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NINE NEW KNOCKOUT POINSETTIAS page 16
Palm Beach
Paradise
Explore the
Ultimate
Winter
Getaway
page 34
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NOV/DEC 2010 U.S. $5.99
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contents
november/december 2010
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FEATURES
34 ITALY INSPIRED To create this Palm Beach landscape, the
design team of Sanchez & Maddux drew on their love for tropi-
cal plants and classic European gardens. BY CARA GREENBERG
44 JACK FROST: MASTER GARDENER Frost is the beautiful
bane of the late-fall garden. It stops plants in their tracks, turns
the backyard into a sparkling wonderland, and gives gardeners
a welcome respite from their labors. BY VALERIE EASTON
52 POWER FLOWERS The editors asked top-ight oral design-
ers to craft arrangements especially for Garden Design. Here
are the ravishing results. BY WILLIAM L. HAMILTON
DEPARTMENTS
6 EDITORS LETTER/CONTRIBUTORS
8 FRESH A new park in Brooklyn; the James Rose Center re-
thinks suburban gardens; oral art by Bella Meyer.
16 PLANT PALETTE The poinsettia is the quintessential holiday
plant. But these varietiesin pink, orange, white, and marbled
will make you think beyond traditional red.
22 LIVING GREEN A lush low-maintenance meadow and a very
sustainable house in Pennsylvania are proof that an energy-
conscious state representative knows how to walk the walk.
26 STYLE Our editors have picked a collection of holiday gift
ideas that are perfect for any gardener.
64 GROUNDBREAKER Author, gardener, artist Amy Goldman is
the champion of heirloom edibles.
70 SOURCEBOOK A listing of products and services mentioned
and shown in our pages.
76 ONE SHOT Landscape architect Randy Thueme creates a
stunning wall of copper in a small San Francisco garden.
ON THE COVER Designed by Sanchez & Maddux, this Palm Beach land-
scape was inspired by Old-World gardens. PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBIN HILL
2 gardendesign.com nov/dec 2010
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GARDEN DESIGN IS A DIVISION OF
editors letter
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212.884 o04o
M
ore than almost anything else in
our lives, gardens teach us the
great, reassuring value of change.
Im always reminded of this as the holi-
day season approaches. With the arrival of
the short, chilly days of winter, I take a lot
of pleasure in looking back at the eeting
progression of our gardens: the promise of
spring in a seed; the beauty of summer in
the soft warmth of the air; the bounty of fall
and its last fruits; the festivals of harvest and
thanks; and, in December, the blackness of
winter nights, which always gets me to pon-
dering life on earth in all its cosmic variety.
Can winter be upon us already?
Well, it is. And, stealthy though its arrival
may have been, I welcome this season with
open arms. In fact, the joys of winter are
what this issue of Garden Design is all about.
The haunting beauty of the years rst frosts,
those harbingers of harder weather to come,
is the subject of Valerie Eastons evocative
essay on page 44, Jack Frost. In Power
Flowers on page 52, William L. Hamilton
describes the oral arrangement techniques
that bring color and beauty indoors, shar-
ing inspired holiday ideas from some of the
best oral designers around. And on page
34, writer Cara Greenberg gives us a health-
ful wintertime dose of warm Mediterranean
beauty, by way of South Florida, with her arti-
cle on a remarkable garden designed by the
Palm Beachbased rm Sanchez & Maddux,
Italy Inspired. And thats just a taste.
So, raise a glass of something zzy and
join me in toasting the season. Because it
wont be long before the year will have faded
into history. And the season will be over,
just in time for us to begin again, with even
more wisdom and eagerness. We cant wait
to see you again in January. Well have some
new beginnings of our own to celebrate at
Garden Design, and there are plenty of sur-
prises in store.
James Oseland, Editorial Director
SEASON OF CHANGE
Robin Hill, who pho-
tographed the Sanchez
& Madduxdesigned
garden featured on
pages 3443 (Italy
Inspired), welcomes
the arrival of winter in
Miami, where he has
lived since 1992. The
winter season in South
Florida brings clear
blue skies and excep-
tional light, says the British-born photographer.
The cooler temperatures mean the air condi-
tioner gets turned o, the windows are open, and
we can enjoy longer bike rides, mosquito-free eve-
nings, and comfortable walks. Hills images have
appeared in numerous publications, and from
2005 to 2008 he was the host for the Suncoast
Regional Emmy-winning public television series
Art 360. robinhillphotography.com
Valerie Easton, whose
musings on frost (Jack
Frost: Master Gardener)
appear on pages 4451,
tends a beautiful home
garden on Whidbey
Island in Puget Sound,
about 25 miles from
Seattle. In this part of the
Pacic Northwest, frosts
dont typically herald the
end of the gardening
season, but she lets her garden slumber during
winter regardless of the weather. Even though we
can garden year-round in the Northwest, we dont
have to, she says. In the winter I love to catch up
on novels and go to yoga class. Easton is a regular
garden writer/columnist for Pacic Northwest Maga-
zine of the Seattle Sun Times. Her latest project is her
recently released book, The New Low-Maintenance
Garden (Timber Press). valeaston.com
Arrangement by David Stark
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6 gardendesign.com nov/dec 2010
HART L E Y B OTANI C
A L L T H I N G S B R I G H T A N D B E A U T I F U L
APPROVED BY THE
T H E F I N E S T G L A S S H O U S E S M O N E Y C A N B U Y - N O T H I N G E L S E I S A H A R T L E Y
To enj oy our book of greenhouses cal l 781 933 1993 hartl eybotani c. com gdus@hartl eybotani c. com
fresh
Nowhere has this been truer than
in Brooklyn Heights, a stately old
neighborhood, which is bordered
by the East River and has two mon-
umental bridges and Manhattans
glittering skyline for a backdrop.
Until recently, along this prime
stretch of riverfront abandoned
warehouses sat forlornly on piers
in varying states of disrepair, sep-
arated from the neighborhood by
a roaring expressway and a chain-
link fence.
But last spring, after two decades
of wrangling among community
members, real estate developers,
city ocials, and environmental
activists, the rst phase of the long-
awaited Brooklyn Bridge Park, with
a landscape design masterminded
by Brooklyn/Cambridgebased
Michael Van Valkenburgh Asso-
ciates, opened to the public,
giving new life to the old industrial
waterfront. The New York Times
heralded it as one of the most pos-
itive statements about our culture
weve seen in years.
Regina Myer, the president
of Brooklyn Bridge Park, the
The remains of a pile
eld from the original
structure of Pier 1, left
in place for its arresting
play of pattern, harks
back to the history of
the site.
A NEW PARK IN BROOKLYN SUBURBAN GARDENS TRANSFORMED FLORAL ARTIST BELLA MEYER
Down by the Riverside
BY CARA GREENBERG
For a city with 578 miles of coastline, New York
in the post-steamship era has had a remarkably
inaccessible waterfront.
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8 gardendesign.com nov/dec 2010
You wont nd better kitchen equipment.
Not even indoors.
Never Compromise.
GRILLS | PIZZA OVENS | REFRIGERATION | CABINETRY | COOKTOPS | WARMING | VENTILATION

THE BEST IS YET TO COME


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Someday, Brooklyn Bridge Park will stretch for 1.3 miles along the East River and
beyond, with a six-acre marina, shing piers, paddling waters, jogging trails, and much
more. About 10 percent of the site will be revenue-generating housing, including a
30-story tower, a hotel, retail stores, restaurants, and parkingnone of it on the piers
themselves but on the uplands or mainland portion of the site. The piers will be devoted
to recreation. Piers 1 and 6 are already nearly complete; heres a preview of whats in
store for Piers 2 through 5:
Pier 2 The original steel frame of an existing shed building, with a new translucent
roof designed by architect Maryann Thompson, will house six basketball courts and
10 handball courts, plus in-line skating tracks, bocce courts, and other game areas.
Construction is not yet scheduled. Pier 3 The most remote spot in the parkthat
is, farthest from the two entranceswill be a setting for large-scale civic and cul-
tural events on informal lawns connected by wild plantings. Construction is not yet
scheduled. Pier 4 A collapsed gantry (bridge system) will be cut free of the shore and
transformed into a bird habitat. Construction is to begin in 2011. Pier 5 Three soccer
fields with artificial turf and night lighting are expected to get heavy use, along with a
picnic peninsula. They are scheduled to open in 2012.
fresh

