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NEW MEXICO

Crossroads of

New and Ancient

NEW MEXICO Crossroads of New and Ancient 1999 – 2000 Speakers Bureau & Chautauqua Programs Millennium

1999 – 2000

Speakers Bureau & Chautauqua Programs Millennium Edition

NEW MEXICO

ENDOWMENT

FOR THE

HUMANITIES

N EW M EXICO E NDOWMENT FOR THE H UMANITIES
MARKO ABOUT THE COVER: AMATEUR of Aztec captures the crossroads of ancient and modern in
MARKO ABOUT THE COVER: AMATEUR of Aztec captures the crossroads of ancient and modern in
MARKO ABOUT THE COVER: AMATEUR of Aztec captures the crossroads of ancient and modern in
MARKO ABOUT THE COVER: AMATEUR of Aztec captures the crossroads of ancient and modern in
MARKO ABOUT THE COVER: AMATEUR of Aztec captures the crossroads of ancient and modern in
MARKO ABOUT THE COVER: AMATEUR of Aztec captures the crossroads of ancient and modern in
MARKO ABOUT THE COVER: AMATEUR of Aztec captures the crossroads of ancient and modern in
MARKO ABOUT THE COVER: AMATEUR of Aztec captures the crossroads of ancient and modern in
MARKO ABOUT THE COVER: AMATEUR of Aztec captures the crossroads of ancient and modern in
MARKO ABOUT THE COVER: AMATEUR of Aztec captures the crossroads of ancient and modern in

MARKO

MARKO ABOUT THE COVER: AMATEUR of Aztec captures the crossroads of ancient and modern in New

ABOUT

THE

COVER:

AMATEUR

MARKO ABOUT THE COVER: AMATEUR of Aztec captures the crossroads of ancient and modern in New

of Aztec captures the

crossroads of ancient and modern in New Mexico with this image of Comet Hale-Bopp over Fajada Butte in Chaco Culture National Historic Park. Kecman wanted to juxtapose the new comet with the butte that was an astronomical observatory in the years 900 – 1200 AD. Fajada (banded) Butte is home to the ancestral Puebloan sun shrine popularly known as “The Sun Dagger” site. The butte is closed to visitors to protect its fragile cultural sites.

PHOTOGRAPHER

visitors to protect its fragile cultural sites. PHOTOGRAPHER KECMAN The clear skies over the Southwest led
visitors to protect its fragile cultural sites. PHOTOGRAPHER KECMAN The clear skies over the Southwest led
visitors to protect its fragile cultural sites. PHOTOGRAPHER KECMAN The clear skies over the Southwest led

KECMAN

to protect its fragile cultural sites. PHOTOGRAPHER KECMAN The clear skies over the Southwest led to
to protect its fragile cultural sites. PHOTOGRAPHER KECMAN The clear skies over the Southwest led to
to protect its fragile cultural sites. PHOTOGRAPHER KECMAN The clear skies over the Southwest led to
to protect its fragile cultural sites. PHOTOGRAPHER KECMAN The clear skies over the Southwest led to
to protect its fragile cultural sites. PHOTOGRAPHER KECMAN The clear skies over the Southwest led to
to protect its fragile cultural sites. PHOTOGRAPHER KECMAN The clear skies over the Southwest led to
to protect its fragile cultural sites. PHOTOGRAPHER KECMAN The clear skies over the Southwest led to
to protect its fragile cultural sites. PHOTOGRAPHER KECMAN The clear skies over the Southwest led to
to protect its fragile cultural sites. PHOTOGRAPHER KECMAN The clear skies over the Southwest led to
to protect its fragile cultural sites. PHOTOGRAPHER KECMAN The clear skies over the Southwest led to

The clear skies over the Southwest led to discovery of Hale-Bopp on July 22-23, 1995. Alan Hale saw the comet from his driveway in Cloudcroft, New Mexico, and Thomas Bopp saw the comet from the desert near Stanfield, Arizona at about the same time.

the desert near Stanfield, Arizona at about the same time. Marko Kecman: 115 N. Mesa Verde
the desert near Stanfield, Arizona at about the same time. Marko Kecman: 115 N. Mesa Verde
the desert near Stanfield, Arizona at about the same time. Marko Kecman: 115 N. Mesa Verde
the desert near Stanfield, Arizona at about the same time. Marko Kecman: 115 N. Mesa Verde
the desert near Stanfield, Arizona at about the same time. Marko Kecman: 115 N. Mesa Verde
the desert near Stanfield, Arizona at about the same time. Marko Kecman: 115 N. Mesa Verde
the desert near Stanfield, Arizona at about the same time. Marko Kecman: 115 N. Mesa Verde
the desert near Stanfield, Arizona at about the same time. Marko Kecman: 115 N. Mesa Verde
the desert near Stanfield, Arizona at about the same time. Marko Kecman: 115 N. Mesa Verde
the desert near Stanfield, Arizona at about the same time. Marko Kecman: 115 N. Mesa Verde
the desert near Stanfield, Arizona at about the same time. Marko Kecman: 115 N. Mesa Verde
the desert near Stanfield, Arizona at about the same time. Marko Kecman: 115 N. Mesa Verde
the desert near Stanfield, Arizona at about the same time. Marko Kecman: 115 N. Mesa Verde

Marko Kecman: 115 N. Mesa Verde Ave., Aztec, NM, 87410, 505-334-2523

Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317, 505-687-2075

87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
87410, 505-334-2523 Alan Hale: Southwest Institute for Space Research, 15 E. Spur Rd., Cloudcroft, NM 88317,
1999-2000 NEW MEXICO ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES
1999-2000
NEW
MEXICO
ENDOWMENT
FOR
THE
HUMANITIES
1999-2000 NEW MEXICO ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES SPEAKERS BUREAU & CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS Welcome to the
1999-2000 NEW MEXICO ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES SPEAKERS BUREAU & CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS Welcome to the
1999-2000 NEW MEXICO ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES SPEAKERS BUREAU & CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS Welcome to the

SPEAKERS BUREAU & CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS

THE HUMANITIES SPEAKERS BUREAU & CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS Welcome to the Millennium Edition of the New Mexico
THE HUMANITIES SPEAKERS BUREAU & CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS Welcome to the Millennium Edition of the New Mexico
THE HUMANITIES SPEAKERS BUREAU & CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS Welcome to the Millennium Edition of the New Mexico
THE HUMANITIES SPEAKERS BUREAU & CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS Welcome to the Millennium Edition of the New Mexico
THE HUMANITIES SPEAKERS BUREAU & CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS Welcome to the Millennium Edition of the New Mexico
THE HUMANITIES SPEAKERS BUREAU & CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS Welcome to the Millennium Edition of the New Mexico
THE HUMANITIES SPEAKERS BUREAU & CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS Welcome to the Millennium Edition of the New Mexico
THE HUMANITIES SPEAKERS BUREAU & CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS Welcome to the Millennium Edition of the New Mexico
THE HUMANITIES SPEAKERS BUREAU & CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS Welcome to the Millennium Edition of the New Mexico
THE HUMANITIES SPEAKERS BUREAU & CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS Welcome to the Millennium Edition of the New Mexico
THE HUMANITIES SPEAKERS BUREAU & CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS Welcome to the Millennium Edition of the New Mexico
THE HUMANITIES SPEAKERS BUREAU & CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS Welcome to the Millennium Edition of the New Mexico

Welcome to the Millennium Edition of the New Mexico Endowment for the Humanities (NMEH) Resource Center Programming Guide. This 1999-2000 edition presents 52 New Mexicans who deliver fascinating programs on New Mexico, Southwest, national and international topics.

on New Mexico, Southwest, national and international topics. Making their debuts on the state stage are
on New Mexico, Southwest, national and international topics. Making their debuts on the state stage are
on New Mexico, Southwest, national and international topics. Making their debuts on the state stage are
on New Mexico, Southwest, national and international topics. Making their debuts on the state stage are
on New Mexico, Southwest, national and international topics. Making their debuts on the state stage are
on New Mexico, Southwest, national and international topics. Making their debuts on the state stage are
on New Mexico, Southwest, national and international topics. Making their debuts on the state stage are

Making their debuts on the state stage are 16 new “living history” Chautauqua characters, ranging from an 1840s mountain man to Martha Washington, from Governor Lew Wallace to Capitán Rafael Chacón, from Pat Garrett to Harry Houdini and Kit Carson to Mabel Dodge Luhan.

to Harry Houdini and Kit Carson to Mabel Dodge Luhan. And say hello to 29 new
to Harry Houdini and Kit Carson to Mabel Dodge Luhan. And say hello to 29 new
to Harry Houdini and Kit Carson to Mabel Dodge Luhan. And say hello to 29 new
to Harry Houdini and Kit Carson to Mabel Dodge Luhan. And say hello to 29 new
to Harry Houdini and Kit Carson to Mabel Dodge Luhan. And say hello to 29 new
to Harry Houdini and Kit Carson to Mabel Dodge Luhan. And say hello to 29 new
to Harry Houdini and Kit Carson to Mabel Dodge Luhan. And say hello to 29 new
to Harry Houdini and Kit Carson to Mabel Dodge Luhan. And say hello to 29 new
to Harry Houdini and Kit Carson to Mabel Dodge Luhan. And say hello to 29 new
to Harry Houdini and Kit Carson to Mabel Dodge Luhan. And say hello to 29 new
to Harry Houdini and Kit Carson to Mabel Dodge Luhan. And say hello to 29 new
to Harry Houdini and Kit Carson to Mabel Dodge Luhan. And say hello to 29 new
to Harry Houdini and Kit Carson to Mabel Dodge Luhan. And say hello to 29 new

And say hello to 29 new speakers topics, from the history of nuclear weapons to the impact of the sunflower, from poetry to storytelling, from Hollywood spin to the borders of Aztlán, from the cultural mosaic of the Española Valley to the Apaches to the millennium. Whatever your group’s interests, you’ll find a sharp, engaging speaker or Chautauqua performer who – for the low price of $50 – will delight, inform, and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group.

and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page
and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page
and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page
and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page
and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page
and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page
and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page
and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page
and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page
and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page
and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page
and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page
and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page
and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page
and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page
and leave lasting cultural impressions with your group. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page

HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE: turn the page to find booking steps and application form; the speakers and performers appear in the Guide alphabetically by their own names; turn to the Index at the end of the Guide to look up characters’ names like “Mabel Dodge Luhan” and various categories of programs like “New Mexico History” or “Storytelling.” “SB” means speaker; “CH” means Chautauquan.

of programs like “New Mexico History” or “Storytelling.” “SB” means speaker; “CH” means Chautauquan.
of programs like “New Mexico History” or “Storytelling.” “SB” means speaker; “CH” means Chautauquan.
of programs like “New Mexico History” or “Storytelling.” “SB” means speaker; “CH” means Chautauquan.
of programs like “New Mexico History” or “Storytelling.” “SB” means speaker; “CH” means Chautauquan.
of programs like “New Mexico History” or “Storytelling.” “SB” means speaker; “CH” means Chautauquan.
of programs like “New Mexico History” or “Storytelling.” “SB” means speaker; “CH” means Chautauquan.
of programs like “New Mexico History” or “Storytelling.” “SB” means speaker; “CH” means Chautauquan.
of programs like “New Mexico History” or “Storytelling.” “SB” means speaker; “CH” means Chautauquan.
of programs like “New Mexico History” or “Storytelling.” “SB” means speaker; “CH” means Chautauquan.
“SB” means speaker; “CH” means Chautauquan. What are the humanities, and who is NMEH? We were

What are the humanities, and who is NMEH? We were created in 1972 as a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the people of New Mexico. Our mission: to deliver humanities programming to every corner of our state. Our programs address the ideas and meanings of life – our experiences of living in a multicultural society – through languages, literature, history, anthropology, philosophy, art history, comparative religions, and some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in our new programs on photography and poetry.

some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
some aspects of law and social sciences. We overlap a lot with the arts, as in
HOW I A DO BOOK PROGRAM? Any not-for-profit group can order up to six of
HOW I A DO BOOK PROGRAM? Any not-for-profit group can order up to six of
HOW I A DO BOOK PROGRAM? Any not-for-profit group can order up to six of
HOW I A DO BOOK PROGRAM? Any not-for-profit group can order up to six of

HOW

HOW I A DO BOOK PROGRAM? Any not-for-profit group can order up to six of our
HOW I A DO BOOK PROGRAM? Any not-for-profit group can order up to six of our
HOW I A DO BOOK PROGRAM? Any not-for-profit group can order up to six of our
HOW I A DO BOOK PROGRAM? Any not-for-profit group can order up to six of our

I

A

DO
DO
HOW I A DO BOOK PROGRAM? Any not-for-profit group can order up to six of our
HOW I A DO BOOK PROGRAM? Any not-for-profit group can order up to six of our

BOOK

PROGRAM?

Any not-for-profit group can order up to six of our programs per calendar year.

group can order up to six of our programs per calendar year. FIRST: Call the scholar
group can order up to six of our programs per calendar year. FIRST: Call the scholar
group can order up to six of our programs per calendar year. FIRST: Call the scholar
group can order up to six of our programs per calendar year. FIRST: Call the scholar
group can order up to six of our programs per calendar year. FIRST: Call the scholar
group can order up to six of our programs per calendar year. FIRST: Call the scholar
group can order up to six of our programs per calendar year. FIRST: Call the scholar
group can order up to six of our programs per calendar year. FIRST: Call the scholar
group can order up to six of our programs per calendar year. FIRST: Call the scholar
group can order up to six of our programs per calendar year. FIRST: Call the scholar

FIRST: Call the scholar and negotiate a date, place, and time (phone numbers and e-mail addresses listed in this Guide).

(phone numbers and e-mail addresses listed in this Guide). SECOND: Make a photocopy of the “Program
(phone numbers and e-mail addresses listed in this Guide). SECOND: Make a photocopy of the “Program
(phone numbers and e-mail addresses listed in this Guide). SECOND: Make a photocopy of the “Program
(phone numbers and e-mail addresses listed in this Guide). SECOND: Make a photocopy of the “Program

SECOND: Make a photocopy of the “Program Application Form” (next page) and send it to NMEH with a check for $100.00 (our address is on the Application). Do this at least 30 days before your program date or as far in advance as you can. Money is tight and scholars get busy.

in advance as you can. Money is tight and scholars get busy. THIRD: Advertise and promote
in advance as you can. Money is tight and scholars get busy. THIRD: Advertise and promote
in advance as you can. Money is tight and scholars get busy. THIRD: Advertise and promote
in advance as you can. Money is tight and scholars get busy. THIRD: Advertise and promote
in advance as you can. Money is tight and scholars get busy. THIRD: Advertise and promote
in advance as you can. Money is tight and scholars get busy. THIRD: Advertise and promote
in advance as you can. Money is tight and scholars get busy. THIRD: Advertise and promote
in advance as you can. Money is tight and scholars get busy. THIRD: Advertise and promote
in advance as you can. Money is tight and scholars get busy. THIRD: Advertise and promote

THIRD: Advertise and promote your program to the general public as well as your membership. You need to have at least 20 people attend. The speaker or performer will supply you with photo and promotion kit.

