and, if I could ever be
even a fraction of that, Id feel
pretty good about myself.
Superheroes motivate Melara
to better.
Superheros like Batman are
especially impressive, Melara
said. He doesnt have superpow-
ers to rely on; he is just a man
who has worked very hard to
become what he wanted. It gives
me the belief that even though
Im just a guy, I can become
something great.
Melara also said that super-
heroes have helped restore his
faith in humanity.
Its exciting to see someone
who has separated themselves
from, and basically risen above,
society choose to remain a part
of it, Melara said. They are
completely free to do anything
they want and decide to put
everything they have into help-
ing others. It gives me hope that
maybe people like that are really
out there.
Superheroes have become
an important part of Ameri-
can society and its predicted
that, because of their adaptable
nature, they will continue to be
around for some time.
Social media presents chal-
lenges on how to present super-
heroes but also presents the
chance to do different things,
Daroski said. Superheroes will
most likely transition more onto
other formats, and the stories
will change slightly to reect
new conicts of the time, but we
will still probably always have
some form of superheroes.
Photo by Elliott Miller
John Darowski stands next to bookshelves of comics at the Dragons
Keep in Provo.
14 The Universe, March 12 18, 2013
SFC David L. Dixon
220 Wells ROTC Bldg
Brigham Young University
(801) 631-3659
david.l.dixon6.mil@mail.mil
There are more than 200
paths to serve in the Guard.
Find out which path is right for you!
C
M
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CM
MY
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CMY
K
Quarter Ad_Dixon.pdf 1 1/17/2013 10:29:14 AM



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Mormon Girls YouTube duo goes viral
B y G L E N N R O W L E Y
Among the rise of viral You-
Tube sensations are a pair of LDS
women shining the spotlight of
self-parody on Mormon culture.
Chelsea Wilson and Elisabeth
Evans, known as the Mormon
Girls, have released two comedy
videos and are lming their third.
Their rst video, Things Mor-
mon Girls Say, focuses on col-
loquialisms popular with LDS
females and has reached nearly
400,000 views in the last year.
Their followup video is a parody
on unique Utah names and has
received almost 300,000 views
since it was released four months
ago.
Wilson and Evans, who met as
the only two LDS students in the
musical theater program at Uni-
versity of Michigan, made the
rst video as a fun side project.
At the time, the Things Peo-
ple Say videos were a major trend
and had gone viral, said Wilson.
There are so many funny say-
ings within LDS culture that
people outside of the Church dont
understand, and it made a perfect
topic for a video.
Wilson said the overwhelm-
ing response to the video was
unexpected.
We thought the video was
funny but kind of gured it would
just be something to show our
friends, she said. But it really
took off, and before we knew it
we were racking up thousands of
views.
After their rst video had gone
viral, the pair set to work making
the Utah Names clip.
Wed been collecting these
really crazy names for a long
time, Evans said. The differ-
ent spellings and just out-there
names are something really
unique to Utah, so it was a perfect
follow-up to the rst video.
While the pairs videos have
been a hit among the LDS commu-
nity, there have also been unex-
pected consequences.
The comment sections have
unfortunately turned into a
place where people debate about
doctrine, Evans said. That
was never what we intended, but
people who have misconceptions
about the Church and our beliefs
are using the forum to start argu-
ments. Its not something we can
totally control, but we try to moni-
tor the space and encourage peo-
ple to see the videos for what they
are: humor and self-parody.
Wilson adds that the popular-
ity of the videos doesnt always
feel real to her since she lives in
New York City.
Where I live, Im not sur-
rounded by other members of
the Church, she said. But when
I came back to Utah for Christ-
mas, it was hilarious because I
got recognized several times, at
a concert I went to with a friend,
out on the street. It was then that
I nally realized that the videos
had had an impact within the
BYU community.
Chelsea Westmoreland, a pub-
lic health major, said she can see
why BYU students relate so well
to the videos.
We connect to the humor in
the videos because its centered
around a stereotype that were
submerged in, Westmoreland
said.
Westmoreland also said its
important for members of the
Church to be able to laugh at
themselves.
We are very different from the
rest of the world, she said. And if
our non-LDS friends were to hear
our jargon and to be exposed to
our culture, then they would prob-
ably laugh too. Lets be honest, its
pretty easy to laugh at some of the
stereotypes in our culture.
Photo courtesy Chelsea Wilson
The Mormon Girls parody
videos have gone viral among
the BYU community.
BYU students turn to comfort food
B y S T A C I A WA H L G R E N
Ending a long, stressful day
with a bowl of ice cream can
make everything better.
Chocolate, cookies, cake and
home-cooked meals all bring a
sense of comfort, but students
choose specic comfort foods
based on how they deal with
stress, rewards or how they
have set up routines.
Shaundra Barney, a sec-
ondary education major from
Orem, said she believes com-
fort food is an emotional pana-
cea for her life. Whenever she
has had a long day, she turns to
chocolate milk.
Its kind of emotional, Bar-
ney said. I know chocolate
milk will make me feel better.
While some students turn to
comfort foods to relieve stress,
others choose specic foods
because of memories of family.
Alyssa Shirley, a math educa-
tion major from Orem, said she
chooses mac and cheese as her
comfort food because of family
tradition.
It was always the meal that I
chose for my birthday growing
up, Shirley said. So if I have
had a tough day, I always go to
macaroni.
Paul Turner, a pre-business
major from Las Vegas, turns to
ice cream to relax after a stress-
ful day but said that, regard-
less of his
day, he usually has a big bowl
of ice cream around four times
a week.
Every time I am stressed,
I eat ice cream, but not every
time (that) I eat ice cream am I
stressed, Turner said.
For some, comfort foods are
foods that imitate the comfort
given by a friend.
Evan Johnson, an undecided
major from Freehold, N.J., said
his comfort food acts like a
friend.
Cafe Rio is like one of my
best friends, Johnson said. I
can always go there when I am
sad or stressed. If all my friends
are busy, I can just go to Cafe
Rio.
College can be difcult, but
food, specically chocolate, is
how one student likes to reward
herself after a project or test.
Mallory Millett, a human
development major from
Lindon, said her comfort
food is based on positive
reinforcement.
