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Syllabus for BOE Examination [As per Notification by Government of India, Ministry of Commerce and Industry under The

Boiler Operation Engineers Rules, 2011] Paper -1 (Written) a) Can calculate loads, areas, volumes, quantities and weights. b) Can give description of the principal types of steam boilers used on land and to state the purposes and reasons for which different types of boilers are employed; and from the data and formulae supplied, calculate the safe working pressure for any part of a boiler in accordance with the Indian Boiler Regulations. c) Can calculate the direct stress, the torsional stress and the bending stress in round bars and shafts and the bending stress in rectangular bars and levers with given load; d) Understands the working and management of steam boilers, super heaters and economizers; e) Understands the use and purpose of various valves, cocks, mountings, fitting and other safety devices. f) Can give a description of and explain the functions of feed pumps, feed injectors, feed regulators, feed water filters and softeners, feed heaters, air heaters, calorifiers, steam accumulators, forced draught, induced draught and automatic draught control devices; g) Can answer questions on fact relating to combustion, heat and steam and calculate consumption of coal and water and quantity of steam that may be generated from a given heating surface under the various systems of draught, in any land boiler and also calculate the overall efficiency of boiler plant. h) Can explain jet and surface condensation, reheating and the working of steam expansion. Paper- 2 (Written) i) Can explain the general methods employed in laying foundation for boilers and chimneys and the suitable area and height of chimneys promote efficient combustion. j) Can explain the significance of principal appliances in use for the prevention of smoke and the principle on which they work and given description of the principal mechanical stokers, pulverizes, gas, oil and pulverized fuel systems in use. k) Understands the need for periodical cleaning, the methods used for prevention of scale or other deposits on heating surfaces and the necessity for maintaining a certain PH value in feed water. l) Can detect defects in boilers and state the means and methods of rectifying them. m) Understands the precautions to be taken for starting a boiler and economizer from cold or from banked fire condition. n) Understands the procedure to be adopted in putting an economizer out of commission while the boiler is on steam; o) Can explain the methods adopted for the achievement of fuel economy and the use of various instruments used in a Boiler House. p) Materials used in Boiler components and piping. Drawing (Written) q) Can read and prepare a working sketch and drawing of boilers and boiler mounting or parts thereof. Oral Examination To answer questions pertaining to Boiler Practices and if required to demonstrate in the examination room or in a workshop, his ability to carry out the practical aspects of his duties in a Boiler House.

Annexure I SYLLABUS FOR EXAMINATION

SI.No. SUbjects Syllabus 1 BOILER I Stipulated under (a) to (h) below 2 BOILER II Stipulated under (i) to (p) below 3 DRAWING Stipulated under(q) below 4 Vwa Oral examination to answer questions pertaining to Boiler practices and if required by the examiner to demonstrate in the examination room or workshop his ability to carryout the practical aspects of his duties in a Boiler House A candidate in order to be qualified for a certificate of proficiency under these rules, shall, inter alia, satisfy the examiner that he(a) Can calculate loads, area, volumes, quantities and weights; (b) Can give description of the principal types of steam boilers used on land and to state the purpose and reasons for which different types of boilers are employed; and from the data and formulae supplied, calculate the safe working pressure for any part of a'boller in accordance with the Indian Boiler Regulations; (c) Can calculate the direct stress, the torsional stress and the bending stress in round bars and shafts and the bending stress in rectangular bars and levers with given load; (d) Understands the working and management of steam boilers, super heaters and economizers; (e) Understands the use and purpose of various valves, cocks, mountings, fittings and other safety devices; (Q Can give a description of and explain the functions of feed pumps, feed injectors, feed regulators, feed water filters and softeners, feed heaters, air heaters, calorifiers, steamaccumulators, forced draught, induced draught and automatic draught control devices; (g) Can answer questions on fact relating to combustion, heat and steam and calculate consumption of coal and water and quantity of steam that may be generated from a given heatingsurface under the various system of draught, in any land boiler and also calculate the overall efficiency of boiler plant; (h) Can explain jet and surface condensation, reheating and theworking of steam expansion; (i) Can explain the general methods employed in laying foundation for boilers and chimneys and the