You need to have at least 20 people attend. The speaker or performer will supply you
You need to have at least 20 people attend. The speaker or performer will supply you
You need to have at least 20 people attend. The speaker or performer will supply you

HOW TO RUN THE PROGRAM: We prefer to be associated with free programs, but you can charge a nominal entrance fee to help meet your expenses, but not to make any profit. (You cannot use our programs as fundraisers.) If the scholar is traveling to your site, we appreciate any help you can give on room and meals. All programs must have questions and discussion during or after the presentation.

questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation
questions and discussion during or after the presentation. LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation

LAST: After the program, fill out the Evaluation Form we mailed to you (we can’t pay the speaker until you return the evaluation form to us.) Help us spread the word about our excellent, unique people and programs by reporting key images, impressions, and interactions that you and your audi- ence enjoyed. We need your reports to show legislators and other funders.

We need your reports to show legislators and other funders. SPECIAL NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your
We need your reports to show legislators and other funders. SPECIAL NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your
We need your reports to show legislators and other funders. SPECIAL NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your
We need your reports to show legislators and other funders. SPECIAL NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your
We need your reports to show legislators and other funders. SPECIAL NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your
We need your reports to show legislators and other funders. SPECIAL NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your
We need your reports to show legislators and other funders. SPECIAL NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your
We need your reports to show legislators and other funders. SPECIAL NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your
We need your reports to show legislators and other funders. SPECIAL NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your
We need your reports to show legislators and other funders. SPECIAL NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your
We need your reports to show legislators and other funders. SPECIAL NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your
We need your reports to show legislators and other funders. SPECIAL NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your

SPECIAL NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your master of ceremonies

NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your master of ceremonies introduces the Chautauquan (“Ladies and gentlemen, please
NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your master of ceremonies introduces the Chautauquan (“Ladies and gentlemen, please
NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your master of ceremonies introduces the Chautauquan (“Ladies and gentlemen, please
NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your master of ceremonies introduces the Chautauquan (“Ladies and gentlemen, please
NEEDS FOR CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAMS: Your master of ceremonies introduces the Chautauquan (“Ladies and gentlemen, please

introduces the Chautauquan (“Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome First Lady Martha Washington!”) The performer talks as the character for about 45 minutes to an hour, using your podium or table, and slide projector or sound system, if needed. At the end of the character’s talk, we need you to help the audience address their questions to the Chautauquan in character – “And now President Roosevelt will take your questions.” This helps extend the spell of the character’s presence among us, willing to answer questions not only about his or her time period, but about our times, too. That's part of the fun! Then, when there are no more questions for the character, your MC invites the audience to ask the performer questions. Now the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete.

the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date
the Chautauqua “time machine” experience is complete. ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date

ONLINE: You may also browse our complete and up-to-date catalogue, begin the booking process, get your questions answered, and more, at our website:

and up-to-date catalogue, begin the booking process, get your questions answered, and more, at our website:
and up-to-date catalogue, begin the booking process, get your questions answered, and more, at our website:
and up-to-date catalogue, begin the booking process, get your questions answered, and more, at our website:
and up-to-date catalogue, begin the booking process, get your questions answered, and more, at our website:

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MARILYN

ADAMS

SUSAN B. ANTHONY IN 1895 (CH)

Born into a progressive Quaker family, Susan B. Anthony became the consummate symbol of feminism. Never before had there been a single, independent woman leader with no male to fall back on. This program begins on Anthony’s 75th birthday tour. Colorado had just joined Wyoming, Utah and Idaho in extending the vote to women. Anthony believed all human beings equal and entitled to justice; she fought for 50 years against the social restrictions that made women legally incompetent.

A MINORITY OF MALES: MEN WHO STOOD WITH WOMEN FOR EQUALITY (SB)

History has largely forgotten the heroic men who, braving the taunts and jeers of the male majority, believed that women should share in the responsibilities of government by being granted suffrage. They were willing to fight in tandem with women for justice and fairness in other areas as well: for health and safety concerns, for equal pay for equal work, for an end to the sexism that still pervades our society. Their stories need to be told, their words to be heard, their continued efforts for equality between the sexes to be admired and emulated.

Marilyn Adams, a former English teacher, now researches women’s history, creating one-woman performances that dramatize the lives of 19th century women.

performances that dramatize the lives of 19th century women. 2 Manzano Lane, Santa Fe, NM 87505,

2 Manzano Lane, Santa Fe, NM 87505, 505-466-2091, marilyn@susanbanthony.org

Santa Fe, NM 87505, 505-466-2091, marilyn@susanbanthony.org KURT ANSCHUETZ WHEN CULTURES MET: THE FORGING OF

KURT

ANSCHUETZ

WHEN CULTURES MET: THE FORGING OF INDO-HISPANO CULTURES IN 1600s NEW MEXICO (SB)

The people of New Mexico recently observed the 400th anniversary of Don Juan de Oñate’s founding of the first Spanish colony. To focus only on Oñate’s notable accomplishments or on the suffering of the Pueblo people keeps us from seeing that there was mutual learning as well. This slide presentation draws from archaeology, history and ethnohistory to examine how Pueblo and Spanish peoples, through a difficult, century- long process of accommodating to each other’s presence, eventually became dependent upon one another as they occupied the New Mexican landscape.

IS

LANDSCAPE (SB)

CORN

LIFE

FARMING,

PLACE

AND

TIME

IN

THE

NEW

MEXICAN

PUEBLO

Those of us who aren’t Pueblo Indians can only begin to comprehend aspects of Pueblo culture and history when we recognize and respect the fact that corn has been the essential metaphor of the Pueblo Indian’s very being for many hundreds of years. This slide lecture reveals the extent of cornfield engineering done by Tewa and Tiwa Pueblo farmers before the Spanish arrived: field clearing, grids, gravel mulch, shrines, and houseblocks. The compelling mountain, mesa, and valley vistas we enjoy today in Northern New Mexico are much more than just pretty scenery – they have coherent and ingenious systems for sustainable water and soil management. Current Tewa and Tiwa authorities have welcomed Anschuetz’s research and presentations.

Kurt Anschuetz is the Program Director for the Rio Grande Foundation for Communities and Cultural Landscapes. His work with New Mexico’s traditional and historic communities applies humanities lessons from the past in planning for the future.

1200 Don Diego Ave., Santa Fe, NM 87505, 505-983-5829, kanschuetz@aol.com

1

from the past in planning for the future. 1200 Don Diego Ave., Santa Fe, NM 87505,

PAULETTE

ATENCIO

HISPANIC STORYTELLING (SB) LA VIDA DE MI RAZA (SB)

In both of these programs, Atencio delights audiences with her insights into northern Nuevomexicano traditional stories and lifeways. The programs can be tailored to the interests of various groups and can be told in either Spanish or English. The programs are augmented with varied stylish clothes and elegant costumes, music/sound effects, and spontaneous humor. The presentations focus on race, cultural diversity and traditions, and learning what it means to be of Hispanic descent.

Paulette Atencio is a professional bilingual storyteller and published author. She was born in a small town in northern New Mexico and has been exposed to traditional stories since a very young age. She has worked as a professional storyteller for twenty years.

PO Box 72, Chama, NM 87520, 505-756-2207

for twenty years. PO Box 72, Chama, NM 87520, 505-756-2207 BART BARBOUR JOHN L. HATCHER: MOUNTAIN
for twenty years. PO Box 72, Chama, NM 87520, 505-756-2207 BART BARBOUR JOHN L. HATCHER: MOUNTAIN

BART

BARBOUR

JOHN L. HATCHER: MOUNTAIN MAN (CH)

John L. Hatcher brings to life the excitement, hilarity, and historical importance of the fur trade. A hunter and trapper at Bent’s Fort, an adopted member of the Kiowa nation, and one of William Bent’s most reliable employees, he offers audiences an American view of 1830s and 1840s New Mexico. A splendid specimen of the authentic southwestern “Mountain Man,” and a first-rate story-teller, Hatcher’s highly original folk-tales illustrate the distinctive, sometimes outrageous, trapper’s jargon. His experiences also inform listeners about trapper’s lives and early nineteenth century multicultural relations on the southern plains and in New Mexico.

THE NINETEENTH CENTURY SOUTHWESTERN FUR TRADE/INDIAN TRADE/ SANTA FE TRADE (SB)

The fur trade was the most important frontier economic enterprise in North American history. Long before Anglo-American settlers and soldiers became important in the Southwest, the Santa Fe trade and the fur trade had established patterns of interaction among Native people, Hispanic residents, and Anglo-Americans from the United States. Many early traders married Native or Hispanic women and raised families in a multicultural setting. Charles and William Bent, Ceran St. Vrain, Kit Carson, Ewing Young, William Wolfskill, and James Ohio Pattie were colorful figures whose exciting tales open windows on the period 1800-1860 and allow the dry bones of history to live again.

Barton Barbour, Ph.D., whose expertise includes the North American fur trade and western American history, has published several books, teaches American history, and currently works for the National Park Service.

Barton B. Barbour, 1520 Silver SE, Albuquerque, NM 87106, 505-247-8620

2

currently works for the National Park Service. Barton B. Barbour, 1520 Silver SE, Albuquerque, NM 87106,

MAISHA

BATON

MAISHA BATON BLACK HISTORY OF NEW MEXICO (SB) Most New Mexicans today are familiar with aspects

BLACK HISTORY OF NEW MEXICO (SB)

Most New Mexicans today are familiar with aspects of the rich Spanish, Indian, and Anglo cultures of the state. But what about the Black New Mexicans? How much do we know of their history? And why? How did they relate to the other cultures of the area? This talk tells the stories of men and women such as Estevaníco (the first non-Indian to arrive in New Mexico), Mateo Naranjo (one of New Mexico’s first colonists), Madam Briever (the curandera of Silver City) and others.

BLACKDOM, N.M AND THE ALL-BLACK TOWN MOVEMENT (SB)

Self determination! Autonomy! Independence! These are the concepts that energized Frank Boyer as he and his companion made their long walk from Pellum, Georgia to southeast New Mexico where they would found the all-Black community of Blackdom. In this presentation we will discuss the life and dreams of Frank and Ella Boyer and how they were influenced by the all-Black town movement.

BLACK WOMEN IN ‘WESTERN FRONTIER’ HISTORY (SB)

Like the early histories of the Western frontier, the story of Blacks in the west has been a tale of male adventure and conquest, full of Buffalo soldiers and Black cowboys. But what of the Black woman? Why did she leave the familiarity of her home to face the uncertainty of this new frontier? What strategies did she employ to secure life’s necessities for herself and her family? How did she relate to the other cultures in the region? We will also discuss specific ways in which women’s history might be retrieved and reconstructed after so many years of neglect.

Maisha Baton is a poet and playwright, currently teaching at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. For the past few years, Dr. Baton has concentrated her research on Black History in New Mexico with an emphasis on the role of the Black woman.

PO Box 796, Albuquerque, NM 87103, 505-266-6428, mbaton@unm.edu

Box 796, Albuquerque, NM 87103, 505-266-6428, mbaton@unm.edu DEBORAH BLANCHE ERNA FERGUSSON: NEW MEXICO’S FIRST LADY OF

DEBORAH

BLANCHE

ERNA FERGUSSON: NEW MEXICO’S FIRST LADY OF LETTERS (1888-1964) (CH)

Erna Fergusson was born in Albuquerque’s Castle Huning. Known in her heyday as “New Mexico’s First Lady of Letters”, she was a writer, globetrotter, lecturer and storyteller who grew up tri-lingual – German, English, and Spanish. She started Koshare Tours – later bought out by Fred Harvey – while honing her writing skills at the Albuquerque Herald.

MARION SLOAN RUSSELL ON THE SANTA FE TRAIL: AN OFT REPEATED DREAM (CH)

The creaking of wagon wheels, the jingle of trace chains, the songs, vistas, creatures and characters of the Santa Fe Trail were memories that Marion Russell treasured throughout her long and eventful lifetime. Marion crossed the trail for the first time in 1852 at age seven with her mother and brother. She would cross it three more times and encounter Archbishop Lamy, Kit Carson, and the Sisters of Loretto.

MRS. CUSTER’S LAST STAND: THE STORY OF ELIZABETH BACON CUSTER (1842-1933) (CH)

General George Armstrong Custer’s military career ended at the Little Big Horn, but you won’t know the last word on Custer until you’ve heard from his widow. Elizabeth Bacon Custer was an intelligent, vivacious, and stalwart woman. “Libbie” often made a tent her home, rode with the ranks, and accompanied the 7th Cavalry on expeditions in the West. After Custer’s death, she wrote three books, lectured widely, became financially independent, and outlived contemporaries critical of her husband.

Deborah Blanche, writer, actor, and storyteller, has been creating NMEH Chautauqua programs since 1985. From Alaska to Mexico, California to England, she presents characters who made Western history vibrant.

Palomita Productions, Box 1988 Old Town Post Office, Las Vegas, NM 87701-1988, 505-425-5004, herstory@zialink.com

3

Palomita Productions, Box 1988 Old Town Post Office, Las Vegas, NM 87701-1988, 505-425-5004, herstory@zialink.com 3

PHIL

BOCK

DR. EDGAR LEE HEWETT (CH)

Dr. Edgar Lee Hewett was an extraordinary man. An anthropologist whose energy and ability led him into Southwestern archaeology at the start of the twentieth century, he became the first president of the New Mexico Teachers College at Las Vegas and, later, Director of the Museum of New Mexico and the School of American Research, and Chair of the Departments of Anthropology at U.N.M, U.S.C. and San Diego State! His legacy is apparent in the look of the Santa Fe Plaza where he directed the restoration of the Palace of the Governors and the design of the Fine Arts Museum and St. Francis Auditorium, monuments of Pueblo Revival style.

Phil Bock is a former Presidential Professor and Chair of Anthropology at U.N.M. Now happily retired, he enjoys theatrical and musical activities including acting, directing, play writing and composing.

8301 4th St NW #3, Albuquerque, NM 87114, 505-890-0438, pbock@unm.edu

St NW #3, Albuquerque, NM 87114, 505-890-0438, pbock@unm.edu RICHARD BODNER LEOPOLD: THE GOOD LIFE – WILD
St NW #3, Albuquerque, NM 87114, 505-890-0438, pbock@unm.edu RICHARD BODNER LEOPOLD: THE GOOD LIFE – WILD

RICHARD

BODNER

LEOPOLD:

THE

GOOD

LIFE

WILD

ALDO

COMMUNITY (CH)

The sheer pleasure of nature’s beauty comes alive with “Alias Aldo” as our wild-country guide. We soar on Leopold’s inspired Sand County words; learn to think like a mountain; and top out on a ridge for a fresh look at where we are, how we got here, and where we are heading. Our exploration of “the good life” draws a moving portrait of the developing conservationist and New Mexico’s own down-to-earth philosopher, from boyhood adventurer full of wonder to modern land prophet.

AND

COUNTRY,

CONSERVATION,

RICEFIELD MOON – BASHO & BEYOND (CH)

Bodner’s longest-running program, and also brand-new, this program can now take just the right shape for first-time or repeat groups. Talk with our “American Basho” about the emphasis you would prefer – Classic Basho, based on the 17th Century master’s life and travel diaries; Asian Masters on the Way of Poetry, Basho’s wider heritage; and Lasting Legacy, the haiku-related traditions.

VOICES FROM THE HEART OF THE WORLD: THE GIFT OF GREAT POETRY (SB)

“The poem itself is not important. It’s just a fragment of the Great Poem being written by all poets through time.” – Octavio Paz. What is great poetry and what does it offer us? From legendary Orpheus and ancient bards to native elders and modern innovators, such gifts from “the heart of the world” bridge distances between people, cultures and ages to illuminate that deeper earth-inspired spirit held in common, the essence of what it means to be human.

