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Contents
Acknowledgements vi
Introduction 1
This version of Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone

chapter 1 Becoming a Cook 3

is dedicated to all my readers in the past who have cooked from the book,

chapter 2 Foundations of Flavor Ingredients and Seasonings in the Kitchen 19

chapter 3 Sauces and Condiments 43

chapter 4 Appetizers and First Courses Greetings from the Cook 75

chapter 5 Sandwiches A Casual Meal 105

chapter 6 Salads for All Seasons 121

chapter 7 Soups from Scratch 171

chapter 8 Vegetable Stew, Sauts, and Stir-Fries 213

chapter 9 Gratins Hearty Dishes for All Seasons 241

shared it with others, and occasionally sent that note that makes the years spent
writing and cooking unquestionably worthwhile.

chapter 10 Beans Plain and Fancy 261

chapter 11 Vegetables The Heart of the Matter 293

chapter 12 Pasta, Noodles, and Dumplings 399

chapter 13 Savory Tarts, Pies, Turnovers, and Pizzas 431

chapter 14 Grains Seeds of Life 455

chapter 15 Eggs and Cheese 497

chapter 16 Tofu, Tempeh, and Miso 521

chapter 17 Breakfast Any Time 541

chapter 18 Breads by Hand 571

chapter 19 Desserts Ending on a Sweet Note 605

Madi_9781607745532_4p_00fm-ch04apps_pi-103.indd 4-5

Resources 650
Index 651

1/8/14 4:32 PM

Common Variety Legumes


and Some New Ones
The entire bean family is extremely diverse, and thanks to gardeners, farmers, and seed
savers, a host of new beansin the sense of unfamiliar, for these are heirloomshave
surfaced. These beans include Jacobs Cattle and Good Mother Stallard, Christmas Limas
and marrow beans, Rio Zape, Black Nightfall and many, many more. Gradually, such beans
are being introduced to the marketplace via specialty stores like Rancho Gordo, farmers
markets, and seed catalogs. Seed Savers Exchange, for example, sells beans for eating as
well as for planting. Heirloom beans can be quite expensive, reflecting their rarity, their
appeal and the fact that many of them involved a great deal of handwork to produce. But
bean enthusiasts dont seem to mind. There are plenty of less costly beans available, too. In
spite of their dramatic markings (which unfortunately fade with cooking), most beans are
neutral enough that they can be used somewhat interchangeably. But when eaten side by
side in a comparative tasting, youll notice that there are differences in earthiness, sweetness, smoothness, or chalkiness of texture.
To include all the names of a seemingly infinite number of beans is still, years later,
beyond the scope of this book. Should you come across some unusual dried beans not
described here, just give them a try in one of these recipes, or just cook them simply to find
out how they taste. After all, all beans are always delicious with nothing more than a little
chopped shallot, fruity olive oil, sea salt, and freshly milled pepper.

Cranberry beans (Borlotti or Roman beans): Popular

Lentils: German brown (actually green), Le Puy, Pardina,

Fava beans (horse bean, broad bean, foul, ful, habas):

Lima beans (butter beans): A flat, kidney shaped bean

in Italian cooking, these beans are dusty pink streaked or


mottled with red strips. About 1/2 inch long, they are excellent salad beans or cooked with pasta. Sometimes available
as shelling beans in the fall in Italian stores and farmers
markets. Tongues of Fire is another cranberry-type bean.
Favas are large, flat beans that have a very distinctive, tart,
pungent flavor. (Fuls are smaller.) Their skins are very hard
and require a long soaking and, if possible, removal once
theyre cooked. Dried favas can sometimes be found without their skins, which will make your work easier unless
you plan to use a food mill. Favas vary in size from 1/2 inch
to almost a full inch, and in color from green, brown, or
purple to yellow and splotchy. They can be found in Asian,
Mediterranean, and Hispanic markets. Some people have
a highly allergic reaction to fava beans, called favism, which
is inherited and found among many Mediterranean peoples
and some American blacks. Its important that fava beans be
thoroughly cooked to prevent a reaction. Soak for 8 hours
and plan to cook for up to three hours, although the time
can vary depending on variety, age, and so on. Pressure cook
40 minutes to an hour, or slightly less if you want the finished
bean to be intact.
Flageolet beans: Though known for their refined elegance,

flageolets are small ( / inch) beans, which vary from shell


white, to buff to pale green. Theyre delicate, fine tasting,
and retain their soft colors. Use in gratins; season with fines
herbes, buttery sauces, or tomato.
3 8

Garbanzo beans (chickpeas): These rough, round legumes

colored interior; pronounced earthy taste with sweet tones.


Used in Mexican, Carribean, and South American cooking,
they have a rich, vegetal flavor. Black Valentine, an heirloom
variety, is exceptionally tasty.

are among the most useful. We know them as hummus, but


they can go into soups, gratins with pastas, and a great many
other dishes, especially if you use chickpea flour (besan),
which is used to make farinata, socca, fritters, and many
good things to eat.

heirloom variety, also called Dalmatian, both names being


for spotted animals. Calypso is another small black and
white heirloom bean with a creamy texture.

