Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 158

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers - E-series

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers - E-series 1194 North Mathilda Avenue Sunnyvale, CA 94089 USA 408-745-2000

1194 North Mathilda Avenue Sunnyvale, CA 94089

USA

408-745-2000

www.juniper.net

Student Guide

Juniper Networks, the Juniper Networks logo. NetScreen, and ScreenOS are registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. in the United States and other countries. JUNOS and JUNOSe are trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. All other trademarks, service marks, registered trademarks, or registered service marks are the property of their respective owners.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series Student Guide, Revision 7.c Copyright © 2007, Juniper Networks, Inc.

All rights reserved. Printed in USA.

Revision History:

Revision 4.c—April 2003 Revision 7.a—September 2005 Revision 7.b—January 2007 Revision 7.c—April 2007

The information in this document is current as of the date listed above.

The information in this document has been carefully verified and is believed to be accurate for software Release 7.3.0. Juniper Networks assumes no responsibilities for any inaccuracies that may appear in this document. In no event will Juniper Networks be liable for direct, indirect, special, exemplary, incidental or consequential damages resulting from any defect or omission in this document, even if advised of the possibility of such damages.

Juniper Networks reserves the right to change, modify, transfer or otherwise revise this publication without notice.

YEAR 2000 NOTICE

Juniper Networks hardware and software products do not suffer from Year 2000 problems and hence are Year 2000 compliant. The JUNOS software has no known time-related limitations through the year 2038. However, the NTP application is known to have some difficulty in the year 2036.

SOFTWARE LICENSE

The terms and conditions for using Juniper Networks software are described in the software license provided with the software, or to the extent applicable, in an agreement executed between you and Juniper Networks, or Juniper Networks agent. By using Juniper Networks software, you indicate that you understand and agree to be bound by its license terms and conditions. Generally speaking, the software license restricts the manner in which you are permitted to use the Juniper Networks software, may contain prohibitions against certain uses, and may state conditions under which the license is automatically terminated. You should consult the software license for further details.

Contents

Chapter 0:

Course Introduction

0-1

Chapter 1:

Overview of E-series Router Features and Applications

1-1

Juniper Networks Router Product Positioning

1-3

E-series Router B-RAS Applications

1-6

E-series Router Dedicated Access Applications

1-13

The

SDX-300 Policy and Network Management System

1-18

Chapter 2:

E-series Router Hardware Architecture Overview

2-1

E-series Product Family and Chassis Types

2-3

ERX-14xx/7xx/310 Architecture

2-8

E320 Architecture

2-20

Packet Flow

2-27

Redundancy

2-33

Hardware Installation Notes

2-44

Chapter 3:

Introduction to the Command-Line Interface and Configuration Basics

3-1

CLI

Modes and Shortcuts

3-3

Basic Configuration Using the CLI

3-16

Configuration Using Scripts and Macros

3-27

E-series Router Timing Configuration Options

3-32

E-series Router Boot Configuration and Reload Options

3-35

Chapter 4:

E-series Virtual Routers

4-1

E-series Virtual Router Concepts

4-3

Configuring and Managing E-series Virtual Routers

4-6

Lab

1: Introduction to the E-series Router CLI

4-12

Lab

2: E-series Router Configuration Basics

4-13

Course Overview

The Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series course provides an introduction to the E-series router platforms, including the E320 router. The course covers E-series router features, applications, and hardware architecture. It gives an overview of using the E-series command-line interface (CLI), including user modes, CLI shortcuts, the file system, and file manipulation. The course teaches students how to use the CLI to perform basic router administration tasks and how to perform a basic configuration of an E-series router. The course also introduces the concept of virtual routers and discusses the basics of virtual router configuration.

Objectives

After successfully completing this course, you should be able to:

Describe the E-series router features and applications in both a B-RAS and dedicated access environment;

Describe the E-series router hardware architecture;

Describe the configuration options available for E-series hardware platforms;

List the different CLI user modes;

Describe the file system used on E-series routers;

Use the CLI to manipulate files, to reload E-series router, and to perform basic troubleshooting;

Use the CLI to configure the E-series platforms for basic IP connectivity; and

Perform basic virtual router configuration and management tasks.

Intended Audience

This course is intended for network professionals, managers, and anyone needing an overview of the E-series router.