After a test, its a reward,
Millett said. I deserve some
chocolate. I dont get depressed
or sad really at all, so I wouldnt
say its emotional. When I have
accomplished something, thats
when I give myself chocolate.
Stress and rewards are both
reasons that students choose
comfort foods, but some stu-
dents turn to comfort food
based on
routines.
Kjersten Ness, a neurosci-
ence major from Missoula,
Mont., says she eats her com-
fort food regularly.
I usually drink hot choco-
late three or four times a week,
Ness said. I usually have one
every Sunday because its a
nice wrap-up to the day after
ward prayer.
Rickelle Richards, assistant
professor in the Department of
Nutrition, Dietetics and Food
Science, said its not abnormal
for students to turn to starches
and fat for comfort.
Looking at literature, you
see that most people turn to
high-calorically dense foods
when they are undergoing
stress, Richards said.
Richards also said that turn-
ing to comfort food isnt always
a bad choice, but consistently
turning to comfort foods could
lead to weight gain.
The occasional, I did a great
job, Im going to have some ice
cream or piece of cake, that
occasional reward is not nec-
essarily a bad thing, Richards
said. Where we would get con-
cerned, is where what you are
adding to your diet as a comfort
food is consistently increas-
ing your calories a day, that is
higher and above what you are
expending through exercise.
While comfort foods can be a
good reward system, Richards
warns that too much of a
good thing could be a bad
thing.
The other con-
cern I might have
is if someone is
consuming just
thei r comfort
foods, and not bal-
anced diet or other
foods, that might
indicate that food
is becoming a cop-
ing mechanism,
Richards said,
indicating that
food can become a
crutch rather than
a tool to intake
nutrients to feed
the body.
Photo illustration by Whitnie Soelberg
Alyssa Shirley and Shaundra Barney eat comfort foods after stressful days, while
Mallory Millett eats comfort foods to reward herself after a test.
The Universe, March 12 18, 2013 15
Internships: Great resume boosters
B y B R I T T A N Y C A R L I L E
The professional job hunt can
be tedious and overwhelming
for soon-to-be-graduated stu-
dents. However, a solid intern-
ship on a resume can place an
applicant a step above the rest.
From theater to accounting
to exercise sciences, there are
many opportunities that can be
provided in all elds through
internships.
Kyle Sta-
pley is the
i nt e r ns hi p
c o o r d i n a -
tor for the
Theatre and
Media Arts
Depart ment
at BYU. One
t hi ng he
noted is that
students often
dont realize
just how cru-
cial an intern-
ship is to their future career, no
matter what their major is.
The No. 1 thing our students
gain from an internship is the
networking, Stapley said.
Students underestimate how
important networking is to
their future careers. The con-
tacts you make on your intern-
ship will help you get future
jobs much more than sending
out hundreds of resumes or
going to hundreds of inter-
views. Your contacts will be the
best resume you could ever put
out there.
Many majors at BYU encour-
age students to seek out intern-
ship opportunities to broaden
their views of their elds and
experience real application in
the professional world.
BYU junior Shawn Fielding
from Vancouver, Wash., works
as an intern at Intermountain
Healthcare at Utah Valley
Regional Medical Center in
American Fork Hospital.
Fielding, a public relations
major, mentioned he was
interested in medical PR, and
his professor recommended
this specic internship to him.
Many of his BYU courses have
prepared him for his role at the
hospital.
So far most of the major
courses have all focused on
writing, making sure I am
good at public relations writ-
ing, which is what I have been
doing mostly as an intern,
Fielding said. I do a lot of
writing for internal magazine
as well as new press releases,
and my courses have denitely
over-prepared me for all of the
tasks I do.
In addi-
tion to actual
professional
experi ence,
there are sev-
eral benefits
and oppor-
tunities that
can come as a
result.
One oppor-
tunity I have
seen is that
many of the
people who have been hired at
Intermountain are BYU gradu-
ates, Fielding said. I know
there will be eventual opportu-
nities either with Intermoun-
tain or, because Intermountain
has such a great name recogni-
tion across the country, I know
that with this experience on my
resume I could get a job almost
anywhere in the eld.
Internship opportunities
are everywhere. Some can be
found close to home, and others
can send you across the nation,
as happened to BYU junior
Meghan Henry.
Henry, a Yelm, Wash., native,
found her dream internship
working for the World Triatha-
lon CorporationIRONMAN
Foundation in Florida.
I like to think I found this
internship through revela-
tion, Henry said. Like really.
One night I was going to bed
and a thought popped into my
head that I had to check if there
was such a thing as intern-
ing for the World Triathlon
Corporation.
Henry has participated in
multiple IRONMAN races and
is currently training for an
international IRONMAN in the
spring. With a passion for the
World Triathlon Corporation, it
is only tting that Henry would
go to work for the corporation
as well.
This internship will pro-
vide me with the necessary
skills in order to become quali-
ed for a specic position at the
World Triathlon Corporation,
Henry said. The biggest com-
ponent is creating connections
with other people and other
companies. Having these con-
nections will provide me with
an ample amount of job oppor-
tunities when the time is right.
When it came down to select-
ing an internship, one of Hen-
rys priorities was to nd one
that would allow her to do some-
thing she loved.
Do something you have
a passion for, Henry said.
Dont settle for mediocrity.
Whatever you want to become
in life, you can achieve. An
internship is the ultimate
segue for a future career.
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BYU photography professor highlighted
at Springville Museum of Art
B y S T E P H A N I E O R A N
Looking beyond ones own
small world and culture allows
people to better understand
others.
Val Brinkerhoff, associate pro-
fessor of photography at BYU,
traveled the world in the past six
years trying to better understand
other cultures. His travels have
led him to various ancient places
used for worship.
Brinkerhoffs interest in these
places and the symbolism and
cultural meanings behind them
is the focus of his latest exhibi-
tion at the Springville Museum
of Art, Sacred Settings, on
display until April 30, 2013. The
exhibition contains a selection of
black and white and color photo-
graphs, from Brinkerhoffs proj-
ect, that were taken in more than
40 countries.