Bolita beans (pink beans): Small round pink beans; similar

Great Northern beans: Larger than Navy beans, Great

flavor to pinto bean, but somewhat faster cooking. They are


still grown in the Southwest.

Northerns are white beans with a more tender creamy flesh;


a good bean for stews and gratins.

Aztec beans: Very large white or purplish-black runner

Cannellini beans: Moderately large white kidney-type

Jacobs Cattle beans: Old-fashioned American heirloom

Anasazi beans: Small, purple and white mottled heirloom

beans found in the Mesa Verde ruins in Colorado and


cultivated in Colorado. Similar to pinto in flavor; slightly
quicker cooking.
Appaloosa beans: Small, spotted black and white beans; an

beans, apparently retrieved from Indian ruins in Aztec,


New Mexico. They cook to extremely plump size and have
an earthy flavor.

262

Madi_9781607745532_4p_c09gratins-c10beans_p240-291.indd 262-263

Black beans: Small, shiny black beans with a cream-

beans that are very popular in Italy. Excellent for salads,


soups, and pures, they have a moist, creamy interior.

Beans Plain and Fancy

beans that are kidney shaped, about 1/2 inch long, cream colored with deep red splotches. A full-flavored, tannic bean,
it stands up well to lots of seasoning.

red split lentils, and Black Beluga are just some of the hundreds of lentils we see. Some are firm and hold up beautifully in a salad; others break down quickly. They are quicker
cooking than beans, but like beans, cook better and faster
after even a short soak.
best known for its role in succotash. Limas, both baby and
regular-size ones, are starchy, have a buttery texture and are
great with butter and herbs. Often they cook more quickly
than you expect, so keep an eye on them because they can
quickly disintegrate. Using a pressure cooker isnt advised:
theyre particularly foamy and can clog the valve. If skins are
removed once theyre cooked, theyre even nicer. Fresh and
frozen Limas are pale green; they dry to white. Christmas
Limas, an heirloom variety, are large and pale, mottled with
purple-red splotches.
Marrow beans: Small, round white beans that swell to a

substantial-looking nugget. If carefully cooked, they make


a great salad bean; they do not taste like marrow, however,
as the name suggests. They have a creamy texture and are
delicious with butter, salt, pepper, and maybe an herb.
Navy beans: Small white beans that hold their shape well,

navy beans have good flavor and are excellent for salads,
simmered dishes, or gratins. They can be used in place of
flageolets.
Peas: Split green and yellow are what we mostly see.

Occasionally, one can find whole peas, which are more


cube-like rather than bean shaped. Theyre best known for
their roles in soups.
Pinto beans: The most popular beans in the Southwest,

pintos are small speckled beige and pink beans. Theyre


somewhat bland but delicious seasoned with nothing more
than a little salt, plus they take well to chile and Southwestern
garnishes. Used for refried beans and soups.
Giant pinto beans are a runner rather than a bush bean,
and are nearly an inch long. As with all runner beans, a gentle
cooking is preferable to the pressure cooker.
Pinquito bean: Similar to the pinto but pinker. Can be

used the same way. They are closely linked to Santa Maria
Barbecue. Often found in Hispanic markets

common variety legumes and some new ones

263

1/8/14 4:34 PM

Common Variety Legumes


and Some New Ones
The entire bean family is extremely diverse, and thanks to gardeners, farmers, and seed
savers, a host of new beansin the sense of unfamiliar, for these are heirloomshave
surfaced. These beans include Jacobs Cattle and Good Mother Stallard, Christmas Limas
and marrow beans, Rio Zape, Black Nightfall and many, many more. Gradually, such beans
are being introduced to the marketplace via specialty stores like Rancho Gordo, farmers
markets, and seed catalogs. Seed Savers Exchange, for example, sells beans for eating as
well as for planting. Heirloom beans can be quite expensive, reflecting their rarity, their
appeal and the fact that many of them involved a great deal of handwork to produce. But
bean enthusiasts dont seem to mind. There are plenty of less costly beans available, too. In
spite of their dramatic markings (which unfortunately fade with cooking), most beans are
neutral enough that they can be used somewhat interchangeably. But when eaten side by
side in a comparative tasting, youll notice that there are differences in earthiness, sweetness, smoothness, or chalkiness of texture.
To include all the names of a seemingly infinite number of beans is still, years later,
beyond the scope of this book. Should you come across some unusual dried beans not
described here, just give them a try in one of these recipes, or just cook them simply to find
out how they taste. After all, all beans are always delicious with nothing more than a little
chopped shallot, fruity olive oil, sea salt, and freshly milled pepper.