Course Level

This is an introductory-level course designed to be a stepping-stone to the more advanced courses available in the Juniper Networks training curriculum.

Prerequisites

Students attending this course should have a general knowledge of the Internet Protocol, including addressing. Students should also have a basic understanding of the OSI model, including the roles played by layers 1-4. Familiarity with common TCP and UDP protocols, such as Telnet and FTP, is helpful.

This course is a required prerequisite for the following:

E-series Routing Protocols (formerly E-series Circuit Aggregation Basics)

E-series Broadband Remote Access Server Configuration Basics

Course Agenda

Day 1

Chapter 1:

Course Introduction

Chapter 2:

Overview of E-series Router Features and Applications

Chapter 3:

E-series Router Hardware Architecture Overview

Chapter 4:

Introduction to the Command-Line Interface and Configuration Basics

Chapter 5:

E-series Virtual Routers

Additional Information

Education Services Offerings

You can obtain information on the latest Education Services offerings, course dates, and class locations from the World Wide Web by pointing your Web browser to: http://www.juniper.net/training/education/ .

About This Publication

The Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series Student Guide was developed and tested using software version 7.3.0. Previous and later versions of software may behave differently so you should always consult the documentation and release notes for the version of code you are running before reporting errors. This document is written and maintained by the Juniper Networks Education Services development team. Please send questions and suggestions for improvement to training@juniper.net.

Technical Publications

You can print technical manuals and release notes directly from the Internet in a variety of formats:

Locate the specific software or hardware release and title you need, and choose the format in which you want to view or print the document. Documentation sets and CDs are available through your local Juniper Networks sales office or account representative.

Juniper Networks Support

For technical support, contact Juniper Networks at http://www.juniper.net/customers/ support/, or at 1-888-314-JTAC (within the United States) or 408-745-2121 (from outside the United States).

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

ChapterChapter 0:0: CourseCourse IntroductionIntroduction Copyright © 2008 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and
ChapterChapter 0:0:
CourseCourse IntroductionIntroduction
Copyright © 2008 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
1

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

ModuleModule ObjectivesObjectives

After successfully completing this module, you will be able to:

Get to know one another

Identify the objectives, prerequisites, facilities, and materials used during this course

Identify additional Juniper Networks courses

Describe the Juniper Networks Technical Certification Program (JNTCP)

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 2
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
2

This Chapter Discusses:

•Objectives and course content information; •Additional Juniper Networks courses; and •Juniper Networks Technical Certification Program.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

IntroductionsIntroductions

What is your name?

Where do you work?

What is your primary role in your organization?

What kind of network experience do you have?

What is the most important thing for you to learn in this training session?

important thing for you to learn in this training session? Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 3
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
3

Introductions

This slide serves to break the ice by having you introduce yourself and state your reasons for attending the class.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

CourseCourse ContentsContents

Contents:

Chapter 0 : Introduction and Overview

Chapter 1 : E-series Router Features and Applications

Chapter 2 : Hardware Architecture Overview

Chapter 3 : Introduction to the Command-Line Interface and Configuration Basics

Chapter 4 : E-series Virtual Routers

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 4
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
4

Course Contents This slide lists the topics we discuss in this course.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

PrerequisitesPrerequisites

The prerequisites this course are :

A general knowledge of the Internet Protocol, including addressing

A familiarity with common TCP and UDP protocols, such as Telnet and FTP

A basic understanding of OSI model, including the particular role played by layers 1-4

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 5
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
5

Prerequisites This slide lists the prerequisites for this course.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

CourseCourse AdministrationAdministration

Sign-in sheet

Schedule

Class times

Breaks

Lunch

Break and restroom facilities

Communications

Telephones

Cellular phones and pagers

Internet access

– Cellular phones and pagers – Internet access Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 6
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
6

General Course Administration This slide documents general aspects of classroom administration.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

EducationEducation MaterialsMaterials

Available in class:

Lecture material

Lab guide

Lab equipment

Available outside of class:

guide – Lab equipment  Available outside of class: – Online documentation at www.juniper.net – Juniper

Online documentation at www.juniper.net

Juniper Networks Technical Assistance Center (JTAC)

Available through your account representative:

Documentation CD

Printed documentation

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 7
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
7

Training and Study Materials This slide describes several options for obtaining study and preparation materials.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

SatisfactionSatisfaction FeedbackFeedback

Satisfaction Satisfaction Feedback Feedback Class Feedback  Please be sure to tell us how we did!
Satisfaction Satisfaction Feedback Feedback Class Feedback  Please be sure to tell us how we did!
Class Feedback
Class Feedback

Please be sure to tell us how we did!