Richard Bodner is a low-down, far-out, up-beat, road-scholar poet, land lover, recording artist, diverse heritage kind of person. This long-time Chautauquan crosses borders of east and west, arts and sciences, scholarship and theater to celebrate the blessings of land and language, our natural and cultural heritage.

1329 Sixth St., Las Vegas, NM 87701, 505-425-3430, rbodner@post.harvard.edu

4

language, our natural and cultural heritage. 1329 Sixth St., Las Vegas, NM 87701, 505-425-3430, rbodner@post.harvard.edu 4

DAVID

L.

CAFFEY

DAVID L. CAFFEY THE HOLLYWOOD SPIN: FILM ADAPTATIONS OF NEW MEXICO NOVELS (SB) If you’ve already

THE HOLLYWOOD SPIN: FILM ADAPTATIONS OF NEW MEXICO NOVELS (SB)

If you’ve already seen the movie, do you still need to read the book? You might. Literature and film are different art forms, and although literary works have provided a consistent source of good material for film makers, the novelist and the movie maker operate under different constraints and sometimes seek different results. This presentation looks at the process of adaptation of novels with New Mexico settings, including Leave Her to Heaven, The Sea of Grass, Pasó Por Aquí, Lonely Are the Brave, The Bravados, The Rounders, Red Sky at Morning, Powwow Highway, and The Milagro Beanfield War. Illustrated with slides and film clips.

DIME NOVEL NEW MEXICO (SB)

Frontier heroes chasing their adversaries through an elaborate underground tunnel in Taos? A traveler on the Jornada protecting his wagon from marauding natives with a magic circle of fire? These and similar exploits were commonplace in the imagined West of the dime novelist. Inexpensively produced, mass-distributed novels between 1860 and 1900 did much to reflect and shape popular perceptions of the American West. Written to formula specifications, most of these have little to recommend them as literature, but they offer us clues to the formation of national and international popular attitudes about the West. This presentation includes a discussion of the dime novel phenomenon, with emphasis on dime novels with New Mexico settings. Illustrated with slides.

David L. Caffey is Vice President for Instruction at Clovis Community College. He served as Chief Ranger at Philmont Scout Ranch in the 1970s and continues to enjoy the New Mexico out-of-doors. He has also served as Director of the Harwood Foundation of the University of New Mexico in Taos. He is the author of Land of Enchantment, Land of Conflict: New Mexico in English Language Fiction, to be published in 1999 by Texas A&M University Press.

Clovis

caffeyd@clovis.cc.nm.us

Community

College,

417

Schepps

Blvd.,

Clovis,

NM

88101-8381,

505-769-4111,

Fax:

505-769-4190,

Clovis, NM 88101-8381, 505-769-4111, Fax: 505-769-4190, DAN D. CHAVEZ OCTAVIÁNO A. LARRAZOLO: A PROGRESSIVE AHEAD

DAN

D.

CHAVEZ

OCTAVIÁNO A. LARRAZOLO: A PROGRESSIVE AHEAD OF HIS TIME (CH)

Larrazolo, born in Mexico and educated in Santa Fe, was a political leader who fought for the rights of women and Hispanics, promoted statehood for New Mexico, and advocated a progressive state constitution. Known as a great orator in Spanish and English, he spoke out for amending the state constitution to allow women to vote and to run for public office – and this before the 19th amendment was accepted nationally. Disappointed that the Democratic Party did not support the proposed constitution, he switched to the Republicans in 1911. He was elected governor in 1918 for a two-year term (1919-1920) and elected to fill an unexpired term as U.S. Senator (1928-1929).

Dan D. Chavez, UNM Professor Emeritus, served as a naval officer, science teacher, principal, state program director, and UNM administrator and professor before retiring in 1990 to do research on the political history of New Mexico.

1723 Stanford Dr. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106, 505-268-0434

5

in 1990 to do research on the political history of New Mexico. 1723 Stanford Dr. NE,

RAPHAEL

J.

CRISTY

CHARLIE RUSSELL’S OLD MONTANA YARNS (CH)

Will Rogers said that Charles M. Russell was the best storyteller he ever heard. Russell (1864-1926), a Montana cowboy and painter/sculptor, was the most famous artist of the 19th century West. In Charlie Russell’s Old Montana Yarns, you hear the exact words that amused Montana cowpunchers, intrigued New York socialites, mesmerized wee children, astounded Los Angeles art patrons, made Blackfoot Indians smile, forced a railroad president to giggle, and got Will Rogers to laugh out loud. With slide projections of Russell’s vivid artworks and several dusty stage props, Cristy brings you into Charlie Russell’s log cabin studio for jokes about his life and some gripping yarns about the nineteenth-century American West.

Raphael Cristy grew up in rural Michigan, studied literature at Stanford and American history at the University of Montana and at UNM (Ph.D.). Cristy has lived in Albuquerque since 1992.

523-A 8th Street NW, Albuquerque, NM 87102, Phone 505-243-6779 (home), 505-768-3566 (work), rcristy@cabq.gov

505-243-6779 (home), 505-768-3566 (work), rcristy@cabq.gov KRISTA ELRICK ENCHANTING LIGHT: HISTORIC AND CONTEMPORARY
505-243-6779 (home), 505-768-3566 (work), rcristy@cabq.gov KRISTA ELRICK ENCHANTING LIGHT: HISTORIC AND CONTEMPORARY

KRISTA

ELRICK

ENCHANTING LIGHT: HISTORIC AND CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHY IN NEW MEXICO (SB)

For more than a century New Mexico’s landscape, light, and peoples have drawn and inspired a multitude of photographers. Not surprisingly, the roster of photographers who have done major work in the state provides a microcosm of the history of photography. In this lecture and slide show, Elrick brings the image-makers to life, discussing historical topics that surrounded the photographers’ lives and the work they produced about New Mexico’s ancient civilizations and living tribes, the architecture of Spanish America, and the light of the Southwestern landscape. The presentation will cover great names in photography – John Hillers, Edward S. Curtis, Laura Gilpin, Ansel Adams, and Eliot Porter – as well as contemporary artists such as Miguel Gandert, Alex Harris, Joan Myers, and Patrick Nagatani.

Krista Elrick has been exhibiting her photographs around the country for twenty years. Her current research explores the history and stories of family-owned general stores in New Mexico.

2 Camino Mayancita, Santa Fe, NM 87501, 505-438-4441, Fax: 505-438-4442, kristae@concentric.net

6

stores in New Mexico. 2 Camino Mayancita, Santa Fe, NM 87501, 505-438-4441, Fax: 505-438-4442, kristae@concentric.net 6

PATRICIA

ERICKSON

THE BUFFALO SOLDIERS IN THE SOUTHWEST (SB)

Long before the Buffalo Soldiers arrived in New Mexico in the winter of 1875 the stage had been set for conflict between the native Apaches, the troopers of the 9th Cavalry, and the civilian populace they were sent to protect. Despite the hardships they faced, these first African American soldiers in the United States Army overcame social prejudices and met the trials of the field and dangers of battle with bravery and valor. Their drive, dedication, and determination resulted in the 9th Cavalry’s becoming the most decorated regiment in the frontier Army – but for nearly a century their story was missing from American history.

Patricia Erickson was born at the site of Old Fort Webster in southern New Mexico and is a writer/researcher in the area’s frontier history.

1120 West Sixth Street, Silver City, NM 88061, 505-388-1022, erickson@zianet.com

Silver City, NM 88061, 505-388-1022, erickson@zianet.com RICHARD W. ETUL AIN TELLING WESTERN STORIES: FROM BUFFALO
Silver City, NM 88061, 505-388-1022, erickson@zianet.com RICHARD W. ETUL AIN TELLING WESTERN STORIES: FROM BUFFALO

RICHARD

W.

ETUL AIN

TELLING WESTERN STORIES: FROM BUFFALO BILL TO LARRY MCMURTRY (SB)

How have western stories changed during the past century? How have narratives about white males by authors like Owen Wister, Zane Grey, and Louis L’Amour become the more complex and ambiguous stores by such writers as Wallace Stegner, Leslie Silko, and Larry McMurtry? This talk, via slides, shows how western stories illustrate shifting attitudes about the American West.

BILLY THE KID (SB)

Why is Billy the Kid the most written-about figure in New Mexico history? What can Billy’s short and violent life tell us about shifting cultural attitudes in the Southwest? Do we really have only one photo of him? These and other questions will be addressed in this slide-illustrated presentation on Billy the Kid, Man and Mystery.

THE MAGIC WEST ON FILM (SB)

This slide presentation furnishes a galloping overview of the film Western from its origins to recent movies like Dances with Wolves and Unforgiven. Heroes such as John Wayne and Clint Eastwood are spotlighted, but so are changing images of Native Americans, women, and gunmen. A central question is raised: are Westerns primarily about the American West, or do they more often reflect changing social and cultural attitudes in the United States?

Richard W. Etulain is Professor of History and Director of the Center for the American West at the University of New Mexico. He has authored or edited more than 30 books about the history and cultures of the American West.

Center for the American West, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, 505-277-7688, baldbasq@unm.edu

7

West. Center for the American West, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, 505-277-7688, baldbasq@unm.edu 7

JOHN

T.

FELDMAN

JOHN T. FELDMAN FROM “HANG THAT VARMINT” TO “MEDIATE, DON’T LITIGATE”: LEGAL DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN NEW

FROM “HANG THAT VARMINT” TO “MEDIATE, DON’T LITIGATE”: LEGAL DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN NEW MEXICO (SB)

This is an historical overview of how legal disputes have been resolved since Territorial days. It gives insight into the development and place of the judicial branch within our government structure. This is a social history of how disputes have been resolved.

WESTERN SWING: MUSIC OF BIG BANDS FROM THE LAND OF THE OPEN SKIES (SB)

How is the music of Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys different from today’s swing revival? Using recordings of many different regional bands, the presentation shows how musicians in the 1930’s-1950’s drew on Black blues and jazz, Spanish, cowboy, frontier fiddle, Tin Pan Alley and European sources for a kind of music that was a mirror of southwestern culture. The music is exciting, and, under certain circumstances, can include a live demonstration. Each program uses vintage film clips of Western Swing bands from the 1930s to the present.

RELIGIOUS ATTITUDES OF THE AMERICAN FOUNDING FATHERS (SB)

Were Ben Franklin, George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson religious in today’s terms? What are the roots of their tolerance? Myths about the religious origins of our country are explored and exploded, and the talk produces a greater appreciation for the genius of key American founders. A good program for any time of year, this talk is particularly well suited to civic occasions such as Presidents’ Day. It can be presented to listeners of any age but is especially appropriate for teenagers.

John T. Feldman is an Albuquerque-based attorney and full-time mediator who teaches about alternative methods of dispute resolution. He is an ordained rabbi and leader of a western swing band, the Curio Cowboys. Mr. Feldman is shown above left with Luke Wills, brother of Bob Wills of the Texas Playboys.

John T. Feldman, 1133 Montclaire NE, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Phone: 505-268-1464

Montclaire NE, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Phone: 505-268-1464 CHERYL FOOTE A TASTE OF AMERICA: AMERICAN FOOD AND

CHERYL

FOOTE

A TASTE OF AMERICA: AMERICAN FOOD AND FOODWAYS SINCE 1492 (SB)

Food is one of the most basic of biological needs, but it also has played major cultural and historical roles in the development of America. The growth of slavery, the industrial revolution, the rise of big business, American overseas expansion, family changes, and immigration have reflected and affected our changing tastes. This talk goes from the “Columbian Exchange” – the 1492 transfer of food and diseases between Europe and the Americas – to regional foodways and folk cultures, to the role of food in U.S. history up to the time of the Golden Arches.

VENTURESOME CREATURES: ANGLO WOMEN IN TERRITORIAL NEW MEXICO (SB)

The traditional accounts of New Mexico history frequently overlook the contributions of women. Anglo-American women came to the state from a variety of backgrounds and for a variety of reasons. They brought with them the cultural values of an expansionist America, as well as expectations that they could create homes, schools, and churches here. Yet, as many of them found, the efforts to duplicate Eastern society and culture were frustrated and their assumptions about people of other races and ethnicities were challenged.

Cheryl Foote grew up in Albuquerque and received her Ph.D. in History from the University of New Mexico. She currently teaches history at Albuquerque Technical- Vocational Institute. She is the author of Women of the New Mexico Frontier, 1846-1912.

1824 Rita NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106, 505-268-2549, cfoote@tvi.cc.nm.us

8

of Women of the New Mexico Frontier , 1846-1912. 1824 Rita NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106, 505-268-2549,

STEVE

FOX

STEVE FOX THE PILGRIM’S ROAD: SACRED JOURNEYS IN SPAIN, MEXICO, AND THE U.S. (SB) For many

THE PILGRIM’S ROAD: SACRED JOURNEYS IN SPAIN, MEXICO, AND THE U.S. (SB)

For many people in Judeo-Christian, Islamic, and Native American traditions, life is a sacred journey, and making pilgrimages to sacred sites is one way of intensifying the role of pilgrim in this life. New Mexico is the pilgrimage center of the U.S., with layers of Indian, Spanish, Mexican, and mainstream alternative pilgrimages – some very visible, some still secret – traced upon the land. Pilgrimage has grown steadily all over the world for 25 years as traditions are revived, strengthened, and modified to suit people’s search for meaning in their lives. From the Camino de Santiágo across northern Spain to Chalma and Esquipúlas in Mexico and Guatemala, to Chimayó, Tortugas, Chaco Canyon and the Shrine of the Stone Lions in New Mexico, come see slides and hear testimonials explaining the power and persistence of walking in a meditative manner to connect with the sacred. The talk and slides include the comic, ironic and surreal aspects of pilgrimage in the nuclear age.

Steve Fox has visited many of the sites and participated in several of the pilgrimages he discusses. He has taught cultural topics at UNM and its branch campuses and is now Assistant Director of the New Mexico Endowment for the Humanities.

143 Green Valley NW, Albuquerque, NM 87107, 505-277-4151(work), 505-761-3103 (home), sfox@unm.edu

87107, 505-277-4151(work), 505-761-3103 (home), sfox@unm.edu NASARIO GARCÍA STORIES OF HISPANIC OLD-TIMERS IN NEW MEXICO

NASARIO

GARCÍA

STORIES OF HISPANIC OLD-TIMERS IN NEW MEXICO (SB)

Hispanic old-timers of the Rio Puerco Valley were not professional storytellers, but, once you piqued their curiosity and showed them a genuine interest in their colorful past, they could shower you with exciting stories. They could tickle your funny bone just as easily as they could make you shed a tear. Dr. García proves that there is no substitute for the human experience.

HISPANIC FOLKLORE OF THE RIO PUERCO VALLEY (SB)

The places are abandoned today, but the richness of the valley’s people and their folklore, intermingling with history, memory and the tragedy and erosion of time, forms the heart of this talk. It includes dichos (folk sayings), adivinanzas (riddles), stories, love quatrains, letters, ballads, and songs. Folklore indeed carries the culture of a people, revealing its sense of self.

Nasario García, a native New Mexican with roots in the Rio Puerco valley, was awarded a Ph.D. in Spanish Literature by the University of Pittsburgh and is Professor of Languages at New Mexico Highlands University. Dr. García has served two terms on the Board of Directors of the New Mexico Endowment for the Humanities and thrives on the folklore of the viejitos (old-timers).