As he traveled, he wasnt look-
ing for a particular church or
landmark but for sites and spaces
around the world that have been
created for the sole purpose of
worshiping a higher being.
Brinkerhoff decided to under-
take this project when he had a
desire to understand LDS tem-
ples as completely as possible. It
became the focus of his life and
research, and a passion.
The answers lay in the past, in
the ancient world, Brinkerhoff
said. I read hundreds of books by
skilled authors like Hugh Nibley
and then had a desire to experi-
ence these sacred places around
the world, not just read about
them. Going there and seeing
them led to understanding them
more fully.
Along with sacred places and
symbolism, patterns and general
architectural shapes behind them
have been a focus of Brinkerhoffs
photography for many years; in
the past six years alone he has
traveled to some 45 countries to
photograph these spiritual places.
I received three mentoring
grants and other funding that
allowed me to take students and
allowed me to study these places,
Brinkerhoff said. In those trav-
els I went to some incredible
places where these sacred places
are found. What you discover are
these patterns that unite most all
of these sacred settings.
One of the places Brinkerhoff
visited, Myanmar, led him to a
deeper understanding of reli-
gion and worship in different cul-
tures. Brinkerhoff spent 10 days
in Myanmar, previously known
as Burma, photographing the
more than 3,000 sacred sites that
were found every seven square
miles. Every day, as Brinker-
hoff described, was a new day of
searching and discovery that has
allowed him to nd more meaning
behind his quest in understand-
ing the LDS temples.
Once you recognize and see
these places and patterns, you
come home from these trips and
see these special patterns repeat-
edly from a visual perspective,
and the patterns lead to search-
ing back in the books, and you nd
meaning, Brinkerhoff said. You
research those patterns, and you
search the scriptures along with
answers to prayers, and you com-
pare what you nd in books, and
answers are given. After you have
all of that, then of course you want
to share it with others.
Charlotte Martell, a pre-acting
major from Portland, Ore., likes
the connection between religion
and culture that Brinkerhoffs
photography displays.
I think its really cool; hes
inspiring others to do their own
search, Martell said. It shows
both religion and history so its
both a connection to religion and
different cultures and it shows
common threads there.
Some of the places in Brinker-
hoffs photographs are well-
known for their religious
signicance Stonehenge, Giza,
Paris while others include reli-
gious sites obscure to viewers.
However, Ashlee Whitaker,
associate curator at the Spring-
ville Museum of Art, explained
the common tie among the images.
(Brinkerhoff) is opening up
whole new layers of understand-
ing in terms of what these sites
mean and what sacred means,
Whitaker said. Val (Brinkerhoff)
is very focused on helping edu-
cate viewers about those things;
he wants to share his vision with
everyone. Its a fabulous cultural
and religious experience to spend
time with his photographs and
understanding them.
Photo courtesy Val Brinkerhoff
Val Brinkerhoff traveled the world in the last six years capturing
images of various places of worship like this one near Parawan Gap
in Southern Utah.

Your contacts will


be the best resume
you could ever
put out there.
Kyle Stapley
Internship coordinator
3 5 8 7 2 4 1 9 6
6 4 1 8 9 3 7 2 5
2 7 9 1 6 5 3 8 4
7 3 6 5 4 8 2 1 9
4 9 2 3 1 6 8 5 7
8 1 5 9 7 2 4 6 3
5 8 4 2 3 9 6 7 1
9 6 7 4 8 1 5 3 2
1 2 3 6 5 7 9 4 8
Puzzle 1: Easy
5 4 9 2 6 7 8 3 1
1 2 6 3 8 4 7 9 5
3 7 8 5 9 1 2 4 6
4 1 3 6 2 5 9 7 8
6 8 7 1 4 9 3 5 2
9 5 2 7 3 8 1 6 4
7 6 5 8 1 3 4 2 9
8 3 4 9 5 2 6 1 7
2 9 1 4 7 6 5 8 3
Puzzle 6: Very Hard
5 8 4 2 9 3 6 1 7
6 7 3 5 8 1 2 9 4
9 1 2 4 6 7 8 3 5
7 6 8 9 2 5 1 4 3
1 4 5 6 3 8 9 7 2
2 3 9 7 1 4 5 6 8
3 9 7 8 5 6 4 2 1
4 5 6 1 7 2 3 8 9
8 2 1 3 4 9 7 5 6
Puzzle 5: Hard
7 3 1 8 6 4 2 9 5
5 8 2 7 9 1 6 3 4
6 9 4 5 3 2 7 8 1
8 7 6 1 2 9 5 4 3
9 1 5 3 4 7 8 2 6
2 4 3 6 5 8 9 1 7
1 5 8 9 7 3 4 6 2
3 2 7 4 8 6 1 5 9
4 6 9 2 1 5 3 7 8
Puzzle 4: Medium/Hard
5 3 8 6 1 9 7 4 2
2 7 9 3 4 8 5 6 1
1 6 4 2 5 7 8 3 9
6 4 1 5 7 2 9 8 3
7 5 2 8 9 3 4 1 6
8 9 3 1 6 4 2 7 5
3 8 5 4 2 1 6 9 7
4 2 7 9 3 6 1 5 8
9 1 6 7 8 5 3 2 4
Puzzle 3: Medium
1 5 2 7 8 3 6 9 4
9 3 6 2 4 5 7 8 1
8 7 4 6 9 1 2 5 3
2 6 8 3 7 9 4 1 5
3 1 5 8 2 4 9 6 7
4 9 7 5 1 6 8 3 2
5 4 3 9 6 2 1 7 8
6 8 1 4 5 7 3 2 9
7 2 9 1 3 8 5 4 6
Puzzle 2: Moderate
8 The Daily Universe, Tuesday, April 24, 2012
Puzzles
[ & Comics ]
Sudoku
Continued from Page 7
Dr. Syed Nabi, a doctor at the
Sleep Institute of Utah in Ogden,
treats individuals who have or
may have a sleep disorder.
You have to figure out where
[the symptoms] are coming
from, Nabi said. Its like a head-
ache.
Similar to a headache, the
symptoms could come from a
number of different stressors in
the persons life.
Dr. Nabi meets with his pa-
tients and asks them questions
about their symptoms. If he sus-
pects an issue with the patients
sleep, he will order a sleep study.