Look for an e-mail asking you to complete our on-line survey

Completed surveys:

Help us serve you better

Ensure that you receive a certificate of completion

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 8
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
8

Satisfaction Feedback

Juniper Networks uses an electronic survey system to collect and analyze your comments and feedback. Depending on the class you are taking, please complete the survey at the end of the class, or be sure to look for an e-mail about two weeks from class completion that directs you to complete an online survey form (be sure to provide us with your current e-mail address).

Submitting your feedback entitles you to a certificate of class completion. We thank you in advance for taking the time to help us improve our educational offerings.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

ServiceService ProviderProvider CurriculumCurriculum :: JUNOSJUNOS PlatformsPlatforms

Prerequisites: Familiarity with JUNOS software CLI, General knowledge of TCP/IP and routing

Prerequisites: General knowledge of TCP/IP, routing, and radio frequency (RF) concepts

Prerequisites : Detailed knowledge of M-series and T- series routers from CIJNR-M attendance or similar
Prerequisites : Detailed knowledge of M-series and T-
series routers from CIJNR-M attendance or similar
Advanced VPNs
Advanced Policy
Advanced Juniper Networks
Routers (AJNR)
Configuring Juniper
Networks Routers
(CIJNR-M)
Juniper Networks Security
Solutions (JNSS)
IPSec
Operation and
Troubleshooting of Juniper
Networks Routers
(OTJNR)
Class of service
IPv6
Intro to SDX for JUNOS
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 9
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
9

Service Provider Curriculum: JUNOS Platforms

This slide displays the primary Education Services offerings that support Juniper Networks M-series and T-series technologies in a service provider environment.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

ServiceService ProviderProvider Curriculum:Curriculum: JUNOSeJUNOSe PlatformsPlatforms

Prerequisites: Detailed knowledge of E- series products from attendance of IJNR-E class or similar

Broadband Remote Access Server Configuration Basics Introduction to SDX -300 for JUNOSe Introduction to Juniper
Broadband Remote Access
Server Configuration Basics
Introduction to SDX -300 for
JUNOSe
Introduction to
Juniper Networks
Routers―E-series
(IJNR-E)
Prerequisites: General
knowledge of TCP/IP and
routing
E -Series Routing Protocols
E -series MPLS
Configuration Basics
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
10

Service Provider Curriculum: JUNOSe Platforms

This slide displays the primary Education Services offerings that support Juniper Networks E- series router technologies.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

EnterpriseEnterprise RoutingRouting CurriculumCurriculum

Prerequisites: General knowledge of TCP/IP and routing

Prerequisites: Detailed knowledge of J- series and M-series routers from OJRE attendance or similar

 

Operating Juniper Networks Routers in the Enterprise (OJRE)

 

Advance Juniper Networks Routing in the Enterprise (AJRE)

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 11
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
11

Enterprise Routing Curriculum

This slide displays the primary Education Services offering that support Juniper Networks M- series and J-series technologies in an enterprise environment.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

SecuritySecurity CurriculumCurriculum

Prerequisites: Basic experience with Ethernet, transparent bridging, TCP/IP operations, IP addressing, and routing

Prerequisites: Basic experience with Ethernet, transparent bridging, TCP/IP operations, IP addressing, and routing

Prerequisites: Moderate background in Internetworking basic, security concepts, network administration, and application support

Prerequisites: CJFV

Configuring Juniper Networks Firewall/ IPSec VPN Products Integrating Juniper Networks Firewall IPSec VPNs into High-
Configuring Juniper
Networks Firewall/
IPSec VPN Products
Integrating Juniper Networks
Firewall IPSec VPNs into High-
Perfomance Networks
Advanced Juniper Networks VPN
Implementations
Attack Prevention with Juniper
Networks Firewalls
Configuring Unified Access
Control
Security Manager
Fundamentals
Implementing Intrusion Detection
and Prevention
Configuring NetScreen
Secure Access
Advanced NetScreen Secure
Access
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 12
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
12

Security Curriculum

This slide displays the primary Education Services offerings that support Juniper Networks security technologies.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

WXWX CurriculumCurriculum

Prerequisites: General knowledge of TCP/IP and routing, switches and VLANS

Prerequisites: Completion of the WAN Acceleration Framework (WX) course or equivalent knowledge.