Cranberry beans (Borlotti or Roman beans): Popular

Lentils: German brown (actually green), Le Puy, Pardina,

Fava beans (horse bean, broad bean, foul, ful, habas):

Lima beans (butter beans): A flat, kidney shaped bean

in Italian cooking, these beans are dusty pink streaked or


mottled with red strips. About 1/2 inch long, they are excellent salad beans or cooked with pasta. Sometimes available
as shelling beans in the fall in Italian stores and farmers
markets. Tongues of Fire is another cranberry-type bean.
Favas are large, flat beans that have a very distinctive, tart,
pungent flavor. (Fuls are smaller.) Their skins are very hard
and require a long soaking and, if possible, removal once
theyre cooked. Dried favas can sometimes be found without their skins, which will make your work easier unless
you plan to use a food mill. Favas vary in size from 1/2 inch
to almost a full inch, and in color from green, brown, or
purple to yellow and splotchy. They can be found in Asian,
Mediterranean, and Hispanic markets. Some people have
a highly allergic reaction to fava beans, called favism, which
is inherited and found among many Mediterranean peoples
and some American blacks. Its important that fava beans be
thoroughly cooked to prevent a reaction. Soak for 8 hours
and plan to cook for up to three hours, although the time
can vary depending on variety, age, and so on. Pressure cook
40 minutes to an hour, or slightly less if you want the finished
bean to be intact.
Flageolet beans: Though known for their refined elegance,

flageolets are small ( / inch) beans, which vary from shell


white, to buff to pale green. Theyre delicate, fine tasting,
and retain their soft colors. Use in gratins; season with fines
herbes, buttery sauces, or tomato.
3 8

Garbanzo beans (chickpeas): These rough, round legumes

colored interior; pronounced earthy taste with sweet tones.


Used in Mexican, Carribean, and South American cooking,
they have a rich, vegetal flavor. Black Valentine, an heirloom
variety, is exceptionally tasty.

are among the most useful. We know them as hummus, but


they can go into soups, gratins with pastas, and a great many
other dishes, especially if you use chickpea flour (besan),
which is used to make farinata, socca, fritters, and many
good things to eat.

heirloom variety, also called Dalmatian, both names being


for spotted animals. Calypso is another small black and
white heirloom bean with a creamy texture.

Bolita beans (pink beans): Small round pink beans; similar

Great Northern beans: Larger than Navy beans, Great

flavor to pinto bean, but somewhat faster cooking. They are


still grown in the Southwest.

Northerns are white beans with a more tender creamy flesh;


a good bean for stews and gratins.

Aztec beans: Very large white or purplish-black runner

Cannellini beans: Moderately large white kidney-type

Jacobs Cattle beans: Old-fashioned American heirloom

Anasazi beans: Small, purple and white mottled heirloom

beans found in the Mesa Verde ruins in Colorado and


cultivated in Colorado. Similar to pinto in flavor; slightly
quicker cooking.
Appaloosa beans: Small, spotted black and white beans; an

beans, apparently retrieved from Indian ruins in Aztec,


New Mexico. They cook to extremely plump size and have
an earthy flavor.

262

Madi_9781607745532_4p_c09gratins-c10beans_p240-291.indd 262-263

Black beans: Small, shiny black beans with a cream-

beans that are very popular in Italy. Excellent for salads,


soups, and pures, they have a moist, creamy interior.

Beans Plain and Fancy

beans that are kidney shaped, about 1/2 inch long, cream colored with deep red splotches. A full-flavored, tannic bean,
it stands up well to lots of seasoning.

red split lentils, and Black Beluga are just some of the hundreds of lentils we see. Some are firm and hold up beautifully in a salad; others break down quickly. They are quicker
cooking than beans, but like beans, cook better and faster
after even a short soak.
best known for its role in succotash. Limas, both baby and
regular-size ones, are starchy, have a buttery texture and are
great with butter and herbs. Often they cook more quickly
than you expect, so keep an eye on them because they can
quickly disintegrate. Using a pressure cooker isnt advised:
theyre particularly foamy and can clog the valve. If skins are
removed once theyre cooked, theyre even nicer. Fresh and
frozen Limas are pale green; they dry to white. Christmas
Limas, an heirloom variety, are large and pale, mottled with
purple-red splotches.
Marrow beans: Small, round white beans that swell to a

substantial-looking nugget. If carefully cooked, they make


a great salad bean; they do not taste like marrow, however,
as the name suggests. They have a creamy texture and are
delicious with butter, salt, pepper, and maybe an herb.
Navy beans: Small white beans that hold their shape well,

navy beans have good flavor and are excellent for salads,
simmered dishes, or gratins. They can be used in place of
flageolets.
Peas: Split green and yellow are what we mostly see.

Occasionally, one can find whole peas, which are more


cube-like rather than bean shaped. Theyre best known for
their roles in soups.
Pinto beans: The most popular beans in the Southwest,

pintos are small speckled beige and pink beans. Theyre


somewhat bland but delicious seasoned with nothing more
than a little salt, plus they take well to chile and Southwestern
garnishes. Used for refried beans and soups.
Giant pinto beans are a runner rather than a bush bean,
and are nearly an inch long. As with all runner beans, a gentle
cooking is preferable to the pressure cooker.
Pinquito bean: Similar to the pinto but pinker. Can be

used the same way. They are closely linked to Santa Maria
Barbecue. Often found in Hispanic markets

common variety legumes and some new ones

263

1/8/14 4:34 PM

Beans with Juniper


This bean dish is truly simple and very satisfying. If you have
a sprig of epazote, add it to the simmering beans. There are
lots of tasty additions you can use to finish the dishcilantro,
mint, slivered scallions, spoonfuls of thick crema, cheese, and
so forthbut try the beans plain first. Their clean, uncluttered taste can be quite refreshing. Serves 4 v
2 cups dried Anasazi, bolita, or pinto beans
10 coriander seeds
8 juniper berries