Department of Languages and Literature, New Mexico Highlands University, Las Vegas, NM 87701, 505-454-3422 (work), 505-425-6582 (home), somosdos@zialink.com

9

New Mexico Highlands University, Las Vegas, NM 87701, 505-454-3422 (work), 505-425-6582 (home), somosdos@zialink.com 9

LARRY

GOODELL

LARRY GOODELL AND AMERICAN PERFORMANCE POETRY (SB)

Like jazz and improv comedy, poetry that is performed is a peculiarly American art form, a direct exercise of free speech. Larry Goodell, New Mexico’s foremost veteran of performance poetry, takes us on an animated tour of the American tradition, from Whitman and Vachel Lindsay to Allen Ginsberg, the Poetry Slam scene and the Taos Poetry Circus World Heavyweight Championship Bouts. Larry will do vignettes of regional, nature, New Age, and cowboy styles. On your piano or his castanets, Larry will throw in a satirical song and perform work from his book Firecracker Soup. Discussion demanded!

VACHEL LINDSAY, AMERICA’S PROTO-PERFORMANCE POET (CH)

Lindsay was the first major poet in the U.S. to take to the road, reciting for food and shelter. Born in 1879 two doors from Abe Lincoln’s house in Springfield, IL, Lindsay’s consciousness was entwined with Lincoln, Jackson, and the common people. An early star of the original Chautauqua movement, his muscular, booming poems were almost too much for generations of quiet English classes: “General William Booth Enters into Heaven,” “Abraham Lincoln Walks at Midnight,” and “The Golden Whales of California.”

at Midnight,” and “The Golden Whales of California.” Larry Goodell, Roswell native, studied with Robert Creeley

Larry Goodell, Roswell native, studied with Robert Creeley and has appeared with all the major poets of the last 30 years. Living in Placitas since 1963, he has published many local writers and is author of Firecracker Soup, Out of Secrecy, The Mad New Mexican, and Here on Earth.

Box 571, Placitas, NM 87043, 505-867-5877, lgoodell@nmia.com

Box 571, Placitas, NM 87043, 505-867-5877, lgoodell@nmia.com RON GRIMES PATRICK FLOYD GARRETT: FROM BUFFALO HUNTER TO

RON

GRIMES

PATRICK FLOYD GARRETT: FROM BUFFALO HUNTER TO MAN HUNTER (CH)

Although best remembered as the sheriff who shot the Southwest’s most infamous outlaw, Billy the Kid, shortly after the Lincoln County War, Pat Garrett left an indelible mark and enduring legacy in the pages of New Mexico and West Texas history. From that fateful night of July 14, 1881, in Fort Sumner when he ended the career of the Kid; to his first vision a few years later of bringing irrigation to the fertile land of the Pecos Valley; to a tumultuous stint as a U.S. Customs Collector in El Paso; followed by a dogged pursuit of the killers of Albert Jennings Fountain and his young son; and ending in his own mysterious death near Las Cruces, Garrett remains a colorful yet enigmatic character of New Mexico’s equally colorful past.

Ron Grimes, having spent most of his life performing at Chautauquas, conventions, Western stage shows, schools, dude ranches and “cowboy campfires” throughout the Southwest, has always been fascinated by the characters of the Old West. Most recently, he has portrayed Pat Garrett, Texas gunman John Wesley Hardin and Jim White, discoverer of the Carlsbad Caverns.

Box 3271, Carlsbad, NM 88221, 505-887-8707 (home), peavine@caverns.com

10

Jim White, discoverer of the Carlsbad Caverns. Box 3271, Carlsbad, NM 88221, 505-887-8707 (home), peavine@caverns.com 10

STANLEY

M.

HORDES

THE SEPHARDIC LEGACY IN NEW MEXICO: A HISTORY OF THE CRYPTO-JEWS (SB)

Five hundred years after the expulsion of the Jews from Spain, scholars are looking into what may constitute a living remnant of Sephardic Jewish culture in New Mexico. Some Hispanic New Mexicans, descendants of the original conversos, are beginning to discuss how their ancestors continued to practice customs suggestive of a Jewish heritage. Dr. Hordes shares the results of his current research, tracing the history of Spanish secret Jews from Spain and Portugal to Mexico, and eventually to New Mexico in the 16th through the 19th centuries.

THE BLACK LEGEND: ANTI-HISPANIC ATTITUDES IN NEW MEXICO HISTORY (SB)

Ever since the 1500s, authorities and common folk from the Protestant, Northern European cultures have held anti-Spanish attitudes. The underlying beliefs were that the Spanish, and their descendants, were somehow more greedy, cruel, arrogant, racist, lazy, fanatical, treacherous, corrupt, etc. Dr. Hordes outlines the origins of these stereotypes and helps audiences to use historical analysis to better understand ethnic conflicts in current New Mexico society.

THE ADOBE WALL OF SEPARATION: THE FIRST AMENDMENT AND CHURCH/ STATE RELATIONS IN NEW MEXICO HISTORY (SB)

AND CHURCH/ STATE RELATIONS IN NEW MEXICO HISTORY (SB) In this talk, Dr. Hordes treats the

In this talk, Dr. Hordes treats the complex question of the relations between church and state, from the founding of the villa of Santa Fe, the “City of Holy Faith,” to recent controversies over the Bernalillo County seal and the expenditure of public money for the Santa Fe Fiesta. This talk is especially interesting to parents, teachers, and school administrators.

Stanley Hordes has been Curator of Colonial Archives at Louisiana State Museum, historian for the National Park Service in Albuquerque, and New Mexico State Historian. He is now Adjunct Research Professor at UNM’s Latin American Institute and operates a historical consulting firm.

1375 Santa Rosa Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505, 505-983-6564, shordes@la.unm.edu

Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505, 505-983-6564, shordes@la.unm.edu DAVID G. JACKSON KIT CARSON – A MAN WHO

DAVID

G.

JACKSON

KIT CARSON – A MAN WHO HELPED SHAPE AMERICA (CH)

Kit Carson was the greatest of frontier scouts. He was a freighter on the Santa Fe Trail, trapper, scout, explorer, rancher, soldier and family man. A legend in his own time, he was instrumental in mapping the west. His role in placing Indians on reservations was highly praised at the time, but has become controversial, particularly with Native Americans. As a military commander his judgments were sound and he avoided needless death on the battlefield for friend and foe alike. Carson was honored and respected from the highest offices of the nation to the everyday citizens of the West–Native, Hispanic and Anglo.

THE HISTORY OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS (SB)

Nuclear weapons have been a fact of life for 53 years. The first weapons were developed in New Mexico and the state remains a center of weapons technology. The history of nuclear weapons is much more than just a chronological listing of the weapons developed. It involved politics, espionage, personalities, and billions of dollars.

Dave Jackson is a lifelong outdoorsman who has hiked many of Carson’s trails, trapped beaver and other animals, and has visited the locations of Carson’s major military engagements. Jackson served 28 years in the Department of Energy. He was principal spokesman for the tests of more than 300 underground weapons and Project Plowshare tests.

11500 Herman Roser SE, Albuquerque, NM 87123, 505-299-2430, zxac2r@concentric.net

11

weapons and Project Plowshare tests. 11500 Herman Roser SE, Albuquerque, NM 87123, 505-299-2430, zxac2r@concentric.net 11

DAVID

JOHNSON

&

KEN

CLARK

DAVID JOHNSON & KEN CLARK MILLENNIUM 2000: MESSIAHS AND MYTHS, PROPHETS AND PROPHECIES (SB) Are you

MILLENNIUM 2000: MESSIAHS AND MYTHS, PROPHETS AND PROPHECIES (SB)

Are you ready for the second millennium? What do the Bible, the Koran, ancient and modern sages say about it? What happened at the time of the first millennium? Are our computers really going to be put out of business by the “millennium bug?” Has the second millennium already come and nobody noticed it? These and many more important questions and issues are addressed in an entertaining, but scholarly, non-sectarian, non-political talk about one of the most important events in our immediate future.

one of the most important events in our immediate future. Ken Clark, pictured at right, a

Ken Clark, pictured at right, a retired theologian and sometime visiting professor, is a specialist in myths, fairy tales and dry fly fishing. He has published educational materials for children and adults.

David Johnson, a Professor of English at the University of New Mexico, is a specialist in the literatures of ancient Babylonia, Greece, Israel, and Mesoamerica. He has published articles and books about mythology and religion.

505-898-5209,

krc1234@aol.com

David Johnson, Department of English, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, 505-266-9960

Ken

Clark,

5537

Furman

NW,

Albuquerque,

NM

87114,

Ken Clark, 5537 Furman NW, Albuquerque, NM 87114, JEAN JORDAN MARY DONOHO, FIRST ANGLO WOMAN IN

JEAN

JORDAN

MARY DONOHO, FIRST ANGLO WOMAN IN SANTA FE (CH)

She was the recently discovered first Anglo-American woman to travel the torturous Santa Fe Trail in 1833 with her 9-month-old baby and trader husband. During her four years in Santa Fe, Donoho gave birth to two more children, the first Anglos born there; helped run her husband’s hotel; mingled with Mexicanos and Pueblos; witnessed the Albino Perez rioting and helped rescue three white women captives ransomed from the Comanches by her husband.

MABEL DODGE LUHAN, VISIONARY HOSTESS OF TAOS (CH)

Overwhelmed by her first breathtaking view of northern New Mexico in 1917, she whispered, “Oh, my God!” and made Taos her home. A millionaire, she had previously married three times, lived restlessly in Italy and New York, and searched for cultural visionaries. She found peace with a stately Taos Pueblo man, Tony Luhan. Eager to share her passion and utopian hopes, she pulled D.H. Lawrence, Willa Cather, Thornton Wilder, Georgia O’Keeffe, Ansel Adams and dozens more to Taos.

KATHERINE STINSON OTERO, PILOT, AIRPLANE DESIGNER, ARCHITECT (CH)

Long before Amelia Earhart, in 1912 she began a spectacular career as an aviator. She flew 10 feet off the ground down main streets, did 3,000-foot death drops and inside loops, ran a flying school and used magnesium flares for the first night flying. She married a handsome pilot from New Mexico, Miguel Otero, became an airplane designer, architect, and New Mexican.

Jean Jordan is a national award-winning journalist, editor, photographer and filmmaker. She is also multimedia actress, director, and playwright from London to Tokyo, New York to California, Chicago to Florida and bilingually in New Mexico and Mexico.

2200 Lester NE #261, Albuquerque, NM 87112, 505-292-4329

12

Chicago to Florida and bilingually in New Mexico and Mexico. 2200 Lester NE #261, Albuquerque, NM

LOUANN

C.

JORDAN

THE MOORISH INFLUENCE IN NEW MEXICO (SB)

Everyone who loves the Southwest owes some thanks to the Arabs because what we know as “our culture” owes a lot to theirs. So think of the Moslems when you admire adobe buildings, Spanish santos, matachines, hollyhocks, fast horses, the Spanish language, acequias in the desert, and Indian jewelry. Although the Spaniards hated the Moorish “infidels” who conquered their country, almost 800 years of occupation made for some profound cultural mixing. The Spanish conquistadores and settlers brought this mix with them to New Spain. And the Moorish influence is still with us today.

Louann D. Jordan was never a student of history until moving to New Mexico 28 years ago. Now her world consists of historic organizations, museums and occasional escapes into the world of very fast cars. She is curator of exhibitions at El Rancho de las Golondrinas colonial settlement in La Cienega, south of Santa Fe.

1524

505-471-2261 (work)

Camino

Sierra Vista,

Santa

Fe,

NM

87501,

505-983-2994

(home),

Sierra Vista, Santa Fe, NM 87501, 505-983-2994 (home), BOB JULYAN SOUTHWEST TREASURES: WHAT WE SEEK, WHAT
Sierra Vista, Santa Fe, NM 87501, 505-983-2994 (home), BOB JULYAN SOUTHWEST TREASURES: WHAT WE SEEK, WHAT

BOB

JULYAN

SOUTHWEST TREASURES: WHAT WE SEEK, WHAT WE FIND (SB)

The story of New Mexico began with a treasure hunt – Coronado’s search for the golden cities of Cibola. And treasure hunting continues today, for the Lost Adams Diggings, Victorio Peak Gold, the Lost Dutchman Mine, and many more. Bob Julyan doesn’t offer clues to these treasures’ locations, nor does he rent metal detectors. But he does offer a lively, fun discussion of this fascinating metaphor of southwestern exploration.

THE PLACE NAMES OF NEW MEXICO (SB)

Pie Town, Starvation Peak, Sangre de Cristo, Tucumcari – New Mexico is filled with such intriguing names, rich with anecdotes and folklore. But place names also offer unique insights into the history and values of the state’s peoples.With humor and local examples tailored to your locale, Bob Julyan gives audiences a lively names tour of the New Mexico landscape.

Bob Julyan is an Albuquerque-based writer and lecturer specializing in the connections between human and natural history. His Place Names of New Mexico is the standard reference. He has also written guides to wilderness treks and the Continental Divide Trail.

31 Avenida Almendro NE, Albuquerque, NM 87123-9648, 505-298-8420, rjulyan@swcp.com

13

and the Continental Divide Trail. 31 Avenida Almendro NE, Albuquerque, NM 87123-9648, 505-298-8420, rjulyan@swcp.com 13

DAVID

KAMMER

DAVID KAMMER YOU WERE HERE: SEEING NEW WISH POSTCARDS (SB) While we often think of postcards

YOU

WERE

HERE:

SEEING

NEW

WISH

POSTCARDS (SB)

While we often think of postcards as a convenient way of reminding friends of our adventures to exotic places, the images those cards convey also tell us a great deal about the self-identity of a particular locale. “The Land of Enchantment”, “The City Different,” “The Heart of Indian Country,” are but a few nicknames that have graced millions of postcards sent from New Mexico – and served to create fundamental impressions of our state. This illustrated talk examines the history of the postcard, focusing on historic and contemporary images of New Mexico and what they tell us about popular perceptions of the state, its inhabitants, landscape, and history.

MEXICO

THROUGH

HISTORIC

PICTURE

CRUISING THE HEART OF NEW MEXICO ON ROUTE 66 (SB)

Even though it officially ceased to exist more than a decade ago, Route 66 continues to beckon travelers. Its crumbling asphalt, old bridges and abandoned roadside buildings spur the spirit for adventure on the open road unlike any other highway in America. While Route 66 appeals to our nostalgia for auto travel in bygone days, the history of the road also reveals a good deal about New Mexico, including the politics of road alignments, boosterism, the rise of a roadside commercial architecture, and the attempts we make to preserve our past. Using historic photographs and maps, the talk examines the role the highway played in promoting early automobile tourism in New Mexico.

David Kammer has an ongoing interest in the architecture, landscape and cultures of the southwest. Since completing his Ph.D. in American Studies, he has directed several projects for the State Historic Preservation Division in Mora, Tierra Amarilla, and statewide.

521 Aliso Dr. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87108, 505-266-0586

521 Aliso Dr. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87108, 505-266-0586 MICHAEL LAFLAMME CREATIVE STORYTELLING (SB) We invent our

MICHAEL

LAFLAMME

CREATIVE STORYTELLING (SB)

We invent our

personal, family and community lives. It’s the original folk art, and from the time you spoke your first sentence, you’ve been a natural-born storyteller yourself! Creative Storytelling applies our natural storymaking talents toward discovering the possibilities in our shared values, experiences, histories, religions, languages, and cultures. Presentations are always customized and interactive and can explore Valuable Stories – see and share the values in your personal experiences; Everyday Storytelling – ways to choose, remember, adapt and tell stories; Regenerating Culture – use stories to explore important social questions; and Intergenerational Storytelling – find common stories in uncommon times. Just Say No to “recycled reality”– out-think the TV and create your own!