Introduction to WAN Acceleration (WX) Framework (IWX) The WAN Acceleration Central Management System (CMS)
Introduction to WAN
Acceleration (WX)
Framework
(IWX)
The WAN Acceleration
Central Management
System (CMS)
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 13
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
13

WX Curriculum

This slide displays the primary Education Services offerings that support Juniper Networks WX Framework technologies.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

DXDX CurriculumCurriculum

Implementing the

DX Application

Acceleration Platform

(IDX)

Prerequisites: General knowledge of TCP/IP HTTP and SSL.

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 14
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
14

DX Curriculum

This slide displays the primary Education Services offerings that support Juniper Networks DX Application Acceleration Platform technologies.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

TechnicalTechnical CertificationCertification ProgramsPrograms

Technical Certification Certification Programs Programs  Routing technical certification tracks include –
Technical Certification Certification Programs Programs  Routing technical certification tracks include –

Routing technical certification tracks include

Service provider track : JUNOSe Platforms

Service provider track : JUNOS Platforms

Enterprise routing track

Routing tracks consist of written and lab-based examination

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 15
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
15

Technical Certification Programs: Routing Tracks This slide outlines the current levels of technical certification offered by Juniper Networks.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

SecuritySecurity trackstracks

Security Security tracks tracks  Security technical certification programs include ; – Firewall/VPN tracks –
Security Security tracks tracks  Security technical certification programs include ; – Firewall/VPN tracks –

Security technical certification programs include ;

Firewall/VPN tracks

SSL/IDP tracks

Security certification programs are written examination only at this time

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 16
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
16

Technical Certification Programs: Security Tracks This slide outlines the current levels of technical certification offered by Juniper Networks.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

JuniperJuniper NetworksNetworks CertifiedCertified InternetInternet AssociateAssociate

JNCIA

Computer-based, written exam

Delivered at Prometric testing centers worldwide

60 questions, 60 minutes

Passing Score: 70%

$125 USD

Prerequisite certification: none

Benefits provided to JNCIAs:

• Certificate

• Logo usage

• Industry recognition

• Certificate • Logo usage • Industry recognition – Validates candidate’s general knowledge of IP

Validates candidate’s general knowledge of IP technologies, platform operating system, and hardware

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 17
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
17

The JNCIA Certification This slide details the JNCIA certification level.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

JuniperJuniper NetworksNetworks CertifiedCertified InternetInternet SpecialistSpecialist

JNCIS

Computer-based, written exam

Delivered at Prometric testing centers worldwide

Prerequisite for the JNCIP lab exam

75 questions, 90 minutes

Passing Score: 70%

$125 USD

Prerequisite certification: none

Benefits provided to JNCISs:

certification: none – Benefits provided to JNCISs: • Certificate • Logo usage • Provides ability to

• Certificate

• Logo usage

• Provides ability to take JNCIP exam

• Industry recognition as an IP and routing platform specialist

Validates candidate’s advanced knowledge of platform operating system, hardware, and IP technologies

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 18
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
18

The JNCIS Certification This slide details the JNCIS certification level.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

JuniperJuniper NetworksNetworks CertifiedCertified InternetInternet ProfessionalProfessional

JNCIP

Internet Internet Professional Professional  JNCIP – One-day, lab-based exam – Tests candidate’s

One-day, lab-based exam

Tests candidate’s configuration and design skills for essential technologies

Testing centers: Sunnyvale, Amsterdam, Herndon, Westford, Remote

Prerequisite for the JNCIE lab exam

$1,250 USD

Prerequisite certification: JNCIS

Benefits provided to JNCIPs:

• Certificate

• Logo usage

• Provides ability to take JNCIE exam

• Industry recognition as an IP and routing platform professional

Validates candidate’s practical platform configuration skills

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 19
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
19