10 gardendesign.com nov/dec 2010


nonprot entity responsible for the planning, construction,
maintenance, and operations of the new public space
which will eventually comprise six piers and a strip of
mainland connecting them and extending north to the
Manhattan Bridgeis even more eusive: This is the
most signicant park development in Brooklyn since the
building of Prospect Park in 1873, she says. Its a symbol
of New Yorks optimism, reconciling its industrial past with
a genius design that uses the latest sustainability practices,
all while providing spectacular views and activities.
The parks narrow, curving shape is dictated by the
existing industrial footprint. So far, only Piers 1 and 6, at
opposite ends of the park, have opened, and both immedi-
ately began drawing crowds. Some 8,000 people showed
up on an open-air movie night last summer on Pier 1s
expansive lawns, while others came to picnic, launch kay-
aks, bird-watch, even do Pilates. Pier 6, where innovative
playgrounds are linked by meandering paths, quickly
became a destination for young families. Its been extraor-
dinarily gratifying, after 25 years of work and dreams, to see
the light in peoples eyes when they enter the park and see
the magnicent harbor views and amazing playgrounds,
says Nancy Webster, executive director of the Brooklyn
Bridge Park Conservancy, the nonprot citizens advocacy
group, founded in 1988, that was instrumental in fundrais-
ing and coordinating the complex eorts needed to bring
the park into being.
Pier 1 is the heart of the project so far, a majestic reimagin-
ing of six at, exposed acres, which have been transformed
into a topographically and ecologically varied space. The
big move was building a 30-foot hill in the middle of the
pier, says Matthew Urbanski, a principal with Michael Van
Valkenburgh Associates. In one act, we got a horseshoe-
shaped lawn facing the harbor and the Statue of Liberty,
A path through Pier
1s uplands wends past
a re-created salt marsh
on the right and a
water garden on the
left. Riprap forms a
stone edge where once
there was a bulkhead.
The Brooklyn-Queens
Expressway, at left,
kept the waterfront
separated from the
neighborhood for
decades. Sedges
grow in a canal-like
segment of Pier 1s
water garden.
1 2
nov/dec 2010 gardendesign.com 11
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another lawn oriented to the bridge view, a valley in
between that we call the Vale, and the granite prospect
a ight of wide stone steps overlooking the river that
doubles as stadium seating for the towering city view.
The man-made hill also serves to redirect storm water
into underground cisterns, which provide 75 percent of
the parks irrigation needs.
Giving visitors a dynamic relationship with the water,
as Urbanski puts it, has been a major goal. Pier 1 includes
a boat ramp for non-motorized craft and a section of nat-
uralistic shoreline where a bulkhead wall was replaced
with riprap and plantings of Spartina (smooth cordgrass)
in order to create a salt marshan attempted return to
the days when the East River estuary was an important
ecosystem for birds and sh.
Hundreds of trees have been planted on Pier 1, most
in atypical ways. Instead of making a lawn and scatter-
ing trees on it, we made stylized hedgerows that parallel
the main paths through the park, says Urbanski, who
chose multi-stemmed specimens of Kentucky coee tree,
London plane tree, and honey locust. In a short time,
they will make shaded tubes of space. At the top of the
granite prospect, a grove of tough Catalpa bignonioides
(southern catalpa) and Paulownia tomentosa (princess
tree) provide a place to pause and take in the view, while
the Vale is lled with deciduous conifers like dawn red-
wood and bald cypress, which give additional shade. Rifts
of sumac, bayberry, and sassafras will also run through-
out the park.
All this is just the beginning. Two-thirds of the
park, eventually to total 85 acres, will be completed
by 2013. When the nal third will be done, no one is
saying. The park was designed as an ensemble, a col-
lection of dierent experiences, Urbanski says. Theres
much more to come, and its not more of the same.
SEE SOURCEBOOK FOR MORE INFORMATION, PAGE 70
A 1.6-acre desti-
nation playground
on Pier 6 includes
such attractions as a
two-story-high slide
mountain that emp-
ties into a sandbox
lled with stone
animals, a swing
valley, innovative
climbing structures,
and water play areas.
1
12 gardendesign.com nov/dec 2010
fresh / cutting edge
Artist Bella Meyer,
seen here hold-
ing an abundant
arrangement of
roses, peonies and
calla lilies, has been
enthralled by owers
since childhood.
Memories of
Meyers grandfather,
artist Marc Chagall,
continue to inu-
ence her work and
she has inherited his
love of color and
storytelling.
Earlier this year,
Meyer opened her
new oral shop,
Fleurs Bella, near
Union Square.
Today, Chagalls granddaugh-
terthe New York Citybased
artist and floral designer Bella
Meyerhas turned her grandfa-
thers custom on its head, using
objects of nature to create repre-
sentations of the world around
her. Asked recently to create a o-
ral display for a benet honoring
one of the owners of the Empire
State Building (proceeds went to
the Natural Resources Defense
Council), Meyer chose art deco
style centerpieces to echo that
iconic landmarks motifs; arrange-
ments included purple calla lilies
and tulips, and silvery-gray dusty
miller, with each design rising
from shiny, architectural pots set
on metal traysa little skyline,
as she calls it. For a concert at
the Brooklyn Academy of Music
featuring Shaker spirituals, she
created a display of burlap linens
and plain white planters filled
with herbs. The 55-year-old Meyer,
who was born in Paris and stud-
ied art history at the Universit
Paris-Sorbonne, says her love of
owers was inspired by trips to
Chagalls home near Nice in the
South of France when she was
a child. Wed never visit with-
out stopping at the local market
and getting a big bouquet of ow-
ers. It was a gesture of love and
respect. Earlier this year, Meyer
opened a shop called Fleurs Bella
in New York Citys Union Square
area; the arrangements on display
demonstrate that the designer has
inherited her grandfathers ability
to tell stories through color and
natural beauty. eursbella.com
1
An Artistic Legacy
in Flowers
BY LISA CREGAN
On completing a painting, the great early-20th-century
artist Marc Chagall would allegedly hold up an object of
naturea rock, a branch, a owerand compare it to its
counterpart on the canvas to see whether his work evoked
the essence of the thing. L
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14 gardendesign.com nov/dec 2010
fresh
Q Modern Revival (Sausalito,
CA), Ive Haugeland/Shades of
Green Landscape Architecture,
shadesofgreenla.com (shown
far left) Q Midcentury Revival
(Sarasota, FL), Dane Spencer
Landscape Architecture, dane
spencer-landscapearchitect
.com (shown, left) Q Water
Treatment Facility as Neigh-
borhood Asset (New Haven,
CT), Michael Van Valkenburgh
Associates, mvvainc.com
(below) Q The Carriage House
Garden (Amherst, MA),
Joseph S. R. Volpe Associates,
umass.edu/larp/faculty/jvolpe
Q Remembering Their Effort
(Dallas, TX), Lisa L. Jenkins
Q Latitude: 41 24 39 Longi-
tude: -73 20 32 (Newtown,
CT), Billie Cohen, Ltd.
Landscape Design Studio,
billiecohenltd.com Q Pamet
Valley (Truro, MA), Keith
LeBlanc Landscape Archi-
tecture, kl-la.com Q Schain
Residence: Applied Sustain-
ability (Brooklyn, NY), Dinorah
M Melendez Architecture
& Landscape Design/Todd
Haiman Landscape Design,
dinorahm-melendez.com,
toddhaiman.com
Q A Subdivision in the Sand
(Amagansett, NY), Dirtworks,
PC Landscape Architecture,
dirtworks.us Q Front Ridge Res-
idence (Penobscot, ME),
Matthew Cunningham Land-
scape Design, matthew
cunningham.com
A competition changes the status quo in residential landscapes
In the sea of cul-de-sacs and cookie-cutter develop-
ments that has come to characterize North Americas
suburbs, there is a cultural shift under way, one that
is making conservation and sustainability an integral
part of the everyday suburban residential environ-
ment. That shift is precisely what inspired Suburbia
Transformed, a provocative competition and exhibi-
tion mounted this year by the James Rose Center
for Landscape Architectural Research and Design in
Ridgewood, New Jersey. The competition, according
to the call for entries, aims to recognize solutions
to the ubiquitous small-lot, detached single-family,
residential condition in the hope that we may better
understand how to transform suburbia.
The 10 residential landscapes honored in the com-
petitionand showcased in a companion exhibition
at the Rose Center this past fallwere chosen by jury
from among a variety of submissions by garden design-
ers, landscape architects, architects, and homeowners
from around the country, and internationally.
The guiding spirit of Suburbia Transformedand
the research centers namesakeis the iconoclastic
landscape architect and theorist James Rose (1913
1991), most often remembered as one of the three
Harvard students who rebelled against their Beaux
Arts training in the 1930s and who helped to usher
the profession of landscape architecture into the
modern era. Rose incorporated a conservation
ethic into a modern design aesthetic for the residen-
tial garden, says Dean Cardasis, the director of the
James Rose Center, which is housed in Roses 1953
residence and has been open to the public since 1993.
In Roses view, successful residential environments
are neither landscape nor architecture, but both; nei-
ther indoors, nor outdoors, but both.
Cardasis adds, the winning projects represent all
kinds of dierent environmental problems. He is
also the head of the new graduate program in land-
scape architecture at Rutgers, the State University
of New Jersey. The designs addressed issues such
as shoreline erosion control, storm-water retention,
and habitat restoration, and utilized in their solutions
recycled and sustainably produced materials and low-
water-use plantings.
Among the projects recognized was landscape
architect Dane Spencers exterior revival of a mid-
century cinder-block ranch house in Sarasota, Florida.
The renovations added solar roof panels, a 3,000-
gallon rainwater cistern (disguised as a planter),
native plantings, and permeable surfaces. I wanted
to show that all these sustainable solutions are great
in and of themselves, Spencer says, but if they
blend in with the surroundings and work with the
site, its more successful.
For his clients in Penobscot, Maine, landscape
designer Matthew Cunningham replaced a vast
expanse of intensively fertilized lawn with a meadow
of native grasses, wildowers, and clover to achieve
greater biodiversity and reduce maintenance and
water use. In Sausalito, California, Ive Haugeland
of Shades of Green Landscape Architecture removed
a dead lawn and replaced it with an attractive pattern
of gravel and cast-in-place linear paversa modern
and permeable surfacing solution that dovetails with
both the homes modern architecture and the sites
coastal setting.
The success of the rst competition has prompted a
second one, with the call for entries in spring 2010. We
will continue with the theme Suburbia Transformed,
says Cardasis, because this subject hasnt been fully
exploited yet. While many people are doing green
design, we feel it is also important to recognize inspir-
ing, sculptural, and artistic experiences in the suburban
landscape. For more information visit jamesrose
center.org. SEE SOURCEBOOK FOR MORE INFORMATION, PAGE 70
Suburban Revolution
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See the full gallery of the 2010 winners at
GARDENDESIGN.COM/SUBURBIA
STORY BY DEBRA PRINZING
Winners
Circle
nov/dec 2010 gardendesign.com 15
plant palette
Poinsettias have become as entwined with our Christmastime traditions as carols and mistle-
toe. Last year, 100 million of them were sold in North America. And its no wonder. Theres
something magical about poinsettias. Sparked by shortening days, they burst forth with daz-
zling color just as the world outside turns gray and cold. Right on cue, tiny topknots of owers
jut from colorful yellow pockets (called cyathia) while the bractsactually modied leaves
take on colors that sing to you from across the room.
Poinsettias have come a long way from their Mexico-native species, Euphorbia pulcherrima.
Decades ago, poinsettias (named for the 19th-century ambassador to Mexico Joel Poinsett) were
bred to have broader and brighter leaves. But that was only the beginning. Now there are many
more forms to seduce us, with bracts embellished by streaks, marbling, zigzags, speckles, and
creamy hems; others with dramatically curled bracts; and still others that impress with their
size, from huge specimens to itty-bitty pocket-size ones. And then there are the colors: deep
crimson, aming orange, peach, and many other hues. Theres nothing blah-humbug about
poinsettias these daystheyve entered a new age.
Poinsettias That Pop
BY TOVAH MARTIN Q PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROB CARDILLO
1
ICE PUNCH
Marbling is all the rage in poinsettias. On this version
from Ecke Ranch, lightning streaks of white embla-
zon the heart of red, holly leafshaped bracts. What
is cool, says Jack Williams of Ecke, is that Ice Punch
looks like frost has landed on the bracts. And this
poinsettia keeps getting better; week to week the
central streak is joined by more white.
The Ecke family is credited with brokering the poin-
settias Cinderella transformation from a tall, lanky
species into the beautiful plant we know and love. In
1911 their California nursery, begun by Albert Ecke
in 1906, turned its full attention to poinsettias. Later
the discovery of a chance seedling in 1963 transformed
the poinsettia from holiday cut ower to lush, compact
superstar. To mark the centennial of its focus on poin-
settias, Ecke Ranch is introducing the rich-red cultivar
Red Jubilee this December.
1
16 gardendesign.com nov/dec 2010
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2
CAROUSEL PINK
Who would have thought wed be describing poinsettia
bracts as wavy, frilly, or frothy? All are apt descrip-
tors for the salmon-pink bracts of this cultivar, from
Syngenta Flowers. As with its sister Carousel Dark
Red, this poinsettia begins showing color in late
November. Given their curliness, the bracts are a tad
smaller than your average wide-winged poinsettia. But
the Carousel types branch beautifully to form a broad,
strong plant that can be transported easily from the
garden center without fear of damage.
4
CINNAMON STAR
Although red is still king for poinsettias, holiday revel-
ers are also excited by other hues, especially around
Thanksgiving. In fact, 20 to 30 percent of poinset-
tias sold throughout the early holiday season sport
alternative shades rather than the traditional red.
Syngenta Flowers is the mastermind behind this
luminous coral colored version. Given the season,
cinnamon seemed like the perfect name. Cinna-
mon Star boasts a rounded shape with expansive,
almost winged bracts, and the younger central bracts
begin with a darker sizzle before fading paler with the
countdown to the winter holidays.
5
WINTER ROSE EARLY RED
No less than 30 years in the making, this novelty
started the nontraditional streak at Ecke. For poin-
settia breeders, the holy grail has been a at-bracted,
big red poinsettia. So it came as a welcome shock 14
years ago when a funky little version with a pageboy
hairdo was the talk of the trials. Four years ago, the
Early Series hit the scene and, quoting Jack Williams
from Ecke, something good got better. Not only has
Winter Rose Early Red revolutionized the holiday con-
tainer-plant market, it also made a splash with orists
looking for a new spin on holiday dcor.
3
WINTER BLUSH
One of the most recent bombshells to land on the
poinsettia market and the latest example of the
marble trend is Winter Blush, introduced two years
ago. This Ecke variety was chosen for both its pat-
terned foliage (peach and yellow twilight colors dance
around the veins) and for the pronounced contrast
between the pink centers and the cream etching on
the margins of its bracts. Bring it to friends and fam-
ily as a holiday gift without fearthe strong stems
withstand breakage. Its also prone to linger long in
average home conditions.
plant palette
2 4
5 3
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Trees add so much value to our
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18 gardendesign.com nov/dec 2010
PULSE Miami
Dec 2 5, 2010
The Ice Palace
1400 N. Miami Avenue
(Corner of NW 14th Street)
Miami, FL 33136
www. pulse-art. com