suitable area and height of chimneys to promote efficient combustion; G) Can explain the significance of principal appliances in use for the prevention of smoke and the principle on which they work and given description of the principal mechanical stokers, pulverisers, gas, oil and pulverized fuel systems in use; (k) Understands the need for periodical cleaning, the methods used for prevention of scale or other deposits on heating surface and the necessity for maintaining a certain PH value in feed water; (I) Can detect defects in boilers and state the means and methods of rectifying them; (m) Understands the precautions to be taken for starting a boiler and economizer from cold or from banked fire condition; (n) Understands the procedures to be adopted in putting an economizers out of commission while the boiler is on steam; (0) Can explain the methods adopted for the achievement of fuel economy and the use of various instruments used in a boiler House; (p) Materials used in Boiler components and piping and; (q) Can read and prepare a working sketch and drawing of boilers and boiler mounting or parts thereof.Annexure

SUPERHEATERS

REVERSE OSMOSIS

FEED WATER TREATMENT

IMPURITIES OF WATER The impurities present in water may be categorised into following categories: (A) Dissolved Impurities (a) Dissolved gases: O2 , CO2 , H2S etc. (b) Inorganic salts: (i) Cations: Ca++, Mg++, Na+ , K+ , Fe++, Al+++ etc. (ii)Anions: CO3 , Cl , SO4 , NO3 etc. (c) Organic salts.

12 Chemistry and Environmental Engineering (B) Suspended Impurities (a) Inorganic: Clay and sand. (b) Organic: Oil globules, vegetables, and animal material. (C) Colloidal Impurities Finally divided clay and silica Al(OH)3 , Fe(OH)3 , organic waste products, colouring matter, amino acids etc. (D) Microscopic Matters Bacteria, algae, fungi etc 1. Temporary Hardness (a) Temporary hardness is caused by the presence of dissolved bicarbonates of calcium, magnesium and other heavy metals and the carbonates of iron and other metals also. Thus, the main salts responsible for temporary hardness are Ca(HCO3) 2 and Mg(HCO3) 2 . (b) Temporary hardness can be largely removed by more boiling of water, when bicarbonates are decomposed, yielding in soluble carbonates or hydroxides, which are deposited as a crust at the bottom of vessel. Ca(HCO3) 2 CaCO3

Mg(HCO3) 2 Mg(OH)2

(c) Temporary hardness is also known as carbonate hardness or alkaline hardness. (d) Alkaline hardness is due to the presence of bicarbonates, carbonates and hydroxides of the hardness producing metal ions. This is determined by titration with HCl using methyl orange as indicator.

QUESTION AND ANSWERS

0000000b

BOILER MOUNTING AND ACCESSORIES

BOILER OPERATION, INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE

DRAUGHT

BURNER

DEAERATION

FUELS AND COMBUSTION


Viscosity The viscosity of a fluid is a measure of its internal resistance to flow. Viscosity depends on temperature and decreases as the temperature increases. Any numerical value for viscosity has no meaning unless the temperature is also specified. Viscosity is measured in Stokes / Centistokes. Sometimes viscosity is also quoted in Engler, Saybolt or Redwood. Each type of oil has its own temperature - viscosity relationship. The measurement of viscosity is made with an instrument called Viscometer. Viscosity is the most important characteristic in the storage and use of fuel oil. It influences the degree of pre-heat required for handling, storage and satisfactory atomization. If the oil is too viscous, it may become difficult to pump, hard to light the burner, and tough to operate. Poor atomization may result in the formation of carbon deposits on the burner tips or on the walls. Therefore pre-heating is necessary for proper atomization. Flash Point The flash point of a fuel is the lowest temperature at which the fuel can be heated so that the vapour gives off flashes momentarily when an open flame is passed over it. Flash point for furnace oil is 66C. Specific Heat Specific heat is the amount of kCals needed to raise the temperature of 1 kg of oil by 1C. The unit of specific heat is kCal/kgC. It varies from 0.22 to 0.28 depending on the oil specific gravity. The specific heat determines how much steam or electrical energy it takes to heat oil to a desired temperature. Light oils have a low specific heat, whereas heavier oils have a higher specific heat.

