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GableGotwals The Tulsa World reports an impasse has occurred with green waste pickup due to a new legal

issue. The auction for Indian Springs Country Club is being challenged in a lawsuit, The Journal Record reports. An article in The Tulsa World reports Williams Cos. offers seats on the board for two hedge funds. The Oklahoman reports a grand jury has handed down fraud charges in a case involving the failure of the First National Bank of Davis. The Oklahoma Supreme Court listened to arguments criticizing a redrafted petition to put storm shelters in all Oklahoma schools, according to an article in The Journal Record. Bitcoin is facing an uncertain future amidst a shutdown of the corporate office and reports of significant losses, The Tulsa World reports. The Journal Record reports the Oklahoma House approved a bill banning embryonic stem cell research. Non-discrimination laws can be applied to wellness programs, according to a Qand-A in The Oklahoman. An article in The Journal Record reports a provision allowing non-violent felons to carry firearms was removed from a bill passed by the House Judiciary Committee. An editorial in The Oklahoman questions the Presidents timeline for the Keystone pipeline. The CBS affiliate in Tulsa reports an inmate was found dead in the Washington County jail. The Tulsa World Green-waste talks with hauler at impasse after legal issue raised By Jarrel Wade Trash officials and the city's hauler are at an impasse on green waste in trash carts after an attorney notified officials Tuesday that contract documents already address the issue.

Tulsa Authority for Recovery of Energy members were prepared to vote on a contract amendment that would pay the hauler, NeWSolutions, about $90,000 per month for picking up green waste that ends up in the trash stream. But the trash board tabled a vote, saying it planned to go into executive session as soon as possible to discuss the legal issue and possibly re-enter negotiations with NeWSolutions. The amendment, stemming from negotiations the city has been in for months waste. NeWSolutions' argument for the amendment is that the company's original bid from the city did not address green waste, and the hauler has shown that a substantial portion of the trash stream has included green waste. The issue brought before the trash board Tuesday was that an addendum to the original contract already addresses the issue, possibly pre-empting any need to amend the contract and pay NeWSolutions more money. While trash board attorney Stephen Schuller said the issue with the contract came to his attention within the last week, a Dec. 28 story in the Tulsa World reported on the addendum that allows for green waste in the trash stream. Schuller said that he, as the attorney for the trash board, could not speak about the issue directly to the media. The contract addendum says trash customers "may place any household waste or green waste in their refuse cart as long as it fits and the lid closes. ... Green waste in excess of the cart will be placed in separate pre-purchased bags dedicated to green waste only." At Tuesday's meeting, Schuller said the contract documents show changes in policy and legal definitions that evolved as proposals came in, which complicate the issue from a legal standpoint. Green waste was originally intended to go to the curb in bags that would be picked up by city crews and taken to the city's mulching plant. But since the program started on Oct. 1, 2012, that hasn't happened. Green waste has instead gone to the city's burn plant along with the regular trash stream because the clear plastic bags required by the city could not be separated efficiently from the green waste. NeWSolutions spokesman Gary Percefull said the hauler's argument is that the city was responsible for the green-waste problems and that the bid assumed a

fully working system. "The understanding, clearly, in the whole community was that there would be a separate green-waste program, and that has not happened," Percefull said. Without a working green-waste system, NeWSolutions officials have said they are carrying much more green waste in the trash stream. "There is a failure of that to be implemented," Percefull said. "Subsequently, we wound up having to employ a lot more equipment and manpower, and we've been doing this for over a year now. ... We thought we had resolved this." The Journal Record Country club auction disputed in lawsuit By Kirby Lee Davis TULSA A Tulsa County District Court lawsuit challenges auction commitments from the first 2012 attempt to sell Broken Arrows Indian Springs Country Club. Tulsas Signature Leasing LLC claimed that it rescinded its $4 million high bid in that June 5, 2012, event after auctioneer Williams & Williams Marketing Services allegedly misrepresented contract details and review time. According to the Sept. 6 lawsuit, Williams and sellers Buyers Group LLC and Buyers Group Operating Co. did not fully represent the property and title conditions of that 472-acre course. The Buyers Group used a second Williams auction later that summer to sell Indian Springs, a pair of 18-hole courses and clubhouse complex at 16006 E. 131st St. South. But Signature Leasing claimed the defendants still pressured it over the original sale agreement, spurring this lawsuit asking Judge Dana Kuehn to uphold the contract rescission and condemn the alleged fraud. Both sets of defendants asked Kuehn to force Signature into binding arbitration over the last two weeks, noting that the plaintiff agreed to that option when it entered the June auction. These allegedly fraudulent statements took place well after Plaintiff had already agreed to arbitrate, Williams attorney Fred C. Cornish wrote in a Feb. 19 filing. Both Buyers Group and Williams moved to dismiss the lawsuit, although Williams disagreed with views that it acted as the plaintiffs agent. Plaintiff could have ascertained any title deficiencies, putting green defects, or