This study evaluates the person
while he or she is sleeping and
measures brain activity.
Jared Facer, a senior major-
ing in international studies at
BYU-Hawaii, has the most severe
form of sleep insomnia. Facer, of
San Clemente Calif., served as a
missionary in Colorado Springs,
Colo., where he received his diag-
nosis. According to doctors, his
insomnia was triggered by high
elevation. After staying awake
for seven days, he was honorably
released from his mission. Five
years later, doctors are still un-
able to help him sleep.
I sleep maybe six hours a
week, he said. My body func-
tions on about two hours of sleep
[a night]. Ive been on every type
of medication, but nothing will
work.
Since the time most people
spend sleeping is time Facer can
use to his advantage, he said he
tries to be productive.
I work a lot, he said. I do a
lot of pondering and scripture
reading. Isaiah is not as boring
as people told me it was.
Sara Michael, a junior major-
ing in public relations, also be-
lieves she has a sleep disorder,
though she has not been diag-
nosed.
A lot of times when Im sleep-
ing, I wake up and think my
dream is still happening, she
said. My dreams are really
crazy.
At times, she dreams a family
member is in danger or someone
dangerous is in her room. She
wakes up and acts how she would
if the event was happening, at
times creating a comical situation.
Michael said her vivid dreams
can affect her sleep because she
still thinks about them, even af-
ter she is awake and knows it was
a dream.
Sometimes [when I am dream-
ing] I want to stop the dream, but
I cant, she said.
To fall back asleep, she listens
to music or lies in bed quietly.
Michael believes her active
dreams could be caused by stress
because they often occur when
she is in a new environment or
with new people.
While these two students have
rather severe cases of sleep dis-
orders, many Americans have
problems sleeping, including
BYU students. Those experienc-
ing symptoms can receive help
on campus from Biofeedback
Services in the Wilkinson Stu-
dent Center.
Barbara Morrell is a clinical
professor at the Counseling and
Career Center and coordinator
of Stress Management and Bio-
feedback Services.
We use biofeedback to help
people become aware of stress in
the body and where theyre hold-
ing the stress and tension and
then to learn to relax it, she said.
While Biofeedback Services
does not treat diagnosed medical
conditions, it is designed to help
relieve stress and tension, often
alleviating common sleep disor-
der symptoms.
One of the ways that stress
impacts sleep is that our brain
waves are different speeds, de-
pending on what were doing,
Morrell said. Our brains are
fast for thinking and doing and
very slow for sleeping. If we are
stressed and our mind is racing,
it is very tough for our minds to
slow down enough to sleep.
Biofeedback Services focuses
on relaxation training. Anyone
seeking help with relaxation
techniques can either schedule
an appointment with Biofeed-
back Services or visit the web-
site, caps.byu.edu/biofeedback-
and-stress-management, where
downloadable relaxation re-
cordings are available as well
as information on ways to sleep
better.
SLEEP
Lack of sleep
can be harmful
B y S A R A H S H E P H E R D
What started as an idea for a
simple Christmas gift, turned
into something Harry Potter
fans around the world could
enjoy year round.
In 2008, with Christmas just
around the corner, Sara Anst-
ed, a BYU graduate, was strug-
gling to think of a present for
her sisters. Knowing their love
for Harry Potter, Ansted went
online to find affordable, au-
thentic looking wands, but was
disappointed to find the wands
cost more than $70.
Ansted decided to try her
hand at whittling and made her
own Harry Potter wands.
I got some wooden dowels
from the BYU Bookstore and
said to myself, Ok lets see what
happens, she said.
Two years after Ansted made
her first wands she decided to
sell them online. She made
a store on Etsy.com and was
pleasantly surprised to see
people all over the world want-
ed to buy her wands. The wands
cost up to $18 and have been
purchased by people in Brazil,
Spain, England, Australia, Po-
land, Canada and Italy.
Stacy Julin, Ansteds co-
worker in the circulation de-
partment at the Provo City Li-
brary, purchased The wands as
birthday presents for her three
sons. She was impressed by the
workmanship and price.
Each wand is unique and re-
ally authentic looking, Julin
said. Ive seen other wands for
sale at craft sales and farmers
markets, but they are priced
much higher, and I like Saras
Wands better. My kids just de-
scribe them as awesome.
Ansteds wands can be found
online by visiting Etsy.com
and searching Embershad-
eDragon.
B y J E F F F I N L E Y
Students with Provo in their
rearview mirror are missing out
during spring term.
The well-kept secret of spring
term is full of warm weather ac-
tivities, like river rafting and re-
cord-setting water balloon ghts,
that would be simply miserable in
the middle of December.
The worlds largest water bal-
loon ght in Summer 2010 was
hosted by BYUSA, BYUs student
service association, with almost
4,000 students and more than
120,000 water balloons.
While campus activities are
scaled down during spring term,
there is still plenty to do. Clubs
and other student groups, such as
the popular Laugh Out Loud com-
edy troupe, also hold activities. Be
sure to check the events calendar
on The Universe website for up-
dates and more information.
For those seeking a spiritual
boost, devotionals and forums
also continue during spring term.
Students who have purchased
an All Sport Pass and want to
watch a good sporting event can
enjoy baseball and softball games,
as well as tennis matches and
track and eld competitions.
Steven Leyland, a pre-business
major, said campus is less crowd-
ed during spring term, which is a
potential benet.
Campus is more freed up, Ley-
land said. There isnt all the foot
trafc where you cant get to class
on time because youre bumping
into people.
In a poll done by The Universe,
71 percent of students who partici-
pated said they do not take classes
during spring or summer terms.
Milanne Carpenter, a nursing
major, said even though classes
are hard, studying for nals is
easier because the course takes
place over a shorter period.
Although it was intense, a lot of
the teachers are pretty laid back,
Carpenter said. And I like that I
only have to remember material
from two months ago instead of
four months ago.
Another benet of being on cam-
pus during the summer months
is the weather. With warm spring
temperatures, many students en-
joy being outside to throw a fris-
bee around or just to take a break
between classes.
When youre coming out of
classes you can go sit on a bench
and it isnt cold, Leyland said.