The JNCIP Certification This slide details the JNCIP certification level.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

JuniperJuniper NetworksNetworks CertifiedCertified InternetInternet ExpertExpert

Certified Certified Internet Internet Expert Expert  JNCIE – One-day, lab-based exam – Tests

JNCIE

One-day, lab-based exam

Tests candidate’s advanced configuration & design skills for essential and specialized technologies

Testing centers: Sunnyvale, Amsterdam, Herndon, Remote

$1,250 USD

Prerequisite certification: JNCIP

Currently only available in the M-series routers track

Benefits provided to JNCIEs:

• Crystal plaque and certificate

• Logo usage

• Worldwide recognition as an Internet Expert

The most challenging and respected exam of its type in the industry

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 20
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
20

The JNCIE Certification This slide details the JNCIE certification level.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

CertificationCertification PreparationPreparation

Training and study resources

JNTCP Website

• www.juniper.net/certification

Education Services training classes

• http://www.juniper.net/training

Juniper Networks documents and white papers

• http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/

• http://www.juniper.net/techcenter/

Sybex JNTCP preparation guides

• JNCIA and JNCIP available February, 2003

guides • JNCIA and JNCIP available February, 2003 – Juniper Networks Routers: The Complete Reference •
guides • JNCIA and JNCIP available February, 2003 – Juniper Networks Routers: The Complete Reference •
guides • JNCIA and JNCIP available February, 2003 – Juniper Networks Routers: The Complete Reference •
guides • JNCIA and JNCIP available February, 2003 – Juniper Networks Routers: The Complete Reference •

Juniper Networks Routers: The Complete Reference

• Available at bookstores now

• Covers M-series and T-series platforms

Practical exams: Lots of hands-on practice

On-the-job experience

Education Services training classes

Equipment access

Education Services training classes – Equipment access Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 21
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
21

Prepping and Studying

This

certification.

slide

lists

some options for

those interested in

prepping f or Juniper

Networks

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

QuestionsQuestions

Questions Questions Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 22
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 22
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
22

Any Questions?

If you have any questions or concerns about the class you are attending, we suggest that you voice them now so that your instructor can best address your needs during class.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

CopyrightCopyright ©© 20062006 JuniperJuniper Networks,Networks, Inc.Inc. ProprietaryProprietary andand
CopyrightCopyright ©© 20062006 JuniperJuniper Networks,Networks, Inc.Inc.
ProprietaryProprietary andand ConfidentialConfidential
www.juniper.netwww.juniper.net
23 23

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

ChapterChapter 1:1: OverviewOverview ofof EE--SeriesSeries RouterRouter FeaturesFeatures andand ApplicationsApplications
ChapterChapter 1:1:
OverviewOverview ofof EE--SeriesSeries RouterRouter
FeaturesFeatures andand ApplicationsApplications
Copyright © 2008 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
1

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

ModuleModule ObjectivesObjectives

After successfully completing this module, you will be able to:

Describe how edge and core router requirements are different

Describe how the E-series routers operate in a B-RAS environment

Describe how the E-series routers operate in a dedicated access environment

Describe the SDX-300 provisioning tool and list its main applications

Explain the purpose and function of the NMC-RX configuration tool

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 2
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
2

This Chapter Discusses:

• The different requirements of edge and core routers;

• The

E-series

router

Broadband

Remote

Access

applications;

Server

(B-RAS)

• The E-series router dedicated access applications; and

• The SDX-300 policy and network resource management system.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-2

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

AgendaAgenda EE--seriesseries RouterRouter FeaturesFeatures && ApplicationsApplications

Juniper Networks Product Positioning

The Edge vs. the Core

E-series Router B-RAS Applications E-series Router Dedicated Access Applications

The SDX-300 Provisioning Tool

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 3
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
3

Juniper Networks Router Product Positioning

This chapter gives an overview of the E-series router's features and applications. The following slides describe how Juniper Networks positions its E-series, J-series, M- series, and T-series routing products, and also discuss key differences between edge and core router applications.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-3

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

JuniperJuniper NetworksNetworks ProductProduct PositioningPositioning

Edge (E-series) Core (M-series, T-series)
Edge
(E-series)
Core (M-series,
T-series)
Positioning Edge (E-series) Core (M-series, T-series) Service Provider Network Consumer Edge Network