CONTEMPORARY ART FAI R
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Nature, Nurture
Zones: Poinsettias will not
withstand a frost and can
be killed if temperatures
go below 50 degrees for
an extended period. That
means getting a poinsettia
home during the holidays
can be dicey if you live in
colder zones. Avoid leaving
your new purchase in an
unheated car, and protect it
with a light covering when
transporting it from store
to car or car to home. The
ideal temperature for grow-
ing poinsettias is between
65 and 70 degrees.
Exposure: Poinsettias need
short days to form their
bracts. When you purchase
a poinsettia for the holi-
days, its primed and ready
to perform and will keep
on looking good for sev-
eral weeks no matter where
its displayed. To make your
poinsettia last even longer,
give it as much natural light
as you can in midwinter,
except in hot south-facing
windows. Soil: Average pot-
ting soil is ne if youre
repotting your poinsettia.
Overwatering is a com-
mon killer. Remove any
foil around the container
that might inhibit drain-
age. Generally, watering
once a week will suce if
you moisten the soil thor-
oughly. Avoid wetting the
foliage. Care: Since poinset-
tias are blooming but not
growing when purchased
for the holidays, fertil-
izer isnt necessary. Proper
light, water, and warmth
will help plants resist pests.
The latex in poinsettias
can cause a dermatological
reaction in some people
play it safe and wear gloves
when grooming. All parts
of the poinsettia plant are
mildly toxic, so keep the
plants away from children
and pets.
6
ORANGE SPICE
Originally, orange poinsettias were only imagined and
wished for. Early attempts were actually just a yellowish
shade of red rather than their own spin on the spectrum.
All that changed with the chance discovery of an orange-
colored seedling at Ecke Ranch. The bracts of Orange
Spice are long, sleek, and graceful, highlighted against
dark foliage. But the biggest news is the color. A true, burn-
ing sunset orange like never before, it can even be used
for Halloween decoration. Better yet, it holds for Thanks-
giving and is still going strong at Christmas.
8
WHITESTAR
Pink was the rst non-red poinsettia color to become popu-
lar, in the late 1960s, but white was not far behind; the rst
white poinsettias were introduced in 1970. Nearly 30 years
later, Syngenta Flowers came out with Whitestar, with
its huge, smooth, at bracts aring out like doves from
the central topknot of owers. Whitestar has a rounded
habit, is generously branched, and will show color in time
for Thanksgiving.
9
PREMIUM PICASSO
Jingling is the term breeders use to denote white
speckling on poinsettia bracts. Premium Picasso, by the
German plant breeder Dmmen, delivers an especially
difuse, seemingly airbrushed look. Against a pinkish
white background, cheery cherry red ecks spangle the
bracts immediately encircling the yellow and red central
cyathia, which are the plants true owers. Meanwhile,
the outer bracts range from pure white to palest pink.
The efect is a two-toned fantasia.
7
MARS MARBLE
The earliest marbled poinsettias, pioneered in the 1970s,
were almost all based on red. Now other colors have joined
the party, notably Syngenta Flowers Mars Marble, with
its soft, delicate pink and equally demure milky cream
colors on open-faced, smooth-edged bracts. This poin-
settia starts to show color early, and the plant maintains
a sturdy, upright posture.
6 8
9 7
20 gardendesign.com nov/dec 2010
The Cultural Landscape Foundation is pleased to announce the 2010 Landslide selections
Photo
Exhibit
This year, for the rst
time, TCLF has partnered
with American Photo to
create an original traveling
exhibition about these seminal trees. The images, by
prize-winning and renowned photographers, capture
the magnicence, grandeur, and uniqueness of these
extraordinary specimens and help reveal their stories.
See more images in the November 2010
issue of American Photo.
Since its inception in 2003, the Landslide initiative has spotlighted more than 150
signicant at-risk parks, gardens, horticultural features, and working landscapes.
Tese horticultural specimens,
many under threat, stand as
living reminders of our countrys
past and have the potential to
witness future generations.
Every Tree Tells a Story
P
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Landslide 2011 > Call for Nominations
www.tclf.org/landslide Deadline: March 31, 2011
Aoyama Tree
Los Angeles, CA
Arborland Old Growth Tree Farm
Milliken, CO
Tulip Poplar
Tudor Place, Washington, D.C.
Cummer Oak
Cummer Museum of Art, Jacksonville, FL
Sycamore Row
Ames, IA
Olmsted Parks and Parkways
Louisville, KY (Pictured)
Boxed Pines
Weymouth Heights, Weymouth, NC
Japanese Flowering Cherry Trees
Branch Brook Park, Newark, NJ
Elms of East Hampton
East Hampton, NY
Black Oak Tree
Katewood, Bratenahl, OH
Ro Piedras Ficuses
San Juan, PR
Commonwealth Avenue Mall
Boston, MA
The Cultural Landscape Foundation
P R E S E N T I N G S P O N S O R
A D D I T I O N A L S U P P O RT
living green
The dining terrace at
the Ross home afords
an ideal view of the
meadow garden.
22 gardendesign.com nov/dec 2010
She didnt want a geodesic dome, a manicured landscape, or wild-
life out of sight across the elds. Chris Ross had another, perhaps
loftier, goal: he saw the project as an opportunity to demonstrate to
constituents and colleagues the potential for sustainable living. A
longtime proponent of responsible energy use, Ross has a record of
sponsoring legislation to that eect, including the Alternative Energy
Portfolio Standards Act of 2004, as well as eorts to establish mini-
mum requirements for electricity conservation; he recently helped
usher a bill through the House on recycling electronic waste. Of his
own house and garden he says, This place enables me to see how
green issues work on the ground.
Beyond those basic imperatives, the Rosses gave local architect
Matthew Mogerthen with Lyman Perry Architects but now a princi-
pal of Moger Mehrhof Architectsand landscape architect Jonathan
Alderson freedom to work their own nature-meets-art magic. As
Alderson explains, I consider the Ross garden a sensitive marriage
between sustainability and aesthetics. In order to achieve a synchro-
nistic end result, Moger and Alderson collaborated in tight tandem.
What was initially a blank-slate property in the midst of urban elds
and farms, 15 miles from Wilmington, Delaware, was ultimately trans-
formed into an earthy, sleek home with all the sustainable amenities,
surrounded by a low-maintenance meadow.
The Rosses had been eyeing the three-acre property, adjacent to
their previous house, for several years, and bought it in 1997. After
their two children moved out, the Rosses decided it was time to create
their dream home next door. So in 2003 they tore down the existing
1970s house, demolished the concrete swimming pool, and started
from scratch, clearing everything essentially down to bare dirt.
Though the new house incorporates all manner of modern green
technology (a green roof, a storm-water collection system, solar
panelsthe Rosses even sell excess energy back to the grid), Moger
Proving Ground
A homestead in rural Pennsylvania becomes a standard-bearer for sustainable style
STORY BY JENNY ANDREWS PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROB CARDILLO
At the entrance,
grasses and sedges
create a soft, green
backdrop for the
orange-tinged,
rough-textured
trunks of river birch
trees.
When Cecilia Ross, the wife of Pennsylvania state
representative Chris Ross, laid out her require-
ments for a new house and garden in the horse
country of southeastern Pennsylvania, the guide-
lines were simple: to get o the electrical grid,
put the garden close at hand, and keep mainte-
nance idiotproof.
nov/dec 2010 gardendesign.com 23
living green
and Alderson also heeded old principles of good sit-
ing to achieve energy-conservation goals. The Ross
home employs such smart construction concepts
as channeling natural breezes (the Rosses rarely
use air conditioning), taking advantage of shifting
sunlight patterns through the seasons, and creating
an earthen ramp for insulation and wind protection
during cold weather. As forward-thinking as the
houses design is, its architectural style is a snug t
for the locale. It incorporates local Avondale stone,
and it bears a strong resemblance to traditional
bank barns, which are partly embedded in the
side of a hill.
As for the garden, it serves as the connective tis-
sue for the site, relating the newly built elements
to the neighboring agricultural and wild proper-
ties. Alderson, along with landscape designer Chris
Pugliese, who acted as the project manager, accom-
plished this by creating a meadow that is, in his
words, blended at the edges with the surrounding
terrain. The result, says Cecilia Ross, is a home-
stead that has not only a sense of place, but also
its own identity. The house and garden stretch the
imagination and make you think about the materials
in more expansive and imaginative ways.
In building the landscape, Alderson didnt truck
away any materials accumulated during construc-
tion; he sculpted excess soil into an earthen ramp and
recycled the concrete from the old swimming pool
into a base for the driveway. Throughout the process
he also remained sensitive to the gardens relation-
ship to the house, making sure he created views from
all the windows. On the north side, outside the living
room, the grade was built up as a ramp to provide
winter insulation, but it also puts the landscape at
eye level so that the Rosses can see the garden even
when theyre sitting down.
Given Chris Rosss role in the public sector, the
Rosses entertain often and host numerous events
at their home, but they also want areas that are all
their own. Accordingly, both the house and the
garden comprise subtly delineated private and pub-
lic spaces. Though the couple wanted to limit the
amount of lawn on the property, one was included
in the project to accommodate larger gatherings.
For more-intimate family get-togethers, the Rosses
1
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Before the project began,
the property was a barren land-
scape that included a 1970s
ranch house, lawn areas, and
a swimming pool. Even the
container plantings reect the
meadow theme. In a scene
that exemplies the horse-coun-
try nature of the area, one of
the Rosses horses grazes near
the meadow garden, which
smoothly segues to elds and
pastureland beyond. Echinacea
purpurea is in full bloom, while
Amsonia hubrichtii (at right)
adds a feathery texture. At the
entrance to the terrace, a plant-
ing of Sedum Autumn Fire
softens the edges and coral hon-
eysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens
Cedar Lane) climbs the stucco
columns. Much of the stone
used for the project is local
Avondale stone. Beneath the
gravel drive lies a base partly
made up of concrete from the
old swimming pool.
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24 gardendesign.com nov/dec 2010
favor their cozy dining terrace. A stone wall, a raised
landform, and screening plants create the line of
demarcation between the two areas but not in a way
that obviously interrupts the landscape. And the
plantings smoothly transition from bold gestures
in the public spaces to complex, subtle patterns
in the private spaces.
To make the half-acre meadow, Alderson chose
native species and their cultivars, and stuck to
suppliers within a 50-mile radius of the location, par-
ticularly North Creek Nurseries, a wholesale grower
based in nearby Landenberg. Not only did North
Creek oer the material Alderson was seeking, but
they grew plants as plugs, which are smaller than
plants sold in quart or gallon containers but have
big, healthy root systems. North Creek founders
Steve Castorani and Dale Hendricks even developed
a guide for contractors and designers, showing them
how to plant the plugs for optimum success. Says
Alderson, Its amazing what you can do with plugs
if you prepare the site and time the planting right.
You need a client whos willing to wait just a little
longer, but the plugs are half the cost of larger plants
per square foot and in 15 months time you have a
phenomenal garden.
The Rosses are indeed clients who appreciate the
process. Even though the rst two years were chal-
lenging, especially when it came to staying ahead
of the weeds (like invasive, nonnative thistle, which
blows in from nearby elds), Cecilia says the trans-
formation of the property was instantly captivating.
In the rst summer, she says, I thought, This is
so cool. And I love how it changes all the time. A
thunderstorm is so much fun; we go from window to
window to get dierent views. Adds Chris, Its like
watching the curtain come up. Even in what most
would consider a gardens downtime, the Rosses are
enthralled, and they have called Alderson in midwin-
ter to tell him how much theyre enjoying the garden.
Its a dynamic, changing thing, says Alderson, not
a series of rigid blocks.
Planted in early May 2006, the garden is now a
ourishing meadow alive with birds and insects. On
the green roof, where initial plantings of grasses
died, seeds of native switch grass drifted in and took
hold, visually taking the meadow up with it. Joe-Pye
weed and sedges have found new spots for them-
selves. Birch trees shade the house in summer but
allow warming sunlight through bare branches in
winter. Ill be really interested to see what happens
in the next 10 years, says Alderson. Will the garden
still resemble the planting plan? We as designers
can think about a space and make an intervention,
but its temporary. It humbles you.
SEE SOURCEBOOK FOR MORE INFORMATION, PAGE 70
The meadow garden
is resplendent in its
late-summer glory, with
black-eyed Susan, Joe-Pye
weed and Eupatorium
hyssopifolium in full bloom.
Making a
Meadow
Once established, a meadow
garden requires only basic
maintenance and little water.
But it takes time and money
to get it under wayno one
believes anymore that you can
just throw a can of seeds on the
ground and stand back. There
are several approaches, depend-
ing on your budget and space.
Remember to choose species
appropriate for your area.
Seeds If you have a big space and
a small budget, seeds can be the
best choice. They are cheaper,
there is a good selection of spe-
cies, and they are available
year-round. But it is dicult to
control placement, the germina-
tion rate wont be 100 percent,
weed control will be labor inten-
sive, and the meadow will take
longer to mature. Plants If you
have a smaller space and/or
more money, installing plants
can speed the maturing process
and provide better placement
control. They are available in a
variety of sizes, but at the Ross
garden, small plants called
plugs were the top choice.
Plugs are cheaper than larger
plants, and quicker to establish
than seeds. Combination You
can also employ a mix of plants
and seeds. Some species are
more readily available in one
form or the other, so a com-
bination can lend diversity.
Installing plants of backbone
species can establish structure
and bring instant gratication.
Then seeds can be sowed
among the plants.
To see more of this garden, go to
GARDENDESIGN.COM/ROSSGARDEN
nov/dec 2010 gardendesign.com 25
26 26
STORY BY DAMARIS COLHOUN Q PHOTOGRAPHY BY TODD COLEMAN
GARDENERS
GIFT GUIDE
Luxury
Digs
Herms, the
French fashion
house known for
its handbags and
scarves, also sup-
plies the gardener
with a bit of style:
hand-forged
stainless steel,
cherrywood-han-
dled tools (set of
pitchfork, dibble,
and trowel, $345),
and cotton canvas
Demeter garden-
ing gloves. $310.
Available at all
Herms stores;
for locations, visit
usa.hermes.com
The
Constant
Gardener
Avid gardeners
can never have
too many hats to
protect themselves
from the sun. With
black stitching
detail, this braided
ra a hat travels
nicely and has a
UPF of 50+. $48.
shopterrain.com
28
Terrariums are the perfect
way to grow a miniature col-
lection of plants indoors. We
especially like this classic
version called Lantern. $88.
shopterrain.com
Artful Botany Help out an urban-dwelling, blossom-loving
friend. These brassy, modern owers brighten darkened corners
and bring pizzazz to empty walls. $45 to $85.
jaysonhomeandgarden.com
The Collector
Lesley Hansard and Rebecca
Welsh design these folksy
and bright handmade felt
slippers, crafted with the
help of artisans in Nepal.
$48. hwd-felt.com
Northern Zones
With its sleek design, Riccardo Paolino and Matteo Fusis Cucuruku White Tree Clock turns
traditional cuckoos on their heads. In a nod to its funkier ancestors, a little bird pops out on the
hour, except at night, when a light sensor keeps him quiet. $490. conranusa.com
Early Riser