David Bracero, a geography
major, summed up his favorite
things about spring term in one
sentence.
Smaller class sizes, not as
many credits, better parking and
good weather, Bracero said.
B y K R I S T A R O Y
There is a tarp tucked under the
bed, with a sleeping bag stacked on
top, seeming anxious and ready to
go.
Their owner, Kim Stevens, a se-
nior from Colorado Springs study-
ing mechanical engineering, puts
them to good use. Last summer she
set a goal to never spend Friday
night in her bed.
I was thinking of things I want-
ed to do that summer and realized
there was no reason I shouldnt be
camping every Friday night, she
said.
Stevens camping streak lasted
from the start of summer into
the Fridays of fall, and she even
camped during winter semester.
In January, my roommates and
I went to Goblin Valley thinking
we would get warm weather, but
it got down to three degrees Fahr-
enheit, Stevens said. We didnt
sleep much, but it was still fun.
Scott Jackson, a junior from Ev-
erett, Wash. studying mechanical
engineering, found inspiration in
Stevens weekend hobby.
Our group just went out and did
something no one else was doing,
and it didnt need to be planned,
he said.
Stevens agrees and said this
hobby teaches her to live off the
bare necessities.
I bring a tarp, sleeping bag,
sometimes a hammock and run-
ning shoes, Stevens said. Theres
nothing better than rolling out of
a sleeping bag and running in the
Saturday air when everyone else
in Provo is still sleeping in their
beds.
Stevens and her outdoorsy atti-
tude will keep her out of her bed
again every Friday night this sum-
mer.
Life is too short to spend it
sleeping in your bed, she said.
Camping keeps
Friday nights fun
Spring is in the air
Handmade wands
make unique gifts
Photo by Chris Bunker
Tulips blooming all across BYU campus are colorful signs of spring.
Photo by Krista Roy
Kim Stevens, Krista Roy, Mackenzie Gregerson and Jenny Stevens hunker
down in sleeping bags during a Friday night camping trip.
Photo by Sarah Shepherd
Sara Anstead whittles Harry Potter-inspired wands to sell on Etsy.
5 1 2 6 4 8 3 7 9
9 7 4 3 1 2 6 8 5
3 8 6 7 5 9 1 2 4
6 5 8 4 3 1 7 9 2
7 9 1 5 2 6 8 4 3
2 4 3 8 9 7 5 6 1
1 3 7 9 6 4 2 5 8
4 6 5 2 8 3 9 1 7
8 2 9 1 7 5 4 3 6
Puzzle 1: Easy
5 8 3 4 9 6 1 2 7
4 6 1 8 7 2 3 9 5
9 2 7 1 3 5 8 4 6
7 1 6 5 2 8 9 3 4
3 4 9 6 1 7 2 5 8
8 5 2 9 4 3 6 7 1
2 7 8 3 5 1 4 6 9
6 3 4 7 8 9 5 1 2
1 9 5 2 6 4 7 8 3
Puzzle 6: Very Hard
7 2 8 5 3 1 6 9 4
3 9 1 4 7 6 8 5 2
4 5 6 8 9 2 3 1 7
5 7 2 9 6 3 4 8 1
8 6 4 1 2 5 7 3 9
9 1 3 7 4 8 2 6 5
1 3 5 2 8 4 9 7 6
6 4 7 3 5 9 1 2 8
2 8 9 6 1 7 5 4 3
Puzzle 5: Hard
1 5 7 3 2 4 8 6 9
8 3 4 7 9 6 1 2 5
6 9 2 5 8 1 3 4 7
2 7 1 4 3 8 9 5 6
3 4 6 1 5 9 7 8 2
5 8 9 2 6 7 4 1 3
9 1 5 6 4 3 2 7 8
4 6 3 8 7 2 5 9 1
7 2 8 9 1 5 6 3 4
Puzzle 4: Medium/Hard
6 1 8 9 7 3 5 2 4
4 7 9 2 5 1 6 8 3
3 5 2 4 8 6 7 9 1
1 9 4 7 6 5 8 3 2
5 2 3 1 4 8 9 6 7
7 8 6 3 2 9 4 1 5
2 6 1 5 9 4 3 7 8
8 4 7 6 3 2 1 5 9
9 3 5 8 1 7 2 4 6
Puzzle 3: Medium
6 3 1 7 9 2 4 8 5
2 7 8 3 4 5 6 1 9
4 5 9 6 8 1 7 2 3
7 6 5 1 2 3 9 4 8
8 9 2 5 6 4 1 3 7
1 4 3 8 7 9 2 5 6
3 8 4 9 1 7 5 6 2
5 1 7 2 3 6 8 9 4
9 2 6 4 5 8 3 7 1
Puzzle 2: Moderate
Sudoku
Solutions available at universe.byu.edu/sudoku
10
16 The Universe, March 12 18, 2013
Study Break
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& Provo Towne Center
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Weekly five:
Utah Countys
most overused
words, phrases
B y S P E N C E R M I N N I C K
Each community has its own lingo, and Utah
County is no exception.
The words found in Utah County range from
slang to colloquial phrases. From shortened
words to abbreviations to full phrases, the fol-
lowing are some of the most overused words in
Provo culture.
1. Totes
Shorten-
ing words
to fewer
s yl l abl e s
is a recent
fad. This is
ma ni f e s t
in exclama-
tions such
as adorbs,
presh, legit
and totes.
Sometimes
the short-
ened words will even be combined. For exam-
ple, when one is viewing a picture of a cat online,
one may say, Oh, totes adorbs! The grammati-
cally correct translation of the previous sentence
would be, Oh, that is totally adorable!
Lindsay Reed, an elementary education major
from Las Vegas, said she totes hates that word.
Oh my gosh, I hate that word, Reed said. It
makes me cringe and reminds me of something
a 16-year-old girl would say.
2. Sluff
Someone who is not originally from Utah will
probably not follow a conversation that has the
word sluff, but someone who grew up in Utah
knows that sluff means to skip school or cut class.
That doesnt even make sense, Reed said.
Ive never heard that before and that cant be
right.
Nevertheless, while students in other states
are skipping school, the students in Utah are
slufng.