Pot Beans with Crema,


Pine Nuts, and Mint
Beans have a subtle flavor that is brought out by slow, careful
cooking, leaving enough broth to sip with the beans. While
the pure taste of the beans and their broth alone is enjoyable,
there are several condiments that go wonderfully with beans.
One constellation includes the thick Mexican crema, which
can be found in Mexican markets (sour cream can be used in
its place), pine nuts, scallions, and fresh mint. Serves 4
11/2 cups pinto, bolita or pinquito beans, soaked overnight or
a quick soak
1/4 cup finely diced onion

1 small onion, diced


1 tablespoon sunflower oil
1 teaspoon ground red chili

Sea salt
1/2 cup sour cream or Mexican crema

1 teaspoon dried Mexican or Greek oregano


2 1/2 quarts water

1/4 cup pine nuts, toasted

2 teaspoons sea salt

Finely sliced chives or scallions

Sort through the beans, rinse, then cover with cold water
and set aside for 4 hours or overnight. When you start
cooking, drain them.
Bruise the seeds and berries in a mortar and chop the
onion. Warm the oil in a wide bottomed soup pot; add the
onions, coriander seeds, juniper berries, chili, and oregano. Cook over medium heat for 3 or 4 minutes, stirring
occasionally. Add the drained beans to the pot along with
the fresh water. Bring to a boil for ten minutes then lower
the heat and simmer for 40 minutes. Add the salt and
continue cooking until the beans are as tender as you like
themprobably another 30 minutes or longer at higher
altitudes. When done, taste for salt. Serve the beans in a
bowl with their broth.

Several mint leaves, finely slivered

Drain the beans, put them in a soup pot with the water,
and gradually bring to a boil. Skim off any foam that rises
to the surface; then lower the heat, add the onion, and
simmer gently for 30 minutes. Add 1 teaspoon salt and
continue cooking over low heat until the beans are soft,
another 30 minutes or so.
Once the beans are cooked, put them through a food mill or
puree them in a blender. Return them to the pot and stir in
the cream, adding 1/2 cup or more, as you like. Taste for salt.
Serve garnished with the copped nuts, chives, and the mint.

Lentils, Mung Beans, and Peas


LENTILS: Lentils can be red, green, brown, yellow, pink, and

black. There are many more lentil varieties in the world than
were likely to see at home. Most common are the German
lentils, actually shades of brown and green, but I much
prefer the smaller dark green French lentils from Le Puy.
They hold their shape better, which makes them ideal for
salads. They have a wonderful deep clean flavor, and they
look marvelous on the plate. French green lentils are available at specialty foods stores and natural foods stores, often
in bulk. Because they taste and look so good, theyre called
for in most lentil recipes, but brown lentils can, of course,
be used in their place. Of the more than 50 varieties of colorful Egyptian and Indian lentils, many are also available at
natural foods stores and Indian and Mediterranean markets. Those that are split cook quickly and disintegrate into
creamy-textured soups or purees.
Lentils are used endlessly in soups, often punctuated with
greens of various kinds. They make wonderfuI salads and
provide an interesting counterpoint when mixed with pasta
or rice. Split lentils are cooked into fragrant Indian dals or
mixed with rice to make a dish called kichuri, and Indian
cookbooks are a rich source of lentil recipes. The broth that
remains when lentils are drained for salads makes a homely
but invigorating drink. Just heat it up and add a teaspoon of
cream or milk to each cup along with some snipped chives
and parsley. If theres enough to serve as soup, include
some thinly sliced croutons or cooked rice. Although usually
thought of as winter fare, with the right seasonal accompaniments lentils can be enjoyed year-round.

Basic Lentils
This is the basic method for cooking brown and green lentils.
Serve them as a side dish or, keeping them slightly on the firm
side, use them for lentil salads. Warm lentils are delicious
served with olive oil or butter. Serves 4 to 6 v
1 1/2 cups brown or green lentils, sorted, rinsed, and soaked
for 1 hour
1 onion, quartered
2 garlic cloves
2 bay leaves
1 carrot, finely diced
1 celery rib, finely diced
1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt
Freshly milled pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil, roasted walnut oil, or butter
Red wine vinegar
Chopped parsley or chervil, for garnish

Drain the lentils, then put in a soup pot, cover with 6 cups
cold water, and bring to a boil. Skim off any foam that
rises, then add the onion, garlic, bay leaves, carrot, celery,
and 11/2 teaspoons salt. Lower the heat and simmer until
tender but still a little firmthey shouldnt be mushy
about 25 minutes. Strain and reserve the broth for soup
stock. Remove the onion, garlic, and bay leaves, taste for
salt, and season with pepper. Stir in the oil and add a few
drops vinegar to bring up the flavor. Garnish with parsley
and serve.

HOW TO COOK: While its not necessary to soak whole lentils

and peas I always dothey taste better and cook in 25 minutes. They take from 25 to 60 minutes to cook unsoaked. You
neednt be fearful about adding salt at the beginning of their
short cooking time. In fact, this helps bring out their flavors.
Like other legumes, lentils and peas need to be cleaned of
debris and rinsed before cooking. French lentils especially
seem to come with a good many pieces of chalky pebbles.

