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Aramburo v.

CA, 101 SCRA 146 (1980) FACTS: The herein petitioners filed with the Court of First Instance of Albay an application for registration of two lots. The application for registration was opposed by the herein private respondent, Concepcion R. Pena who prayed that she be declared the owner of said lots. Said private respondent filed an action for reivindicacion with damages seeking to recover from the herein petitioners the two lots together with another lot of the same cadastral survey. As the latter lot was found to be in the possession of a certain Jose Atadero, the complaint was amended to include said new defendant. A decision was rendered by the Court of First Instance of Albay dismissing both cases. Private respondent appealed to the Court of Appeals. Respondent-appellant filed with said appellate court her appeal brief; petitioners-appellee did not file any brief. Consequently, on September 23, 1971, the Court of Appeals issued a resolution considering the case as submitted for decision without appellee's brief. More than seven years thereafter, a decision was rendered by the Court of Appealsin favor of the Respondent-appellant. Petitioners-appellees now assail the decision of the Court of Appeals on the ground of lack of procedural due process. They contend that they were deprived of their day in court when the appeal was submitted for decision without their brief. Allegedly, they were not able to file their brief because the respondent appellant did not furnish them with a copy of the appellant's brief. They further contend that they did not receive both the resolution of the Court of Appeals which considered the case as submitted for decision without appellee's brief, as well as the decision of said court and that it was only when the Deputy Provincial Sheriff of Albay served upon them a copy of the writ of execution enforcing the judgmentthat they learned about the same. Respondents filed their comment on the petition denying petitioners' claim of lack of procedural due process, respondents allege that the counsel for the petitioners-appellees were furnished with copies of the appellant's brief per registry receipts nos. 6724 and 6725 (Quiapo, Manila) dated January 20, 1971, which were filed with the Court of Appeals along with the appellant's brief and were attached to the rollo of the appealed case. ISSUE: WHETHER OR NOT SUCH REGISTRY RECEIPTS MAY BE CONSIDERED AS SUFFICIENT PROOF OF SERVICE OF THE APPELLANT'S BRIEF. RULING: We are inclined to believe petitioners' allegation that they were not served with a copy of the appellant's brief. For it must be observed that the duty of proving service of the appellant's brief upon the appellee lies with the appellant, the

private respondent herein, who, regretably, failed to comply with the same. Section 10, Rule 14 of the Rules of Court provides: "SEC. 10.PROOF OF SERVICE. Proof of personal service shall consist of a written admission of the party served, or the affidavit of the party serving, containing a full statement of the date, place and manner of service, . . . If service is made by registered mail proof shall be made by such affidavit and the registry receipt issued by the mailing office. The registry return card shall be filed immediately upon receipt thereof by the sender, or in lieu thereof the letter unclaimed together with the certified or sworn copy of the notice given by the postmaster to the addressee." Conformably with the foregoing provision, sufficient proof of service of the appellant's brief upon the appellees, which was allegedly effected thru registered mail, consists of: (1) the affidavit of the party serving, containing a full statement of the date, place and manner of service; (2) the registry receipt issued by the mailing office; and (3) the registry return card or, in lieu thereof, the letter unclaimed together with the certified or sworn copy of the notice given by the postmaster to the addressee.The records of the case, however, reveal that only the registry receipts allegedly issued by the mailing office were presented by the respondent-appellant as proof of service of her brief upon petitioners-appellees. Such registry receipts cannot be considered as sufficient proof of service of the appellant's brief. Registry receipts alone does not prove service by registered mail. The registry receipts are evidence of the posting of the mail matter with the post office of the sender not of the delivery of said mail matter by the post office of the addressee. Furthermore, the date of actual delivery to the addressee cannot be ascertained from such registry receipts. To prove service by registered mail, the registry receipts must be accompanied by the affidavit of the serving party, and the registry return card or the unclaimed letter together with the certified or sworn copy of the notice given by the postmaster to the addressee.