Pour Point The pour point of a fuel is the lowest temperature at which it will pour or flow when cooled under prescribed conditions. It is a very rough indication of the lowest temperature at which fuel oil is readily pumpable. Calorific Value The calorific value is the measurement of heat or energy produced, and is measured either as gross calorific value or net calorific value. The difference being the latent heat of condensation

of the water vapour produced during the combustion process. Gross calorific value (GCV) assumes all vapour produced during the combustion process is fully condensed. Net calorific value (NCV) assumes the water leaves with the combustion products without fully being condensed. Fuels should be compared based on the net calorific value. The calorific value of coal varies considerably depending on the ash, moisture content and the type of coal while calorific value of fuel oils are much more consistent. Coal Classification Coal is classified into three major types namely anthracite, bituminous, and lignite. However there is no clear demarcation between them and coal is also further classified as semianthracite, semi-bituminous, and sub-bituminous. Anthracite is the oldest coal from geological perspective. It is a hard coal composed mainly of carbon with little volatile content and practically no moisture. Lignite is the youngest coal from geological perspective. It is a soft coal composed mainly of volatile matter and moisture content with low fixed carbon. Fixed carbon refers to carbon in its free state, not combined with other elements. Volatile matter refers to those combustible constituents of coal that vaporize when coal is heated. The common coals used in Indian industry are bituminous and sub-bituminous coal. The gradation of Indian coal based on its calorific value is as follows:
Grade Calorific Value Range ( in kCal/Kg)

A Exceeding 6200 B 5600 6200 C 4940 5600 D 4200 4940 E 3360 4200 F 2400 3360 G 1300 2400 Normally D, E and F coal grades are available to Indian Industry. The chemical composition of coal has a strong influence on its combustibility. The properties of coal are broadly classified as 1. Physical properties 2. Chemical properties Proximate Analysis Proximate analysis indicates the percentage by weight of the Fixed Carbon, Volatiles, Ash, and Moisture Content in coal. The amounts of fixed carbon and volatile combustible matter directly
1. Fuels and Combustion Bureau of Energy Efficiency 7
TABLE 1.4 GCV FOR VARIOUS COALS

Parameter Lignite Indian Coal Indonesian Coal South African Coal (Dry Basis) GCV (kCal/kg) 4,500* 4,000 5,500 6,000
*GCV

of lignite on as received basis is 2500 3000 contribute to the heating value of coal. Fixed carbon acts as a main heat generator during burning. High volatile matter content indicates easy ignition of fuel. The ash content is important in the design of the furnace grate, combustion volume, pollution control equipment and ash handling systems of a furnace. Significance of Various Parameters in Proximate Analysis (a) Fixed carbon: Fixed carbon is the solid fuel left in the furnace after volatile matter is distilled off. It consists mostly of carbon but also contains some hydrogen, oxygen, sulphur and nitrogen not driven off with the gases. Fixed carbon gives a rough estimate of heating value of coal. (b) Volatile Matter: Volatile matters are the methane, hydrocarbons, hydrogen and carbon monoxide, and incombustible gases like carbon dioxide and nitrogen found in coal. Thus the volatile matter is an

index of the gaseous fuels present. Typical range of volatile matter is 20 to 35%. Volatile Matter Proportionately increases flame length, and helps in easier ignition of coal.

Sets minimum limit on the furnace height and volume. Influences secondary air requirement and distribution aspects. Influences secondary oil support
Ultimate Analysis: The ultimate analysis indicates the various elemental chemical constituents such as Carbon, Hydrogen, Oxygen, Sulphur, etc. It is useful in determining the quantity of air required for combustion and the volume and composition of the combustion gases. This information is required for the calculation of flame temperature and the flue duct design etc. Natural Gas Methane is the main constituent of Natural gas and accounting for about 95% of the total volume. Other components are: Ethane, Propane, Butane, Pentane, Nitrogen, Carbon Dioxide, and traces of other gases. Very small amounts of sulphur compounds are also present. Since methane is the largest component of natural gas, generally properties of methane are used when comparing the properties of natural gas to other fuels. Natural gas is a high calorific value fuel requiring no storage facilities. It mixes with air readily and does not produce smoke or soot. It has no sulphur content. It is lighter than air and disperses into air easily in case of leak.