the existence of any other problems with reasonable diligence, Buyers Group attorney R. Tom Hillis said in a Feb. 13 filing. However, plaintiff exercised no diligence before buying the Indian Springs property and now seeks to rescind the contract due to buyers remorse. This plaintiff cannot do. Signature claimed that the problems started after Williams closed the auction. According to the lawsuit, Signature members Bill McAnally and James Kuykendall were asked to immediately sign and initial each page of a sale contract exceeding 120 pages. The legal description alone was more than seven pages of metes-and-bounds description, Signature attorney R. Jay Chandler wrote. An exhibit entitled Preliminary Title Commitment Encumbrances showed 94 special exemptions, an extraordinary number for any property. McAnally and Kuykendall cited need for their attorneys to review the document, according to the lawsuit, which the defendants allegedly claimed impossible. Their representatives, said to include Williams Deputy General Counsel Jacob D. Erhard, allegedly downplayed review needs, calling the contract ordinary and standard. The next day, Michael Boyd, the golf pro of Indian Springs, told the members of Signature Leasing that there were many problems with the golf course, including issues concerning the condition of the putting greens on the Windmill course and that much money would be needed to solve those issues, wrote Chandler, who prepared the lawsuit with fellow attorney Ryan A. Ray of the Tulsa law firm Norman Wohlgemuth Chandler & Jeter PC. Mr. Boyd also stated that he wa s instructed to keep quiet those issues until after the auction. Former club manager Ron Minkler allegedly told McAnally and Kuykendall of Indian Springs title problems, spurring Signature to contact a Tulsa abstract company. Those concerns spurred Signatures June 8 letter rescinding the agreement, according to the lawsuit. The petition condemned several elements of that agreement as unconscionable, even as it cited a provision allowing the buyer adequate document inspection time. That statement was absolute falsehood, Chandler wrote. Hillis said every auction participant received a copy of the contract weeks before the event, leaving plenty of time to independently probe title issues. The contract itself said the property was sold as is, where is and with faults, he wrote, with the actual Indian Springs title insurance attached.

The defendants further held several open houses, and repeatedly reaffirmed that any individual who had not read or agreed to the terms and condition should not bid on the property, wrote Hillis, of the Tulsa law firm Titus Hillis Reynolds Love Dickman & McCalmon. There was no attempt at any concealment, Hillis said. Plaintiff, having eyes, refused to see the matter directly before him, and is therefore not entitled to favorable consideration when he complains that he has suffered from his own voluntary blindness and been misled by overconfidence in the statements of another. Both defendants said Signature was bound by the auction contract once it made the winning bid. Hillis downplayed any alleged misrepresentation as puffery, not statements of positive fact. No rational person would give any meaning to a statement (after a auction) that a contract was a standard contract, Hillis wrote. There simply arent any standard 120-page contracts. The Tulsa World Williams Cos. grants board seats to two hedge funds By Rod Walton Two hedge funds that had pushed for changes at Williams Cos. Inc. will be given places on the Tulsa-based company's board of directors. Williams reported Tuesday that it had reached an agreement with Corvex Management LP and Soroban Capital Partners LLC. Soroban managing partner Eric Mandelblatt will be "promptly appointed" to the Williams board, while Corvex managing partner Keith Meister will gain a spot at the company's regular board meeting in November. The two New York-based funds recently acquired close to 9 percent of Williams' outstanding shares. Mandelblatt and Meister had asked for board seats and other changes, citing "financial missteps" by the natural gas infrastructure company. "Creating stockholder value is the top priority of the Williams Board," Williams CEO Alan Armstrong said in a news release. "To that end, we appreciate the confidence that Corvex and Soroban have demonstrated in Williams via their substantial investments. We look forward to working with them as we continue to execute our short and long-term plans and create sustainable stockholder value." The Williams board will nominate Mandelblatt to stand for election at the

company's annual shareholder meeting this spring. Meister has the option of taking a board seat or allowing a "mutually agreeable industry expert" to take his place in November. Meister said that together Corvex and Soroban have more than $2.5 billion invested in Williams. He and Mandelblatt expressed confidence that the company's pipeline and processing assets can contribute to a high rate of dividend growth over this decade. "I am delighted to join the board at Williams, a company I have followed closely for the past 16 years," Mandelblatt said. "This is an exciting time in the midstream energy industry in North America, and we believe Williams has among the industry's best assets with which to realize the significant growth opportunities that lie ahead." In a recent regulatory filing, the two hedge funds touted Williams' "strong competitive position" but noted that "operational and financial missteps" had kept the stock from realizing "full value." The pipeline, processing and terminal sector produced several notable mergers in 2013. Oklahoma City-based Devon Energy Corp. and CrossTex Energy combined midstream units, as did Crestwood and Inergy, among others. Houston-based Kinder Morgan acquired El Paso Corp. in a massive $21 billion deal in 2012, while competitor Energy Transfer Partners outbid Williams for regional pipeliner Southern Union Co. in 2011. Activist shareholders have played a big role in companies nationwide lately. Carl Icahn has pushed for big changes at Oklahoma City-based Chesapeake Energy Corp., for instance. In December, Ralph Hill resigned as CEO of Tulsa-based WPX Energy Inc. A day later, in what the company reported as an unrelated move, shareholder Taconic Capital Advisors LP gained a seat on the WPX board and the CEO search committee. WPX Energy was formed in 2011 when Williams spun off its oil and gas exploration and production segment. The Journal Record High court hears testimony about school shelter petition By M. Scott Carter OKLAHOMA CITY The ballot title of Take Shelter Oklahomas petition was

