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Bauman Carpets

314 N. Buc keye


263-1423
Every
Budget
Deserves
Good Design
Every
Budget
Deserves
Good Design
314 N. Buckeye
263-1423
WOODBURNING BY:
Jo Schwartz - Pyrographer
Unique One of a
Kind Art Work
Reopening Tursday, May 1st
www.JoSchwartz.net
Phone: 7854796880
Gallery Inside Clock Repair Bldg.
200 SE 5th St. /Old Abilene Town
Abilene, Kansas
Email: JoSchwartz101hotmail.com
Hrs: Wed-Sat 9-4 Sun 1-4
closed Mon & Tues
G & Dservice
Owner - Greg Davis
105 Ne 4th
Abilene, Ks 67410
(785) 263-1128
BELAIR INC.
AUTO BODY REPAIR
COMPUTERIZED ESTIMATES
EXPERT GLASS INSTALLATION
307 W. 1ST 263-4130
Open 7
Days A
Week!
200 S. Buckeye Abilene, KS
263-3939
Ample supply, low interest rates help homebuyers
By TIM HORAN
tim.horan@abilene-rc.com
Twenty fourteen might be a good
year to buy a home.
Tony Haug, president of The Dick-
inson County Board of Realtors, said
there are two good reasons to pur-
chase.
The frst: There are lots of houses
on the market.
Haug calculated 110 residential
homes on the market in February, 14
of which had pending contracts.
There is a variety of homes and a
variety of price ranges, Haug said,
adding the prices range from $30,000
to nearly $600,000. Three houses in
2013 sold for more than $300,000
which was unusual.
Money is available and they are
giving it away, he said. The inter-
est rate is still low. Its not 10 to 12
percent like it was 10 years ago.
So know matter what a potential
home buyer is looking for in a new
home, Abilene and the surrounding
area probably has it.
Regardless of what they are look-
ing for, there is something out there,
Haug said.
Tim Hamilton, Abilene Commu-
nity Development director, said there
were 10 permits for new homes last
year.
There are not a ton of new houses
on the market, Haug said. Im talk-
ing brand new houses. They usually
sell and then they start building an-
other one.
As far as commercial property, we
have a lot of remodeling going on,
Hamilton said. Some smaller ex-
pansions.
As far as residential, we saw a lit-
tle up tick from previous years, he
added.
He said the city hopes homeowners
take advantage of the citys neigh-
borhood revitalization programs.
The new revitalization that was
just passed pertains primarily to resi-
dential units downtown, in second
stories, Hamilton said, citing the
lofts in the United Building as an ex-
ample.
Haug said for homeowner who is
interested in selling, take a good look
at the current condition of the home.
Walk through the house like you
were trying to buy it and see what
needs to be done, Haug said.
Natural paint colors in rooms are
recommended.
Year SFR MFR Total Avg. value
2009 7 0 7 $219,000
2010 6 0 6 $169,000
2011 2 4 6 $80,000
2012 3 6 9 $126,800
2013 10 0 10 $219,000
Abilene housing starts
Progress 2014
Business
February 2014
2 Progress 2014 Business www.abilene-rc.com
Abilene bed and breakfasts greeting visitors
By TIFFANY RONEY
tiffany.roney@abilene-rc.com
Between researchers
from all over the world
who come to study for-
mer President Dwight D.
Eisenhower and period
topics, to groups of gig-
gling girlfriends who just
want to get away, both
Abilene area bed-and-
breakfasts fit that mold.
What I think is unique
about the Victorian Inn is
the home itself, Conven-
tion and Visitors Bureau
director Glenda Purkis
said. I think its one of
the most fabulous homes
that we have in Abilene,
and it will sleep more
than a typical bed-and-
breakfast.
The Windmill Inn
which we also market,
because its within the
county offers a totally
different experience, if
you like something that
is outside of town with-
out the local traffic, she
said.
Each of the area bed-
and-breakfasts fulfill dif-
ferent needs, but Purkis
said there is still a need
for even more dine-in
lodging facilities.
I wish we had more,
she said. For the amount
of historic housing in-
ventory that we have,
we should have several
B&Bs. We get a lot of calls
from people who want to
stay in B&Bs. There are
travelers looking for that
more personal, close-knit
experience.
Abilenes
Victorian Inn
Abilenes Victorian Inn,
a local 1887 Queen Anne
Victorian-style house,
was built and lived in
by Abilenes first sur-
geon, whose son was
best friends with Dwight
Eisenhower, inn owner
Adrian Potter said.
It is fitting for Eisen-
hower to have spent time
in the home because Pot-
ter said many of the inns
guests come to study the
accomplished Abileniean.
At a distance of just one
mile, the inn, 820 N.W.
Third St., is the closest
lodging facility to the
Eisenhower Presidential
Library, Museum and
Boyhood Home. Guests
walk, use one of the inns
bicycles or borrow a bike
from the center.
We have fun with the
researchers, Potter said.
Sometimes I make them
dinner, and sometimes
theyll come in our back
area if theyre here a long
time. They become part
of the family and they
watch movies with us and
we visit. So that can be
a real reward for us, too.
We treat them like fam-
ily. We take good care of
them.
The inn has housed re-
searchers from 18 to more
than 65 years of age, who
hail from all corners of
the world, including Hun-
gary, West Africa, Eng-
land, Scotland and Japan,
as well as U.S. students
from Harvard and Yale.
Some are fluent in Eng-
lish, while others need
translators or simply get
by as best they can, Pot-
ter said.
Researchers have stayed
any length of time from
two days to two months.
Potter and her husband,
Jay, offer reduced rates
for extended-stay guests.
We love what we do.
We love our guests and
more than 50 percent of
our guests return to us,
Adrian said. Some even
consider us their second
home. Others have iden-
tified us as if it was like
going to Grandmas, and
thats the nicest compli-
ment that we could get.
Looking back over the
past couple of years, the
inn received regional at-
tention and new busi-
ness because of a
feature on the bed-and-
breakfast in Midwest Liv-
ing Magazine.
I dont know how they
found us, Adrian said.
They did say they had
chosen one B&B per
state. I think they must
have sent someone here
anonymously to stay with
us. And it ended up that
we were on three pag-
es, and that was really a
blessing.
The inn is featured in
the November-December
2012 issue of the maga-
zine. Around the same
time, in that December,
the inn published a cook-
book featuring 188 reci-
pes from 22 guests. Adri-
an, who has a degree in
culinary arts, continues to
offer lunch and tea parties
to the public by reserva-
tion.