Principle of Combustion Combustion refers to the rapid oxidation of fuel accompanied by the production of heat, or heat and light. Complete combustion of a fuel is possible only in the presence of an adequate supply of oxygen. Oxygen (O2) is one of the most common elements on earth making up 20.9% of our air. Rapid fuel oxidation results in large amounts of heat. Solid or liquid fuels must be changed to a gas before they will burn. Usually heat is required to change liquids or solids into gases. Fuel gases will burn in their normal state if enough air is present. Most of the 79% of air (that is not oxygen) is nitrogen, with traces of other elements. Nitrogen is considered to be a temperature reducing dilutant that must be present to obtain the oxygen required for combustion. Nitrogen reduces combustion efficiency by absorbing heat from the combustion of fuels and diluting the flue gases. This reduces the heat available for transfer through the heat exchange surfaces. It also increases the volume of combustion by-products, which then have to travel through the heat exchanger and up the stack faster to allow the introduction of additional fuel air mixture. This nitrogen also can combine with oxygen (particularly at high flame temperatures) to produce oxides of nitrogen (NOx), which are toxic pollutants. Carbon, hydrogen and sulphur in the fuel combine with oxygen in the air to form carbon dioxide, water vapour and sulphur dioxide, releasing 8084 kCals, 28922 kCals & 2224 kCals of heat respectively. Under certain conditions, Carbon may also combine with Oxygen to form Carbon Monoxide, which results in the release of a smaller quantity of heat (2430 kCals/kg of carbon) Carbon burned to CO2 will produce more heat per pound of fuel than when CO or smoke are produced.

3 Ts of Combustion The objective of good combustion is to release all of the heat in the fuel. This is accomplished by controlling the three Ts of combustion which are (1) Temperature high enough to ignite and maintain ignition of the fuel, (2) Turbulence or intimate mixing of the fuel and oxygen, and (3) Time sufficient for complete combustion. Too much, or too little fuel with the available combustion air may potentially result in unburned fuel and carbon monoxide generation. A very specific amount of O2 is needed for perfect combustion and some additional (excess) air is required for ensuring complete combustion. However, too much excess air will result in heat and efficiency losses.

For ideal combustion process for burning one kg of a typical fuel oil containing 86% Carbon, 12% Hydrogen, 2% Sulphur, theoretically required quantity of air is 14.1 kg.

Element

Molecular Weight kg / kg mole

C 12 O2 32 H2 2 S 32 N2 28 CO2 44 SO2 64 H2O 18 C + O2 _ CO2 H2 + 1/2O2 _ H2O S + O2 _ SO2 Constituents of fuel C + O2 _ CO2 12 + 32 _ 44 12 kg of carbon requires 32 kg of oxygen to form 44 kg of carbon dioxide therefore 1 kg of carbon requires 32/12 kg i.e 2.67 kg of oxygen 2H2 + O2 _ 2H2O

4 + 32 _ 36 4 kg of hydrogen requires 32 kg of oxygen to form 36 kg of water, therefore 1 kg of hydrogen requires 32/4 kg i.e 8 kg of oxygen (12) H2 + (12 8) O2 _ (12 x 9 ) H2O S + O2 _ SO2 32 + 32 _ 64 32 kg of sulphur requires 32 kg of oxygen to form 64 kg of sulphur dioxide, therefore 1 kg of sulphur requires 32/32 kg i.e 1 kg of oxygen Optimizing Excess Air and Combustion For complete combustion of every one kg of fuel oil 14.1 kg of air is needed. In practice, mixing is never perfect, a certain amount of excess air is needed to complete combustion and ensure that release of the entire heat contained in fuel oil. If too much air than what is required for completing combustion were allowed to enter, additional heat would be lost in heating the surplus air to the chimney temperature. This would result in increased stack losses. Less air would lead to the incomplete combustion and smoke. Hence, there is an optimum excess air level for each type of fuel

FBC Boiler When an evenly distributed air or gas is passed upward through a finely divided bed of solid particles such as sand supported on a fine mesh, the particles are undisturbed at low velocity. As air velocity is gradually increased, a stage is reached when the individual particles are suspended in the air stream. Further, increase in velocity gives rise to bubble formation, vigorous turbulence and rapid mixing and the bed is said to be fluidized. If the sand in a fluidized state is heated to the ignition temperature of the coal and the coal is injected continuously in to the bed, the coal will burn rapidly, and the bed attains a uniform temperature due to effective mixing. Proper air distribution is vital for maintaining uniform fluidisation across the bed.). Ash is disposed by dry