changed so dramatically by Attorney General Scott Pruitts office that it hampered efforts to gather signatures and confused voters, an attorney for the group told the nine justices of the Oklahoma Supreme Court on Tuesday. Speaking during an en banc hearing in front of the states high court, Oklahoma City attorney David Slane criticized Pruitts office for rewriting the Take Shelter ballot title and taking longer than five business days to review the document. The group filed the initiative petition after similar legislation authored by state Rep. Joe Dorman, D-Rush Springs, failed last year. Like the initiative petition, Dormans bill called for the state to earmark $500 million in bond funds for the construction of storm shelters or safe rooms in public schools. The bonds would be repaid by redirecting the state franchise tax. State law requires those sponsoring an initiative petition to submit it to the secretary of states office and attorney general. Once the petition is received, the attorney has five business days to review the title and submit a new version, should flaws be found. On Tuesday, Slane said the attorney general left out part of the ballot titles provision that changed the meaning. We submit to you that our ballot title was correct and that there was no reason to rewrite it, Slane told the court Tuesday. He had an obligation to summarize it under the law so people could understand it and he left out a major provision. I would argue thats contrary to law. Slanes argument drew tough questions by Justice James Edmondson. You talked about the attorney general being out of time, and you mentioned the word jurisdiction, Edmondson said. Do you think that taking six or seven days deprives the attorney general of this jurisdiction or the statutory obligation to pass on the ballot title proposed? Slane said the time issue was jurisdictional. We only have 90 days to gather 160,000 signatures, he said. Every day counts. Slane said Pruitts office came in late after the statutory time had elapsed. He comes in late when the statute says shall and the people have already started, he said. So now were in this quandary on what to do. Senior Assistant Attorney General Neal Leader the author of the revised ballot title for the petition countered that the AGs office complied with the law and the

revised ballot title was needed to explain the provision of the petition. Leader also criticized the Take Shelter group, claiming that the organization has politicized the debate over the petition by taking conspiracy theories to the media. There is no conspiracy; no one told me what to do, Leader said. The chamber of commerce didnt call. The governor didnt call. Take Shelters goal, Leader said, was to build shelters in schools, but what the group presented was a financial transaction. Thats the proposal, he said. I looked at that financial transaction and I said they didnt explain it adequately enough. Leader also sought to counter Take Shelters complaint about the time frame in which the ballot title was examined. What we now know is nothing was filed with the AG, he said. Leaders argument about the time frame didnt appear to sway Chief Justice Tom Colbert. We would both have to agree that it boils down to the issue of notice, Colbert said. And you did have notice the next day. Leader said Colbert wasnt correct. But you received it from the secretary of state the next day? Colbert said. Correct? We received it from the secretary of state on the (September 2013) 20th, Leader said. That is correct. So you received notice at that time? Colbert said. Leader said yes and added that five business days later the AGs office provided its response. What triggers our obligation is when something is filed with us, he said. Had they done what they were supposed to do we would have started. A ruling in the case is expected sometime later this spring. The Tulsa World

Bitcoin takes major blow as virtual-currency exchange goes under TOKYO - One of the world's largest bitcoin exchanges has seemingly disappeared, delivering a severe blow to the virtual currency as it struggles to gain legitimacy. A coalition of virtual currency companies said Tuesday that Tokyo-based Mt. Gox went under after secretly racking up catastrophic losses. Mt. Gox's website was returning a blank page Tuesday. The disappearance of the site follows the resignation Sunday of Mt. Gox CEO Mark Karpeles from the board of the Bitcoin Foundation, a group seeking legitimacy for the exotic new form of money. The exchange had imposed a ban on withdrawals earlier this month. Prominent supporters of Bitcoin - including San Francisco-based wallet service Coinbase and Chinese exchange BTC China - sought to shore up confidence in the currency by saying Mt. Gox's collapse was an isolated case of mismanagement. They said it had abused users' trust but did not offer details. "As with any new industry, there are certain bad actors that need to be weeded out, and that is what we are seeing today," the statement said. Since its creation in 2009, Bitcoin has become popular among tech enthusiasts, libertarians and adventurous investors because it allows people to make one-toone transactions, buy goods and services and exchange money across borders without involving banks, credit card issuers or other third parties. Criminals like Bitcoin for the same reasons. For various technical reasons, it's hard to know just how many people around the world own bitcoins, but the currency has attracted outsize media attention and the fascination of millions as an increasing number of retailers such as Overstock.com begin to accept it. Speculative investors have jumped into the Bitcoin fray, too, sending the currency's value fluctuating wildly in recent months. In December, the value of a single bitcoin hit an all-time high of $1,200. In the aftermath of the Mt. Gox collapse Tuesday, one bitcoin stood at about $470. Central banks across the globe have been hesitant to recognize bitcoin as a legitimate form of money, and Mt. Gox's virtual vanishing isn't helping. Mt. Gox "reminds us of the downside of decentralized, unregulated currencies. There is no Federal Reserve or IMF to come to the rescue. There is no deposit insurance," said Campbell Harvey, a professor at the Duke University Fuqua School of Business who specializes in financial markets and global risk