Adrian and Jays biggest
plan for 2014 is to add a
new floor to the kitchen.
Im very excited about
that its been a long
time coming, she said.
Its going to be black and
white, on the diamond, so
Tiffany Roney Refector-Chronicle
Tim and Deb Sanders, owners of the Windmill Inn, prepare a Valentines Day dinner for guests.
See: Bed, Page 9
Introducing the latest
Diagnostic Imaging Technology
at Geary Community Hospital
Toshiba Vantage Titan 1.5T
MRI
Installed January 2014
Now located inside the radiology dept.
Outstanding image quality
More comfortable patient experience
Larger Opening (71cm) and ultra-short
magnet - less claustrophobic
Utilizing Toshibas Pianissimo
Noise-Reduction Technology, the
Titan is quieter than other MRIs
Table lowers to less than 17 inches
allowing better access for the young
and old.
Adjustable ventilation, lighting and
airfow
Toshiba Aquillion Prime
CT
Installed October 2013
80-slice CT
45% Dose Reduction - increased
patient safety
Acquires data faster to reduce exam
duration
Extra-large Opening (78cm), 660 lb.
capacity and the industrys widest
couch (47cm) increases comfort and
the ability to accommodate larger
patients.
Table lowers to less than 17 inches
allowing better access for young, old,
and emergency patients
Imaging You Need
Comfort You Deserve
Rago Radiology
Geary Community Hospital
Junction City
A project in partnership with the Geary Community Healthcare Foundation
www.abilene-rc.com Progress 2014 Business 3
Special Memories to Last Forever
Di gi t al Kl as s i ks can help!
We specialize in:
Scanning and saving photos & slides to CD
Creating Power Point presentations or movies of your photos
Converting VHS to DVD
WENDYKLOSTERMAN
785-263-7846
www.digitalklassiks.com
wendy@digitalklassiks.com
Martin-Becker-Carlson
Funeral Home
414 NW 3rd Abilene
785-263-1414
www.martinbeckercarlson.com
Cindy and Ron Overlease
Aaron Overlease
8eeth
#976
3 8izes
AvaiIabIeI
- Pull on highway at speed limit
- Fits through any gate your pickup will
- Stable on uneven terrain.
- Wheels on each panel and electric over
hydraulic jack eliminates lifting~
saves time
- Frame gates for sorting
- Transport wheels are permanent,
no sliding off the axles and rolling
out of the way
- There is a permanent sheeted alley
with option to make adjustable















Back Row: Andrew Brown, John Kollhoff, Molly Sexton
Front Row: Sara Holley, Jordyn Backhus, Haley Lauer
We Bill Medicare For
Medical Equipment
& Diabetic Supplies
Local hotels keep busy with updates
By TIFFANY RONEY
Tiffany.roney@abilene-rc.com
The year of 2013 was a busy
one for Abilene motels. The Dia-
mond Motel received new own-
ers who moved to the area from
out-of-state and gave the motel
a facelift. Americas Best Value
Inn received new management.
Additionally, both motels, as
well as Holiday Inn Express and
Super 8, all received substantial
upgrades.
While it may sound like a lot of
changes for a motel to put in new
tile, replace all its mattresses,
box springs and paint, replace
most of its carpet and half of its
windows all in one year, Lynda
Collins, manager of Super 8,
said its just business as usual.
You have to keep things up-
dated, she said. Were just up-
dating everything we can on the
property and making sure our
guests have a good experience.
During the rest of 2014, Col-
lins said she and her team plan to
complete the carpeting replace-
ment and then redo all of their
sheets, blankets and furnishings.
The following year, they plan to
replace all of the televisions.
Thats not until 2015, but you
have to plan it out, she said.
Savan Bhakta, manager of
Americas Best Value Inn, said
he still feels new to the motel
since he started managing it in
November. Hes no stranger to
the motel business though the
Panama native has 6 years of
experience in various states.
We are doing a lot of things,
like changing the interior style
and remodeling things, Bhakta
said. Right now its a lot of
work as we change some things.
We have to pay for the pool and
hot tub, so its going to affect us
a little bit from the income side
of it, but we are going to take
care of it.
Bhakta said he is especially
thankful for the motels relation-
ship with La Fiesta, as the two
entities share a building. Simi-
larly, Collins said she enjoys
sending guests across the park-
ing lot to Green Acres. Chad
Rufener, manager of Holiday
Inn Express, said he regularly
recommends Brookville Hotel to
guests and often receives thanks
from the customers via takeout
boxes of fried chicken a phe-
nomenon he said he cant com-
plain about.
Holiday Inn Express pumps a
lot of money into upgrades ev-
ery year, and Ive stayed in other
Holiday Inn Express hotels that
arent nearly as nice as ours,
Convention and Visitors Bu-
reau director Glenda Purkis said.
When we go to shows and the
fair, I get comments about what
a great hotel we have at the Hol-
iday Inn. We dont appreciate
what we have sometimes or
we dont know what we have.
Purkis said she is thankful all
of the local hotels and motels are
continuing to put resources to-
ward improvements.
The upgrades are very key to
keeping the businesses operat-
ing and keeping the ability to
pull traffc off the interstate, she
said. Tourists want upgraded
properties, and were fortunate
that our hotels see the impor-
tance of that and are doing it.
Tiffany Roney Refector-Chronicle
Lynda Collins shows a recently remodeled bathroom at Abilenes Super 8
Tiffany Roney Refector-Chronicle
Solid surface window sills are one of several up-
grades at Abilenes Super 8.
4 Progress 2014 Business www.abilene-rc.com
ENJOY LIFE
TO THE
FULLEST
Benjamin F. Edwards & Co.
102 NW 3rd Street, Abilene, KS 67410
Phone: 785-263-3794
Toll Free: 855-200-3794
benjaminfedwards.com
2014-0049 Exp. 1/31/2016 Member SIPC
Patricia OMalley-
Weingartner
Managing Director
Investments
Brian Williams
Financial Consultant
Donna Nanninga
Senior Financial
Associate
Let us help make sure you have
a nancial plan in place that helps
you enjoy yours.
Trust. Integrity. Mutual Respect.
These principles anchor our
commitment to put our clients
interests rst. We also have the
top-notch service and advice
that you need to build a plan
that ts your unique goals
and objectives.