We speak in stories to imaginatively explore reality – what is and what if

Michael LaFlamme is fluent in Talking and presents storytelling statewide for educational, cultural, human service, civic and religious organizations. He is a UNM educator and directs the UNM “Wemagination” (we-imagination, people imagining together) Creativity Center. Familiar with many world storytelling traditions, he has earned 60 awards for creative and community service.

352 Madison NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106, 505-277-5571 (work), 505-265-4056 (home), laflamme@unm.edu

14

community service. 352 Madison NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106, 505-277-5571 (work), 505-265-4056 (home), laflamme@unm.edu 14

ENRIQUE

LAMADRID

ENRIQUE LAMADRID RAFAÉL CHACÓN (CH) Capitán Rafael Chacón was witness to the most significant events in

RAFAÉL CHACÓN (CH)

Capitán Rafael Chacón was witness to the most significant events in the formation of modern New Mexico, between the U.S. invasion of 1846 and statehood in 1912. At the tender age of 13, he commanded an artillery position at Apache Pass for the aborted defense of Santa Fe. During the Civil War, his company fired both the first and last shots at the Texan invaders at the Battles of Valverde and Glorieta. Chacón served with honor in the campaigns for peace with the Navajos and Apaches, and was the first Commander of Fort Stanton. He embraced the challenges and contradictions facing all nuevomexicanos, rose to action, and recorded his reflections as the most resonant Hispano voice from the 19th century.

COYOTES AND THEIR KIN: LIVING BETWEEN CULTURES IN NEW MEXICO (SB)

In Southwest mythology, Coyote is a culture hero who teaches the tricks of his trade with laughter and defiance. In New Mexico, he is the totem of inter-culturalism, that precocious strategy of living and thriving between languages and cultures. Here “coyotes” are also mixed breed humans, who, like their animal namesake, operate as cultural mediators in folklore, literature, and society itself. Just as human beings fall in love with each other, they fall in love with each other’s cultures, through food, language and art. This is the realm of Coyote, who seduces us into crossing boundaries and ultimately expanding and embracing our humanity.

Enrique Lamadrid is a folklorist, critic, translator and Professor at UNM. His research charts the influence of indigenous cultures on the Spanish language and imagination. His literary writings explore the borderlands between cultures, popular traditions, and literary expression.

Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, 505-277-5907 (work), 505-345-4189 (home), lamadrid@unm.edu

JOAN

LOGGHE

AND

CAMILLA

TRUJILLO

(home), lamadrid@unm.edu JOAN LOGGHE AND CAMILLA TRUJILLO MESTIZÁJE STEW: THE RICH CULTURAL LANDSCAPE OF THE

MESTIZÁJE STEW: THE RICH CULTURAL LANDSCAPE OF THE ESPAÑOLA VALLEY (SB)

How does a landscape come to inhabit us? How do lifeways intertwine? How do natives and newcomers stay themselves, yet create something new in their shared society? Poet Joan Logghe and potter/photographer Camilla Trujillo offer a slide show with bilingual poetry and commentary. The “newcomer” of 25 years, Logghe weaves the voices of neighbors, family, and the land. Roaming the kaleidoscope of change and continuity with her camera, the native-born Trujillo frames sacred sites, humble red chile ristras becoming varnished ornament for the chic, and a grassroots inventiveness everywhere.

Joan Logghe (above right), author of 12 books of poetry, has taught writing as a bridge to cultural awareness at many institutes in New Mexico. Her forthcoming books include Sofia, about an Hispanic woman with Sephardic Jewish roots, and Another Desert:

Jewish Poetry in New Mexico (Miriam Sagan, co-editor.) KNME-TV has featured Logghe reading her poem, “Something like Marriage,” about her relationship with New Mexico.

Camilla Trujillo grew up in the Española Valley and apprenticed under Santa Clara Pueblo matriarch Rose Naranjo. She has led the revival of Hispanic pottery-making and was the first potter invited to Spanish Market in Santa Fe. She teaches at Ghost Ranch and at many schools and exhibits widely.

Joan Logghe, Rt. 3 Box 180-A, Española, NM 87532, 505-753-3174, jlogghe@española.com Camilla Trujillo, Box 604, Santa Cruz, NM 87567, 505-747-8062

15

Española, NM 87532, 505-753-3174, jlogghe@española.com Camilla Trujillo, Box 604, Santa Cruz, NM 87567, 505-747-8062 15

SANDRA

D.

LYNN

SANDRA D. LYNN CLASSIC AMERICAN NATIVE, THE SUNFLOWER: A CULTURAL HISTORY (SB) Sunflowers – why do

CLASSIC AMERICAN NATIVE, THE SUNFLOWER: A CULTURAL HISTORY (SB)

Sunflowers – why do we see them decorating everything from dish towels to perfume bottles? Why do the heads of the garden varieties grow so big? Are these garden giants kin to the ones alongside the road? And what do they have to do with Jerusalem artichokes, Van Gogh, and the whole world of plants and people? This talk is illustrated with slides and assorted sunflowerabilia. Lynn explains how the wildflower growing all over the country is also the only internationally important food crop that originated in what is now the continental United States. Lynn tells the story of its ethnobotanical uses among Native Americans, its journey to Europe after the colonization of North America, its amazing transformation at the hands of the Russians, and the Return of the Native as an American icon.

WINDOWS ON THE PAST: HISTORIC LODGINGS OF NEW MEXICO (SB)

Take an illustrated tour through time and travel in New Mexico with the author of a new book by this title. Visit stage stops, the Santa Fe Trail, the coming of the steel rails, Fred Harvey and his line of luxury hotels, a fabulous guest ranch, automobile tourism and Route 66. From Shakespeare Ghost Town’s Stratford Hotel to Conrad Hilton’s 1939 Albuquerque Hilton, visit the small town hotels and the world class resorts, along with drummers, health seekers and tourists in search of Santa Fe Style.

Sandra D. Lynn is a writer with a strong interest in history, historic preservation, and in the interactions between people, places, and the natural world. She is currently serving as Program Officer for the New Mexico Endowment for the Humanities.

315 Pike Drive, Carlsbad, NM 88220, 505-234-1772, sdlynn@rt66.com

Drive, Carlsbad, NM 88220, 505-234-1772, sdlynn@rt66.com TONY MARES AZTLÁN IN A WORLD WITHOUT BORDERS (SB) Aztlán,

TONY

MARES

AZTLÁN IN A WORLD WITHOUT BORDERS (SB)

Aztlán, the once-and-future homeland of the Chicanos, is an idea that developed in the turbulent days of the 1960s Chicano Movement. Tony Mares wrote the first essay ever published on Aztlán, even then arguing that the most helpful meaning for Aztlán to serve was not nationalist but internationalist. Now that 30 years have passed, what can this homeland idea mean in a world of global forces like the internet, multinational corporations, and NAFTA? What shape can Aztlán take in a world where many continue to call for wars on immigration while the World Wide Web dissolves borders? Mares argues that the situation offers Chicanos a dual opportunity – to assert their cultural autonomy here in the Southwest and their growing role in a borderless international community at the same time.

E. A. “Tony” Mares is a poet, fiction writer, and historian. He teaches creative writing in the UNM English department. His work has been widely published.

202 Edith NE, Albuquerque, NM 87102, 505-248-0946, tmares@swcp.com

16

department. His work has been widely published. 202 Edith NE, Albuquerque, NM 87102, 505-248-0946, tmares@swcp.com 16

BILL

MARTIN

HOUDINI, AMERICAN ICON (CH)

The young immigrant from Budapest, Ehrich Weiss, accepted the opportunities for greatness offered by his beloved new country. He recreated himself as Harry Houdini from Appleton, Wisconsin and began the struggle to become the greatest escape artist and entertainer of his era. Experience the relentless drive of this man who invented illusions and death-defying escapes, becoming “The Great Liberator” to all who needed to believe in themselves once more. Houdini represents a true rags-to-riches story. He dared to dream. He was fearless. He was also showman, adventurer, spiritualist, aviator, writer, crusader, film actor and producer, patriot, and devoted family man. Houdini’s traditional $100 escape challenge will be offered at each performance!

Bill Martin is a hypnotherapist, magician, escapeologist, and retired naval aviator. He has been a Golden Gloves boxer, carnival wrestler, hardrock miner, tractor mechanic, night club entertainer, public relations director, and entrepreneur. He is president of Mindreach, Inc.

Mindreach, Inc., 19 Mallette Dr., Belen, NM 87002, 505-864-7953

Inc., 19 Mallette Dr., Belen, NM 87002, 505-864-7953 VALERIE MARTINEZ NO LONGER AVAILABLE END OF THE
Inc., 19 Mallette Dr., Belen, NM 87002, 505-864-7953 VALERIE MARTINEZ NO LONGER AVAILABLE END OF THE

VALERIE

MARTINEZ

NO LONGER AVAILABLE

END

OF

THE

TWENTIETH

WATER

INTO

AIR:

LATINA

POETRY

AT

FROM

CENTURY (SB)

We tend to look toward a new century with expectation. As we hurtle towards it, perhaps we believe we are a bit Rip Van Winkle, a bit caterpillar – we will wake from our deep sleep! All that is old and dead will fall away, and the world will burst forth in wings and color! Art constantly renews itself in this way, and perhaps we expect that the year 2000 will mark some monumental shift in consciousness, reflected in our art. This shift has already begun, and the contemporary poetry of Latina writers – ever provocative and revealing – unveils themes and images for us to consider for the next millennium. This presentation introduces you to the poetry of Latina writers, using the metaphor “from water into air” to explore important themes in their work. Latina poets depict a uniquely American and female consciousness which tells the (sometimes unknown) story of end-of-the-century America.

THE

Valerie Martinez is a poet, teacher, editor, and translator. Her book of poems, Absence, Luminescent, won the Larry Levis Prize and will be published in 1999. Her poetry has appeared in many anthologies and journals. She is currently Professor of English at New Mexico Highlands University.

17

appeared in many anthologies and journals. She is currently Professor of English at New Mexico Highlands

BRUCE

MCLAREN

NO LONGER AVAILABLE

PAUL HORGAN AS I KNEW HIM (SB)

He was a Knight of St. Gregory, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, compatriot of Peter Hurd, Thornton Wilder, and the ashes of D.H. Lawrence. He was Paul Horgan, writer, musician, and artist. Horgan’s roots were in New York, his career in New Mexico, and his last years were spent reflecting in a carriage house in Connecticut. He was a writer who looked at the gate and saw beyond, a New Mexico celebrity who rubbed elbows with the famous, a polymath of great and varied learning – a legacy to us all. Let me share that legacy with you.

Bruce McLaren is a television producer, public speaker, retired Major General, and was librarian at the New Mexico Military Institute’s Paul Horgan Library for twenty-two years. McLaren is an educator and a storyteller.

twenty-two years. McLaren is an educator and a storyteller. ROBERTA COURTNEY MEYERS THE HONORABLE LADY DOROTHY
twenty-two years. McLaren is an educator and a storyteller. ROBERTA COURTNEY MEYERS THE HONORABLE LADY DOROTHY

ROBERTA

COURTNEY

MEYERS

THE HONORABLE LADY DOROTHY BRETT (CH)

With humor, some sadness, and great bombast, Brett (as she preferred to be called) talks of Taos, of Queen Victoria’s Court, of the Bloomsbury group of England, of her own life and of her life with D.H. Lawrence and entourage. A sort of magical figure on the Taos landscape, bridging the bohemian times to the hippie era, Brett dressed outlandishly and endeared herself to all with her bubbly and domineering personality. Her paintings hang in the National Portrait Gallery in England and across the U.S.

JOSEPHA JARAMILLO CARSON (3RD WIFE OF KIT CARSON) (CH)

You’ve heard a lot about Kit Carson but have you ever heard from a woman who knew him intimately? With humor and sadness Josepha talks of her life with Carson in Taos, Rayado, Colorado and other places; of her sister and brother-in-law, Charles Bent, and the 1847 Taos Revolt; of Padre Martinez; of Carson’s wide travels across the continent as trapper, guide, soldier and translator; of the Taos of her day; of her children, and of spending much of her time alone in lonely places while Carson is away.

Roberta Courtney Meyers directs Enchantment Dreams Theater and Tours, is a playwright/composer/freelance writer/tour guide. Her work has been published in many periodicals, anthologies and magazines. Twenty-five of her dramas/musicals have been produced. She knew Dorothy Brett and Frieda Lawrence.

Box 1472, Taos, NM 87571, 505-776-2562

18

dramas/musicals have been produced. She knew Dorothy Brett and Frieda Lawrence. Box 1472, Taos, NM 87571,

RANDY

MILLIGAN

“TR”–THEODORE ROOSEVELT, ROUGH RIDER PRESIDENT (CH)

Teddy Roosevelt is a classic story of perseverance, activism and America’s Western myths. On his way to becoming our 26th president, Roosevelt overcame asthma, poor eyesight, and the deaths – on the same Valentine’s Day! – of his mother and wife. TR commanded two companies of New Mexico volunteers as they charged – on foot – up San Juan Hill overlooking Santiago de Cuba. Milligan can present TR programs that emphasize his love of books and his “Rawhide Library,” or his later presidential campaigns.

Randy Milligan, President of the Carlsbad Arts & Humanities Council, has also done Chautauqua performances of James Madison and Judge Roy Bean in several states.

3324 Pike Ct., Carlsbad, NM 88220, 505-885-9041, ram@caverns.com

Pike Ct., Carlsbad, NM 88220, 505-885-9041, ram@caverns.com VANANN MOORE THE ONE AND ONLY UNSINKABLE MOLLY BROWN
Pike Ct., Carlsbad, NM 88220, 505-885-9041, ram@caverns.com VANANN MOORE THE ONE AND ONLY UNSINKABLE MOLLY BROWN

VANANN

MOORE

THE ONE AND ONLY UNSINKABLE MOLLY BROWN (CH)

The legend of the 1912 sinking of the Titanic lives on in the remarkable life of one of its most outspoken heroines, Molly Brown. She came to national attention again in the 1960s with a highly successful Broadway musical and movie which glamorized her rags-to-riches life from the “Gilded Age.” She will be remembered in the United States and across Europe as the woman with “a heart as big as a ham!”

MARTHA WASHINGTON: THE WOMAN BEHIND THE FATHER OF OUR COUNTRY (CH)

The love story of Martha and George Washington began before their marriage in 1759. Making beautiful Mount Vernon their home, they would help to create for the first time in history an actual democracy. Martha was an attractive, intelligent and gracious woman who stood behind one of our country’s greatest heroes during the American Revolution and who set the precedent as our country’s first First Lady.

LILLIAN RUSSELL: THE ORIGINAL DIAMOND LIL (CH)

Lillian Russell was “sweetheart, mother and country all wrapped up in one!” As a singer-actress she represented the Golden Age of the American Theater charming theater-goers for forty years. Lillian also worked as a suffragette and social activist, writing one of the first advice columns ever published. This “Original American Beauty” promoted bicycling, and was the first to sing over the telephone wires.