268

Madi_9781607745532_4p_c09gratins-c10beans_p240-291.indd 268-269

Beans Plain and Fancy

lentils, mung beans, and peas

269

1/8/14 4:34 PM

Souffls
Few dishes are as dramatic as a souffl. The whole dish swells like an enormous inhalation
then, within moments of serving, collapses. In spite of such drama, souffls are not at
all difficult to make. You simply make a stiff bchamel, beat in egg yolks, add cheese and/
or other fillings, and finally fold in billowy whisked egg whites. Vegetable souffls incorporate a cup or so of pureed vegetable into the base. They dont rise quite as high but are
still impressive. A pudding souffl is the same dish baked in a water bath, which tempers
the rise but also slows the fall, giving the cook some leeway for serving as well as the further
advantage of reheating. Roulades are souffls baked flat in sheet pans ( jelly roll pans), then
rolled around a filling and sliced or, if you prefer, cut into strips, stacked, and served like
a soft, savory Napoleon.

Goat Cheese Souffl with Thyme


Of all souffls, this is still my favorite. The enticing aroma of
goat cheese is very seductive and the little pockets of melted
cheese are treasures to find. Although a classic souffl dish
forms a high, puffed crown, I often bake this, and other souffls, in a large shallow gratin dish instead. It still looks marvelous, bakes more quickly, and ensures theres plenty of crust
for everyone. Serves 4
Butter, plus 2 tablespoons freshly grated parmesan,
for the dish
11/4 cups milk

3 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons flour
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
Freshly milled pepper
Pinch cayenne

Gruyre Souffl: This is every bit as enticing as a goat

4 egg yolks
1 cup (about 4 ounces) crumbled goat cheese, preferably
a Bucheron or other strong-flavored cheese
Several plump thyme sprigs, leaves only

508

Madi_9781607745532_4p_c12pasta_c15eggs_p398-519.indd 508-509

Melt the butter in a saucepan. When foamy, stir in the


flour and cook over low heat for several minutes. Whisk
in the milk all at once and stir vigorously for a minute or
so as it thickens, then add 1/4 teaspoon salt, a few twists of
pepper, and the cayenne. Remove from heat. Beat in the
egg yolks one at a time until well blended, then stir in the
cheese. Dont worry about getting it smooth.
Beat the egg whites with a pinch of salt until they form firm
peaks, then stir a quarter of them into the base to lighten
the mixture. Fold in the rest, transfer to the prepared dish,
then put in the center of the oven and lower the heat to
375F. Bake for 30 minutes or until golden and just a bit
wobbly in the center. Remove, scatter the thyme over the
top, and serve immediately.

Aromatics: 1 bay leaf, several thyme sprigs, 2 thin


onion slices

6 egg whites

Preheat the oven to 400F. Butter a 6-cup souffl dish or


an 8-cup gratin dish and coat it with the parmesan. Heat
the milk with the aromatics until it boils. Set it aside to
steep for 15 minutes, then strain.

cheese souffl. Omit the aromatics and add a pinch of


nutmeg to the base along with the cayenne. In place of goat
cheese, stir in 1 cup coarsely grated Gruyre.

Vegetable Souffls

Double Spinach Souffl

While spinach and eggs form a classic alliance, other vegetables make handsome additions to a souffl base too.
They should be cooked, seasoned, and finely chopped or
pureed before being folded into the base along with the egg
yolks. Add the cheese, whisk in the whites, and bake in a
6-cup souffl dish, individual ramekins, or a gratin dish as
described.

A spinach souffl is a fine supper dish. Serves 4


1/3 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese or fine dried
bread crumbs

2 bunches spinach, about 2 pounds, the stems removed


Sea salt and freshly milled white pepper
5 tablespoons butter, plus butter for the souffl dish
Freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 cup all-purpose flour

Asparagus Souffl: Fold 3/4 cup finely chopped asparagus

tips into the base. For the cheese, use fontina or Gruyre.

1 cup milk, heated


4 eggs, separated
1/2 cup grated Gruyre cheese

Broccoli Souffl: Stir 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard into the

bchamel base, then fold in 1 cup finely chopped cooked


and seasoned broccoli. For cheese, use 1/2 cup grated sharp
cheddar.
Shallot Souff l: When making the base for the Goat

Cheese Souffl (previous page), cook a diced shallot (or


3 sliced scallions, including just a little of the green) in the
butter for a few minutes before adding the flour.
Spinach Souffl: Cook a large bunch of spinach leaves with

the water clinging to them until tender, then finely chop and
season with salt, pepper, and a pinch of nutmeg. For cheese,
stay with the goat cheese or use Fontina, Gruyre, or cheddar. You can use other greens as wellchard and tender kale
come to mind.
Winter Squash Souffl: Fold in 1 to 2 cups pureed baked

winter squash (or sweet potatoes) into the base and for
cheese use fontina or Gruyre. Crumble fried sage leaves
over the top as soon as it comes out of the oven.