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Its tax time, and its also
a good time to review your
investment portfolio and its
performance. Call and schedule
an appointment today.
PEtErSON MONuMENtS & DESigN, iNC.
Professional reliable Experienced
LyNN PEtErSON
PO Box 368
Abilene, KS
New
Location
110 NE 3rd St.
(East of Post Office)
Office: (785) 263-3535 Cell: (785) 479-0122
Mon-Fri: 10 to 5
Call for appointment. (Appreciated but not required)
Sat and evenings by
appointment only.
Getting married? Having a birthday? Family reunion?
The 1928 Art Deco Historic Union Pacific Depot is a perfect location
for your event! Affordable, classy, and convenient!
Charter the Abilene Trolley!
Transport your wedding party from the church to the reception
Treat your group to a historic trolley tour of Abilene
Charter the trolley for corporate events
Having a conference or group gathering in Abilene?
The Abilene CVB:
Provides welcome bags for your group
Assist you in planning your conference or gathering
Makes arrangements with local attractions
Provides a step-on guide to tell the story of Abilene!
Call 785-263-2231 to learn what we can do for you!
Abilene Convention & Visitors Bureau & Civic Center
Located in the Historic Union Pacific Depot
201 NW Second, Abilene, Kansas
304 N. Broadway
Name: Shelley Rosebrook
How long have your worked in
Abilene? 18 years
Graduated from Abilene High School
and University of Kansas School of
Pharmacy.
A unique feature of the pharmacy is
the soda fountain that has been there
since 1972. One of the few places in
Kansas where Green Rivers and 400s
are sold.
Name: Angela Horsfall
Broadway location
Angela is a graduate of Central
Heights High School, a small, country
school in eastern Kansas in 2005. She
spent the next eight years in Lawrence
at the University of Kansas, four years
as an undergraduate and four at the
School of Pharmacy. She graduated in
May 2013 and moved to Abilene the
very same week taking on the position
of pharmacy manager with AuBurn.
Angel and her husband Kellen have
been married 4 years and have two
children that keep them very busy,
Emma, who is 1 and 1/2, and Killian
who is 1 month old.
They have live in Abilene for eight
months.
What is the nature of your business?
Providing fast, quality, community
pharmacy services with a friendly, pro-
fessional pharmacy staff with affordable
prices, walk-in vaccinations and new
extended hours.
Business in profle
Angela Horsfall (left) and Taylor Heinrich in the unique soda fountain at Auburn Pharmacy.
AuBurn Pharmacy
Business: Insurance services and risk management
New Location: 500 N. Buckeye Ave.
Tell our readers a little bit about yourself:
Copeland Insurance Agency, Inc. was established in
1960 in Riley, Kan., to serve the residents and farmers of
the area. Over the past 50 years, Copeland Insurance has
continued to grow and now
serves all of Northeast and
Central Kansas. Copeland
Insurance is owned by Jay
and Vonda Copeland and is
quickly becoming one of the
fastest growing insurance
agencies in the State. Each
location is staffed by local
people who live in and know
your community, and give
you personal service.
In 2000 Jay purchased an agency in Enterprise, in 2006
bought a building on Broadway St. and moved the agency
to Abilene. For the past few years the Jay kept an eye open
for an opportunity to move to a more visible location. When
the former Abilene Area Chamber of Commerce building was
put on the market, the perfect spot was found.
Currently CIA has three Abilene Agents:
Deborah Lake
Has been with Copeland Insurance since 1995, starting out
first in the Manhattan office for several years before moving
Copeland Insurance Agency, Inc
Debra Lake
Robert Cox
Sheldon Jones
See: Copeland, Page 6
302 N. Broadway Abilene, KS 785-200-6622 Hrs: T-F 8-4, Sat 9-3
Gifts &
Home Accents
gourmet specialty coees
pastries, cookies & cakes
sandwiches, breakfast & lunch
special orders welcome
Home Decor, Jewelry,
Personal Accessories
Baby Gifts & More
By TIFFANY RONEY
tiffany.roney@abilene-rc.com
First, he was a county
attorney. Then a racing
museum owner. Then a
screenwriter and producer.
Now, hes about to be-
come a grocery store own-
er while continuing his
work with all of the above.
Doug Thompson said he
had considered the idea
of starting a grocery store
in Chapman for several
years, but a recent catalyst
caused him to put the plan
into practice.
Chapman hasnt had
a full-size grocery store
in a long time, so there
was a need for it and the
community wanted it,
Thompson said. The
neighborhood revitaliza-
tion program that the city
adopted probably was the
last piece of the puzzle to
bring it together.
The program gives busi-
nesses like the upcoming
Chapman Food Mart tax
abatements on their real
estate, which, Thompson
said, gives a new busi-
ness with that sort of in-
vestment a good chance to
get off the ground and be
proftable.
Thompson and his wife,
Connie Thompson, decid-
ed to build the store on a
piece of land in front of an-
other of Dougs ventures,
the Kansas Auto Racing
Museum. Doug said con-
struction of the 100 x 80
square foot building is 80
percent complete.
Doug said he hopes to re-
ceive not only local busi-
ness but also sales from
people traveling on Inter-
state-70.
If I was traveling down
the road and we said,
Lets grab something
from a deli, I might see
the sign and say, You
know, thats easy enough
for me. I can see where
I get off and where I get
back on lets go do it,
Doug said. Its better
than fghting through an
area where its just really
busy.
Doug said the grocery
store will probably cre-
ate 15 to 20 jobs, some
of which will be full-time
and others part-time. He
said it will likely employ
a combination of local in-
dividuals and people from
outside Chapman.
I think there will be
some people who are
maybe working outside of
the area in that business
who may want to come
and work closer to home,
Doug said. There will be
some who say, Im look-
ing for some part-time
work, and those may ft as
checkers, stockers, carry-
out or working in the deli.
And there may be some-
body who will take a job
and move into the area.
In addition to the deli,
Doug said the full-service
grocery store will include
a meat market, salad bar,
fresh fruits and vegetables
and a variety of dry goods.
The store will be open
seven days per week.
Partnering for produce
Doug said he hopes to
partner with area farmers
for fresh, local produce.
There is some excellent
produce around, and that
would make sense, rather
than paying the expense to
truck it in, he said. I bet
we can fnd some farmers
around who are producing
watermelons and so forth
that would just be perfect
for it.
He said farmers who are
interested in partnering
with the grocery store can
stop by the store or, after it
opens, call its phone num-
ber, which is not yet set
up. Doug said he plans to
open the store by the end
of March.