management. Documents purportedly leaked from Mt. Gox lay out the scale of the problem. An 11-page "Crisis Strategy Draft" published on the blog of entrepreneur and bitcoin enthusiast Ryan Selkis said that 740,000 bitcoins are missing from Mt. Gox, which roughly translates to hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of losses, though figures are fuzzy given Bitcoin's extreme volatility. "At the risk of appearing hyperbolic, this could be the end of Bitcoin, at least for most of the public," the draft said. At the Tokyo office tower housing Mt. Gox, bitcoin trader Kolin Burges said he had picketed the building since Feb. 14 after flying in from London, hoping to get back $320,000 he has tied up in bitcoins with Mt. Gox. "I may have lost all of my money," Burgess said. "It hasn't shaken my trust in Bitcoin, but it has shaken my trust in bitcoin exchanges." The disappearance of Mt. Gox could be fatal for Bitcoin, which was started as a currency free from government controls. Bitcoin's boosters say the currency's design makes it impossible to counterfeit and difficult to manipulate. The Journal Record Oklahoma House approves embryonic stem cell ban By Sean Murphy (AP) OKLAHOMA CITY Conducting certain types of embryonic stem cell research in Oklahoma would be a felony punishable by at least a year in prison under a bill that the Oklahoma House of Representatives overwhelmingly approved on Tuesday. The House voted 73-14 for the Protection of Human Life Act of 2013, despite concerns it sends the wrong message to the nations research community. The bill, which now heads to the Senate, prohibits nontherapeutic research that destroys a fertilized human egg, although the measure specifically exempts embryo transfers connected to in vitro fertilization. For me, and I believe for the majority of Oklahomans, the real question is about life, said state Rep. Dan Fisher, R-El Reno, a minister who wrote the bill. When does life begin? I believe it begins at conception. And anything that is done to knowingly end that life is the ending of human life, and we generally call that murder. But opponents say it sends a message that Oklahoma is not open to taking part

in groundbreaking research. Not only are we sending a message that we dont want stem cell research, but that if you even try to do stem cell research in this state, youre going to be a felon, said state Rep. Doug Cox, R-Grove, one of two physicians in the Legislature. Thats not the message that I want the scientific community in the world to receive about the state of Oklahoma. House Bill 2070 is opposed by the Oklahoma State Medical Association. We as an association dont take a position on abortion, but any time the Legislature overrides the medical or clinical judgment of physicians and researchers, were going to be opposed to that, said OSMA spokesman Wes Glinsmann. Fisher likened the destruction of human embryos to leaving a baby alone outdoors to starve to death. The only thing that this embryo needs to become a fully developed baby is time and nourishment, Fisher said. The Legislature passed a similar bill in 2009, but it was vetoed by thenDemocratic Gov. Brad Henry. Henry said then the measure would prohibit research that could potentially save lives. The House voted to override Henrys veto, but the Senate did not. Republican Gov. Mary Fallin has signed several anti-abortion measures during her three years in office, but her spokesman Alex Weintz said Tuesday the governor has not yet taken a position on this issue. The Journal Record Bill shoots a blank: Measure that would have allowed nonviolent felons to carry guns revised By M. Scott Carter OKLAHOMA CITY A measure that would have allowed residents convicted of nonviolent felonies to possess guns cleared a House committee on Tuesday, but only after it was dramatically changed during the meeting. The original version of House Bill 2324 by state Rep. Ken Walker, R-Tulsa, would have allowed a person who had not been convicted of a violent felony and was lawfully able to own or possess a firearm. That language would have allowed nonviolent felons to possess weapons.

Current state law prevents any person convicted of any felony both violent and nonviolent from owning a gun. The bill, in its original form, could have caused problems for agencies such as the Department of Corrections. Allowing nonviolent offenders to have firearms, DOC spokesman Jerry Massie said, would have violated the agencys parole rules. Most probation rules would prohibit them (nonviolent felons) from possessing a firearm, Massie said. However, during a meeting of the House Judiciary Committee, lawmakers adopted a substitute version of the measure that eliminated the exemption for nonviolent felons. Instead, according to the measures new language, the proposal would not include someone who was previously convicted of a felony and did not have a current valid license to possess and carry a firearm issued by the persons state of residence. State Rep. Ben Sherrer, D-Chouteau the only member of the Judiciary Committee to vote against the measure said the revised bill could also be interpreted to allow weapons on school grounds. Actually I have more concerns about the new version of the bill than I did the old version, he said. Sherrer said he came to the meeting prepared to vote against the original version of the bill, too. When I saw that it brought in the federal Gun-Free School Zones Act, it bothered me, Sherrer said. Ive have had a staunch position with respect to schools and school property, whether its elementary, secondary, CareerTech or higher ed, Ive had the general position that less guns is better than more guns on those campuses. However, Ryan Kiesel, executive director of the Oklahoma Branch of the American Civil Liberties Union, said the original version of the bill could have opened a dialogue about restoring the rights taken from nonviolent offenders. It wasnt a bill that was really on our radar screen, he said. But legislation like that could be part of a larger dialogue in restoring some of the rights taken from those convicted of nonviolent crimes. Kiesel said Oklahoma has too many nonviolent offenders in prison. He said a recent study by the ACLU showed that more than 40 Oklahoma prisoners were

serving life sentences for nonviolent offenses. At least one Senate Republican said he liked the idea at first look, but believed the issue needed more study before it became law. I like the concept and I think it starts a discussion about something that we should take a look at, said Kyle Loveless, R-Oklahoma City. The problem is how its implemented and what the rules are. When you get down to the policies and procedures, there could be difficultly. In Oklahoma, about 13,700 residents are incarcerated for nonviolent offenses, while 16,158 nonviolent offenders are currently on probation. State records show that more than 2,500 nonviolent offenders have been paroled. House Bill 2324 passed the Judiciary Committee on a 11-1 vote. The measure will be heard next by the full House of Representatives.