Heat the oven to 375F. Butter a 6 cup souffl dish or


shallow gratin dish. Coat the sides with the cheese or
breadcrumbs.
Go through the spinach leaves and throw out any that are
bruised or yellowed. Wash them well in 2 or more changes
of water until free of grit, then put them in a large pot with
the water clinging to the leaves. Cook over medium heat
until wilted, turning them with a pair of tongs to help them
cook evenly. Drain in a sieve or colander, pressing out any
extra moisture. Chop finely, toss with 1 tablespoon of the
butter, and season well with salt, pepper and a grating of
nutmeg. Set aside.
To make the souffl batter, melt the remaining butter in
a saucepan over medium heat, stir in the flour, and cook,
stirring frequently, for 2 minutes. Whisk in the hot milk all
at once and cook, stirring, until the sauce has thickened
and is smooth, about 5 minutes. Season with 1/2 teaspoon
salt, white pepper to taste, and a few scrapings of nutmeg.
Place the yolks in a bowl and whisk in 1/2 cup of the hot
sauce to warm them, then return them to the rest of the
sauce and stir in the cheese. When the cheese has melted,
stir in 1 cup of the spinach.
By hand or with a mixer, beat the egg whites until stiff, but
not dry. Stir a quarter of them into the souffl base then
fold in the remainder, just until no white streaks show.
Cover the prepared dish with the remaining spinach then
pour the souffl batter on top.
Bake on rack set in the middle of the oven until risen,
golden and mostly firm except for the middle which may
be slightly wobbly, 25 to 30 minutes. Serve right away.

Eggs and Cheese

souffls

509

1/8/14 4:40 PM

Pita Sandwiches

Supper Sandwiches

Freshly baked pita breadtender, pliable, and fragrant with the scent of wheatis one of
the most delicious containers for fillings, albeit a fairly fragile one. With its nourishing taste
and ancient feel, pita bread is worth making at home on occasionpage 598. Otherwise,
look to Middle Eastern and Mediterranean bakeries for fresh pita.

The following knife-and-fork sandwiches are fine fare for supperlunch, too, if you eat
at home, but theyre definitely not the kind to carry to work. These sandwiches are warm,
full of vegetables, and satisfying to eat. Similar to Italian bruschetta and, to a degree, those
homey American classics such as creamed mushrooms on toast and Welsh rarebit.

Unless its very fresh, pita bread requires some special


handling. Defrost frozen pita slowly, at room temperature
or in the refrigerator. If the bread seems dry, moisten it
with water, wrap in aluminum foil, and heat it briefly in the
oven. Halve and carefully open the pita. Spread the sauce
inside the pocket first, then fill and drizzle more sauce on
top. Dont put too much filling in the sandwich, or itll tear.
And most important, assemble it just before you plan to eat.
Moist fillings quickly soften the bread. Pita sandwiches will
tempt you to improvise, but here are some specific combinations that I enjoy. If you are vegan, choose your pita bread
carefullysome are made with honey.

Pita with Falafel, Tomatoes,


Tahini, and Lemon
This classic Middle Eastern combination is one of my favorites. Its especially good when the bread and falafel are both
fresh and warm. While falafel can be made by soaking and
pureeing cooked chickpeas, I use a convenient mix.
Makes 1 sandwich
3 to 4 falafel patties, made from a prepared mix
1 (7-inch) pita bread

Pita with Broiled Eggplant: Broil or grill rounds of eggplant. Tuck them into pita bread and spoon in Yogurt
Sauce with Cayenne and Dill (page 57). Serve with a dish
of olives or diced Preserved Lemon (page 70).
Pita with Fried Zucchini: Fry sliced zucchini in a little olive

oil in a skillet over medium-high heat until golden, and


season with sea salt and pepper. Dice a tomato and mix it
with a little chopped parsley, cilantro, and/or dill. Spread
pita bread with Tarator Sauce (page 59), add the zucchini,
then add the tomato-herb mixture. Top with extra sauce
and serve. v
Pita with Herb Salad and Pine Nuts: I like this best with

whole wheat pita. Make Herb Salad (Sabzi) (page 129)


and toss it with a few pine nuts or roasted walnuts. Line
pita bread with Tarator Sauce (page 59) and add the salad
and a few sliced tomatoes if theyre in season. Spoon a
little extra sauce over the top and serve. v
Pita with Chopped Salad and Hummus: This sandwich

is one of my favorite summer lunches. Dont fill it too full,


or youll have to gulp it down. Line pita bread with Spicy
Chickpea Puree (Hummus) (page 87), then add a little
salad of chopped cucumbers and tomatoes and drizzle
with Lemon Vinaigrette (page 164), or lemon juice. v

Yogurt Tahini Sauce (page 57) or Tahini with Lemon and


Garlic (page 59)
Shredded lettuce
Green Chile and Mint Salsa (page 90)

Make the falafel according to the packaged instructions.


Open the pita bread and spread a little sauce inside. Add
the falafel, then the tomatoes and lettuce. Spoon more
sauce over the top. Serve with a dish of the green chile
relish on the side.