Its just a big empty
store right now, he said.
www.abilene-rc.com Progress 2014 Business 5
We Can Help You Achieve
Your Financial Goals
Growing Dreams with Hometown Values.
418 N.W. 3rd
Abilene, KS
(785) 263-1112
446 N. Marshall
Chapman, KS
(785) 922-6515
1205 18th Street
Belleville, KS
(785) 527-2268
113 W. Mill Street
Plainville, KS
(785) 434-2809
1100 Fort Street
Hays, KS
(785) 628-2400
323 4th Street
Scandia, KS
(785) 335-2243
When you help people reach
for the stars...
Good Tings Happen
bankwithastra.com
Member FDIC
Everything you need for your office
from ink cartridges and color copies
to furniture, printing & wide format.
Still in business serving Abilene
& Dickinson County since 1894
One block east of the post office
Started in 1951 by Don & Pauline Sims
106 N. Spruce Abilene
263-2271 1-800-640-2273
O
V
ER
60 YEARS IN BUSINESS
Zeys
1020 West 1st
Abilene, Kansas
Across from McKinley School
3 blocks South of Eisenhower Park
Providing The Community With
Top Quality, Dependable Service, That
Only A Family Owned Grocer Can Provide!
Help Us Celebrate Our
78
th
Anniversary!
Open: 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday thru Saturday; Closed Sunday
84
th
8
Zeys
Investing In The Future
Dickinson County Board of Realtors




(785)263-3111
206 N.W. 2nd Abilene, Ks 67410
cookrealestate.net
Yvette Ebright
Realtor
785-258-3379
Becky Schwab
Owner/Broker
785-479-1920
Shelly Crane
Realtor
785-263-5028
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www.etheringtonrealtors.com
115 N.W. 3rd Abilene, Ks. 263-1216
Susan Watt
Realtor
280-9919
Diane Landers
Realtor
280-0628
Katie Lady
Realtor
479-0306
ETHERINGTON & CO. REALTORS
HAUG REALTY
263-2222
Devin
Karraker
Travis
Bartley
Tony Haug
Broker
Nancy
McConville
Call Evenings & Weekends Too!
Gina Dalton
785-787-3082
Realtor
Missy Blacketer
785-479-3675
Realtor
April Clark
785-479-0374
Realtor
Gerald Gray
785-630-1017
Auctioneer/Realtor
327 N. Broadway 263-7332















Heidi Anderson
Broker/Owner
785-200-1060
102 N. Buckeye Abilene, Ks. 263-7151
Call our team for your Real Estate Needs
www.rehomes.com





Be Wise,
Select


Be Wise...Select
Ron Shivers Realty
and Auction Co.
Real Estate - Auctioneering -Appraisals
120 N.E. 14th Abilene785-263-7488
Ron Shivers
Broker, Auctioneer Appraisor
Christy Loy
Realtor
www.rsrealtyandauction.com
Maxine L. Biggs: 263-1016
Mark Biggs: 263-4220
Pat Shaffer: 263-3225
Gregg Biggs: 263-4428
Appraisal Service
Helping You Find Your Way Home
Chapman awaiting new hometown grocery
Tiffany Roney Refector-Chronicle
Doug Thompson looks out the entrance to Chapman Food Mart.
6 Progress 2014 Business www.abilene-rc.com
Thank You
Dickinson County
for all Your
Support the Last
47 Years!
1900 n. Buckeye 263-2285 abilene
Thank You
Dickinson County
for all Your
Support the Last
47 Years!
Serving The Abilene
Community Since 1930
Richard R. Danner, Willa Danner,
Andy DeLay, Rick Wyckoff &
Louise Ryan
P.O. Box 758
501 N. Buckeye Abilene, Ks 67410
263-1313
Danner
funeral home
Interior Restoration Churches
Commercial Buildings
Retail Wallcovering Custom Draperies
Ceramic Tile Carpet Area Rugs
Kathy Geske Tim Geske Lucas Geske
110 North Cedar Abilene, Kansas 67410
Phone: (785) 263-7984
208 N. Broadway
Call (785)263-2400
Life - Health - Annuities
Gene & Debbie
Bielefeld
785-280-2599
aaron@christnertech.com
www.christnertech.com
Solutions For All Your Technical Needs!
C
h
ristn
er
Tech
n
ical
S
olu
tion
s
LLC
On-site services
Virus removal/Computer cleanup
New computer consulting, sales
and setup
Wilson Electronics Cell Phone
Boosters
Wireless Routers in stock
Below are just a few of the services we offer!
to Enterprise in 2000,
and later to Abilene.
Deborahs hobbies
include reading, play-
ing cards and watching
Disney movies with the
grandchildren. She and
her husband Rick Lake
live in Abilene and have
two grown children.
Sheldon Jones
Has been with Copeland
Insurance since 2009.
Before working for CIA,
Sheldon worked at the
Green Team of Abilene
for around four years and
was employed at Midco
Plastics in Enterprise for
over 20 years. Sheldon
likes to spend time at the
lake with friends and also
enjoys his grandsons. He
and his wife Julie live in
Enterprise and have two
grown children.
Robert Cox
Has been with Copeland
Insurance nearly one
year now. Prior to joining
CIA Rob worked at UMB.
Robs favorite hobby is
whatever the kids are
into, so right now he is
a Boy Scout leader and
kids wrestling coach. He
and his wife Kara live in
Abilene and have four
children. Rob grew up
here in Abilene and is the
son of Greg and Susan
Cox. His grandfather Joe
Cox ran Cox Gambles
here in Abilene
What is the nature of
your business?
As an Independent
Insurance Agency, we
represent some of the
top insurance compa-
nies in the country. That
means better coverage
at a competitive price.
Because we are substan-
tial in size and strength,
our staff handles the
placing of large or dif-
ficult policies quickly and
accurately.
Copeland Insurance
understands you may
have special and ongo-
ing needs. Unlike the
insurance days of old, we
understand that you do
not need just an insur-
ance policy but a specific
and specialized program,
which includes ongoing
support. Copeland Insur-
ance is dedicated to serv-
ing your insurance and
safety needs throughout
the entire year and not
just at renewal. Looking
out for a customers best
interest is important, an
agent should not only
take the time to get to
know the customer, but
to also educate them
about insurance. You
have to earn their confi-
dence.