Keystone Foodservice The Tulsa World features goat cheese as part of a recipe for Oscar night. Mardi Gras recipes are featured in an article in The Oklahoman. The Fox affiliate in Oklahoma City reports the federal government is implementing new rules on marketing of snacks in schools. An article in The Tulsa World features Louisiana-based recipes from a Tulsa couple. The Oklahoman reports a bill allowing oil and gas companies to avoid royalty payments totaling millions of dollars is drawing concerns from school officials. The Tulsa World Recipe: Goat cheese phyllo bites make savory Oscar party snack What to serve at this year's Oscar party? I had no clear idea about the right dish until I glanced at a list of the movies in contention. "Gravity" was the one that jumped out at me. Watching the trailer, I was a little alarmed at the sight of poor Sandra Bullock floating around in space. But I also was inspired by her weightlessness. It made me think of souffles, which are famously light thanks to all the whipped egg whites in them. Thus, these are "anti-gravity" - not "anti-'Gravity' " - treats. Still, a problem remained: How to turn a full-blown souffle into a tasty nibble? The solution: Make each one small enough to fit into a mini-phyllo shell. Happily, these days you should be able to find mini-phyllo shells in the freezer section of your local supermarket. Take them home, fill them and bake them, and they're no more than 15 calories per shell. And if you can't find them pre-made, they're easy to make at home. Just stack four sheets of phyllo dough on top of one another, lightly spritzing each sheet with olive oil cooking spray as you stack. Cut the stacked sheets into 3-inch squares, ease the stacks into the cups of a mini-muffin pan, then bake at 375 degrees for 8 to 10 minutes, or until they're barely golden at the edges. Let them cool before filling and baking. What about that filling? I considered a chocolate souffle or an orange souffle. But I opted for the lusciousness of a cheese souffle because, after all, we're talking about the Oscars here, which is not exactly a model of restraint. Still, there's no

reason to chump ourselves, so I went with goat cheese, which is relatively lean even as it boasts tangy flavor and creamy texture. I also added some Parmigiano-Reggiano, because even a little delivers big impact. With the cheeses chosen, making the "cream" sauce was easy: Just thicken some 1 percent milk with a little roux (the classic butter-flour mixture), and flavor it with the cheeses and some Dijon mustard. These little souffles are fairly indestructible. It's hot, melty cheese in a crispy shell. Indeed, when the show is over, don't be surprised if you walk away with an award for Best Appetizer at an Oscar Party. Phyllo pastry cups are widely available in the freezer section of most grocers, usually near the pastry and frozen fruit. GOAT CHEESE PHYLLO BITES Makes 45 bites 3 packages (each package contains 15 cups) phyllo pastry cups 1 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 1/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1/2 cup 1 percent milk 4-ounce log soft goat cheese, crumbled 1 ounce finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano 1 large egg, separated, plus 1 large egg white, at room temperature 1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard Kosher salt and ground black pepper Pinch of cream of tartar 45 fresh dill, tarragon or miniature fresh basil sprigs or snipped chives 1. Heat the oven to 375 degrees. Arrange the phyllo cups on a rimmed baking sheet. Set aside. 2. In a medium saucepan over medium-low heat, melt the butter. Add the flour and whisk for 2 minutes. Add the milk in a stream, whisking, and bring to a boil,

whisking. Simmer, stirring occasionally, for 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in the goat cheese, half of the Parmigiano-Reggiano, the egg yolk, the mustard and salt and pepper, to taste, stirring until smooth. Set aside. 3. In a large bowl, use an electric mixer to beat both egg whites until foamy. Add the cream of tartar and continue beating until they just hold stiff peaks. Stir a third of the whites into the sauce, then fold in the remaining whites, gently but thoroughly. 4. Spoon the mixture into the phyllo cups. Bake on the oven's middle shelf until they are puffed and golden, about 15 minutes. Transfer to a platter, sprinkle the tops with the remaining cheese and some herbs, then serve immediately. Nutrition information per bite: 30 calories; 15 calories from fat (50 percent of total calories); 2 g fat (0.5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 5 mg cholesterol; 3 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 0 g sugar; 1 g protein; 55 mg sodium. The Tulsa World Tulsa transplants from Louisiana share favorite New Orleans recipes By Nicole Marshall Middleton While milling about Mardi Gras parades, a big bucket of fried chicken and a daiquiri are the perfect foods to munch on, according to Louisiana natives Amanda and Chris West. But those popular street foods take a back seat to Grandma's jambalaya when you get home from the festivities in New Orleans. The Wests moved to the Tulsa area after Hurricane Katrina, and Chris West worked at other local restaurants until recently. This month they opened their dream restaurant, Lassalle's New Orleans Deli downtown at 601 S. Boston Ave. The specials that they serve are the same foods they ate growing up. "Everyone who comes in here from New Orleans know this is the real deal," Chris West said. "It's got to be. Food is a religion down there." Both Wests are from Metairie, a suburb of the The Big Easy. They are middle school sweethearts who've stayed together through a long-distance romance. "We met in the seventh grade," Amanda West said. "He sat behind me in homeroom." Amanda West's mother was originally from the Tulsa area, and when she was