VanAnn Moore researches, writes and portrays ten historical characters as well as performing in her own musical-theatre shows. VanAnn is a scholar, teacher, and voice coach.

439 Aquina Court, Belen NM 87002, 505-864-2038

19

musical-theatre shows. VanAnn is a scholar, teacher, and voice coach. 439 Aquina Court, Belen NM 87002,

BRUCE

NOLL

WALT WHITMAN’S AMERICA (CH)

In the mid-19th century, America held great promise with its vast forests, open rivers, and rich natural treasures. Walt Whitman believed this great landscape could only be equaled by its people if they were free to develop themselves to their full potential. Carl Sandburg wrote, “Whitman’s Leaves of Grass is the most widely keyed solemn oath that America means something and is going somewhere; it is America’s most classic advertisement of itself as having purpose, destiny, banners and beacon-fires.” The promise of America, the hope of democracy, and the belief in the creative power of the individual are brought to life in this Chautauqua presentation.

Dr. Bruce Noll has toured nationally for many years with his dramatic interpretation of Whitman’s Leaves of Grass. In “Walt Whitman’s America” he combines Whitman’s life and work to create an exciting Chautauqua presentation.

423 Aliso Dr. SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108, 505-262-2273, banoll@unm.edu

Dr. SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108, 505-262-2273, banoll@unm.edu DON PERKINS ESCAPING SLAVERY, FIGHTING FOR FREEDOM:
Dr. SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108, 505-262-2273, banoll@unm.edu DON PERKINS ESCAPING SLAVERY, FIGHTING FOR FREEDOM:

DON

PERKINS

ESCAPING SLAVERY, FIGHTING FOR FREEDOM: FREDERICK DOUGLASS, THE LION (CH)

Born a Maryland slave in 1817, said to be the son of his master, Frederick Douglass became the most famous Black American of his era. At eight, he was taught to read by his Baltimore owner’s wife – a kind and subversive act that broke the law against teaching Black people to read. His freedom began at age 17 when his new owner, “slave-breaker” Edward Covey, whipped Frederick every day until the blood ran. Frederick exploded in rebellion, wrestled Covey to a two-hour standstill, and Covey never whipped him again. Frederick escaped and his great physical presence and speaking voice attracted the mentorship of anti-slavery publisher William Lloyd Garrison. Douglass became the first African American invited to the White House, by Abraham Lincoln, and later served as Ambassador to Haiti.

Don Perkins is an Iowan who came to Albuquerque in 1959 as a student-athlete at UNM. He spent nine years with the Dallas Cowboys and is one of only 10 men inducted into their Ring of Honor with legendary names like Landry, Staubach and Lilly. He has been a broadcaster locally and nationally, a speaker, and an actor. He has been with the Albuquerque Police Department for 10 years, currently a nationally-certified Crime Prevention Specialist working with community service programs.

808 Vassar NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106, 505-768-2102, xles21a@prodigy.com

20

working with community service programs. 808 Vassar NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106, 505-768-2102, xles21a@prodigy.com 20

LESLEY

POLING-KEMPES

THE HARVEY GIRLS & THE SANTA FE RAILWAY: MYTH, LEGEND & HISTORY (SB)

The Santa Fe Railway and the Fred Harvey Company were responsible for the creation and promotion of the Mythic Southwest, and of the region’s popularity as a tourist destination. The Harvey Girls’ role in the opening of the West has become legendary, their lives forever linked with the Grand Canyon, Santa Fe, and the exotic and elegant resorts built along the railroad in the early years of this century. In this slide show/lecture learn how Harvey and the Santa Fe influenced the art and architecture of the Southwest, and how the Harvey Girls became synonymous with adventure and romance during the golden years of American railroad travel.

O’KEEFFE’S COUNTRY: ABIQUIU AND THE VALLEY OF SHINING STONE (SB)

What makes the region of Abiquiu and Ghost Ranch, O’Keeffe’s home country, so special? There has been a mystique to the people and the landscape for hundreds of years. Today, this region is among New Mexico’s most popular destinations. In this slide show/lecture learn about the myths, legends and history of this ancient pueblo community, part Native American, part Hispanic, completely unique and impossibly beautiful. The valley’s story includes the region’s first Native Americans, conquistadores, artists, writers, dude ranchers, fur traders, paleontologists, atomic scientists, and a few spirits and brujos.

atomic scientists, and a few spirits and brujos. Lesley Poling-Kempes is the author of Valley of

Lesley Poling-Kempes is the author of Valley of Shining Stone: The Story of Abiquiu; The Harvey Girls; and a novel, Canyon of Remembering. She lives in Abiquiu, NM.

PO Box 36, Abiquiu, NM 87510, 505-685-4579

in Abiquiu, NM. PO Box 36, Abiquiu, NM 87510, 505-685-4579 NOEL H. PUGACH LEW WALLACE (CH)

NOEL

H.

PUGACH

LEW WALLACE (CH)

He is remembered as the author of Ben Hur: A Tale of the Christ. But Lew Wallace (1827-1905) was also a lawyer and politician in his native Indiana, Civil War general, and United States minister to the Ottoman Empire. As Territorial governor of New Mexico, he grappled with the Santa Fe Ring, the Lincoln County War, and Billy the Kid. His many successes meant that he had a keen grasp of reality. But it was the quest for adventure, in deed and spirit, that shaped his character and impelled him to write romantic historical novels, which constitute Wallace’s permanent legacy.

HARRY S. TRUMAN: THE BUCK STOPS HERE (CH)

Compared to the “Great Roosevelt,” whom he succeeded as thirty-third president of the United States, Harry S. Truman’s beginnings were undistinguished. Yet, by virtue of his direct style, earthy personality, and willingness to make tough decisions, Truman left an indelible mark on the United States and the world. His decisions on the atomic bomb, Soviet-American relations, the Middle East, the Korean War, and the firing of General Douglas MacArthur shaped the direction of history. In recent years, Truman’s reputation has soared, and he has become an American folk hero.

THE UNITED STATES AS A WORLD POWER AT THE MILLENNIUM (SB)

How did the United States emerge as a superpower after World War II? Is it still a superpower? What does this mean as we approach the millennium? Answers to these questions are central to an understanding of the challenges facing policy makers and the American public in the 21st century. At your group’s request, Dr. Pugach can give special attention to the American role in East Asia or the Middle East.

Noel H. Pugach is Professor of History at the University of New Mexico. He earned the Ph.D. and is the author of numerous books and articles on American foreign relations.

History Department, UNM, Albuquerque, NM 87131, 505-277-2701 (work), 505-881-4123 (home), npugach@unm.edu

21

relations. History Department, UNM, Albuquerque, NM 87131, 505-277-2701 (work), 505-881-4123 (home), npugach@unm.edu 21

SHERRY

ROBINSON

THE APACHES OF NEW MEXICO (SB) INSIDE WESTERN NEW MEXICO: ZUNI, ACOMA AND GRANTS (SB)

Meet the heroes of western New Mexico! Walk in the moccasins of the Warm Springs, Chiricahua and Mescalero Apaches! Author Robinson will take you to Spanish colonies, American homesteads, and the Apache rancheria. Told in their own words, the Apache talk includes women warriors, survival on the land (including weaponry), the remarkable Mescalero escape from federal detention at Bosque Redondo and Massai, the last renegade. The Western New Mexico talk includes the brave settlers of Cebolleta, the environmental destruction and revival of the Zuni Mountains, the survival of Mormon colonists at Ramah, and the twentieth-century adventures of the nation’s last homesteaders.

Sherry Robinson, an award-winning journalist, began her career in Grants and Gallup writing on Indian issues. She is author of El Malpais, Mt. Taylor and the Zuni Mountains and Apache Voices.

503 Solar Road NW, Albuquerque, NM 87107, 505-343-0852, robinson@nmia.com

NW, Albuquerque, NM 87107, 505-343-0852, robinson@nmia.com TOBY SMITH COAL TOWN: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF DAWSON,
NW, Albuquerque, NM 87107, 505-343-0852, robinson@nmia.com TOBY SMITH COAL TOWN: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF DAWSON,

TOBY

SMITH

COAL TOWN: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF DAWSON, NEW MEXICO (SB)

Not all ghost towns are alike. The northeast New Mexico community of Dawson has been rubble since 1950, but it lives on in the minds and hearts of the people who made it their home and – through those people’s children and grandchildren – in the reunion picnics held every other year at the site of the vanished town. One of the largest and most important coal-mining towns in the West, Dawson was a melting pot of 19 nationalities from around the world. A company town run by Phelps Dodge, Dawson was also a place that overcame great tragedies through its solid work ethic and an admirable esprit de corps. Dawson’s cemetery is the only one in New Mexico on the National Register of Historic Places.

Toby Smith is a longtime New Mexico journalist and the author of seven nonfiction books. He is a former Fulbright lecturer in Romania and a contributor to the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune, Village Voice and National Geographic Traveler.

3813 Inca St. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111, 505-294-2865 or 505-823-3902,

bsmith3366@aol.com

22

Geographic Traveler . 3813 Inca St. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111, 505-294-2865 or 505-823-3902, bsmith3366@aol.com 22

FERENC

SZASZ

RELIGION AND THE MODERN AMERICAN WEST: THE 1890’S TO THE PRESENT (SB)

This lecture, illustrated with slides, will explore the important role that organized religion has played in creating the 20th Century West. Although many historians have bypassed this theme, religious values and institutions have often lain at the very heart of many a western community, ranging from the ethnic cultures of the Great Plains to the modern inner-city Megachurches. Given the pluralism of the contemporary western religious landscape, the West may well be providing the model for the entire nation as regards to religion in the 21st Century.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN: A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS (SB)

Historians and the American population generally agree that Abraham Lincoln was one of our greatest presidents. Known to most of us as “the man who freed the slaves,” Lincoln was a complex man who sought to square his life choices with the principles he declared. Dr. Szasz examines the myth and the man, his faith in democracy and his symbolic force on the country.

faith in democracy and his symbolic force on the country. SCOTLAND AND THE AMERICAN WEST: TWO

SCOTLAND AND THE AMERICAN WEST: TWO LANDS OF ROMANCE AND MYTH (SB)

Scotland had a considerable effect on the history of the Trans-Mississippi West from the eighteenth century until the era of Wo rld War I. Scots participated in all occupations in the West and brought their own traditions and outlook with them. The concept of “hero” was intrinsic to them, making the West a fertile source of romantic depictions of hardship, bravery and success.

Ferenc M. Szasz is Professor of History at the University of New Mexico, specializing in American Cultural and Religious Histor y.

Department of History, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1181, 505-277-2451

of History, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1181, 505-277-2451 ROBERT J. TORREZ THE ZORRO SYNDROME: CRIME AND PUNISHMENT IN

ROBERT

J.

TORREZ

THE ZORRO SYNDROME: CRIME AND PUNISHMENT IN COLONIAL NEW MEXICO (SB)

One of the common images of the Spanish Colonial Empire is of a down-trodden populace, governed by cruel officials who imposed arbitrary punishment and taxes on them – at least until Zorro comes to their rescue. This talk will compare those myths with the material in New Mexico’s own Spanish and Mexican archives, which show how the system worked in the real world. Included are the types of crimes people were arrested for, how judges ruled, what punishments were given, and how women were treated in the system.

THE MYTH OF THE HANGING TREE: JUSTICE IN TERRITORIAL NEW MEXICO, 1846-1912 (SB)

Before Statehood, were murderers and horse thieves actually taken to the hanging tree, mounted on horseback and relieved of their earthly burdens? Were lynching and vigilantism the most common methods of justice? Using facsimiles of original documents and photos from the capital, Mr. Torrez examines the myths and truths about crime and punishment during New Mexico’s colorful, violent territorial period.

Robert J. Torrez is State Historian at the State Records Center and Archives in Santa Fe. He is a native of northern New Mexico and has researched a variety of subjects related to New Mexico history. Mr. Torrez has published articles in New Mexico Magazine, True West and Enchantment.

New Mexico State Records Center and Archives, 1205 Camino Carlos Rey, Santa Fe, NM 87505, 505-476-7955 (work), 836-9699 (home), Fax: 476-7909

23

Center and Archives, 1205 Camino Carlos Rey, Santa Fe, NM 87505, 505-476-7955 (work), 836-9699 (home), Fax:

CIPRIANO

VIGIL

FROM RITUAL TO NUEVO CANCIÓN: NEW MEXICO’S MUSIC (SB)

Cipriano Vigil, native of Chamisal on the high road to Taos, is the living embodiment of nuevomexicano music and ritual. Cipriano learned all the types of village music at bailes (dances) and entriegas (“handing-over” ceremonies of baptism, marriage, and death.) Then he studied the known sources and got a PhD in musicology. So Dr. Vigil can show your group the bridges from past to present, from Spanish to English, and from analysis to laughter. He brings the tradition into the present with songs he writes in the nuevo canción style, combining traditional music with lyrics that comment on current social issues. He, his son Cipriano, and daughter Felicita perform together, embodying the importance of family in preserving heritage. Laugh, learn, wonder, and sing along with the man nominated three times for the National Endowment for the Humanities Living Heritage Award and honored with a 1998 NMEH Excellence in the Humanities Award.

Cipriano Vigil has written the nuevo canciónes “Se Ve Triste El Hombre” (The Man Looks Sad) and “Nuevo Mexico Lindo Y Querido” (New Mexico, Beautiful and Beloved). He teaches at Northern New Mexico Community College and performs widely.

Northern New Mexico Community College and performs widely. Box 747, El Rito, NM 87530, 505-581-4520 (home),

Box 747, El Rito, NM 87530, 505-581-4520 (home), 505-747-2295 (work)

El Rito, NM 87530, 505-581-4520 (home), 505-747-2295 (work) JEANNE WHITEHOUSE PETERSON A CHILD’S SOUTHWEST: CULTURE,

JEANNE

WHITEHOUSE

PETERSON

A CHILD’S SOUTHWEST: CULTURE, CONFLICT AND CHANGE IN REGIONAL LITERATURE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE (SB)

For more than seventy years, adult writers and storytellers have entertained and informed young readers with tales about southwestern people, places and events. As we enter the 21st Century, however, schools and other community groups are beginning to embrace new voices and multiple interpretations of the cultural landscape, revised images of regional characters and alternate meanings for historical events. This informative presentation will explore the dynamic field of regional literature – from the early work of Scott O’Dell, Joseph Krumgold and Ann Nolan Clark to that of Will Hobbs, Luci Tapahanso and Pat Mora, among others. Whitehouse Peterson will engage her audience with dramatic readings and interactive discussions.

Jeanne Whitehouse Peterson has served as New Mexico’s editor for the American Library Association’s Reading for Young People: the Southwest. She has worked in Magdalena, Bloomfield and Zuni Pueblo, and has published nationally known children’s books: I Have a Sister, My Sister is Deaf, Sometimes I Dream Horses, and My Mama Sings. She has taught literature and writing courses at the University of New Mexico since 1971.

521 Aliso Dr. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87108, 505-266-0586, jwhouse@unm.edu

24

at the University of New Mexico since 1971. 521 Aliso Dr. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87108, 505-266-0586,

MICHAEL

ZEILIK

ASTRONOMY IN THE PUEBLO WORLD–AN ASTRONOMER’S VIEW (SB)

The Pueblo people of the U.S. Southwest perceive a cosmos in which nature functions with the active cooperation of humankind, who must perform the proper ceremony at the proper time to ensure the regulation of order. The selection of the proper time was guided by astronomical observations that were the responsibility of a small number of religious officials – the Sun Priests of the Pueblos. This talk will focus on the astronomy of the historic Pueblos to understand how the sequence of ceremonies is properly scheduled. With the background of historic practices as a guide, Zeilik will examine selected sites of the prehistoric Pueblo world, including Fajada Butte and Chaco Canyon, to evaluate their possible astronomical uses and practices. This talk is based on publicly-accessible sources, and does not divulge any information given in confidence.