At Copeland Insurance
you can receive advice
in all areas of insurance
and benefit needs from
Property and Casualty,
Employee Benefits, Buy/
Sell Agreements, Bonds,
to your investment
needs.
We insure all lines
including Business,
Farming, Home, Auto,
Life & Health, and Public
Entities, basically if its
important to you, we can
insure it.
We would appreciate
having the opportunity
to serve as your business
insurance representative
to protect your personal
and business property
and assets.
Copeland Insurance
Agency has on staff a full
time Loss Control Con-
sultant who can inspect
a risk and work with the
insured and the insur-
ance company.
Other locations are
Junction City, Leawood,
Manhattan, Marysville,
Riley, Salina, Topeka and
Wamego.
What role, if any,
does technology have
in your business?
Smart phones; people
can find us and also have
access to some policy in-
formation in the palm of
their hand. We also have
a state of the art website
and lead system.
What changes to do
you see in your busi-
ness because of the
change in location?
Consider the difference
of the amount of traffic
on the 200 block of N.
Broadway and 500 block
of N. Buckeye along with
the LED sign. We have
had people talk to us
that think we are new to
Abilene. It is difficult to
know what media to use
to market a business.
Top of mind awareness is
important. Someone may
not want to change in-
surance agents today but
when they do, they will
remember that place by
the credit union with the
Las Vegas sign.
Copeland
Continued from Page 4
Abilenes incentives limited by state
By DAVID DILLNER
Abilene City Manager
W
hen I am out and about,
I am often asked about
economic develop-
ment incentives. In many cases,
business owners are inquiring as
to their business eligibility for
city incentives. I thought I would
provide some explanation about
why incentives are used and why
certain businesses are not eligi-
ble to receive certain incentives.
For the most part, the City is
very limited on the economic de-
velopment incentives it can pro-
vide the public. Most incentives
are authorized by state law and
have little room for local modi-
fication. Other programs, such as
the Neighborhood Revitalization
Program, provide greater flex-
ibility to local governments espe-
cially as it relates to where such
incentives are allowed to be used
in a community and what criteria
is used to determine eligibility.
The City of Abilene has autho-
rized the following economic
development incentives: Ad Va-
lorem Property Tax Abatement,
Issuance of Industrial Revenue
Bonds, Neighborhood Revital-
ization Program (known as the
Abilene Revitalization Program),
and the Hotel Incentive Program.
Over the next several weeks, I
will explore each of these in-
centive programs to help inform
the public on the eligibility for
these various programs. But first,
please allow me to discuss some
things the public needs to con-
sider to better understand incen-
tives.
Economic development incen-
tives encourage development to
address specific land use issues.
The Abilene Revitalization Pro-
gram provides an incentive to
property owners who invest in
buildings or structures located in
specific areas of the community.
These areas have been designat-
ed because of their importance to
Abilenes tax base.
For example, the Downtown
Revitalization District is intend-
ed to promote private invest-
ment in aging buildings located
in the Downtown Business Dis-
trict. Many of the buildings in the
downtown are historic structures
that add a certain appeal and nos-
talgia to the community. These
structures are valued assets that
the community desires to pre-
serve. Aging buildings, however,
also have their liabilities.
Aging buildings will deteriorate
over time without proper main-
tenance. The repairs needed to
keep an historic building in good
order tend to be costly, especially
if retrofitting is required for non-
compliant electric, plumbing, or
mechanical features. Downtown
Abilene is unique because of the
density of historic commercial
buildings. Incentivizing improve-
ments to this area is one way the
City can assist in preserving this
valued asset of the community.
See: Incentives, Page 8
www.abilene-rc.com Progress 2014 Business 7

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Hankook, Kumho, Uniroyal,
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Hours:
Mon-Fri 8 am-5:30 pm
Saturday 8 am3:00 pm
785-263-7110
mmtire@eaglecom.net
www.mmtireauto.net
400 N. Buckeye Abilene, KS 67410
Family Owned and Operated
BARBIERI INSURANCE SERVICES
Ron Barbieri Since 1989 Tracy Westby
Farm Commercial Auto Home
110 N. Buckeye 785-263-2287
An independent agency offering several major
companies including:
Nationwide - Allied Insurance
Progressive Dairyland
Bremer Farmers Mutual Kansas Mutual
Johns Service
Serving Abilene Area Since 1970
24 hour Light & Heavy
Towing & Recovery
Light Car Repair Custom Exhaust
Lock Out Service
785-263-4444
425 N Buckeye, Abilene
Ryan Horan 785-280-1814
(25 Gutter Colors To Choose From)
Seamless Guttering
Leaf Shelter (Gutter Protection
System Available)
**FREE ESTIMATES**
G
G
orilla
uttering
and Repair
263-7012 or 263-4002 For Information on Marking Your Home
Heritage Homes Association
Helping Preserve Abilenes Older Homes
Rotary 2014
EngagE RotaRy, ChangE LivEs
Rotary International Theme - 2013-2014
In 2013
The Following Projects Were Supported By
Volunteer Service Or Funding:
Adopt-a-Highway Cleanup
Radio Days
Food For Kids
Literacy Project -
Dictionaries
Worldwide Polio
Eradication Campaign
Fred Jarvis Rotary
Scholarships
Church Women United
Abilene Food Pantry
Heritage Center Carousel
Horse
Old Abilene Town -
Restroom Grant
Rocky Rorabaugh Golf
Tourn for BB/BS &
Food For Kids
4-H Banquet
Meals on Wheels
Big Brothers Big Sisters
Rotoract Scholarship
Shelter Box
Abilene Rotary Club
No. 1543 District 5670
Randy Gassman, President-
Bryan Koehn, President Elect
Glenda Purkis, Vice President
Joleen Rankin, Secretary
Bruce Hettenbach, Treasurer
Becky Schwab, Past President
Henry Baxa, Sergeant at Arms
Bruce Dale, Member
Mack Teasley, Member
Tonya Mills, Member
Organized October 6, 1921. Meets each Friday 12:10 at Mr. Ks Farmhouse
Benjamin F. Edwards
Name: Brian Williams
New Location: N.W. corner of Third and Buckeye
Streets, in the old Long Oil building.
Tell our readers a little bit about yourself:
Williams grew up the son of a career Navy man. As
a child, his family lived in California, Maine (twice),
Florida, Iceland and Michigan. After graduating high
school, he joined the Armys Military Police Corps and
was stationed at Fort Riley following basic and ad-
vanced training in Alabama. When he completed his
military service, he enrolled at Kansas State Univer-
sity, where he studied Economics and Sociology.