16, her family moved back here. "But she flew back down for my senior prom," Chris West said, and Amanda West returned to New Orleans after graduating. While Chris worked in food service, Amanda planned to open a salon. She was supposed to sign the papers on her new business the day that Katrina hit. They moved to Oklahoma, but Chris returned to help the restaurant he worked in reopen after the storm. "Between 2005 and 2007, we were back and forth three times," Chris West said. "When we got married in 2007, the rebirth still had not happened yet and it was kind of rough at that time. That's why we moved here." Opening the New Orleans-style deli was their goal. "In New Orleans, these kind of restaurants are dime a dozen, and our food is as good as any of them," Chris West said. "But they are not as common here. "And people there do all this at home," he said, motioning to his menu filled with dishes such as gumbo, red beans and rice, and muffuletta. Chris West's grandmother is Cajun, and Amanda West's family is Sicilian. They each grew up eating dishes specific to their family's culture, especially during the festive season. "My Grandma is a pressure-cooker artist," he said. "That's how she cooks everything. And that is what she grew up with." The weekend before Fat Tuesday is when the festivities - and the feasting - really kicks into overdrive. "When you go to a parade or carnival, you have fun and you eat the street food, but after you go home and have the gumbos, red beans and rice, and hang out at someone's house or downtown and St. Charles Avenue," Chris West said. Harry Connick Jr. hosts the couple's favorite parade. They described it as "very visual" with a lot of fiber optic lights. They both love parades and were happy to see their new restaurant was on the Veterans Day Parade route in Tulsa. The parades and carnival season last about three weeks in New Orleans, they said. And that's plenty of time to try all of your favorite Cajun and Creole dishes. One of the easiest New Orleans favorites to make is jambalaya, the Wests said. And they shared their recipe with the Tulsa World, if you are looking for recipes

to make this Mardi Gras. "It is easy to make at home," Amanda West said. "If you can make rice, you can make jambalaya." Jambalaya consists of sausage, vegetables and a variety of meats or seafood. Long-grain rice added to absorb flavors from the stock makes it a one-dish special. Chris West shared his recipe for jambalaya with the Tulsa World. He recommends making sure that the sausage is thoroughly browned and the onions are caramelized. "It really imparts a rich flavor," he said. "Also, turning off the fire after cooking and letting it sit for five minutes is important, as it gives it a great, fluffy texture," he said. The Wests also shared some tips on making pralines, one of the most popular Louisiana confections. "For the pralines, the most important thing is to be patient and trust your thermometer," Chris West said. "It should be a good one with lots of detail so that you can read the precise temperature changes." Getting the texture right after removing them from the heat is tricky and takes practice, he said. "The only real advice I have is that it takes lots of practice," he said. "We don't always get it right, but if they're messed up, they always taste great over ice cream." For Mardi Gras at Lassalle's Deli, the Wests plan to offer something special, possibly crawfish etouffee. Because whenever they are away from New Orleans, the celebrations are always "focused on the food," Amanda West said. This recipe makes enough for a crowd, about 40 servings. JAMBALAYA 3 pounds smoked sausage 4 cups diced onion 4 cups diced green bell pepper

4 cups diced celery 2 cups chopped green onion 60 ounces petite diced tomatoes, drained 4 tablespoons minced garlic 3 tablespoons Louisiana hot sauce 3 tablespoons Worcestershire 6 bay leaves 2 teaspoons salt 4 tablespoons Creole seasoning 3 pounds chicken 6 cups parboiled rice 12 cups chicken stock 1. Saute sausage in hot pan until brown. 2. Add onions, saut until caramelized. 3. Add bell pepper and celery, saut until soft. 4. Add garlic, green onions, tomatoes, Louisiana hot sauce, Worcestershire, bay leaves, salt and creole seasoning. 5. Add chicken, rice and stock. 6. Bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. 7. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, for 30 minutes. 8. Turn off fire and let stand for 5 minutes covered. PECAN PRALINES 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar 1 1/2 cups firmly packed light brown sugar

1 cup evaporated milk 1/2 cup butter 1 1/2 cups pecan halves 1 teaspoon vanilla 1. Bring sugars and milk to a boil in 3- or 4-quart saucepan, stirring often. 2. Cook on medium heat, stirring often, 11 minutes or until candy thermometer reads 228. 3. Stir in butter and pecans and cook, stirring constantly, until thermometer reads 232. 4. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. 5. Beat with a wooden spoon until mixture begins to thicken and lose its gloss. 6. Quickly drop by heaping tablespoonful onto buttered wax paper or parchment paper. 7. Let stand until firm. Other ways to celebrate Mardi Gras Blue Dome District fourth annual Mardi Gras Parade, First Street and Elgin Avenue. Watch as masked, costumed revelers and colorful, elaborate floats make their way through the Blue Dome District. In Mardi Gras tradition, brightly colored beads and other trinkets will be tossed into the crowds, so collect as much as you can. Following the parade, the festivities continue in the after-party at the Blue Dome District's restaurants and bars. Hosted by the Blue Dome District Merchants Association. The Oklahoman Oklahoma school leaders are upset over Land Commission bill By Randy Ellis Oil and gas companies that are delinquent in making certain royalty payments