Madi_9781607745532_4p_c05sandwich-c08stews_p104-239.indd 116-117

Sandwiches

Braised Spinach with Tomatoes


and Sauted Onion on Focaccia
Makes 2 large sandwiches
Olive oil, as needed
2 garlic cloves, 1 sliced, 1 halved
1 bunch spinach, stems removed
Red pepper flakes
1 small onion, thinly sliced
2 big squares focaccia, about 6 by 6 inches, or 4 large slices
Sourdough bread
2 small tomatoes, sliced
6 1/2-inch rounds goat cheese
Sea salt
Freshly milled pepper

Ricotta and Peperonata on Toast


Heres another way to use peperonata, the highly versatile
summer vegetable braise, or the Sauted Peppers on
page 363. Serves 4 or more
Peperonata, page 363 or Sauted Peppers, page 363
4 slices sourdough or country bread
1 garlic clove, halved
1/2 cup or more ricotta
Thinly slivered basil leaves, to finish

2 ripe tomatoes, seeded and diced

116

The basic technique is straightforward. Start with a slice of


country bread. Place it under a broiler or, if a grill is going,
over the coals until browned around the edges, crisp on the
outside, but still soft inside. Rub one side with the cut surface of a large garlic clove, perfuming the bread with its juice,
then brush olive oil on top. I often lay a thin slice of Gruyre,
parmesan, or fontina right on top of the hot bread. This small
enrichment makes all the tastes resonate in a particularly
satisfying way, but of course those avoiding dairy can omit
it. Then add vegetables, including their juices, so that the
final rendering is an exciting mingling of crisp edges with
soft toast, tender cheese, and succulent, moist vegetables.
All of these have a little cheese along with the vegetables
vegans can omit or replace with an ersatz cheese.

If youre using peperonata thats been refrigerated, warm


it up in a skillet, adding some water or a splash of white
wine to thin it and make a little sauce. Toast the bread,
rub with garlic, and cover with the ricotta cheese. Set on
plates, spoon the peperonata over the top, and finish with
the slivered basil.

Balsamic or red wine vinegar

Heat 1 tablespoon oil with the sliced garlic in a medium


skillet over medium-high heat until the garlic begins to
color, then add the spinach and sprinkle with salt and
several pinches pepper flakes. Raise the heat and saut
until wilted and tender, after a few minutes. Remove to a
colander to drain. Discard any juices left in the pan, add
2 teaspoons oil and the onion, and saut over high heat
until golden, about 5 minutes. Toast or broil the focaccia,
then rub with the halved garlic clove.
Pile the spinach on the bottom halves of the focaccia, then
top with the onion, tomato, and cheese. Drizzle with olive
oil and season with pepper. Broil until the cheese begins to
color in spots, about 5 minutes. Sprinkle generously with
vinegar, add the tops, and press down to secure them.

supper sandwiches

117

1/8/14 4:36 PM

Bulgur and Green Lentil Salad


with Chickpeas
Youll recognize some of the qualities of tabbouleh here, but
with the added textures and tastes of lentils and chickpeas. A
good winter salad when theres a dearth of fresh vegetables.
Makes 5 cups v
1/2 cup French green lentils, soaked for 1 hour then drained
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon sea salt
3/4 cup fine or medium bulgur

With Walnuts and Tarragon: Replace the mint with

2 tablespoons chopped tarragon. Use half walnut oil in


the dressing and add 1/2 cup chopped roasted walnuts to
the salad. v

Couscous with Bulgur


Fine bulgur, like couscous, can also be steamed, which
makes it especially light. If you mix bulgur and couscous
together, youll have something interestingtwo wheats,
similar but different.

5 scallions, including some of the greens, thinly sliced


2 garlic cloves, finely minced
Grated zest of 2 lemons

Couscous or Quinoa with


Pine Nuts and Dried Fruits

6 to 8 tablespoons fresh lemon juice


1/2 cup olive oil
1 teaspoon paprika
11/2 cups cooked chickpeas, rinsed if canned

This sweet and tangy salad is punctuated with succulent bits


of pepper and dried fruits. Serves 4 v

2 cups finely chopped parsley


1/4 cup chopped mint or 2 tablespoons dried
Freshly milled pepper

Cover the drained lentils with water in a small saucepan,


add the bay leaf and 1/2 teaspoon of the salt, and bring
to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer until tender but
firm, 20 to 25 minutes. Meanwhile, put the bulgur in a
bowl, cover with water, and let stand until the liquid is
absorbed and the grains are tender, 20 to 30 minutes.
Combine the scallions, garlic, lemon zest and juice, oil,
paprika, and the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt in a large
bowl. When the lentils are done, drain them and add them
to the bowl. Press out any excess water from the bulgur.
And add the bulgur to the the chickpeas, parsley, and
mint. Toss gently and thoroughly, then taste for salt and
season with pepper. Serve warm or cover and set aside to
serve later with a fresh sprinkling of paprika.
With Vegetable Garnishes: In summer, include tomatoes,

cucumbers, and peppers, all finely chopped. In winter,


toss with a chopped Preserved Lemon(page 70) or rounds
of steamed Jerusalem artichoke. v

11/3 cups raw whole wheat couscous or quinoa,


or 3 cups cooked

1/2 teaspoon sea salt


11/3 cups quinoa, rinsed thoroughly
2 large mangoes
1 jalapeo chile, seeded and diced
3 scallions, including an inch of the greens, thinly sliced
Curry Vinaigrette (page 167)
1/3 cup whole almonds, roasted

Bring 3 cups water to a boil in a saucepan, then add


1/2 teaspoon salt and the quinoa. Lower the heat, cover, and
simmer until the quinoa is tender, 12 to 15 minutes. Drain.
Cut the mangos: Stand each one upright and slice down
either side of the seed, which you cant see but which runs
lengthwise through the center of the fruit. Score the two
pieces, then bend the skin. Cut off the squares of mango
where they attach to the skin.
Toss the quinoa with the mangoes, chile, scallions, and
vinaigrette. Add the almonds last so that theyll stay crisp.