Following the completion of his bachelors degrees,
Williams stayed at KSU and earned his Masters
Degree in Public Administration. During that time,
he started a career in municipal government, work-
ing for the City of Manhattan; first as an intern in the
Finance Department and eventually in several other
roles, including Assistant to the City Manager and
Assistant Airport Director at the Manhattan Regional
Airport. In his various roles with the city (and in his
subsequent position as a civilian analyst with the U.S.
Army Garrison at Fort Riley) he was fortunate to inter-
act professionally with numerous regional, state and
federal government officials and organizations, and
in doing so provided insight, information and analy-
sis on innumerable special projects and initiatives of
the City, County, School District and State, including
several significant financial undertakings that required
the issuance of either General Obligation or Special
Revenue Bonds (or some combination thereof) by
one or more of those taxing jurisdictions. He was also
especially privileged to work with the Flint Hills Re-
gional Council on regional housing, transportation and
infrastructure development issues that have impacted
this region significantly as our local communities have
continued to grow.
In 2011 he left the local community and was hired
by Merrill Lynch as a Financial Advisor in Kansas
City, Mo., and Leawood, Kan. While at Merrill Lynch,
he built on the foundation of his previous educa-
tion and experience by further developing the skills
necessary to manage his clients investments in the
various capital markets. In December of 2013 he
was fortunate to be offered my current position with
Benjamin F. Edwards & Co, here in Abilene. Williams
said, I am proud to have joined a highly reputable,
privately-owned firm, widely-known and respected for
its history of prudent management and protection of
our clients financial well-being.
He has two children (8 and 10) who are active in
sports, theater and dance. In his limited time off
from being a Financial Consultant and Dad, he enjoys
golfing and reading.
How long have your worked in Abilene? Since
December 2013.
What was your occupation before the one you
have now? I worked for Merrill Lynch as a Financial
Advisor in Kansas City.
What is the nature of your business? At Benja-
min F. Edwards, we work with our clients to develop
an investment program that combines sound advice,
a wide range of investments and services and the
personalized attention our clients deserve.
What role, if any, does technology have in
your business? Our Financial Consultants have
access to a complete and powerful suite of finan-
cial analysis programs and resources that we use
on behalf of our clients in developing individualized
goals-based financial plans, and in reviewing their
progress towards achieving specific objectives. We
also leverage those resources to identify the most
prudent investments for our clients as we tailor and
monitor their investment portfolios according to their
particular needs.
Business in profle
The staff at the Benjamin F. Edwards & Co., in the newly re-
modeled offce at the corner of Buckeye Ave. and Third Street
(from left) Brian Williams, Patricia OMalley-Weingartner, Donna
Nanninga and Marcella Cobb.
8 Progress 2014 Business www.abilene-rc.com
Salina
est. 1996
Locally Owned Since 1905...
Three Convenient Locations
Abilene, Ks.
(785) 263-1332
Salina, Ks.
(785) 827-3600
Solomon, Ks.
(785) 655-2941
Abilene
est. 1990
Solomon
est. 1905
To our loyal customers,
the foundation of our success,
we extend our sincere gratitude
Thank You!
Back, left to right, toward front: Scott Darling, Marianna Carney, Dennis Riordan, David Riordan, Kirk Berneking, Kyle McCook, Kathy Crichton,
Diane Swenson, Kathy Hasker, Rebecca Meuli, Bernie Nogle, Mary Beth Thompson, Joan Reiff, Kimberly Reinert,
Cheril Geist, Gay Scanlan, Terri Scanlan, Kathy Breer, Joy Sarapa,
Lindsey Strunk, and Jacque Anguiano
For All Your
Automotive Needs!
AUTO CLINIC
Kenny Rodda
Open Daily 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
CLOSED SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS
315 W. 1st Abilene 263-3383
Since 1971
Brians
Plumbing, Inc.
663 Old Hwy. 40, Abilene, KS 67410
Ph. (785) 263-1960
Fax (785) 263-0265
Brian and Leigh Ann Griffis, owners
Licensed Master Plumber with over 30 years experience
By default, incentives
are also set up to dis-
courage development
in certain areas. For
example, the City does
not extend the Abilene
Revitalization Program
to areas included in the
floodplain because en-
couraging development
in areas designated as
floodplain would be
counterproductive with
the FEMA Flood Pro-
gram.
Economic develop-
ment incentives encour-
age certain types of
business development.
By state law, the City
is only able to provide
constitutional tax abate-
ments to businesses that
manufacture articles of
commerce, conduct re-
search and development
relative to the manu-
facture of products, or
that store goods traded
in interstate commerce.
Retail and service busi-
nesses are not eligible
for this specific incen-
tive. The State of Kan-
sas, like many states,
has decided to grant
special provisions to
encourage these types
of businesses to locate
and expand in Kansas.
Because the incentive is
established by state law
and not subject to lo-
cal modification, most
businesses in Abilene
are not eligible for a
tax abatement like the
one provided in 2005 to
Great Plains Manufac-
turing, Inc.
Economic develop-
ment incentives are
supposed to encourage
activity that would not
otherwise occur with-
out the incentive. Many
incentives authorized
by state law require a
but-for analysis that
is meant to show that
the development would
not occur but for the in-
centive. The thought be-
hind this analysis is that
businesses should not
be granted an incentive
for doing something
that they were going to
do without the incen-
tive. When a business
is provided an incen-
tive, it receives either
a direct or indirect sub-
sidy from a governmen-
tal entity. At the local
level, this means that a
business either receives
a rebate on property
taxes or does not have
to pay the liability at
all. The result is the re-
maining tax base must
continue to pay for lo-
cal government services
that may be used by that
business during the in-
centive period. If an in-
centive is not needed in
order for the business to
succeed, it should theo-
retically not be granted
so as to preserve equity
throughout the tax base.
Economic develop-
ment incentives shift the
burden of taxation from
those property owners
that receive the incen-
tive to those that do not.
As briefly discussed in
the previous point, in-
centives shift the tax
burden on to all others
that do not receive the
incentive. If a large em-
ployer comes to a com-
munity and is awarded a
ten-year, 100% property
tax abatement, other
businesses and residen-
tial properties will be
paying to subsidize the
business receiving the
abatement. A good ex-
ample of this would be
a call for police service
during the abatement
period. The business
has not paid property
taxes, which are meant
to pay for public ser-
vices. When the Police
Department arrives to
the call, the bill for
the call was paid for by
other property owners
of the community. The
property will continue
to be subsidized until
the property comes unto
the tax rolls.