3. YOLO
The recent trend of acronyms has only
increased through the efforts of texters and hash
taggers. YOLO is the modern version of carpe
diem and is often used by younger generations
while implying that being irresponsible is the
next big thing because you only live once.
YOLO is now part of the LOL, OMG and NBD
club.
4. Heres the thing
Are you paying attention now?
Okay, I say that, Reed said. I dont mean to.
I use it because I feel like it makes people pay
attention before I start a sentence. I will admit
that I have a dream to barge into a room and
scream, Heres the thing! and then follow it
up with a statement that will rock everyones
world.
Emily Brooks, an English major, agreed with
Reed and expressed that she believes this is an
acceptable phrase.
I think its great, she said. Everyone should
say that. If you want to be more attractive, this is
something you should say.
5. Oh my heck
Heck, along with many other culturally-
approved words, are used as substitutes for pro-
fane language.
When Melissa Prins moved to Utah with her
family two years ago, she was not familiar with
the LDS Church or the culture. She rst heard
the word heck while she was walking with a
co-worker who dropped a bunch of les. Prins
recalls that she heard, Oh my and thought
that the rest was gagging.
Heck? she said. I had never heard that
before. Oh my heck? That is not a thing.
Cougar Questions
What would you do if you found a
leprechauns pot o gold?
I would look around for the leprechaun
and, if he wasnt there, I would take a
doubloon and see if it disappears to test
the water. Then, if it didnt dissappear, I
would probably take some.
Ben Thornell
Philosophy
Bountiful Utah
I would travel back to Chile, where I
served my mission, and Thailand. Id
also help my friend with the start up of
her nonprot organization.
Melissa Jo Boud
Enviromental science
San Clemente, Calif..
Buy a car, Tesla, electric car. Donate to
charity, to schools, to the poor and to my
personal charity fund.
Austin Jones
Pre-business strategy
Denver, Colo.
Probably split it up and hide it through-
out the world as a treasure hunt.
Matthew Pearson
Manufacturing engineering
West Valley City Utah
For more cougar questions, visit
universe.byu.edu

Oh my gosh, I hate
that word. It makes me
cringe and reminds me
of something a 16-year-
old girl would say.
Lindsay Reed
Elementary education major
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ACROSS
1 Muscles
strengthened
by squats
6 Shul attendees
10 Easy-to-spread
cheese
14 Zac of High
School
Musical
15 Dont worry
about me
16 Course list
17 Coming on
to a patient,
perhaps?
19 Way off
20 Piltdown man,
for one
21 Deny
membership
to skater
Starbuck?
23 Agree to
26 Kedrova of
Zorba the
Greek
27 Genre that
includes
freestyling
28 Up time
29 Cyberspace
zine
31 Less-than signs
keymate
33 First name in
scat
34 Make my ___!
35 Shiverers
sound
36 Dictators
directive at a
dance club?
42 Seek pocket
change, say
43 Itinerary word
44 Close to closed
45 Taras Bulba
author
48 Marijuana,
informally
49 Seeker of illicit
48-Across
50 Hollywoods
Gardner
51 Cowardly Lion
portrayer
53 New York site
of Mark Twains
grave
55 Bad-mouth
designer
Chanel?
57 Mon ___!
58 Radio Citys
architectural
style
59 Strive for
medium quality
on this one?
64 Cheese that
doesnt spoil
65 Painter Nolde
66 Muslim
womans veil
67 Idiot
68 Onion rings,
e.g.
69 Potentially
dangerous
strain
DOWN
1 Proof letters
2 Area 51 craft,
supposedly
3 Part of a curve
4 Dance to Tito
Puente, say
5 Buttinsky
6 Give bad luck
7 Rock subgenre
8 Hit the jackpot
9 Toast word
10 Key using all
the black keys:
Abbr.
11 Go straight
12 Facing big
trouble
13 Moon of Jupiter
18 Suitable for
most audiences
22 Decorative inlay
material
23 First fratricide
victim
24 Nat or Natalie
25 Gelding-to-be,
maybe
26 Break between
flights
30 Fannie ___
32 Sunday hymn
accompaniment
35 2002 sequel
starring Wesley
Snipes
37 Mello ___ (soft
drink)
38 Budget chart
shape
39 City near Santa
Barbara
40 Teri of Tootsie
41 Ocean predator
45 Traipsed
(about)
46 City of northern
Spain
47 Often-removed
car part
48 Amnesiacs
question
52 Topmost points
54 Hades river of
forgetfulness
56 Command to
Fido
57 Editorial
strike-out
60 Give a ribbing
61 Spanish eye
62 ___ ammoniac
63 Geishas
accessory
PUZZLE BY WILL NEDIGER
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ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE
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17 18 19
20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31 32
33 34 35
36 37 38 39 40 41
42 43 44
45 46 47 48 49
50 51 52 53 54
55 56 57
58 59 60 61 62 63
64 65 66
67 68 69
R E D S O R C A S C A S S
A P O P Z I L C H A N T I
V I V A Z A P A T A V I A L
I C E S A W M A M M A M I A
D A D A L E R S
A B O V O O L I V E R
D O N O R M E R S Y V E S
E X C L A M A T I O N M A R K
N Y E T B I A S A E T N A
A V A N T I I N S E T
O B A M A N I L
A I R P L A N E F E R V O R
S L O E H E L L O D O L L Y
I B A R A N S E L T O G A
S O R E B A A E D E G A N
The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation
620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018
For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550
For Release Wednesday, March 6, 2013
Edited by Will Shortz No. 0130
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Chiquita import
8 Sailors heavy
jacket
15 1968 to the
present, in
tennis
16 Gathers on
the surface,
as a layer of
molecules
17 Small image
displayed in
a browsers
address bar
18 Quick break
19 Subject of a
2010 biography
subtitled The
Voice
21 Marie
Antoinettes
loss
22 Title boy in a
Humperdinck
opera
26 Forearm bones
30 Word before
and after
yeah
32 Whoa, baby!
33 It may have
one or two
sides
35 Part of a babys
daily schedule
37 Port ___
38 City thats
home to three
Unesco World
Heritage Sites
39 Tabloid TV
show co-hosted
by Mario Lopez
41 Atomic
42 Broccoli
again?, e.g.