Dr. Michael Zeilik works as Professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of New Mexico, specializing in introductory courses for the novice, non-science major. He is a pioneer in astronomy education research at the university level.

800

zeilik@chicoma.la.unm.edu

Yale

Blvd

NE,

Albuquerque,

NM

87131-1156,

505-277-4442,

Yale Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1156, 505-277-4442, PAUL ZOLBROD RENEWED VISIONS FROM THE “OLD
Yale Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1156, 505-277-4442, PAUL ZOLBROD RENEWED VISIONS FROM THE “OLD

PAUL

ZOLBROD

RENEWED

VISIONS

FROM

THE

“OLD

WORLD”:

NEW

LIFE

FOR

SOME

CLASSIC

POEMS (SB)

The dreaded “Intro to Lit” course you struggled with in college – and most especially those inscrutable poems with their “hidden meanings” – now deserve a second chance. With life’s out-of-school lessons fully absorbed, you’re ready to re-hear Shakespeare’s sonnets, Donne’s metaphysical poems, Browning’s dramatic monologues, the great odes of Keats and Shelley and Wordsworth, and the soaring lyrics of Emily Dickinson. Spoken out loud rather than being studied for a written exam, those poems linger in the ear like songs, and speak to the heart as well as the mind. Then they can transmit the humanistic legacy of our Western Heritage – in full partnership with the unheralded legacy that the poetry of North America’s oral traditions bestow.

ANCIENT VISIONS FROM THE “NEW WORLD”: NATIVE AMERICAN ORAL LITERATURE (SB)

This warm, humorous talk answers questions like: Who are we? Where do we come from? What does it mean to be male or female? Dr. Zolbrod suggests that southwestern Indian narratives comprise a vibrant, ongoing oral tradition that rivals and complements Europe’s great literary heritage. These spoken verses–elegant in their formality and earthy in their honesty about the human condition–explore the battle of the sexes, the meaning of homeland, and the relationships between people and gods.

Paul Zolbrod, a former English professor at a liberal arts college back East, has studied with Navajo elders for 25 years. His English versions of the Navajo creation stories, Diné Bahane, is regarded as a benchmark of poetic translation.

1301 Hertz Dr. SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108, 505-266-3588

25

Diné Bahane , is regarded as a benchmark of poetic translation. 1301 Hertz Dr. SE, Albuquerque,
INDEX IF YOU KNOW A PRESENTER’S NAME, the whole catalogue is arranged in alphabetical order,
INDEX IF YOU KNOW A PRESENTER’S NAME, the whole catalogue is arranged in alphabetical order,
INDEX IF YOU KNOW A PRESENTER’S NAME, the whole catalogue is arranged in alphabetical order,
INDEX IF YOU KNOW A PRESENTER’S NAME, the whole catalogue is arranged in alphabetical order,
INDEX IF YOU KNOW A PRESENTER’S NAME, the whole catalogue is arranged in alphabetical order,
INDEX IF YOU KNOW A PRESENTER’S NAME, the whole catalogue is arranged in alphabetical order,
INDEX IF YOU KNOW A PRESENTER’S NAME, the whole catalogue is arranged in alphabetical order,
INDEX IF YOU KNOW A PRESENTER’S NAME, the whole catalogue is arranged in alphabetical order,

INDEX

INDEX IF YOU KNOW A PRESENTER’S NAME, the whole catalogue is arranged in alphabetical order, and
INDEX IF YOU KNOW A PRESENTER’S NAME, the whole catalogue is arranged in alphabetical order, and
INDEX IF YOU KNOW A PRESENTER’S NAME, the whole catalogue is arranged in alphabetical order, and

IF YOU KNOW A PRESENTER’S NAME, the whole catalogue is arranged in alphabetical order, and all of a presenter’s programs are listed in the same place. For example, you’ll find presenter Enrique Lamadrid between Michael LaFlamme and Joan Logghe, and with Enrique’s picture you’ll find descriptions of his talk on “Coyotes and Their Kin” and his Chautauqua performance of “Capitán Rafael Chacón.”

his Chautauqua performance of “Capitán Rafael Chacón.” IF YOU ONLY KNOW A CHARACTER’S NAME (LIKE "MABEL
his Chautauqua performance of “Capitán Rafael Chacón.” IF YOU ONLY KNOW A CHARACTER’S NAME (LIKE "MABEL
his Chautauqua performance of “Capitán Rafael Chacón.” IF YOU ONLY KNOW A CHARACTER’S NAME (LIKE "MABEL
his Chautauqua performance of “Capitán Rafael Chacón.” IF YOU ONLY KNOW A CHARACTER’S NAME (LIKE "MABEL
his Chautauqua performance of “Capitán Rafael Chacón.” IF YOU ONLY KNOW A CHARACTER’S NAME (LIKE "MABEL
his Chautauqua performance of “Capitán Rafael Chacón.” IF YOU ONLY KNOW A CHARACTER’S NAME (LIKE "MABEL
his Chautauqua performance of “Capitán Rafael Chacón.” IF YOU ONLY KNOW A CHARACTER’S NAME (LIKE "MABEL
his Chautauqua performance of “Capitán Rafael Chacón.” IF YOU ONLY KNOW A CHARACTER’S NAME (LIKE "MABEL
his Chautauqua performance of “Capitán Rafael Chacón.” IF YOU ONLY KNOW A CHARACTER’S NAME (LIKE "MABEL
his Chautauqua performance of “Capitán Rafael Chacón.” IF YOU ONLY KNOW A CHARACTER’S NAME (LIKE "MABEL
his Chautauqua performance of “Capitán Rafael Chacón.” IF YOU ONLY KNOW A CHARACTER’S NAME (LIKE "MABEL
his Chautauqua performance of “Capitán Rafael Chacón.” IF YOU ONLY KNOW A CHARACTER’S NAME (LIKE "MABEL
his Chautauqua performance of “Capitán Rafael Chacón.” IF YOU ONLY KNOW A CHARACTER’S NAME (LIKE "MABEL

IF YOU ONLY KNOW A CHARACTER’S NAME (LIKE "MABEL DODGE LUHAN") AND NOT THE PRESENTER’S NAME, or if you’re interested in

NOT THE PRESENTER’S NAME, or if you’re interested in comparing topics in a category, the following
NOT THE PRESENTER’S NAME, or if you’re interested in comparing topics in a category, the following
NOT THE PRESENTER’S NAME, or if you’re interested in comparing topics in a category, the following

comparing topics in a category, the following indexes will help you.

topics in a category, the following indexes will help you. "LIVING HISTORY" CHARACTERS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER
topics in a category, the following indexes will help you. "LIVING HISTORY" CHARACTERS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER
topics in a category, the following indexes will help you. "LIVING HISTORY" CHARACTERS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER
topics in a category, the following indexes will help you. "LIVING HISTORY" CHARACTERS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER
topics in a category, the following indexes will help you. "LIVING HISTORY" CHARACTERS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER
topics in a category, the following indexes will help you. "LIVING HISTORY" CHARACTERS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER
topics in a category, the following indexes will help you. "LIVING HISTORY" CHARACTERS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER
topics in a category, the following indexes will help you. "LIVING HISTORY" CHARACTERS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER
topics in a category, the following indexes will help you. "LIVING HISTORY" CHARACTERS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

"LIVING HISTORY" CHARACTERS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER (CH):

HISTORY" CHARACTERS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER (CH): Susan B. Anthony (Marilyn Adams) Basho (Richard Bodner)
HISTORY" CHARACTERS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER (CH): Susan B. Anthony (Marilyn Adams) Basho (Richard Bodner)
HISTORY" CHARACTERS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER (CH): Susan B. Anthony (Marilyn Adams) Basho (Richard Bodner)

Susan B. Anthony (Marilyn Adams)

IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER (CH): Susan B. Anthony (Marilyn Adams) Basho (Richard Bodner) Dorothy Brett (Roberta Meyers)
IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER (CH): Susan B. Anthony (Marilyn Adams) Basho (Richard Bodner) Dorothy Brett (Roberta Meyers)

Basho (Richard Bodner)

Susan B. Anthony (Marilyn Adams) Basho (Richard Bodner) Dorothy Brett (Roberta Meyers) Molly Brown (VanAnn Moore)
Susan B. Anthony (Marilyn Adams) Basho (Richard Bodner) Dorothy Brett (Roberta Meyers) Molly Brown (VanAnn Moore)

Dorothy Brett (Roberta Meyers)

Adams) Basho (Richard Bodner) Dorothy Brett (Roberta Meyers) Molly Brown (VanAnn Moore) Josepha Carson (Roberta Meyers)
Adams) Basho (Richard Bodner) Dorothy Brett (Roberta Meyers) Molly Brown (VanAnn Moore) Josepha Carson (Roberta Meyers)

Molly Brown (VanAnn Moore)

Josepha Carson (Roberta Meyers)

Molly Brown (VanAnn Moore) Josepha Carson (Roberta Meyers) 1 4 18 19 18 Kit Carson (Dave
1 4 18 19 18
1
4
18
19
18
Moore) Josepha Carson (Roberta Meyers) 1 4 18 19 18 Kit Carson (Dave Jackson) 11 15
Moore) Josepha Carson (Roberta Meyers) 1 4 18 19 18 Kit Carson (Dave Jackson) 11 15
Moore) Josepha Carson (Roberta Meyers) 1 4 18 19 18 Kit Carson (Dave Jackson) 11 15

Kit Carson (Dave Jackson)

(Roberta Meyers) 1 4 18 19 18 Kit Carson (Dave Jackson) 11 15 3 12 20
(Roberta Meyers) 1 4 18 19 18 Kit Carson (Dave Jackson) 11 15 3 12 20
11 15 3 12 20 3 10 2
11
15
3
12
20
3
10
2
4 17 5 4
4
17
5
4
(Dave Jackson) 11 15 3 12 20 3 10 2 4 17 5 4 Raphael Chacón
(Dave Jackson) 11 15 3 12 20 3 10 2 4 17 5 4 Raphael Chacón
(Dave Jackson) 11 15 3 12 20 3 10 2 4 17 5 4 Raphael Chacón
(Dave Jackson) 11 15 3 12 20 3 10 2 4 17 5 4 Raphael Chacón
(Dave Jackson) 11 15 3 12 20 3 10 2 4 17 5 4 Raphael Chacón

Raphael Chacón (Enrique Lamadríd)

20 3 10 2 4 17 5 4 Raphael Chacón (Enrique Lamadríd) Elizabeth Bacon Custer (Deborah
20 3 10 2 4 17 5 4 Raphael Chacón (Enrique Lamadríd) Elizabeth Bacon Custer (Deborah
20 3 10 2 4 17 5 4 Raphael Chacón (Enrique Lamadríd) Elizabeth Bacon Custer (Deborah

Elizabeth Bacon Custer (Deborah Blanche)

Mary Donoho (Jean Jordan)

Frederick Douglass (Don Perkins)

Mary Donoho (Jean Jordan) Frederick Douglass (Don Perkins) Erna Fergusson (Deborah Blanche) Patrick Floyd Garrett (Ron
Mary Donoho (Jean Jordan) Frederick Douglass (Don Perkins) Erna Fergusson (Deborah Blanche) Patrick Floyd Garrett (Ron
Mary Donoho (Jean Jordan) Frederick Douglass (Don Perkins) Erna Fergusson (Deborah Blanche) Patrick Floyd Garrett (Ron
Mary Donoho (Jean Jordan) Frederick Douglass (Don Perkins) Erna Fergusson (Deborah Blanche) Patrick Floyd Garrett (Ron

Erna Fergusson (Deborah Blanche)

Douglass (Don Perkins) Erna Fergusson (Deborah Blanche) Patrick Floyd Garrett (Ron Grimes) John L. Hatcher (Barton
Douglass (Don Perkins) Erna Fergusson (Deborah Blanche) Patrick Floyd Garrett (Ron Grimes) John L. Hatcher (Barton

Patrick Floyd Garrett (Ron Grimes)

John L. Hatcher (Barton Barbour)

Edgar Lee Hewett (Phil Bock)

L. Hatcher (Barton Barbour) Edgar Lee Hewett (Phil Bock) Houdini (Bill Martin) Octaviano Ambrosio Larrazolo (Dan
L. Hatcher (Barton Barbour) Edgar Lee Hewett (Phil Bock) Houdini (Bill Martin) Octaviano Ambrosio Larrazolo (Dan

Houdini (Bill Martin)

Barbour) Edgar Lee Hewett (Phil Bock) Houdini (Bill Martin) Octaviano Ambrosio Larrazolo (Dan Chavez) Aldo Leopold
Barbour) Edgar Lee Hewett (Phil Bock) Houdini (Bill Martin) Octaviano Ambrosio Larrazolo (Dan Chavez) Aldo Leopold
Barbour) Edgar Lee Hewett (Phil Bock) Houdini (Bill Martin) Octaviano Ambrosio Larrazolo (Dan Chavez) Aldo Leopold
Barbour) Edgar Lee Hewett (Phil Bock) Houdini (Bill Martin) Octaviano Ambrosio Larrazolo (Dan Chavez) Aldo Leopold
Barbour) Edgar Lee Hewett (Phil Bock) Houdini (Bill Martin) Octaviano Ambrosio Larrazolo (Dan Chavez) Aldo Leopold

Octaviano Ambrosio Larrazolo (Dan Chavez)

(Bill Martin) Octaviano Ambrosio Larrazolo (Dan Chavez) Aldo Leopold (Richard Bodner) Vachel Lindsay (Larry Goodell)

Aldo Leopold (Richard Bodner)

Vachel Lindsay (Larry Goodell)

Aldo Leopold (Richard Bodner) Vachel Lindsay (Larry Goodell) Mabel Dodge Luhan (Jean Jordan) Katherine Stinson Otero
Aldo Leopold (Richard Bodner) Vachel Lindsay (Larry Goodell) Mabel Dodge Luhan (Jean Jordan) Katherine Stinson Otero

Mabel Dodge Luhan (Jean Jordan)

Bodner) Vachel Lindsay (Larry Goodell) Mabel Dodge Luhan (Jean Jordan) Katherine Stinson Otero (Jean Jordan) 10
Bodner) Vachel Lindsay (Larry Goodell) Mabel Dodge Luhan (Jean Jordan) Katherine Stinson Otero (Jean Jordan) 10

Katherine Stinson Otero (Jean Jordan)