29
A Gardening
Legend
Austin-based artist
Leah Duncan has deco-
rated trays, coasters, note
cards, and runners for
Teroforma. Named Wild-
owers + Powerlines, the
collection was inspired
by Lady Bird Johnsons
campaign for national
beautication, which, in
the 1960s, saw sweep-
ing banks of wildowers
planted alongside U.S.
highways. Six coasters,
$45. teroforma.com

Magical
Thinking
Mixing various
colors of stone-
ware clay, Berke-
ley-based sculptor
Marcia Donahue
shapes, res,
and carves lively
clusters of acorns.
$27.50 to $37.50.
415-864-2251.
livinggreen
.com
Impressive Greetings
Yee-Haw Industries in Knoxville, TN,
sells a variety of hand-printed note cards
with a Farmers Market theme, pro-
duced with its collection of antique letter-
presses. All cards and their envelopes are
printed on recycled paper. A miscella-
neous set of ve is $20. Several dierent
selections are available.
yeehawindustries.com
32
Gardeners are readers and recorders,
always on the lookout for new ideas
and advice on gardening, and ready to
take notes on what theyve seen. Below
is a selection of recent works on a
variety of subjects.
All-Weather Birders Journal (Rite in the
Rain), $12, shopterrain.com
The Dirt Cheap Green Thumb Book (Sto-
rey Publishing), $10.95, sprouthome
.com For the Birds (Stewart, Tabori
& Chang), $19.95, shopterrain.com
Whats Wrong With My Plant (and How
Do I Fix It)? (Timber Press), $24.95,
amazon.com From Seed to Skillet: A
Guide to Growing, Tending, Harvesting,
and Cooking Up Fresh, Healthy Food to
Share with People You Love (Chronicle
Books), $30, chroniclebooks
.com The New Encyclopedia of Gar-
dening Techniques (Mitchel Beazley/
Octopus Books), $30, amazon.com
DIY Heirloom D. Landreth Seed Company is the oldest seed
company in the U.S. It oers 12 types of heirloom seeds, which
arrive with a guide in a vintage-look burlap sack; these include
Christmas Pole lima beans, Calabrese broccoli, Viroay spin-
ach, and Chervena Chujski peppers. $24. shopterrain.com
Winter
Reading