43 Tale
44 Put on guard
46 Hollywoods
Roberts and
others
48 Part of P.S.T.:
Abbr.
50 Several Boris
Godunov parts
51 Lapsed
53 Back
55 Compact since
1982
61 Bordering state
64 Two
65 Line of
Porsches whose
name is Spanish
for race
66 Decorative
melody added
above a simple
musical theme
67 With 47-Down,
popular hotel
chain
68 Goddess with a
golden chariot
DOWN
1 Sockeroo
2 On ___ with
3 Gulf of Finland
feeder
4 Have ___ with
5 Unimaginative
gift, maybe
6 Sprang
7 Madness put
to good uses,
per George
Santayana
8 Nickname for
Haydn
9 First lady of the
1910s
10 Off course
11 Dangerous
family
12 Meal morsel
13 Type letters
14 Medicine amt.
20 Colorful fish
23 Country lads
24 Newsweek and
others
25 She was on
the cover of
back-to-back
issues of Time
in September
1997
26 Metalworkers
tool
27 Sweater
material
28 It stops at
Manhattans
Washington
Square and
Rockefeller
Center
29 Affair of the
1980s
31 Bygone political
inits.
34 Sushi fish
36 Part of the
Iams logo
40 Fraternity
letters
45 Side by side
47 See 67-Across
49 Youre
welcome,
amigo
52 Line that ended
in 1917
54 Consistent with
56 Leave rolling in
the aisles
57 Good job!
58 Ride in London
59 Rice-A-___
60 Talk show
times: Abbr.
61 Pal
62 Kapow!
63 City community,
informally
PUZZLE BY MICHAEL SHTEYMAN
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ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16
17 18
19 20
21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31 32
33 34 35 36 37
38 39 40 41
42 43 44 45
46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54
55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64
65 66
67 68
P A C T B Y M E H A L T
O V E R C R O A T U C L A
M E N U H E Y Y A H I C K
P E T E R O T O O L E D O E
O N E A C T E F R O N
M O R E S O L A I L A A L I
A T L I P O R I J N
I S A A C N E W T O N
A R N E T I E A R F
P A U L R Y A N S O F T I E
R I N S O S T U O N S
O L D I V A N K A T R U M P
P S A T A B O U T A C A I
O A T S T B O N E G A T E
S T E P S A N K U N E S
The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation
620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018
For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550
For Release Thursday, February 28, 2013
Edited by Will Shortz No. 0124
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Wines said to
go well with
meat
5 White-bellied
whales
10 Musical Mama
14 Each
15 Bubkes
16 Voting nay
17 *1952 Marlon
Brando film
19 It might hold
the solution
20 Arctic fishing
tool
21 *2008 Meryl
Streep film
23 Parent who can
pass on an X or
Y chromosome
25 Orioles and
Blue Jays,
informally
26 From the start
30 *1968 Mark
Lester film
34 Name on a
plaque, maybe
35 French seas
36 Part of fashions
YSL
40 It follows the
answer to each
starred clue
43 Medvedevs
denial
44 Skew
45 Blue Cross
competitor
46 *1972 Jack
Lemmon film
48 Atlas blowup
49 Harvard Law
Review editor
who went on
to become
president
52 Bubkes
54 *1980 Robert
Hays film
58 Intense passion
63 Tart fruit
64 *1969 Barbra
Streisand film
66 Letter-shaped
support
67 Lensman
Adams
68 Common
feature in
Roman statuary
69 Achy
70 Emulated a
lamb
71 Former New
York archbishop
DOWN
1 Shankar at
Woodstock
2 Like some
fails, in modern
slang
3 Bird of peace
4 Baden-Baden
and others
5 Seiji ___,
longtime
Boston
Symphony
maestro
6 Dead letters?
7 Tight-lipped
sort
8 Court
proceedings
9 Hoax
10 Chargers in
The Charge
of the Light
Brigade
11 Japanese
cartoon art
12 Connector of
stories
13 Fictional
Marner
18 Actress Pia
22 Daisy ___
24 Realm
26 Mideast oil port
27 Hardly
aerodynamic
28 Formerly
29 Watts
equivalent
31 Allow to attack
32 Silent film
effect
33 Letters on
brandy
37 Textile factory
containers
38 White-tailed
raptor
39 Game similar to
bridge
41 Many a C.E.O.
has one
42 Did perfectly
47 Batman
portrayer
Kilmer
49 Desert stop-off
50 A ring bearer
51 Loud, as a
crowd
53 Poker players
Uncle
55 Melville captain
56 99
Luftballons
singer
57 Lohengrin
heroine
59 Tedious
learning
method
60 Many a
YouTube upload
61 Gymnast
Korbut
62 Meg of
Sleepless in
Seattle
65 Big name in
jeans
PUZZLE BY DAVID STEINBERG
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ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16
17 18 19
20 21 22
23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33
34 35 36 37 38 39
40 41 42
43 44 45
46 47 48
49 50 51 52 53
54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62
63 64 65
66 67 68
69 70 71
I M P I D L E S D A D A S
N O R L E E Z A E R U P T
F U E L L E V E L C A M P O
E N T O M I K E H A M M E R
S T E U B E N S I D Y A M
T I E R E D P E R U S E
S E N A T S L I P O P E D
W H A T A T O O L
A R A L S U B S B L O K E
L E T S O N C L O N E S
A B E R A E I H A V E I T
M O D E L P L A N E E L L E
O X I D E F I R E D R I L L
D E R N S I D E S T N O L
E S T A S N A M E S E R E
The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation
620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018
For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550
For Release Tuesday, March 5, 2013
Edited by Will Shortz No. 0129
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Deal
5 Fine ___
9 Stop!, at a
checkpoint
13 Finito
14 Balkan native
15 Jackie
Robinsons
alma mater
16 It might start
with Starters
17 2003 OutKast
hit that was #1
for nine weeks
18 Bumpkin
19 Po boy?
22 Female
kangaroo
23 & 24 Like
Edward Albees
The Zoo Story
25 Teen heartthrob
Zac
27 To a greater
extent
29 L.A. woman?
32 N.L. team with
a tomahawk in
its logo
33 Notable 2012
Facebook
event, for short
34 Artist
Rembrandt van
___
35 In person?
38 Obama
education
secretary
Duncan
40 Draw
41 Chow line?
42 P.R. man?
44 Pushover
48 Detergent
brand
49 Apt name for a
chef?