would retain millions of dollars at the expense of Oklahoma schoolchildren under a bill expected to be heard Wednesday by the Senate Appropriations Committee. During the first eight months of the current fiscal year, Oklahomas kindergarten to 12th-grade schools would have received about $5.5 million less and higher education institutions would have received about $1.5 million less if the bill by state Sen. Anthony Sykes, R-Moore, had been law, said Harry Birdwell, secretary of the Commissioners of the Land Office. Norman Schools Superintendent Joe Siano said of Senate Bill 1966, Were opposed to it. ... This seems like another ill-timed bill as it pertains to public schools. Siano said Norman schools would have lost about $115,000 so far this fiscal year if the bill were law. Sykes did not return messages left Monday and Tuesday with his state Senate office. Sykes bill would cut the interest rate that oil and gas companies must pay the Oklahoma Commissioners of the Land Office on delinquent royalty payments from 12 percent to about 3 percent, Birdwell said. Oil and gas companies would pay 12 percent interest to other state royalty owners, he said. Birdwell said he doesnt know why Sykes would want to shortchange a state agency that benefits schoolchildren. The bill also would require the agency to use the state attorney generals office for lawsuits involving public lands. Several times we have gone to the attorney general and they said, We dont have the forensic accounting expertise you maybe need so you may need to hire somebody external, Birdwell said. However, Diane Clay, spokeswoman for Attorney General Scott Pruitt, said Pruitt has encouraged state agencies to use his office. Pruitt has hired specialist attorneys when necessary, she said. The Commissioners of the Land Office manages about 1.1 million mineral acres and 747,000 surface acres of trust lands for the financial benefit of Oklahoma common education schools, colleges and universities. There are about 6,100 producing oil and gas wells on land managed by the commissioners. Birdwell said that during the first week of July, his agency paid school districts

about $9 million in interest from late payments and nonpayments of royalties. That was important money to many of the school districts in the state, particularly this year, when lots of the state had storm damage and it came at a time when many of the school districts had yet to receive appropriated dollars, Birdwell said. They were trying to meet insurance deductibles and figure out ways to repair classrooms and get prepared for the beginning of school.

Redbud Dental There is nothing for todays report.

Champion CNG Unit Corp. profits were up due to increased production, The Journal Record. The Oklahoman reports a bill allowing oil and gas companies to avoid royalty payments totaling millions of dollars is drawing concerns from school officials. OGE Energy has a plan for the future should the U.S. Supreme Court rule against the company, according to an article in The Journal Record. An editorial in The Oklahoman questions the Presidents timeline for the Keystone pipeline. The Journal Record Production boosts Unit Corp. profits By D. Ray Tuttle TULSA Despite a flat rig market last year, Unit Corp. reported a nearly eightfold increase in profits for the year as annual production jumped 18 percent compared to 2012. Profits in 2013 were $184.7 million, or $3.80 per diluted share, up from $23.2 million, or 48 cents per share, for 2012. Revenues for the year increased to $1.35 billion, compared to $1.32 billion in 2012. Fourth-quarter production growth was primarily driven by the Wilcox and Granite Wash plays. Tulsa-based Unit also saw a year-over-year swing of $108 million in fourthquarter profits. The contract drilling and exploration and production company reported $51.3 million in fourth-quarter profits for 2013, compared to a $56.55 million loss for the same period a year earlier. Per-diluted-share Unit profits were $1.05 in the quarter, compared to a loss of $1.18 for the 2012 fourth quarter. Adjusted profits were $54.28 million, or $1.11 per diluted share, for the quarter. On average, eight analysts polled by Thomson Reuters expected the company to report profit per share of 94 cents for the quarter. Analysts estimates typically exclude special items. Unit will commission its first BOSS rig in Oklahoma City on Wednesday, Unit

CEO and President Larry Pinkston said during Units 45-minute conference call with analysts on Tuesday. In view of the demand for drilling rigs using new technologies and capabilities, Unit officials decided to pursue the sale of several older and larger drilling rigs that have not worked for some time, Pinkston said in the earnings report. Last year, for $32.4 million, Unit sold four 2,000-horsepower drilling rigs and one 3,000-horsepower drilling rig. The sale of four additional idle 3,000-horsepower drilling rigs was completed after the end of the year for about the same price, Unit officials confirmed during the conference call. The proceeds from the sales will be used in Units new proprietary drilling rig. We anticipate this drilling rig, coupled with continued enhancements to our existing fleet, will position us to continue to meet the demands of our existing customers and allow us to compete for the work of new customers, Pinkston said in the report. The BOSS rig will be the prototype for the future expansion of the companys rig fleet, said John Cromling, executive vice president of drilling. The rig will incorporate features to move more efficiently and also to walk on multi-well pads, Cromling said during the conference call. There are many other components of the rig that were permitted to excel at horizontal drilling, especially in the drilling fleet system. Units new BOSS rig is set to start drilling in the Granite Wash play in March, said Brad Guidry, executive vice president of exploration for Unit Petroleum Co. We have experienced some weather-related production losses and operational delays this winter that will primarily impact our first and second quarter 2014 results, Guidry said. At this time we are not adjusting our 2014 produ ction guidance of 15-percent to 18-percent growth; however, we will monitor this closely as we foresee through the second quarter. Last years success was a reflection of the quality of Units core plays and focus on those plays, Guidry said during the conference call. In 2013, Unit averaged 9.7 unit rigs working in the core area and officials anticipate averaging 12 rigs this year a 25-percent increase. Currently, we are running 11 unit rigs; three are in the Granite Wash, two in the Marmaton, two in the Mississippian, two in the Wilcox and one in the emerging