33
History
Bu
When Carl
Friedrich Philipp
von Martius,
a professor of
botany, and
Johann Baptist
von Spix, a zoolo-
gist, returned in
1820 from the
Amazon Basin,
where theyd
spent three years
collecting and
sketching every
species of palm
they encountered,
the men were
knighted by the
King of Bavaria.
The Book of Palms
does justice to the
pairs landmark
achievement,
an exquisitely
drawn history of
palm trees. $150.
taschen.com
ITALY INSPIRED
STORY BY CARA GREENBERG PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBIN HILL
A SOUTH FLORIDA LANDSCAPE BY SANCHEZ & MADDUX
IS RESPLENDENT WITH OLD-WORLD CHARM
Arches cut out of massive
Cuban laurel hedges are a deco-
rative and functional leitmotif
throughout the property.
36
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erry Rakolta has no trou-
ble reeling off words to
describe what she desired
for her South Florida waterfront
property, a wedge-shaped half-
acre mostly swallowed up by
a Mediterranean-style villa. I
wanted charming, romantic, mys-
terious, Old World, she says. I
just didnt know how to get there
from a big house sitting on a lot.
Achieving this sublime vision
fell to the Palm Beachbased
landscape architecture firm of
Sanchez & Maddux, known for
their synthesis of classical Euro-
pean garden design elements
with exotic tropical plants. The
term they use to describe their
signature stylethe civilized
jungleis also the title of a book
about their work published last
year by Grayson Publishing.
Some initial landscaping had
been done in the mid-1990s,
when the house was built, but
Rakolta was never completely
satised with it. A few years ago,
she contacted principals Jorge
Sanchez and Phil Maddux, her
head lled with images of north-
ern Italys lake district. The
eventual result was an exten-
sive redo of hardscaping and
plantings. We removed all of
the walkways and some of the
plants, says Sanchez. We left
the swimming pool and a little
terrace, but thats about it.
The most difficult challenge
was the water view. The house
faces the Lake Worth lagoon,
which is lovely, but the buildings
on the opposite bank less so.
The view could have been either
beautiful or common, depend-
ing on how it was handled, says
Sanchez. A clever workaround
was needed.
Rakolta and her husband, John,
who use the property as a winter
getaway (they also have homes in
New York, Harbor Springs and
Bloomeld Hills, Michigan, and
are building a home in Aspen),
often joined by their four children
and foursoon to be five
grandchildren, also wanted more
privacy. Boats would anchor and
look in at us, she says, a prob-
lem since the early days, when
the new house was surrounded
by a moonscape, with not a sin-
gle tree.
1.Vaux-le-Vicomte, Maincy, France
A few years before
creating Louis XIVs
park at Versailles,
landscape archi-
tect Andr Le Ntre
participated in the
design of this mile-and-a-half-long 17th-
century garden, which was the dominant
structure of a great complex of water basins
and canals, fountains, gravel walks, and pat-
terned parterres. Sanchez describes the
garden succinctly: Grandeurcompletely
over the top. vaux-le-vicomte.com
TOP
4
INSPIRATIONAL GARDENS
37
The distinctive arched
hedges hug the sides of the
swimming pool, rendering it
private and a bit mysterious.
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On a trip to Italys Lake Como,
Rakolta had noticed hedges with
arches cut out of them. She pro-
posed a similar approach to
taming the too-open view of the
waterway. Everyone fought me
on it, saying, You paid so much
for the water view, why hide it?
Only Jorge said, Good idea. The
sculpted hedge, comprising Ficus
retusa (Cuban laurel) formed into
arches, runs about one-third the
length of the propertys 200-foot
waterfront, between the lawn and
a newly built sea wall, and also
encloses the swimming pool on
two sides. You get views to the
water without it being shown
completely, while the eye tends
to skip over the buildings across
the way, says Sanchez. Theres
a little bit of mystery.
The irregularly shaped spaces
around the sprawling house were
organized as a series of outdoor
rooms, each with a strong charac-
ter of its own. The most dramatic
of these is dened by an alle of
eight towering date palms, which
create a long view to the water
from the houses front entrance.
It feels to me like a cathedral,
says Rakolta, who plans to put a
long harvest table in that serene
space.
Moving counterclockwise
from there, on the more for-
mally designed waterfront
side of the house, theres the
rectangular-shaped swimming
pool hugged by hedges, which
makes it very private, Sanchez
says. A recessed open-air dining
loggia, overlooking the lawn, is a
gathering place, used for enter-
taining, says Rakolta: I like to set
tables on the grass. Paved with
coquina, a locally quarried, pale-
colored stone, and topped by a
bougainvillea-clad pergola, the
loggia could very well be some-
where in the hills of Italy.
A tiny waterside terrace with
footed urns brings in still more of
what Rakolta loves about Italian
gardens. Theres a change in ele-
vation here, says Maddux, an
expert on rain forest plants who
has worked with Sanchez since
1980. The terrace drops from
2.Chatsworth, Derbyshire, England
Sanchez loves the
broad sweep and
scope of the work
of Capability Brown,
the landscape archi-
tect commissioned
by the fourth Duke of Devonshire to trans-
form his baroque estate in the fashionable
naturalistic style of the 18th century. Brown
converted most of the existing ponds and
parterres to lawn, but important earlier fea-
tures, including the Cascade, in which water
ows over 24 stone steps, and the Seahorse
and Willow Tree Fountains, as well as a clas-
sical temple, were spared. chatsworth.org
39
Clad in bougainvillea, a per-
gola tops the dining loggia.
The homeowner also likes to
set tables on the lawn.
40
The dining loggia, a covered
open-air patio modeled
closely on classical European
architecture, overlooks a
lawn used for entertaining.
41
Peace lilies surround a stone rill and
fountain designed by Terry Rakolta,
the homeowner, in collaboration with
Jorge Sanchez, in a jungly area ap-
propriated from a former driveway.
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Mirrors set within lattice arch-
es create an illusion of great
depth, making the property
appear more expansive than it
is. Opposite top: Bougainvillea
New River.
43
3.
Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, D.C.
Pioneering land-
scape architect Beatrix
Farrands most nota-
ble work, accomplished
between 1922 and 1940,
was closely modeled on
Italian Renaissance gardens. Formal terraces step
down a steep slope, dissolving into more natural-
istic eects toward the creek that runs along the
bottom of the estate. Farrand had an incredible
eye for detail, notes Sanchez. doaks.org
4.
Generalife, Granada, Spain
Placid pools and
private spaces are
among the features
Sanchez admires
at the 14th-century
palace of Spains
onetime Muslim rulers. Reorganized in the
1920s and 30s by landscape designer Torres
Balvas in classical French style, the Generalife
is famous for its crenellated hedges, pool court,
and bay laureldraped staircase. alhambra.org
the level of the house to the sea
wall. The drop is only a couple of
feet, but the illusion is that its a
lot more than that, he explains.
You look out the windows of
the den and youre right on the
water, Rakolta says. Its very
Venetian in feeling.
Bougainvillea New River
climbs the walls of a brick-paved
interior courtyard with a circular
wall fountain, next to which, in
space reclaimed from an oversized
driveway, Sanchez & Maddux
created an informal, intensively
planted area, referred to as the
jungle. Here the classical sym-
metry and careful balance of the
more formal waterfront areas give
way to a naturalistic style.
Closing off part of the origi-
nal driveway with a decorative
iron gate to create the space was
a stroke of genius, Rakolta says.
Centered around a big banyan
tree, with curved brick walkways
and plantings inspired by the
rain forests of South America,
this hidden garden is redolent
with the seductive fragrance of
Cananga odorata (ylang-ylang)
and Michelia champaca, a mag-
nolia relative (think Joy perfume).
Its wonderful in the evening,
Sanchez says. Usually one or the
other is in bloom, and it makes
the space very romantic.
Clusters of sky-blue blooms of
Thunbergia grandiora hang from
above, while dierent varieties of
palms, Heliconia (the rhododen-
dron of Florida, Sanchez calls it,
for its ubiquity), gingers, orchids
in pots, bananas, chalice vine,
and confederate jasmine, ll this
part of the property with tropical
scent and splendor.
Not all of the antecedents for
the landscape are Italian. Sanchez
counts the Generalife gardens
next to Spains Alhambra pal-
ace (whose origins date to the
9th century), with its placid
pools, squirts of water, and little
private spaces, among his inspi-
rations for the Rakolta property.
Andalusian gardens are histori-
cally designed to draw the eye,
as Sanchez says, oering tanta-
lizing glimpses from one discrete
space into the next as you move
through them. So it is at the
Rakoltas home. You can take
a short walk and nd dierent
views, Maddux says. You dont
see everything all at once.
Terry Rakolta knew she was
asking for a lot, but she got it.
Im more than happy, she
says. Until we redid the garden,
I really wasnt too excited about
the house. Now I feel the love.
SEE SOURCEBOOK FOR MORE INFORMATION,
PAGE 70
An early frost coats
each blade of grass and
every twig in this silvery
landscape.
JACK FROST:
MASTER GARDENER
STORY BY VALERIE EASTON
45 45
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It also works constructive magic. Without a period
of serious cold, tulips wont bloom in the spring, and
lilacs and peonies wont set ower buds. Instead of
killing parsnips and collards, frost sweetens them
and is said to boost their overall quality. Frost also
gives the garden a break from slugs, snails, aphids,
Japanese beetles, and many weeds.
Although winter can be like a slap in the face after
a warm, lingering autumn, theres usually plenty
of warning. Chill fall mornings find roofs and
evergreens delicately coated with sparkling white;
then, as the day warms up, the garden rebounds,
us out, and continues to bloom and fruit as if
never nipped. These light, teasing frosts can go on
for weeks, but the time will comein September,
October, or even November, depending on your lati-
tude and altitudewhen the temperature dips into
the mid-20s and a hard, killing frost will have its
way with your garden. After weeks of frosty irta-
tion, this time most plants without a stout woody
stem will be reduced to compost. Winter has arrived
in the garden, no matter what the
calendar says.
As soon as Ive started to pull
on warm gloves and a wooly hat
before going outdoors, Im on the
lookout for hints of that rst seri-
ous frost. In anticipation of its
inevitable arrival, I dig the dahl-
ias and cart pots of aeoniums and
fragrant-leaved geraniums indoors.
I rush out to pick the last raspberries and the
Sungold tomatoes, turned sweeter by their brush
with the impending freeze. I pull pots close to the
house for protection and spread a blanket of insu-
lating mulch over beds and borders. When the frost
still sits lightly on the pumpkin, its time to pick
the last of the zucchinis, tender lettuces and herbs,
grapes, and green tomatoes.
Still, no matter how much Ive prepared myself
and my garden for that rst killing frost, its a shock
to wake up and nd the entire scale and density of
it all changed overnight by startling destruction. Its
as if frost turns the garden transparent, paring away
the massings of summer to reveal the underlying
structure. New and unexpected sights are exposed,
and light penetrates the garden, the sunrays weak
and slanting but welcome all the same. In most
climates, frost comes and goes through the winter
months, but its eect on the garden lasts until foli-
age returns in spring.
There are few more dismal sights than a lovely
clump of coleus taken down overnight, but the
arrival of frost brings plenty of pleasures, too. It
turns conifers and ornamental grasses to tawny
shades of bronze and russet. Hydrangea heads
take on soul-stirring hues of burgundy, mauve,
and mossy green. The subtle splendors of tree
bark, dangling berries, pods, and cones come into
their own once frost has done its work to expose
them. Finally I see the birds Ive only heard rustling
through the tree branches all summer. My terrier
runs around the garden barking wildly at foraging
squirrels shes suspected were there but hadnt been
able to get a bead on before the garden died down.
Before modern meteorological
forecasts, people predicted weather
by careful observation and mem-
ories of seasons past, much as
gardeners tend to do even today.
My mother, who taught me to gar-
den, believed that her naked ladies,
a k a Belladonna lilies, foretold frost
dates. She swore by an old wives
tale that rst frost hits six weeks
from the date these pink lilies drop their blooms.
As far as Im concerned, feeling the weather in
your bones is as good a way to anticipate frost as
any chart or map of averages. So is stepping outside
on an autumn evening to sni the airin many
parts of the country, a cold, clear night, with glitter-
ing stars and a brilliant moon, is a sign that frost is
on its way. Will tomorrow be the day?
There are myriad types of frost, their quality
and appearance dependent on temperature and
the amount of moisture in the air. When the air is
dry and the temperature barely freezing, frost can
look as ephemeral as the lightest dusting of pow- A
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Degrees of Frost
Maybe we should think of frost
not as a great destroyer, but
as something more akin to,
say, rain or shade. We moni-
tor drizzle and downpours for
how deeply they penetrate the
soil. We pay close attention to
whether shade is partial, light,
or deep, knowing it makes all
the dierence as to what can
grow in it. Frost has its own
variables and can be catego-
rized by its eect on plants:
In a light freeze the tempera-
ture dips just below freezing,
to 29 degrees, killing only the
tenderest of plants, including
tomatoes. A moderate freeze,
between 25 and 28 degrees,
causes destruction of blos-
soms, fruit, and semi-hardy
plants. A heavy or killing
frost means the temperature
has dropped to 24 degrees
and below, bringing an end
to herbaceous plants and the
gardening season. If youre a
precise type of gardener who
counts backward from the rst
killing frost to determine veg-
etable planting dates, check
out the average frost-date
map in the Farmers Alma-
nac (farmersalmanac.com/
weather/2007/02/14/average-
frost-dates), which chronicles
the normal averages for the
rst and last frosts around the
country. Be aware, however,
that theres a 50 percent possi-
bility of frost occurring earlier
or later than these dates. Frost
dates, though based on hard
data, are really just a conve-
nient way to look at seasonal
weather changes.
Many plants hold up quite well to
a light frost, rebounding as the
sun melts it away. Left: Heuchera
Chocolate Rufes. Opposite:
The last roses of the season.
F
rost is a beautiful assassin. One wintry morning, we wake to a gar-
den silvered with ice, the product of simple chemistry: water vapor
forms frost when surface temperatures it comes in contact with are below
freezing. Crystalline white replaces autumnal browns and greens. Tree
branches glisten. Conifers look as if ocked for Christmas. The swaying
inorescences on ornamental grasses sparkle and shine like diamonds.
My children used to vie to be rst out the door to crunch their boots across
the newly frosted lawn, leaving a trail of footprints. Frost transforms the
world, then melts away as quickly as chocolate on the tongue.
Frost is the greatest artist
in our climeHe paints
in nature and describes in
rime. Thomas Hood

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One reason to refrain from
cutting back perennials
at seasons end is to enjoy
the architectural quality of
their seedheads in winter,
especially when rimmed
with frost. Shown here are
purple coneower and sea
holly (opposite).