6 dried apricots, finely chopped


3 tablespoons golden raisins
2 tablespoons currants
1/4 cup pine nuts, toasted in a small skillet
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro or slivered chives

Tabbouleh
Tabbouleh should be so saturated with parsley that its moist
and intensly greenpractically a parsley salad.
Serves 4 to 6 v

Sea salt
Perfect whole lettuce or radicchio leaves

Cook the couscous or quinoa as described on page 495


or 472. Toss the cooked grain with 1/4 cup of the dressing
or more to taste, add the remaining ingredients except
salt and lettuce, and toss again. Taste and season with
salt. Serve warm or chilled cradled in nicely formed lettuce leaves.

Salads for All Seasons

Meanwhile, whisk the remaining lemon juice, the oil,


and 1/2 teaspoon salt together. Pour the dressing over the
bulgur and toss well. Check the seasoningit should be
lemony and very zesty. Mound the tabbouleh in a shallow
serving bowl and surround with the lettuce leaves.

Lentil Salad with Roasted


Peppers and Vegetable Garnishes
With all of its garnishes, this salad can make an entire meal.
Try mixing the lentils with 1 cup cooked pasta shells, orzo, or
riceits not only good but makes legumes more appealing to
those not used to eating them. Serves 4 to 6
1 cup French green lentils, soaked for 1 hour then drained
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
2 red or yellow bell peppers, roasted, and chopped (see
page 364)
Lime-Cumin Vinaigrette (page 165)
1/2 cup chopped parsley
2 tablespoons chopped dill
1 tablespoon chopped mint
Freshly milled pepper
2 ripe tomatoes, quartered

1 yellow bell pepper, very finely diced

lane sprigs. v

Madi_9781607745532_4p_c05sandwich-c08stews_p104-239.indd 154-155

Serves 4

Lime-Cumin Vinaigrette (page 165)

With Purslane: Toss the salad with 1 or 2 handfuls purs-

154

Quinoa Salad with Mangoes


and Curry Dressing

1 cup fine or medium bulgur


1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
1 bunch scallions, including some of the greens, finely sliced
3 ripe tomatoes, seeded and chopped
3 or 4 large bunches flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped,
about 4 cups
1/2 cup chopped mint

Garnishes
1/2 cup small cubes feta or goat cheese
2 hard-cooked eggs, quartered
12 kalamata olives
I cucumber, cut into short spears

Cover the lentils with water in a small saucepan, add


1/2 teaspoon salt, and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and
simmer until tender but still a little firm, 20 to 30 minutes.
Drain the lentils and toss them while warm with the peppers, vinaigrette, parsley, dill, and mint. Taste for salt and
season with pepper.
Mound the lentils on a platter and garnish with the tomatoes,
cheese, eggs, olives, and cucumber. Serve warm or cold.

6 tablespoons olive oil


1/2 teaspoon sea salt
Small Bibb or romaine lettuce leaves

Put the bulgur in a bowl, cover it with water, and let stand
until the water is absorbed and the grains are soft, about
30 minutes. Press out any excess liquid, return the bulgur
to the bowl, and toss with half of the lemon juice, the scallions, tomatoes, parsley, and mint. Let stand again for 20 to
30 minutes for the grains to soften fully.
hearty salads based on pasta, grains, and beans

155

1/8/14 4:36 PM

Copyright 2014 by Deborah Madison


Jacket illustrations copyright 2014 by Yana Beylinson
All rights reserved.
Published in the United States by Ten Speed Press,
an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group,
a division of Random House LLC,
a Penguin Random House Company, New York.
www.crownpublishing.com
www.tenspeed.com
Ten Speed Press and the Ten Speed Press colophon are
registered trademarks of Random House LLC
Originally published in hardcover in slightly different form as
Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone in 1997, 2007
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Madison, Deborah.
[Vegetarian cooking for everyone.]
The new vegetarian cooking for everyone / Deborah Madison.
First revised edition.
pages cm
Originally published: New York : Broadway Books, 1997.
Includes index.
1. Vegetarian cooking. I. Title.
TX837.M23618 2014
641.5636dc23
2013046540
Hardcover ISBN: 978-1-60774-553-2
eBook ISBN: 978-1-60774-554-9
Printed in the United States of America
Design by Toni Tajima
Production by Layla Smith and Anitra Alcantara
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
First Revised Edition

Madi_9781607745532_4p_c16soy-BM_p520-666.indd 666

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