Economic develop-
ment incentives are
nearly uniform through-
out the State of Kansas,
and many states have
similar incentives to at-
tract investment. The
incentives that are au-
thorized by the State of
Kansas are authorized
such that most commu-
nities have the ability to
approve nearly the same
incentive as every other
community. Cities have
some flexibility with re-
spect to some of the cri-
teria and the amount of
incentive granted, but I
would suspect that there
is not a lot of disparity
in these areas through-
out Kansas. As a result,
incentives do not make
any community more
attract than another.
Since most communi-
ties and other states
provide nearly the same
incentives, businesses
will choose the most at-
tractive locations and
then determine the best
incentive package for
their business. While it
may help separate two
or three competing mu-
nicipalities, it probably
wont help a community
that lacks the necessary
labor force, education
quality, public infra-
structure, tax policy,
and quality of life that
is expected to attract
outside business invest-
ment.
Incentives
Continued from Page 6
Business in profle
Name: Jarad and Jennifer Waite
New Location: 202 N.W. 15th Street
Jarad Waite O.D. is a graduate of Osborne High School.
He received a Bachelor of Science at Kansas State Uni-
versity, attended University of Missouri, and received a
Doctorate in Optometry from St. Louis College of Optom-
etry. He is a member of the Kansas Optometry Associa-
tion, American Optometry Association, Abilene Breakfast
Optimist Club and St. Andrews Knights of Columbus.
Jennifer is the office manager for Family Eye Care.
They have a son, Grant, in third grade at St. Andrews
and a daughter, Annastyn, in preschool. Their hobbies
include family, sports, hunting and fishing
How long have you worked in Abilene? 5-1/2
years.
When did you move? The business moved to its new
location last December.
Is there a reason for the move? Larger building,
better layout and location, better parking.
What do you like best about the new location?
The ability to grow.
What is the nature of your business? Optometry,
optical frame boutique, contact lens fitting, ocular dis-
ease diagnosis and treatment.
What role, if any, does technology have in your
business? Family Eye Care offers electronic health
records and uses scanning lasers in some instruments.
The staff at the Family Eye Care of Abilene (from left) Dr. Jarad
Waite, Jennifer Waite, LeAnn Kuntz, Nikki Young, Kathy Heiser,
Laurie McLaughlin, Jo Ferguson and Donna Bathurst.
Family Eye Care
of Abilene
By TIFFANY RONEY
tiffany.roney@abilene-rc.com
Though local hotel own-
ers saw a decrease in busi-
ness during the Interstate
70 construction last fall,
Convention and Visitors
Bureau director Glenda
Purkis said the hotels are
so busy in the summertime
that they have to turn tour-
ists away.
We have so many attrac-
tions that visitors want to
see when they come here,
but during our peak months
the summer months
we dont have the lodging
because our hotels fll up,
Purkis said.
To remedy this problem,
the CVB board and city
staff are working to attract
developers to build a new
hotel in the area.
Any hotel developer
would be interested in as
close to I-70 as they can
get, with a view from I-70
so drivers can see whats
available before they get
here and then pull right
off, she said.
Purkis said another hotel
would beneft not only the
travelers who want a place
to stay while they visit at-
tractions like Eisenhower
Presidential Library, Mu-
seum and Boyhood Home;
but it would also beneft the
city of Abilene as a whole.
Overnight lodging is
what provides the funding
for the CVB to do all the
marketing and the tourism
programs for Abilene, she
said. So if we dont have
what I call the heads in
beds, then we dont have
the budget that we can put
back in to get more visitors
to pull off the interstate and
see the attractions and the
restaurants, fll up with gas
and spend the night.
While it may sound like a
catch-22 loop funds are
needed via heads in beds
to produce funds for more
heads in beds Purkis
said there are ways to gen-
erate more economic activ-
ity to boost the loops mo-
mentum.
I know that there are
other communities that
will plan winter events,
she said. Hays has the
Frost Fest to create some
visitor traffc in the winter
months. Ive seen crafting
weekends. Wamego has a
wool fest. So weve looked
at events we could have
in January, February and
March.
Though no winter events
are set in stone for after
Christmas next year, Pur-
kis said the local tourism
industry has something
to look forward to that is
coming up in less than two
months.
April is a packed month
for Abilene tourism be-
cause it holds the Eisen-
hower Marathon and the
National Greyhound Asso-
ciation Spring Meet.
Our season really starts
in April with those two
big events, she said. The
more events that you can
create, the more traffc
youre going to pull from
outside the area, and some
of them will spend the
night.
While not every Abilene
resident has the time to
put together a new tourist-
drawing event or has the re-
sources to pull in a new ho-
tel, Purkis said any Abilene
resident can support local
hotels and the citys tour-
ism industry simply by
staying in touch with their
long-distance loved ones
and faraway friends.
State Travel and Tour-
ism says the No. 1 reason
people travel and visit
communities is family and
friends, she said. Class
reunions. Family get-to-
gethers. Our residents are
the best generator of the
overnights.
it will be very retro.
Additionally, the Pot-
ters are hiring part-time
employees to help keep
the space spick-and-
span.
Were just always
striving to learn more and
be better, and our goal,
ultimately, is to achieve
excellence, Adrian said.
Every year, we hope to
bring more blessings to
our guests and increase
the number of people
coming out, and give
them the best possible
experience.
Windmill Inn
While the Victorian
Inns owners moved to
Abilene from New Mex-
ico to run the inn, the
Windmill Inns owners,
Tim and Deb Sanders,
who hail from Hutchin-
son and Wichita, respec-
tively, moved to the area
without a bed-and-break-
fast plan. They came be-
cause Tim wanted to start
farming.
I looked at what was
available for rural wom-
en, and there wasnt
that much, Deb said.
I wanted some work.
We had stayed in a B&B
before, so we thought,
Why not?
Twenty-four years in,
the Sanders said they en-
joy opening their home
as an inn, and Deb espe-
cially enjoys the cook-
ing. They watch cooking
shows and keep an eye
on menus of upscale res-
taurants to ensure they
serve whatevers cur-
rent, Deb said.