51
All that is gold does
not glitter, not all those
who wander are lost;
the old that is strong
does not wither,
deep roots are not
reached by the frost.
J.R.R. Tolkien
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dered sugar. At the other extreme is hoarfrost, which
on cold, clear nights encrusts surfaces with a thick,
white fuzz of feathery ice crystals.
In my part of the Pacic Northwest, we dont often
get hoarfrost. But one morning late last November
my garden was coated in what looked like a dense
albino peltcould it be frozen fog? Each ice crystal
was so long and thick that the frost looked pettable. A
little urn holding sedum became an object of strange
beauty when touched with hoarfrost, and I was sorry
to look out at noon and see it gone, my garden now
plain by comparison.
Then there is black frost, glazed frost, ground frost,
and air frost. The rapscallion Jack Frost, an elsh
creature of English and Scandinavian folktales, was
held responsible for fern frost, the patterns etched
across windowpanes on cold mornings. When I was
little, it was a treat to help my dad scrape the intricate
frost patterns o the car windshield. Sometimes the
ice lay in ne swirls on the glass; other mornings it
was as thick as fur.
Beware especially the frost pocket, which can
damage even hardy plants. Because cold air sinks, it
tends to pool in low-lying areas, creating spots where
frost hits earlier and lingers longer. When a frost
is brief, plants can bounce back, but if it lasts sev-
eral hours or more, it ruptures cell membranes by
freezing the moisture inside the leaves and stems.
Plants then blacken and seem to melt, or in the case
of perennials, die down and go dormant until the
warmth of spring coaxes them out of the ground
again.
But isnt the rst hard frost something of a relief?
It signals an end to dragging hoses about, pulling
weeds, and deadheading owers. In fact, what I
most appreciate about frost isnt its eeting beauty
or its transformative eect on my garden. What I
love best is how frost clears my calendar of routine
garden chores as surely as it winnows out the plants
in my garden. Only after a killing frost puts the gar-
den decidedly to bed do I have guilt-free time to read
a novel or go to the movies. The garden is at rest,
and we are too, for a few months, anyway.
Opposite: Spent blossoms of
Hydrangea paniculata. Above:
A blanket of frost can highlight
the good bones of a formal
garden, delineating every edge
and curve of clipped hedges
and garden ornaments.
For more on frost in the garden, go to
GARDENDESIGN.COM/FROST
53
OUR A-LIST PARTY EXPERTS SHOW YOU HOW TO MAKE
YOUR HOLIDAY TABLE THE TALK OF THE TOWN
STORY BY WILLIAM L. HAMILTON Q PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL KRAUS
POWER FLOWERS
When Nicholas Apps, direc-
tor of special programming
and events at the Museum
of Modern Art in New York,
throws a party, he knows
who to call to make it
superb. So, too, the directors
at the Metropolitan Museum
of Art, the Frick Collection,
and other well-known insti-
tutions. We asked for their
favorite oral designers and
made our own calls. They
created six arrangements for
the home, exclusively for
Garden Design.
54

Stark, whose clients include Rachael Ray, Tiany &


Co., and the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, cre-
ated two arrangements for us. An assembly of beautiful
bottles (below) deconstructs a formal spray and makes
it easy to arrange; a dressy silver palette of whites and
steel-blues (right) is set in a glass container with a clip-
art collar, giving the vase an inexpensive antique look
that you can change at will.
David Stark Design & Production
55
Materials include: Ranunculus rex begonia drumstick allium blossoms minia-
ture pomegranate branches blue Viburnum berries dusty miller Echinops
French anemones silver Brunia white tulips
SUBSTITUTIONS: Use your favorite vases or bottles (as seen far left) to create your own
still life; with a clever clip-art vase as its base (above), any tumble of whites and blues
hydrangeas, lavender, paperwhites, rosemarywould work.

56

57
Materials include: an Anthurium clarinervium leaf red Indian Summer calla lilies green
Cymbidium orchids Mokara Red Azacoff orchids white Dutch hydrangea aspidistra leaves
SUBSTITUTIONS: The arrangement is based on making a big statement, not intricacy. Banchet
suggests alternates of Green Goddess calla lilies for the green orchids, white roses or tulips for
the hydrangea, red roses for the red callas, red hypericum berries for the Mokara orchids, Monstera
for the Anthurium clarinervium leaf.
Banchet Jaigla, whose clients include Diane von
Furstenberg and HBO, created an unexpected,
exotic holiday arrangement that would work in a
guest bedroom as well as in a hallway or on a din-
ing table or sideboard. Inspired by her childhood
in Thailand, it features a simple, tightly edited
grouping of bold, colorful, graphic elements. The
inside of the glass vase is wallpapered with foliage
to hide the arrangements stems.
Banchet Flowers

58
A. Choose a vase,
and cut a piece of
chicken wire wide
enough to form
into a ball that can
sit in the opening
of the vase. Push
the ball halfway
into the vase: this
will secure your
branches.
B. Using your
largest branches
rst, build a
form and sil-
houette that you
like. Thompson
favors asymmet-
rical shapes, with
some branches
hanging down
toward the table
and some reach-
ing up, for a more
naturalistic eect.
C. Wire the stems
of fruit onto wire
skewers that can
be inserted into
the arrangement
and secured to
the branches,
leaving enough
length of wire
skewer so that the
fruit will either
be at the sur-
face of the leaves
or dangle below
the arrange-
ment. Then add
the most delicate
elements, like
grasses and ow-
ers, lling in and
extending beyond
the leaves in a
spray.

Materials include: Purple Majesty millet bittersweet magnolia leaves


purple clematis flowers pinecones
SUBSTITUTIONS: Shape, height, and form dramatize an arrangement of rel-
atively ordinary elements. Oak and magnolia leaves could be replaced with
chestnut, sweet gum, pear, or plum leaves. Any type of grain, such as wheat or
broomcorn, would do the expressionistic, skyrocketing work of the millet. Fall
fruits look perfect for a Thanksgiving table; orchids would make the piece par-
ticularly elegant for New Years Eve.
59

Emily Thompson, whose clients include the


Horticultural Society of New York, based her
arrangement on a belief that humble materi-
als can have as strong an impact as hothouse
owers. She chose oak and magnolia branches
for shape, and millet for texture. Pears,
grapes, and plums add color and cue the eye
for a banquet feast.
Emily Thompson Flowers
60

61 61
Materials include: lotus seed pods Schwarzwalder calla lilies
chocolate cosmos Scabiosa seed pods fern fiddleheads Amnesia roses
Cymbidium orchids purple artichokes
SUBSTITUTIONS: Other seed pods, berries, or succulents would work to bring
texture and shape to the arrangement. Van Vliet recommends dark-colored dahl-
ias or miniature dark sunflowers for the orchids, any other blush- or sand-colored
roses such as Sahara or Silverstone for the Amnesia roses, miniature eggplants
or plums for the artichokes, field flowers or grasses for the fern fiddleheads.

Remco van Vliet, whose clients include


Ralph Lauren and the Metropolitan
Museum of Art, created an arrange-
ment largely based on texture: the use of
many textures in the same family of col-
ors lends peace to the eye, rather than
the chaos typical of grander arrange-
ments, a strategy that van Vliet equates
with a painters technique. As a nish-
ing touch, he let go the vase in favor of a
twig bowl, which becomes a part of the
design. He calls it a Dutch still life
not surprising since van Vliet is Dutch.
Van Vliet & Trap

Lewis Miller, whose clients include Gucci and the New York Public
Library, created an arrangement based on the winter-forest associa-
tions of wood and bark, and red, the seasons signature color. Pillar
candles, the quintessential holiday lighting, complete the look. The
pillars are wrapped like gifts at the bottom like gifts and set on ped-
estals of tree-branch sections. Most of the elements can be found
easily at local ower shops, garden centers, and craft stores.
LMD New York Lewis Miller Design

63
A. Staple the bark
to a plain pine
box: in addition to
craft stores, there
are good online
resources for
birch bark, such
as birchbarkstore
.com, which also
sells replace logs
to create the can-
dle pedestals.
B. Cut the candle
pedestals to the
desired heights.
Line the pine box
with plastica
heavy-duty gar-
bage bag cut to
t is neand
ll with Oasis o-
ral foam, which
will support the
arrangement. It is
available at craft
stores or from
online sources.
Start by arranging
around the perim-
eter of the box,
to conceal the
edges of the con-
tainer. Continue
to ll in the cen-
ter, varying height
to create depth
and movement.
C. Wrap the pillar
candles with gros-
grain ribbon and
fasten with pins.
Wrap the ribbon
with natural rope,
such as linen
twine or ra a, for
a textural, organic
contrast.