Bodner) Vachel Lindsay (Larry Goodell) Mabel Dodge Luhan (Jean Jordan) Katherine Stinson Otero (Jean Jordan) 10
Bodner) Vachel Lindsay (Larry Goodell) Mabel Dodge Luhan (Jean Jordan) Katherine Stinson Otero (Jean Jordan) 10
Bodner) Vachel Lindsay (Larry Goodell) Mabel Dodge Luhan (Jean Jordan) Katherine Stinson Otero (Jean Jordan) 10
10 12 12
10
12
12
Bodner) Vachel Lindsay (Larry Goodell) Mabel Dodge Luhan (Jean Jordan) Katherine Stinson Otero (Jean Jordan) 10
Bodner) Vachel Lindsay (Larry Goodell) Mabel Dodge Luhan (Jean Jordan) Katherine Stinson Otero (Jean Jordan) 10
Theodore Roosevelt (Randy Milligan) 19 Charlie Russell (Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell
Theodore Roosevelt (Randy Milligan) 19 Charlie Russell (Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell
Theodore Roosevelt (Randy Milligan) 19 Charlie Russell (Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell
Theodore Roosevelt (Randy Milligan) 19 Charlie Russell (Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell
Theodore Roosevelt (Randy Milligan) 19 Charlie Russell (Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell

Theodore Roosevelt (Randy Milligan)

Theodore Roosevelt (Randy Milligan) 19 Charlie Russell (Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell (VanAnn
Theodore Roosevelt (Randy Milligan) 19 Charlie Russell (Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell (VanAnn
Theodore Roosevelt (Randy Milligan) 19 Charlie Russell (Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell (VanAnn
19
19
Theodore Roosevelt (Randy Milligan) 19 Charlie Russell (Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell (VanAnn
Theodore Roosevelt (Randy Milligan) 19 Charlie Russell (Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell (VanAnn

Charlie Russell (Raphael Cristy)

(Randy Milligan) 19 Charlie Russell (Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell (VanAnn Moore) Marion
(Randy Milligan) 19 Charlie Russell (Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell (VanAnn Moore) Marion
(Randy Milligan) 19 Charlie Russell (Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell (VanAnn Moore) Marion

6

19 3 21
19
3
21
Milligan) 19 Charlie Russell (Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell (VanAnn Moore) Marion Sloan
Milligan) 19 Charlie Russell (Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell (VanAnn Moore) Marion Sloan

Lillian Russell (VanAnn Moore)

(Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell (VanAnn Moore) Marion Sloan Russell (Deborah Blanche) Harry
(Raphael Cristy) 6 19 3 21 Lillian Russell (VanAnn Moore) Marion Sloan Russell (Deborah Blanche) Harry

Marion Sloan Russell (Deborah Blanche)

Harry S. Truman (Noel Pugach)

Russell (Deborah Blanche) Harry S. Truman (Noel Pugach) Lew Wallace (Noel Pugach) Martha Washington (VanAnn Moore)
Russell (Deborah Blanche) Harry S. Truman (Noel Pugach) Lew Wallace (Noel Pugach) Martha Washington (VanAnn Moore)
Russell (Deborah Blanche) Harry S. Truman (Noel Pugach) Lew Wallace (Noel Pugach) Martha Washington (VanAnn Moore)

Lew Wallace (Noel Pugach)

Harry S. Truman (Noel Pugach) Lew Wallace (Noel Pugach) Martha Washington (VanAnn Moore) Walt Whitman (Bruce
Harry S. Truman (Noel Pugach) Lew Wallace (Noel Pugach) Martha Washington (VanAnn Moore) Walt Whitman (Bruce

Martha Washington (VanAnn Moore)

Lew Wallace (Noel Pugach) Martha Washington (VanAnn Moore) Walt Whitman (Bruce Noll) 21 19 20 THE
Lew Wallace (Noel Pugach) Martha Washington (VanAnn Moore) Walt Whitman (Bruce Noll) 21 19 20 THE

Walt Whitman (Bruce Noll)

Martha Washington (VanAnn Moore) Walt Whitman (Bruce Noll) 21 19 20 THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES LIST PRESENTERS’
Martha Washington (VanAnn Moore) Walt Whitman (Bruce Noll) 21 19 20 THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES LIST PRESENTERS’
Martha Washington (VanAnn Moore) Walt Whitman (Bruce Noll) 21 19 20 THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES LIST PRESENTERS’
21 19 20
21
19
20
(VanAnn Moore) Walt Whitman (Bruce Noll) 21 19 20 THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES LIST PRESENTERS’ NAMES, FOUND
(VanAnn Moore) Walt Whitman (Bruce Noll) 21 19 20 THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES LIST PRESENTERS’ NAMES, FOUND

THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES LIST PRESENTERS’ NAMES, FOUND IN THE CATALOGUE IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER:

NAMES, FOUND IN THE CATALOGUE IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER: CULTURAL/ETHNIC STUDIES Atencio, Baton, Bodner, Erickson,
NAMES, FOUND IN THE CATALOGUE IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER: CULTURAL/ETHNIC STUDIES Atencio, Baton, Bodner, Erickson,
NAMES, FOUND IN THE CATALOGUE IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER: CULTURAL/ETHNIC STUDIES Atencio, Baton, Bodner, Erickson,
NAMES, FOUND IN THE CATALOGUE IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER: CULTURAL/ETHNIC STUDIES Atencio, Baton, Bodner, Erickson,
NAMES, FOUND IN THE CATALOGUE IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER: CULTURAL/ETHNIC STUDIES Atencio, Baton, Bodner, Erickson,
NAMES, FOUND IN THE CATALOGUE IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER: CULTURAL/ETHNIC STUDIES Atencio, Baton, Bodner, Erickson,
NAMES, FOUND IN THE CATALOGUE IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER: CULTURAL/ETHNIC STUDIES Atencio, Baton, Bodner, Erickson,
NAMES, FOUND IN THE CATALOGUE IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER: CULTURAL/ETHNIC STUDIES Atencio, Baton, Bodner, Erickson,
NAMES, FOUND IN THE CATALOGUE IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER: CULTURAL/ETHNIC STUDIES Atencio, Baton, Bodner, Erickson,

CULTURAL/ETHNIC STUDIES

Atencio, Baton, Bodner, Erickson, Fox, Garcia, Hordes, L. Jordan, Lamadríd, Logghe/Trujillo, Mares, Martinez, Perkins, Poling-Kempes, Robinson, Torrez, Vigil, Zeilik, Zolbrod

Poling-Kempes, Robinson, Torrez, Vigil, Zeilik, Zolbrod LANDSCAPE AND SKYSCAPE Anschuetz, Bodner, Fox, Garcia, L.
Poling-Kempes, Robinson, Torrez, Vigil, Zeilik, Zolbrod LANDSCAPE AND SKYSCAPE Anschuetz, Bodner, Fox, Garcia, L.
Poling-Kempes, Robinson, Torrez, Vigil, Zeilik, Zolbrod LANDSCAPE AND SKYSCAPE Anschuetz, Bodner, Fox, Garcia, L.

LANDSCAPE AND SKYSCAPE

Torrez, Vigil, Zeilik, Zolbrod LANDSCAPE AND SKYSCAPE Anschuetz, Bodner, Fox, Garcia, L. Jordan, Julyan, Kammer,
Torrez, Vigil, Zeilik, Zolbrod LANDSCAPE AND SKYSCAPE Anschuetz, Bodner, Fox, Garcia, L. Jordan, Julyan, Kammer,
Torrez, Vigil, Zeilik, Zolbrod LANDSCAPE AND SKYSCAPE Anschuetz, Bodner, Fox, Garcia, L. Jordan, Julyan, Kammer,

Anschuetz, Bodner, Fox, Garcia, L. Jordan, Julyan, Kammer, Logghe/Trujillo, Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Smith, Zeilik

Kammer, Logghe/Trujillo, Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Smith, Zeilik NEW MEXICO HISTORY Precontact & Colonial: Anschuetz,
Kammer, Logghe/Trujillo, Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Smith, Zeilik NEW MEXICO HISTORY Precontact & Colonial: Anschuetz,
Kammer, Logghe/Trujillo, Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Smith, Zeilik NEW MEXICO HISTORY Precontact & Colonial: Anschuetz,
Kammer, Logghe/Trujillo, Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Smith, Zeilik NEW MEXICO HISTORY Precontact & Colonial: Anschuetz,
Kammer, Logghe/Trujillo, Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Smith, Zeilik NEW MEXICO HISTORY Precontact & Colonial: Anschuetz,
Kammer, Logghe/Trujillo, Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Smith, Zeilik NEW MEXICO HISTORY Precontact & Colonial: Anschuetz,

NEW MEXICO HISTORY

Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Smith, Zeilik NEW MEXICO HISTORY Precontact & Colonial: Anschuetz, Fox, Hordes, L.
Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Smith, Zeilik NEW MEXICO HISTORY Precontact & Colonial: Anschuetz, Fox, Hordes, L.
Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Smith, Zeilik NEW MEXICO HISTORY Precontact & Colonial: Anschuetz, Fox, Hordes, L.

Precontact & Colonial:

Anschuetz, Fox, Hordes, L. Jordan, Lynn, Torrez, Zeilik, Zolbrod

Fox, Hordes, L. Jordan, Lynn, Torrez, Zeilik, Zolbrod Nineteenth Century: Barbour, Blanche, Chavez, Erickson,
Fox, Hordes, L. Jordan, Lynn, Torrez, Zeilik, Zolbrod Nineteenth Century: Barbour, Blanche, Chavez, Erickson,
Fox, Hordes, L. Jordan, Lynn, Torrez, Zeilik, Zolbrod Nineteenth Century: Barbour, Blanche, Chavez, Erickson,
Fox, Hordes, L. Jordan, Lynn, Torrez, Zeilik, Zolbrod Nineteenth Century: Barbour, Blanche, Chavez, Erickson,

Nineteenth Century:

Barbour, Blanche, Chavez, Erickson, Etulain, Feldman, Foote, Grimes, Jackson, J. Jordan, Lamadrid, Milligan, Pugach, Torrez

Jackson, J. Jordan, Lamadrid, Milligan, Pugach, Torrez Twentieth Century: Baton, Bock, Bodner, Caffey, Elrick,
Jackson, J. Jordan, Lamadrid, Milligan, Pugach, Torrez Twentieth Century: Baton, Bock, Bodner, Caffey, Elrick,
Jackson, J. Jordan, Lamadrid, Milligan, Pugach, Torrez Twentieth Century: Baton, Bock, Bodner, Caffey, Elrick,
Jackson, J. Jordan, Lamadrid, Milligan, Pugach, Torrez Twentieth Century: Baton, Bock, Bodner, Caffey, Elrick,
Jackson, J. Jordan, Lamadrid, Milligan, Pugach, Torrez Twentieth Century: Baton, Bock, Bodner, Caffey, Elrick,

Twentieth Century:

Lamadrid, Milligan, Pugach, Torrez Twentieth Century: Baton, Bock, Bodner, Caffey, Elrick, Feldman, Garcia,

Baton, Bock, Bodner, Caffey, Elrick, Feldman, Garcia, Hordes, J. Jordan, Kammer, Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Robinson, Smith, Vigil

Jordan, Kammer, Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Robinson, Smith, Vigil LITERATURE Poetry: Bodner, Goodell, Logghe/Trujillo,
Jordan, Kammer, Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Robinson, Smith, Vigil LITERATURE Poetry: Bodner, Goodell, Logghe/Trujillo,
Jordan, Kammer, Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Robinson, Smith, Vigil LITERATURE Poetry: Bodner, Goodell, Logghe/Trujillo,
Jordan, Kammer, Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Robinson, Smith, Vigil LITERATURE Poetry: Bodner, Goodell, Logghe/Trujillo,
Jordan, Kammer, Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Robinson, Smith, Vigil LITERATURE Poetry: Bodner, Goodell, Logghe/Trujillo,
Jordan, Kammer, Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Robinson, Smith, Vigil LITERATURE Poetry: Bodner, Goodell, Logghe/Trujillo,
Jordan, Kammer, Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Robinson, Smith, Vigil LITERATURE Poetry: Bodner, Goodell, Logghe/Trujillo,
Jordan, Kammer, Lynn, Poling-Kempes, Robinson, Smith, Vigil LITERATURE Poetry: Bodner, Goodell, Logghe/Trujillo,

LITERATURE

Poetry:

Bodner, Goodell, Logghe/Trujillo, Martinez, Noll, Zolbrod

Bodner, Goodell, Logghe/Trujillo, Martinez, Noll, Zolbrod Writers: Storytelling: Bodner, Blanche, Caffey, Etulain, J.

Writers:

Storytelling:

Martinez, Noll, Zolbrod Writers: Storytelling: Bodner, Blanche, Caffey, Etulain, J. Jordan, Lamadrid,

Bodner, Blanche, Caffey, Etulain, J. Jordan, Lamadrid, McLaren, Perkins

Caffey, Etulain, J. Jordan, Lamadrid, McLaren, Perkins Atencio, Garcia, LaFlamme, Whitehouse Peterson NATIONAL AND
Caffey, Etulain, J. Jordan, Lamadrid, McLaren, Perkins Atencio, Garcia, LaFlamme, Whitehouse Peterson NATIONAL AND
Caffey, Etulain, J. Jordan, Lamadrid, McLaren, Perkins Atencio, Garcia, LaFlamme, Whitehouse Peterson NATIONAL AND

Atencio, Garcia, LaFlamme, Whitehouse Peterson

NATIONAL AND GLOBAL TOPICS

Adams, Blanche, Bodner, Cristy, Feldman, Foote, Fox, Jackson, Johnson/Clark, J. Jordan, Mares, Martinez, Milligan, Moore, Perkins, Pugach, Szasz

Mares, Martinez, Milligan, Moore, Perkins, Pugach, Szasz We thank Golden Graphics and Heather Scanlon for their
Mares, Martinez, Milligan, Moore, Perkins, Pugach, Szasz We thank Golden Graphics and Heather Scanlon for their
Mares, Martinez, Milligan, Moore, Perkins, Pugach, Szasz We thank Golden Graphics and Heather Scanlon for their
Mares, Martinez, Milligan, Moore, Perkins, Pugach, Szasz We thank Golden Graphics and Heather Scanlon for their
Mares, Martinez, Milligan, Moore, Perkins, Pugach, Szasz We thank Golden Graphics and Heather Scanlon for their
Mares, Martinez, Milligan, Moore, Perkins, Pugach, Szasz We thank Golden Graphics and Heather Scanlon for their
Mares, Martinez, Milligan, Moore, Perkins, Pugach, Szasz We thank Golden Graphics and Heather Scanlon for their
Mares, Martinez, Milligan, Moore, Perkins, Pugach, Szasz We thank Golden Graphics and Heather Scanlon for their
Mares, Martinez, Milligan, Moore, Perkins, Pugach, Szasz We thank Golden Graphics and Heather Scanlon for their
Mares, Martinez, Milligan, Moore, Perkins, Pugach, Szasz We thank Golden Graphics and Heather Scanlon for their
Mares, Martinez, Milligan, Moore, Perkins, Pugach, Szasz We thank Golden Graphics and Heather Scanlon for their
Mares, Martinez, Milligan, Moore, Perkins, Pugach, Szasz We thank Golden Graphics and Heather Scanlon for their
Mares, Martinez, Milligan, Moore, Perkins, Pugach, Szasz We thank Golden Graphics and Heather Scanlon for their

We thank Golden Graphics and Heather Scanlon for their design artistry.

NEW MEXICO ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES 209 OÑATE HALL ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87131-1213 1999 – 2000

NEW MEXICO ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES 209 OÑATE HALL ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87131-1213

THE HUMANITIES 209 OÑATE HALL ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87131-1213 1999 – 2000 Speakers Bureau & Chautauqua Programs

1999 – 2000 Speakers Bureau & Chautauqua Programs – Millennium Edition

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO PERMIT NO. 741