50 Turn-___
51 Not funny
anymore
52 It girl?
57 Natl. Merit
Scholarship
earners exam
59 Give or take
60 Antioxidant
berry
61 Lucky Charms
ingredients
62 Steak cut
63 Scandal suffix
64 Rung
65 Went under
66 Quelques-___
(some: Fr.)
DOWN
1 It might be
shaken next to
a field
2 Johnson &
Johnson skin-
care brand
3 Tallest member
of a basketball
team, often
4 You make a
good point
5 Rush Hour
director Ratner
6 It has its ups
and downs
7 Tuna salad
ingredient
8 List ender
9 Come again?
10 Environmental
problem
addressed in
the Clean Air
Act
11 Rapper on
NCIS: Los
Angeles
12 Fooled
14 Like many
clairs
20 Guy in dreads,
say
21 Pickled delicacy
26 Way in the
distance
28 Stands in a
studio
29 Fourth-
anniversary gift
30 Donkey Kong,
e.g.
31 The Cyclones of
the Big 12
35 Overwhelm
36 Homeland
org.
37 Rainbow ___
38 Suitable
39 Harangues
43 Person in un
palais
45 Amazon flier
46 Cell body
47 Spots
49 One raising a
stink?
53 Tanks
54 Mamma Mia!
group
55 When shadows
are shortest
56 Sauce brand
58 Recipe amt.
PUZZLE BY JOEL FAGLIANO
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19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31
32 33 34
35 36 37
38 39 40 41
42 43 44 45 46 47
48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56
57 58 59 60
61 62 63
64 65 66
W I S E R G A S P S H U N
E L O P E O L I O A I N T
B L U E C H E E S E V A S E
R E A D S S T A T U S
T A M P L A I N Y O G U R T
A R A B T R U Y E S E S
C O S M O S I M H O
W H I P P E D B U T T E R
T A X I T A R G E T
F A R S I O U S A G A S
S T E A M E D M I L K S L O
T O P H A T L E I G H
O N E A H E A V Y C R E A M
P E A R A C M E K I L L S
S R T A N O I R S P L A T
The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation
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For Release Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Edited by Will Shortz No. 0123
Crossword
The Universe, March 12 18, 2013 17
18 The Universe, March 12 18, 2013
al fresco
Italian: in the open air (outdoors)
Avoid the possibility
of living al fresco.
Find your housing
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A friendly reminder from the BYU Off-Campus Housing Offce.
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Cinnamon Tree
A PA R T ME N T S
The Hale Center Theater celebrates personal stories from the Civil War
B y E M I L Y P A R K I N S O N
The Oscar-winning movie
Lincoln has renewed interest
in the Civil War. While Lincoln
was viewed by millions, one local
theater is taking a more personal
look at real stories from the Civil
War.
The Hale Center Theater Orem
is showing Frank Wildhorns
1999 Tony best-musical nominee,
The Civil War. Performances
run every night at 7:30 p.m.
through April 20.
The musical takes an intimate
look at the lives of individuals
from the Civil War era, using
journal entries, letters and
other primary-source accounts.
Neal Johnson, the director,
said the play interweaves real
accounts from real people who
experienced those events.
The plot, though not
continuous, leads you through
the various vantage points of the
three sides: Union, Confederate,
and slaves, Johnson said. The
show is mostly sung, and the
lyrics are based on those letters,
entries, etc.
Enormous loss of life often
clouds depictions of the Civil
War, but Johnson said the over-
arching theme communicates
hope and a love of freedom.
The events, though evi-
dently tragic, speak of things
besides the many deaths, but of
the motivations behind the cost
of freedom, true love and ght-
ing for truth, Johnson said.
As a director, I tried hard to
make sure that the actors were
believed as real people. I believe
that they are all deserving of that
truthful representation.
Amanda Crabb is a BYU grad
and faculty member in the music
dance theater department. Crabb
plays Mabel Cushman, a nurse in
the show. Crabb said the produc-
tion is unique because it incorpo-
rates real stories and real images
from the Civil War.
When Frank
Wildhorn wrote
it, he took
excerpts of real
journals, so a lot
of the song lyr-
ics are pulled
directly out of
Civil War jour-
nals, Crabb
said. Neal, the
director, also has
done research
and pulled photographs from the
Civil War. During some moments
in the show, youll see photo-
graphs of real men.
The musical has no plot line
but is a collection of vignettes
of different individuals. Crabb,
who plays a Civil War nurse,
said she did additional research
to make her character as real and
individual as possible.
The idea is that with these
songs, which are representative
of every soldier, we tried to make
them more personal to one spe-
cic person, Crabb said.
Bob Freeman, a professor of
church history and doctrine, will
be presenting an exhibit titled,
Inspiring Proles of Civil War
Soldier Saints,
on March 15 in
the Harold B. Lee
Library. Free-
man said expe-
riences such as
watching The
Civil War give
audience mem-
bers the opportu-
nity to remember
a war that came
at a high price
for the American people.
I think it is terribly impor-
tant to preserve this history,
Freeman said, As we do, three
things happen. First, we become
educated to the realities of war.
Second, we pay tribute to those
who sacriced so much for us.
Third, we deepen our gratitude
for such service.
To purchase tickets for The
Civil War, visit www.halethe-
ater.org.
Photo ny Peter Widtfeldt
Cast members of the Hale Center Theaters The Civil War pose as Confederate soldiers.

The events, though


evidently tragic, speak
of things besides the
many deaths ...
Neal Johnson
The Civil War director
Next weeks theme:
College meals at their best
@scroggins253
#earlymorningclasses #ygram #tbt #morematurenow #living-
thedream #antiracism"
@smzeyer
Somebody got sleepy again on their way back from Park City!
Good day at @canyons resort #parkday #ygram #snowboard-
ing #noschoolfridays @daddy_wes