Materials include: Black Magic roses Piano cabbage roses


silver Brunia Protea nana
SUBSTITUTIONS: Miller says the flowers were chosen for their rich
color and contrast against the white tones of the birch bark. Red-on-
red flowers are complemented by the silver Brunia, which also relates
to the silver in the bark. Another color palette different from red would
also work, if its uniform. Miller suggests natural cork or green sheet
moss as an alternative to the birch bark.
When it comes to preserving traditional varieties of fruits
and vegetables, Amy Goldman is a force of nature
STORY BY BILL MARKEN
A barnful of squash, har-
vested from Amy Goldmans
garden, waiting to be
sorted, weighed and graded,
then photographed for her
book in an improvised studio
in a corner of the barn.
groundbreaker
HEIRLOOM ACTIVIST
64 gardendesign.com nov/dec 2010
She says this year shell probably decorate
with cheese pumpkins, which resemble a
wheel of cheese with an exterior that looks likes
terra-cottatoo brous and coarse for eating
but beautiful to stack. For a side dish, she may
cook a favorite winter squash such as Musque
de Provence, a variety that was introduced
to American gardeners 111
years ago and, as one of her
books describes it, the color
of milk chocolate and just as
addictive. Goldman says she
thinks of Thanksgiving as a
harvest festival, and the holi-
day reects much of what she
has been doing in the ground,
in print, and in public for three
decades.
While scientists and agricul-
tural experts continue to press the case for
genetic diversity, and organizations such as
Seed Savers Exchange and a few mail-order
companies (including Burpee) do their part
to collect, store, and disseminate seeds of
heirloom plants, Goldman has a more direct
approach to promoting precious varieties from
the past. She makes us want to grow them and
eat them. Cultivating edibles and cooking the
harvest have been passions for Goldman since
she was a teenager growing up on the North
Shore of Long Island. With both parents (her
mother a gardener herself) oering encour-
agement, she sprouted seeds in a
greenhouse, grew tomatoes, corn,
melons, squash, and other vegeta-
bles, and planted an orchard and
grape vines. Later, while work-
ing as a clinical psychologist in
upstate New York, she always man-
aged to have a plot in Rhinebeck
bursting with good things to eat.
In 1990, after her leeks and red
onions won blue ribbons at the
Dutchess County Fair, there was
no stopping her. Five years later, her pro-
duce hauled in 38 blue ribbons, making her
the fairs grand-champion winner, thanks in
large part, she says, to mastering the growing
Above: The bump-encrusted rind of the turban
squash Marina di Chiogga masks highly edible
golden insides. Author Amy Goldman (below)
describes this Italian heirloom as an oddball, born
to be gnocci and ravioli.
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If youve looked at any of Amy
Goldmans beautiful, authorita-
tive books on heirloom produce,
you have a mental picture of
what her Thanksgiving table
will look like.
nov/dec 2010 gardendesign.com 65
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of squash, the competitions largest category
of vegetables.
Then she fell in love with heirlooms, those
often curiously named open-pollinated vari-
eties of fruits and vegetables passed down
by generations of farmers and gardeners
which have typically been shoved aside in
the stampede toward produce developed for
commercially appealing looks and durabil-
ity in shipping. She credits her conversion to
the seminal 1990 book on preserving genetic
diversity, Shattering: Food, Politics, and the
Loss of Genetic Diversity, by Cary Fowler and
Pat Mooney. Reading it, Goldman says, turned
her into a card-carrying seed saver, collec-
tor, and advocate of heirloom edibles. As
Goldman says, Fowlers and Mooneys warn-
ings about the dangers of genetic uniformity
and seed monopoly were prescient. To create
a more bountiful future, we need to preserve
the vast genetic reservoir of food crops that is
our heritage. Extinction happens when seeds
are not passed along to the next generation,
when the new replaces the old, and the old is
not conserved.
In 1997, Goldman won a Golden Trowel
award from Garden Design magazine for her
vegetable garden, and soon the avid gardener
went from being the subject of articles to
being a contributor, writing articles on mel-
ons, peppers, and cabbages. A few years later,
Goldman asked New York Citybased ne-arts
photographer Victor Schrager to collaborate
on a book about heirloom melons based on
what she had learned growing them in her
1 acres of gardens in Rhinebeck. Schrager
improvised a studio in Goldmans barn, where
she would cut the melons, taste them, and,
says Schrager, pronounce them fabulous or
t only for the local pigs. Schrager would
arrange the winners on sawhorses and shoot
them with a large-format wooden Deardor
view camera.
groundbreaker
Above: Named for Amy Goldmans fathers gro-
cery store in Brooklyn, this is Goldmans Italian
American tomatoblood red, deeply ribbed, and
considered multipurpose though its recommend-
ed for sauce.
66 gardendesign.com nov/dec 2010
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For evidence of just how highly esteemed
heirloom fruits and vegetables have become
these days, you need look no further than
Sothebys in New York City. There, on a late
September afternoon, an auctioneer stepped
to the podium to sell just that: prized Ozette
potatoes, Lady Godiva squash, Isis Candy
Cherry tomatoes, packets of open-pollinated
heirloom seeds, and other rare treasures.
A single crate of heirloom vegetables sold
for $1,000. The auction event, The Art of
Farming, was a day of seminars and a recep-
tion and dinnerorganized with the help of
advocates like Amy Goldman, and farm-to-
table movement visionariesto raise money
for GrowNYCs New Farmer Development
Project, which supports and educates immi-
grants with agricultural experience to become
local farmers, and for the Sylvia Center at
Katchkie Farm, a New Yorkbased nonprot
that strives to teach children good nutrition
through hands-on experience with gardening
and farming. Given Sothebys involvement,
much was made of the heirloom vegetables
artistic, sculptural appeal. Not everything on
the block that day was edible. Among the lots
was a limited-edition set of Amy Goldmans
bronzed squashes.
Heirlooms
on the Block
Above: Sothebys auctioneer Jamie Niven takes
bids for crates of heirloom vegetables and
produce-related art, including a squash painting
by P. Allen Smith.
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nov/dec 2010 gardendesign.com 67
:ee cara|og soo-1cs-oIIs www.cha:|esronGa:dens.co
groundbreaker
Melons for the Passionate Grower came out in
2002 to instant acclaim, garnering such recog-
nition as the American Horticultural Societys
Annual Garden Book Award.
The melon book also staked out Goldmans
strong advocacy for heirlooms. She disparaged
many modern hybrids as the green bowling
balls that pass for watermelons or the melons
posing as cantaloupes in grocery stores across
America. And she makes the point that sub-
lime taste and fascinating histories are only
part of the reason to grow heirloom varieties:
We need their germplasm, she writes. With-
out their genetic diversity, we will be prey to
ever more virulent pests and diseases.
Goldmans second book, The Compleat
Squash: A Passionate Growers Guide to Pump-
kins, Squashes and Gourds, published in 2004,
had an equally earnest mission: to catalog
these marvels before they disappear.
But Goldmans most ambitious work, six
years in the making, is The Heirloom Tomato:
From Garden to Table: Recipes, Portraits, and
History of the Worlds Most Beautiful Fruit, pub-
lished in 2008. Of nearly 6,000 estimated
cultivated tomato varieties, she grew over
1,000 dierent types, 200 of which made it
into the book. The work reects Goldmans
nearly lifelong aversion to standard supermar-
ket hybrid tomatoes, which she describes as
a tool of industry and the market economy.
Heirloom tomatoes, on the other hand, are
designed to be homegrownliving legacies
valued by generations of gardeners. As the
book amply attests, heirloom varieties are as
impressive to look at as they are to taste: the
yellow and green stripes of Green Zebra, or
the stunning orange, yellow, and pink esh
of Gold Medal. Often their names oer tan-
talizing hints of the cultivars rich histories:
Nebraska Wedding, for example.
Cary Fowler, Goldmans early role model
and executive director of the Global Crop
Diversity Trust, wrote the preface for The Heir-
loom Tomato. How, then, can we ensure that
these wonderful varieties do not go the way of
the dinosaurs and the dodo? he writes. We
are in the midst of a mass extinction event
in agriculture at precisely a moment in his-
tory when diversity for further adaptation is
most needed.
Over the years, Goldmans activism has
extended beyond gardening and writing.
In 1991, she became a member of the Seed
Savers Exchange, a nonprofit formed in
1975 to save and share heirloom seeds
and a major source of her seeds when she
rst started growing heirlooms. Shes been
68 gardendesign.com nov/dec 2010
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a Seed Savers board member since 2001,
and in 2007 she became chairperson of the
board. Since Goldman came on as board
chair, membership in the organization has
signicantly increased. She says she is espe-
cially proud of Seed Savers contribution
of hundreds of heirlooms to the Svalbard
Global Seed Vault in Norway. Chiseled into
a mountain, the Doomsday Vault, as it is col-
loquially known, stores seed collections from
around the world as a safeguard against the
extinction of the genes of plants that may be
valuable in the future.
This fall and winter, Goldman is continu-
ing to support the work of Seed Savers and
doing book tours as she develops ideas for
another book. Last spring and summer,
while researching, she filled her garden
with some 400 varieties of eggplant: round,
oval, bat-shaped, purple, green, white, from
Antigua to Zebrina. But by August, she
realized, My heart wasnt in eggplant.
She scrapped that idea. Shes now rming
up her planting plan for next year, which
will include the usual melons, squash, and
tomatoes plus, we can hope, other heir-
looms that can form the basis of a next
book based on her heart and hands.
SEE SOURCEBOOK FOR MORE INFORMATION, PAGE 70
Above: Using plain backgrounds and dramatic
lighting, photographer Victor Schrager posed
melons to reveal their distinctive exteriors and
luscious esh. This is Jenny Lind, named after
the celebrated soprano and introduced around
1846. Goldmans book points out its characteris-
tic outie belly button at its blossom end.
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sourcebook
Emily Thompson
Emily Thompson Flowers
323-896-1494
emilythompsonowers.com
Remco van Vliet
Van Vliet & Trap
212-352-3385
vanvlietandtrap.com
groundbreaker / p. 64
Amy Goldman
rareforms.com
The Heirloom Tomato: From
Garden to Table: Recipes,
Portraits, and History of the
Worlds Most Beautiful Fruit
Bloomsbury, 2008
The Compleat Squash:
A Passionate Growers
Guide to Pumpkins,
Squashes and Gourds
Artisan, 2004
Melons for the Passionate
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Artisan, 2002
Seed Savers Exchange
seedsavers.org
one shot / p. 76
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CONTEST INFORMATION
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POSTAL INFORMATION Garden Design, Number 169 (ISSN 0733-4923). Published 7 times per year (January/February, March, April, May/June, July/August, September/Octo-
ber, November/December) by Bonnier Corporation, P.O. Box 8500, Winter Park, FL 32790. Copyright 2010, all rights reserved. The contents of this publication may not be repro-
duced in whole or in part without consent of the copyright owner. Periodicals postage paid at Winter Park, FL, and additional mailing offices. SUBSCRIPTIONS: U.S.: $23.95 for one
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portions of our subscriber list available to carefully screened companies that offer products and services we think might be of interest to you. If you do not want to receive these offers,
please advise us at 800-513-0848. EDITORIAL: Send correspondence to Editorial Department, Garden Design, P.O. Box 8500, Winter Park, FL 32790; e-mail: gardendesign@bonniercorp.com.
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PREMIER RETAIL PARTNER LISTING
Call today to find out how to become a GARDEN DESIGN retailer and be included in this list of exclusive
retailers. The GARDEN DESIGN Retail Program offers you magazines for resale in your store and exposure
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For details call Linda today at 888-259-6753 Ext. 4511
To find out more about our featured retailers visit www.gardendesign.com/newsstands.jsp
California
Artefact Design & Salvage (Sonoma)
707-933-0660
www.artefactdesignsalvage.com
Big Red Sun (Venice)
PH: 310-433-0019
www.bigredsun.com
DIG Gardens (Santa Cruz)
831-466-3444
www.diggardens.com
Gardenology (Encinitas)
PH: 760-753-5500
www.gardenology.com
Intnl Garden & Floral Design Center
(El Segundo)
PH: 310-615-0353
www.igardencenter.com
Marina del Rey Garden Center
(Marina del Rey)
PH: 310-823-5956
www.marinagardencenter.com
Potter Green & Company (Sonoma)
PH: 415-902-0198
www.pottergreen.com
Regan Roses (Fremont)
PH: 510-797-3222
www.regannursery.com
Richard Gervais Collection (San Francisco)
PH: 415-255-4579
www.richardgervaiscollection.com
Santa Barbara Botanical Garden
(Santa Barbara)
805-682-4726
www.sbbg.org
Seaside Gardens (Carpinteria)
PH: 805-684-6001
www.seaside-gardens.com
The Gardener (Healdsburg)
PH: 707-431-1063
www.thegardener.com
The Garden Gates (Metairie)
504-833-6699
www.thegardengates.com
With Garden Flair (Stockton)
PH: 209-933-9009
www.withgardenair.com
Colorado
Birdsall & Co. (Denver)
303-722-3535
www.birdsallgarden.com
Georgia
Boxwoods Gardens & Gifts (Atlanta)
404-233-3400
www.boxwoodsonline.com
Four Seasons Pottery (Atlanta)
404-252-3411
www.4seasonspottery.com
Illinois
Steel Heart, Ltd. (Harvard)
PH: 815-943-3465
www.steelheartlimited.com
Minnesota
Tangletown Gardens (Minneapolis)
PH: 612-822-4769
www.tangletowngardens.com
New Jersey
J&M Home Garden (Madison)
973-377-4740
www.jmhg.com
Sickles Market (Little Silver)
PH: 732-741-9563
www.sicklesmarket.com
Timothys Center for Gardening
(Robbinsville)
PH: 609-448-6222
www.timothyscenter.com
New York
Evan Peters & Co. (Long Island City)
PH: 718-349-7545
www.evanpeters.com
Fort Pond Native Plants (Montauk)
631-668-6452
www.nativeplants.net
Plaisirs du Jardin (Port Jervis)
PH: 845-856-6330
plaisirsdujardin@frontiernet.net
Pennsylvania
Garden Accents (W. Conshohocken)
PH: 610-825-5525
www.gardenaccents.com
Seasons Garden Center
(Washington Crossing)
PH: 215-493-4226
www.seasonsgardencenter.com
Texas
Antique Rose Emporium (Brenham)
979-836-9051
www.weareroses.com
Big Grass (San Antonio)
PH: 210-735-7999
www.biggrassbamboo.com
Nelson Water Gardens & Nursery Inc (Katy)
PH: 281-391-4769
www.nelsonwatergardens.com
North Haven Gardens (Dallas)
PH: 214-363-6715
www.nhg.com
PlantEscape Gardens (Austin)
512-444-0013
www.plantescapegardens.com
The Arbor Gate (Tomball)
PH: 281-351-8851
www.arborgate.com
Vermont
Verde for Garden and Home (Brattleboro)
802-258-3908
www.verdeforgardenandhome.com
Washington
Swansons Nursery (Seattle)
206-782-2543
www.swansonsnursery.com
Wisconsin
The Wreath Factory (Plymouth)
PH: 920-893-8700
www.wreathfactoryonline.com
International
Atlas Pots (North Vancouver,
British Columbia)
PH: 604-960-0556
www.atlaspots.com
Garden Architecture and Design
(Saskatchewan)
PH: 306-651-2828
www.gardenarchitecture.ca
La Marche Vert (Quebec, Canada)
450-227-2775
peterboxer@bellnet.ca
T O A D V E R T I S E , C A L L 4 0 7 - 5 7 1 - 4 5 4 1
Foxgloves
Classic design, superior performance,
luscious colors, comfortable form fit,
soothing supple support, excellent
sun protection and easy care
combine to create the most versatile
gloves in the world. Foxgloves are the
gloves youll love to give and receive!
888-322-4450
www.foxglovesgardengloves.com
Loll Designs
New Harbor Bench
Satellite Side Tables
Made in Duluth, MN, U.S.A.
Its good to be recycled.
877-740-3387
www.lolldesigns.com
From the Studio of George Carruth
The work of George Carruth has been enjoyed by collectors for more than 25
years and we thank you for helping to support this little company in Waterville,
Ohio. Visit our studio or shop online to see more than 250 original sculptures
cast in stone for years of pleasure indoors or out. Georges desire has always
been to plant a smile in your home or garden with exceptional and afordable
American-made artwork.
800-225-1178
www.carruthstudio.com
2010 Gift Catalog Is Now Available
Our annual gift catalog provides unique gift ideas for gardeners, woodworkers,
culinary and outdoor enthusiasts, as well as toys for children. In addition to
traditional items, we ofer unusual gifts you cant nd just anywhere.
View the digital edition of our annual gift catalog online or call to have a print
copy mailed to you free. When youre ready to order, shopping is just a call or
a click away.
800-683-8170
www.leevalley.com
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David Austin Roses
David Austins English roses combine the wonderful forms and fragrances of old
roses with the repeat owering of modern roses. Our new collection for 2011
contains over 200 varieties, all grown in the U.S., including fragrant shrub roses,
climbers and ramblers.
Call toll-free to request your free copy of David Austins 120-page Handbook of
Roses, featuring six new English roses. Please quote code GD22.
800-328-8893
www.davidaustinroses.com
us@davidaustinroses.com
T O A D V E R T I S E , C A L L 4 0 7 - 5 7 1 - 4 5 4 1
Calico Juno Designs
Beautifully crafted original gemstone
jewelry with over 800 designs in
gold and silver. Custom orders are
available. Call or visit our website for
a free catalog.
718-392-4823
www.calicojunodesigns.com
calicojunodesigns@msn.com
Eco-Friendly Lightweight Concrete Planters
Concrete R&D LLC is ofering its Delaware Coast Planters, the rst in a planned
series of regional planters. Each 6" planter is unique and individually crafted
in our workshop with our eco-concrete mix that includes 40% recycled and
sustainable materials, including sand, seashells, pine needles and cones native
to the Mid-Atlantic coast. The planters promote optimum plant growth through
superior drainage, aeration and insulation and are built to last.
A perfect holiday gift idea. One percent of sales are contributed to foundations
dedicated to land and historic preservation.
302-547-1101
www.delawarecoastplanter.com
delawarecoastplanter@gmail.com
Perennials, Grasses & Succulents Direct to You
How does your garden grow? With plants you wont normally nd at your garden
center or superstore. And theyre shipped right to you from Santa Rosa Gardens.
Were the family-owned mail-order nursery with the industrys largest availability
of ornamental grasses, as well as perennial plants, ferns, hostas, daylilies,
owering bulbs, tropical palms, aquatic plants and gifts for gardeners. Browse
our online catalog and sign up to receive our monthly gardeners newsletter.
866-681-0856
www.santarosagardens.com
sales@santarosagardens.com
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White Flower Farm
Superb gifts with service to match!
Celebrate the holidays with the
natural beauty of amaryllis, fragrant
wreaths and greens, jasmine and
colorful houseplants fresh from
our nursery, plus ripe citrus direct
from the groves. Save 10% on gift
certificates, too. Satisfaction is
guaranteed.
800-503-9624
www.whiteflowerfarm.com/gifts
Nature by Designs
Red Collection
Featured: Elegantly decorated 28"
mixed evergreen wreath, $89.95 +
S/H.
Other wreath sizes and styles,
garlands and swags available. To
order, call or visit our website.
888-552-3747
www.naturebydesign.com
Fabulous Stationery
Looking for unique gift ideas for the
avid gardeners in your life? Create
beautiful personalized notes from
our wide selection of modernist-
inspired nature designs. These cards
make perfect hostess gifts, holiday
cards or party invites. And be sure
to visit our One Dollar Greeting Card
Shop for even more inspiration!
www.fabulousstationery.com
T O A D V E R T I S E , C A L L 4 0 7 - 5 7 1 - 4 5 4 1
Gorgeous Garden
Gazebos
Create outdoor retreats with our
stunning selection of cedar, vinyl
and pine gazebos in eye-catching
shapes and sizes. Use our step-
by-step customization process to
completely personalize your design
for a one-of-a-kind gazebo or other
garden structure. We offer worldwide
shipping and design consultations.
888-293-2339
www.gazebocreations.com
contact@gazebocreations.com
Brent & Beckys Bulbs
Shop our extensive selection of
unique bulbs and enjoy easy year-
round color. A Garden Watchdog
Top 30 company, we offer both old
favorites and prized rarities. Visit
our website or send for our lavishly
illustrated free catalog.
877-661-2852
www.brentandbeckysbulbs.com
info@brentandbeckysbulbs.com
Authentic Handmade Clay Pottery
Since 1992, Ceramica Renacimiento has been exporting quality products that
bring the artisanal look of traditional stoneware to garden enthusiasts in the
U.S. Our original designs include terra-cotta and glazed vases, bowls, pots, dcor
items and planters.
U.S.: 512-940-7600
renacimiento.sales@ceramicarenacimiento.com
Mxico: +52 477-267-1616
gventas@ceramicarenacimiento.com
www.ceramicarenacimiento.com.mx
Raw Urth Designs
Our recycled steel fire features
add the perfect blend of ambience
and style to outdoor living and
entertaining. Propane and natural
gas models available. Handcrafted in
our Colorado studio.
866-932-7510
www.rawurth.com
steel@rawurth.com
LatticeStix
LatticeStix Standard Lattice Panels
are an intriguing addition for gardens
and landscapes. Available in seven
sizes and 100 patterns, the panels can
be inserted into site-built framing to
create fence toppers, screens, gates,
trellises and more. Visit our website
to see our full range of captivating
patterned lattice products including
gates, screens, trellises, arbors,
garden and wall dcor. Lattice for life.
888-528-7849
www.latticestix.com
Archies Island Furniture
Our premium Adirondack furniture
is constructed with environmentally
harvested Malaysian mahogany.
Known for our 28 stunning custom
colors, our furniture is now available
unfinished and in a standard color
palette as well. Enjoy affordable
pricing on these new options. Call for
details or visit us online.
800-486-1183
www.archiesisland.com
BambooFencer.com
Fences Poles Edging Wall Coverings
Bamboo Fencer has over twenty
years of experience in the provision
of bamboo fences. Were happy to be
your source for sustainable bamboo
fencing materials. Build yourself that
green picket fence.
www.bamboofencer.com
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Bamboo Fencing & More
Established in 1880, Bamboo &
Rattan Works has been family-
owned and -operated for five
generations. We offer stock,
custom, tropical or oriental fencing,
as well as bamboo poles, roof
thatching and much more. Call us for
a free catalog or visit us on the web.
800-4-BAMBOO
www.bambooandrattan.com
suzbamboo@verizon.net
Trellis Structures
Trellis Structures designs and
manufactures innovative solutions
for pergolas, arbors, trellises and
gates. Made of the finest quality
western red cedar and mahogany
in multiple styles and sizes. Custom
pergolas also available. Shown here:
Large pergola, stained white, with a
shade cloth providing up to a 90%
UV filter.
800-649-6920
www.trellisstructures.com
sales@trellisstructures.com
Imagine Your Homes Potential
Homeowners are looking at their yards and seeing an opportunity to expand
their homes living space. Landscape architects agree that renovating outdoor
spaces enhances leisure time and adds value to a home and water features
are among the most requested landscape designs. At the heart of thousands
of decorative water features are Firestone PondGard Rubber Liners. PondGard
liners ofer the utmost in design exibility, resulting in water features that
complement the style of the home owner, as well as the natural surroundings.
With the combination of conformability, ease of installation and durability
inherent in PondGard liners, the only limit is your imagination.
800-428-4442
www.firestonesp.com/gd2
info@firestonesp.com
Rainwater Harvesting
Our RainBox system filters and stores
rainwater for irrigating gardens, filling
ponds and washing automobiles.
Interconnecting 75-gallon tanks
made of super-thick, sunlight-stable
plastic offer high-volume storage. We
also offer surface and underground
systems capable of recycling all of
the rainwater from a home or
commercial building.
800-477-7724
www.rainwatertechnology.com
sales@conservationtechnology.com
Vixen Hill Cedar Products
Vixen Hill has developed an
extraordinary selection of pre-
engineered cedar products.
Modular gazebos, screened garden
houses, shutters and porch systems
designed for simple one-day
installation. Visit our interactive
website or call us toll-free for more
information.
800-423-2766
www.vixenhill.com
sales@vixenhill.com
Drivable Grass