Fluidised bed combustion has significant advantages over conventional firing systems and offers multiple benefits namely fuel flexibility, reduced emission of noxious pollutants such as SOx and NOx, compact boiler design and higher combustion efficiency. Boiler Efficiency Thermal efficiency of boiler is defined as the percentage of heat input that is effectively utilised to generate steam. There are two methods of assessing boiler efficiency. 1) The Direct Method: Where the energy gain of the working fluid (water and steam) is compared with the energy content of the boiler fuel. 2) The Indirect Method: Where the efficiency is the difference between the losses and the energy input.

a. Direct Method This is also known as input-output method due to the fact that it needs only the useful output (steam) and the heat input (i.e. fuel) for evaluating the efficiency. This efficiency can be evaluated using the formula

Parameters to be monitored for the calculation of boiler efficiency by direct method are : Quantity of steam generated per hour (Q) in kg/hr.

Quantity of fuel used per hour (q) in kg/hr. The working pressure (in kg/cm2(g)) and superheat temperature (C), if any The temperature of feed water (C) Type of fuel and gross calorific value of the fuel (GCV) in kCal/kg of fu
Boiler efficiency = Q x (hg-hf)/qxGCV *100 Where, hg Enthalpy of saturated steam in kCal/kg of steam hf Enthalpy of feed water in kCal/kg of water Example Find out the efficiency of the boiler by direct method with the data given below: Type of boiler : Coal fired Quantity of steam (dry) generated : 8 TPH Steam pressure (gauge) / temp : 10 kg/cm2(g)/ 180C Quantity of coal consumed : 1.8 TPH Feed water temperature : 85C GCV of coal : 3200 kCal/kg Enthalpy of steam at 10 kg/cm2 pressure : 665 kCal/kg (saturated) Enthalpy of feed water : 85 kCal/kg It should be noted that boiler may not generate 100% saturated dry steam, and there may be some amount of wetness in the steam. Advantages of direct method: _ Plant people can evaluate quickly the efficiency of boilers _ Requires few parameters for computation _ Needs few instruments for monitoring Disadvantages of direct method: _ Does not give clues to the operator as to why efficiency of system is lower _ Does not calculate various losses accountable for various efficiency levels b. Indirect Method Indirect method is also called as heat loss method. The efficiency can be arrived at, by subtracting the heat loss fractions from 100. The standards do not include blow down loss in the efficiency determination process. The principle losses that occur in a boiler are: Loss of heat due to dry fluegas

Loss of heat due to moisture in fuel and combustion air Loss of heat due to combustion of hydrogen Loss of heat due to radiation Loss of heat due to unburnt
In the above, loss due to moisture in fuel and the loss due to combustion of hydrogen are dependent on the fuel, and cannot be controlled by design.

What are the causes of Bulging or Bagging or Blistering?

1) Oil (from lubricated pump rods etc) getting into the Boiler feed water and being carried to the lower part of the shell, which is exposed to fire and thus causing overheating. 2) Scale or Mud (from sediment in the water) deposits in the lower portion of the shell thus restricting heat transfer. 3) Excessively localized flame on a portion of the shell thus causing overheating.

What is difference between a bag and a Blister on the shell of a Boiler? A bag is a bulged out section of a portion of the shell, extending through the full thickness of the shell, caused by overheating and pressure. A bag can be driven(hammer) back if the remaining thickness is at least as strong as the longitudional joint and if the quality of the metal has not been effected. A blister is actually a separation of the metal from the shell plate, caused by impurities rolled into the shell plate when formed. But only the outside layer will blister from the heat because the remaining thickness is not affected. A blister cannot be driven back but must be cut out and edges are trimmed. If the remaining metal is sound, the pressure on the boiler must be reduced to correspond to the thickness of remaining sound metal. If pressure cannot be reduced, the entire blistered section, including sound metal must be cut out, a flush welded patch formed and butt-welded in, with localized stress relieving required required after welding. If the diameter of the blister is over 8 inch, the weld must be radiographed. After this is shown to be satisfactory, a hydrostatic test of 1.5 times the maximum allowable pressure is required to check the repair. All welding must be done by a certified weldor, and the repair must be approved by a commissioned Boiler Inspector.

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