play and one in the Cleveland, Guidry said. At the analysts day in December, Unit officials announced an emerging play in the Oklahoma portion of the Anadarko Basin, Guidry said. We are continuing to build our leasehold position and have about 25,000 net acres; with about 11,000 of those acres in the area we consider the current core, Guidry said. Unit has one rig drilling and officials expect to add a second rig this summer. Unit shares climbed $2.09 each, or 3.7 percent, on the New York Stock Exchange on Tuesday. The Oklahoman Oklahoma school leaders are upset over Land Commission bill By Randy Ellis Oil and gas companies that are delinquent in making certain royalty payments would retain millions of dollars at the expense of Oklahoma schoolchildren under a bill expected to be heard Wednesday by the Senate Appropriations Committee. During the first eight months of the current fiscal year, Oklahomas kindergarten to 12th-grade schools would have received about $5.5 million less and higher education institutions would have received about $1.5 million less if the bill by state Sen. Anthony Sykes, R-Moore, had been law, said Harry Birdwell, secretary of the Commissioners of the Land Office. Norman Schools Superintendent Joe Siano said of Senate Bill 1966, Were opposed to it. ... This seems like another ill-timed bill as it pertains to public schools. Siano said Norman schools would have lost about $115,000 so far this fiscal year if the bill were law. Sykes did not return messages left Monday and Tuesday with his state Senate office. Sykes bill would cut the interest rate that oil and gas companies must pay the Oklahoma Commissioners of the Land Office on delinquent royalty payments from 12 percent to about 3 percent, Birdwell said. Oil and gas companies would pay 12 percent interest to other state royalty owners, he said.

Birdwell said he doesnt know why Sykes would want to shortchange a state agency that benefits schoolchildren. The bill also would require the agency to use the state attorney generals office for lawsuits involving public lands. Several times we have gone to the attorney general and they said, We dont have the forensic accounting expertise you maybe need so you may need to hire somebody external, Birdwell said. However, Diane Clay, spokeswoman for Attorney General Scott Pruitt, said Pruitt has encouraged state agencies to use his office. Pruitt has hired specialist attorneys when necessary, she said. The Commissioners of the Land Office manages about 1.1 million mineral acres and 747,000 surface acres of trust lands for the financial benefit of Oklahoma common education schools, colleges and universities. There are about 6,100 producing oil and gas wells on land managed by the commissioners. Birdwell said that during the first week of July, his agency paid school districts about $9 million in interest from late payments and nonpayments of royalties. That was important money to many of the school districts in the state, particularly this year, when lots of the state had storm damage and it came at a time when many of the school districts had yet to receive appropriated dollars, Birdwell said. They were trying to meet insurance deductibles and figure out ways to repair classrooms and get prepared for the beginning of school. The Journal Record OGE Energy has plan if it loses at Supreme Court By Sarah Terry-Cobo OKLAHOMA CITY Pete Delaney has a plan B if his company loses an air pollution lawsuit. The CEO of OGE Energy Corp. told analysts in a quarterly earnings call Tuesday that if the U.S. Supreme Court rules against Oklahoma Gas & Electric, the utility will have to spend about $1 billion to upgrade or replace coal-fired power plants. However, a 2005 law allows the utility to pass those costs on to ratepayers. The law created by House Bill 1910 allows utilities to recover money spent on mandated environmental expenditures. If we arent successful before the Supreme Court, we will promptly file for recovery of associated environmental costs under House Bill 1910, Delaney

said. Despite the backup plan, OG&E is fighting the lawsuit, because if it loses, it would result in a substantial rate increase for customers, Delaney said. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sued the utility and the Oklahoma attorney general, arguing that the states plan to clean up air pollution from coalfired power plants wasnt sufficient. A provision of the federal Clean Air Act, the regional haze rule, protects visibility in national parks and requires states to limit smog-forming chemicals. In January, OG&E joined Attorney General Scott Pruitt in appealing the case to the U.S Supreme Court, after the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals refused to rehear the case in front of a 10-judge panel. In July, the Denver-based appellate court ruled that the EPA has the authority to establish its own plan for limiting air pollution. Appealing the case to the nations high court was the best option for OG&Es customers and for OGE Energys shareholders, Delaney told analysts. The company will release more information about how it will affect the companys financial forecast in the second quarter, said Sean Trauschke, OGE Energys chief financial officer. Delaney said if they lose the case, the company will argue to the Oklahoma Corporation Commission to recover the costs from the billion-dollar environmental upgrades. Matt Skinner, spokesman for the OCC, said no utility has ever applied to receive recovery from upgrades that are a result of the 2005 law. Any party making application for cost recovery has to provide evidence that demonstrates how the law applies to their case and why recovery should be granted, Skinner said. OGE Energy reported higher earnings for 2013 and the fourth quarter. For the fourth quarter, it reported net income of $57.6 million, compared to $38.5 million for the fourth quarter of 2012. For 2013, it reported net income of $387.6 million, compared to $355 million in 2012. For the fourth quarter, the company earned 29 cents per share, beating analyst estimates by 5 cents and 2012 results by 10 cents. For the fourth quarter of 2013, the company reported $508.9 million in operating revenue, compared to $862.1 million from the same period a year ago. OGE Energys stock, which trades under the symbol OGE, rose as high as $36.45 Tuesday and closed at $36.22, up 0.70 percent, or 25 cents, from the previous days close.

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