Make your neighbors green with envy. Efortless to install and aesthetically
pleasing, Drivable Grass

provides you with an environmentally friendly


alternative to poured concrete while ofering the same strength and durability.
Permeable, exible and plantable, Drivable Grass

is the solution for driveways,


parking areas, pathways and patio areas. Explore your opportunities with
Drivable Grass

using scented thyme, creeping oregano or colored crushed


stone as an inll. With Drivable Grass

, its your choice!


800-346-7995
www.soilretention.com
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one shot
COPPER TONE
In a San Francisco garden, a wall of woven metallic strips doubles as screening and sculpture
T
hink your tiny backyard is too small for big drama?
Then take a peek at this private garden, designed by San
Franciscobased landscape architect Randy Thueme, only
550 feet square and tucked behind a classic Victorian house in
Pacic Heights. What really makes the space sing is a stunning
10-foot-tall, 32-foot-long fence of 12-inch-wide bands of perforated
copper, clad over a supportive structure of cedar slats and steel.
Undulating like an oversize detail of basket weaving, the fence was
sculpted to allow three whitebarked Himalayan birch trees to inter-
lace through the copper strips. Up-lit at night by low-voltage bulbs,
the fence fairly glitters. As the homeowner says of the space at
night, Sheltered from the wind, with a soft glow illuminating the
garden, I feel as if San Francisco has retreated and I am at peace.
Before the new garden was installed the space was dank and dark,
with unsightly views of neighboring fences, decks, railings, and walls.
Thuemes goal was to block out the surroundings and create an invit-
ing spot that extends the homeowners living space out of doors, both
physically and visually (the patio can be seen from multiple rooms
through French doors and oor-to-ceiling windows).
The warm tones of the cedar slats on other outdoor walls now
coordinate with the copper, but Thueme anticipates that over time
the materials will change and continue to harmonize, as the copper
turns verdigris and the cedar mellows to gray. In expectation of this
metamorphosis, the Chinese-limestone patio ooring incorporates
bands of pale green, which is continued in a row of succulents at the
base of the fence. SEE SOURCEBOOK FOR MORE INFORMATION, PAGE 70
STORY BY JENNY ANDREWS
76 gardendesign.com nov/dec 2010
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Now you can create a lush oasis just about anywhere. Inside or out.
On the oor or on the wall. In a tiny apartment or covering
the Empire State Building. The plant-abilities are endless!
Plants are natural friends, so lets give them a cozy home theyll love
and thrive in. Made from 100% recycled materials, Pockets
are soft-sided, breathable, modular and infectiously fun!
And theyre made right here in the USA by our Woolly little family.