They offer evening
meals, by reservation,
to groups of eight or
more, and they serve a
six-course Valentines
Dinner each year on the
weekend closest to the
holiday.
We enjoy the hospital-
ity, and we get wonder-
ful people, Deb said.
People who come into
a bed-and-breakfast are
looking for something
a little different. They
dont necessarily want
the same room they had
the night before. And
they enjoy getting into
older homes, typically,
and learning the history.
We meet a variety of peo-
ple. Its a great way share
your property.
Deb said 2013 was a
good year for the Wind-
mill Inn, but the past
few years hadnt been as
strong.
After the economy slid
in 08, things were a little
quiet, but in 2012, things
started to improve, and
in 13, they improved
more, she said. This
year, I expect to be back
where we used to be be-
fore the recession start-
ed.
The inn has already re-
ceived something new in
2014: a spot on the Flint
Hills Quilt Block.
Were putting a quilt
block trail through the
Flint Hills, and weve
added two quilt blocks
out on one of our build-
ings, Deb said. Theyre
very visible from the
road and very beautiful,
and theres pinwheels.
Theres a lot of people
that have an interest in
the quilts, the patterns,
that sort of thing, and I
think that will be a good
draw for us, for people
coming in to see that.
The Sanders continu-
ally make changes to the
inn to maintain a quality
atmosphere for the wide
spectrum of guests they
receive.
Weve been getting
more intergenerational
families grandparents,
parents and grandkids
who want to show their
kids something differ-
ent than Disneyland on
a family vacation, Deb
said. Several years ago,
we had eight men from
Korea. Only one of them
could speak English, and
that was difficult, but we
sure had a nice time with
them.
Deb said she is amazed
by the people she gets ac-
quainted with and by the
variety of reasons they
traveled to the area.
Some are here for a
funeral or a memorial
service, and of course
graduations and wed-
dings, she said. There
are all kinds of reasons
why people are out and
about. Its pretty cool.
www.abilene-rc.com Progress 2014 Business 9
See Us For All Your
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1701 W. 1st 263-7668
M-F 8-5:30 | Sat 8-5
BETTER SERVICE. BETTER SAVINGS. BETTER VALUE.
Come to American Family Insurance and take advantage of our new lineup of discounts.
Contact me today for a competitive insurance quote.
Your dream is out there. Go get it. Well protect it.
American Family Mutual Insurance Company, American Family Insurance Company,
American Standard Insurance Company of Ohio, American Standard Insurance Company of Wisconsin.
6000 American Parkway, Madison, WI 53783 2013 007390 6/13
Brian Tajchman Agency
American Star Certifed Agency
Excellence In Customer Experience
Monday - Friday 8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
(785) 263-2512
More hotel beds
could be boon
to local tourism
So if we dont have what
I call the heads in beds,
then we dont have the bud-
get that we can put back
in to get more visitors to
pull off the interstate and
see the attractions and the
restaurants, fill up with gas
and spend the night.
Glenda Purkis
Bed
Continued from Page 2
Tiffany Roney Refector-Chronicle
Abilenes Victorian Inn owner Adrian Potter arranges cushions on a couch at the inn.
10 Progress 2014 Business www.abilene-rc.com
SALES OFFICE
PARTS
DETAIL DEPARTMENT
SERVICE
BODY SHOP
Chris Eckert
Sales
25 Years
Thank you for your business and support over these last 31 years. During this time we have made
lots of changes and improvements to our ability to serve the transportation needs of our community
and we could not have done so without your generous support. When you choose to do business
with Holm Automotive Center, please know you are supporting our City and County and you are
doing business with friends and neighbors.
You can be sure your investment with Holm Automotive Center will be reinvested in our commu-
nity for the good of our community.
Thanks again, and heres to the next 31 years and more.
Tim Holm, Dealership Principal
Come On Over to Holm Automotive Center in Abilene.
Youll Be Glad You Did!
GROWING TO MEET THE NEEDS OF DICKINSON COUNTY
Eric Altwegg
Sales
23 Years
Pat Magee
Finance Director
18 Years
Hunter McMillen
Sales
10 Years
Brent Palin
Internet Mngr
10 Years
David Brooks
Sales
1 Year
David Surrite
Sales
1 Year
Jeff Johnson
Sales
1 Year
Jeff Holm
Sales
8 Years
Matt Holm
GSM
8 Years
Michelle Holt
Sales
6 Years
Chuck Stein
Sales
4 Years
Ross Taplin
Sales Mngr.
4 Years
Michelle Holm
Sales
3 Years
Pam Hasselman
Asst. Office Mngr
15 Years
Darwin Alderson
Controller
13 Years
Elizabeth Thompson
Title Clerk/Acct. Receivable
7 Years
Diane Holt
Evening Receptionist
4 Years
Greg Hagemeister
Body Shop Tech
15 Years
Devin McKee
Body Shop Tech
3 Years
Andy Elliott
Body Shop Mngr
2 Years
Norman Hartman
Body Shop Tech
2 Year
Brad Signer
Parts Mngr
16 Years
Niles Guerra
Parts Consultant
4 Years
Gary Hasselman
Fixed Operations Mngr
27 Years
Kit Veal
Service Tech
23 Years
Jamie Avers
Service Advisor
14 Years
Darren Rapp
Service Tech
11 Years
Chuck Loader
Service Advisor
9 Years
Mike Hasselman
Service Tech
6 Years
Rick Vandercreek
Service Tech
6 Years
Steven Anguiano
Lube Tech
2 Years
Ramon DeLaMora
Body Shop Tech
1 Year
Jeff Thornton
Service Tech
2 Years
Len Legette
Detail Mngr.
1 Year


ANY MAKE OR MODEL




ON MOST MAKES AND MODELS, SOME SLIGHTLY MORE


holmauto.com
Hrs: M-T-W-F 8-5:30
Thurs 8-8 Sat 8-2
I like Ike Month Specials!
Kim Bacon
Receptionist/Rental Mngr.
1 Year
Kari Thorton
Cashier/Title Clerk
1 Year
Dede Brunner
Collision Shop Asst.
1 Year
Justin Bias
Detail Consultant
6 Months
Cody Koch
Service Advisor
1 Year
Joshua Gardinier
Detail Consultant
6 Months
Jeremy Plott
Sales
1 Year
Jed Smith
Sales
1 Year
Corey Neufeld
Finance
1 Year
Norm Holt
Courier Driver
3 Years
Nathan Wendland
Body Shop Tech
1 Year