Service Provider Network

Core (M-series, T-series) Service Provider Network Consumer Edge Network ResidentialResidential PSTN/PSTN/
Core (M-series, T-series) Service Provider Network Consumer Edge Network ResidentialResidential PSTN/PSTN/

Consumer Edge Network

ResidentialResidential PSTN/PSTN/ MobileMobile
ResidentialResidential
PSTN/PSTN/
MobileMobile
Network ResidentialResidential PSTN/PSTN/ MobileMobile Education Business Edge Network (E-series, M-series)

Education

Business Edge

Network

(E-series, M-series)
(E-series,
M-series)

Large Enterprise

Edge Network (E-series, M-series) Large Enterprise S O H O Small/Medium Enterprise Copyright © 2006 Juniper

SOHO

Small/Medium Enterprise

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 4
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
4

Juniper Networks Router Product Positioning

Today's service provider networks are typically made up of two major components:

the network edge and the network core. These two components operate differently and have different network device requirements and application focuses. The network edge normally has routers that support large numbers of low- to medium-speed subscriber interfaces. These subscribers can range from residential subscribers with Broadband Remote Access Server (B-RAS) connections to enterprise customers with dedicated lines. Edge devices terminate customer-facing interfaces and must be able to classify and differentiate between traffic flows to provide dynamic IP services. Edge devices might provide security, virtual private network (VPN) features, and quality of service (QoS). In most cases, the E-series family of edge routers serves network edge applications, although J-series routers and smaller M-series routers are also deployed to address business edge applications.

In contrast, the network core often has a smaller number of routers that support fewer, high-speed interfaces. These high-speed interfaces act to aggregate the data from large numbers of edge routers and enable efficient long-haul transport. Core routers might also provide QoS, security, and VPN-related features.

The

core

applications.

M-series

and

T-series

routing

platforms

normally

serve

network

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-4

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

EE--seriesseries RouterRouter MarketMarket SegmentationSegmentation

IP edge

Edge Business Edge
Edge
Business
Edge

Where service providers meet their customers

Service provider defines and delivers services

End users subscribe to services

Two major applications

B-RAS

• Consumer edge

• Subscriber management

Dedicated access

• Business edge

• Circuit or private-line aggregation

Consumer

Edge

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 5
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
5

IP Edge

The edge of the network is the entry point for the subscriber or end user. Service providers define and deliver services at the edge of their network and end users subscribe to these services. The E-series router can deliver exceptional performance and scalability in the demanding role of an edge router.

Two Major Applications The E-series router is most often deployed in one of two environments: B-RAS and dedicated access. B-RAS offers service providers the ability to deploy high-speed services to residential and business customers using a variety of last-mile technologies. The E-series router currently supports all broadband deployments, including digital subscriber line access multiplexer (DSLAM) environments, cable modem head ends, wireless networks, and Ethernet.

The E-series family of products allows service providers to aggregate thousands of dedicated business connections on a single router, while also providing highly customized IP services to each of these businesses. Service providers can use a single E-series system to offer customers various access line speeds, from fractional T1, T3, and E3 through 0C3c/STM 1. In turn, the provider can route this traffic into the core across high-speed connections, such as 0C12c/STM4, 0C48c/STM16, Gigabit Ethernet, and 10 Gigabit Ethernet. Circuit aggregation is a phrase sometimes used to describe the aggregation of traffic from many connections onto a few high- speed interfaces.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-5

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

AgendaAgenda EE--seriesseries RouterRouter FeaturesFeatures && ApplicationsApplications

Juniper Networks Product Positioning

–The Edge vs. the Core

E-series Router B-RAS Applications E-series Router Dedicated Access Applications

The SDX-300 Provisioning Tool

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 6
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
6

E-series Router B-RAS Applications

The following slides discuss the E-series router's support for Broadband Remote Access Server (B-RAS) applications

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-6

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

BB--RASRAS OverviewOverview

What is a B-RAS?

Intelligent Layer 3 device aggregating traffic from Layer 2 devices

Provides PPP session termination and authentication

Facilitates IP address assignment

– Offers IP QoS per traffic flow Internet Access PPPoE PPPoA Edge DSLAM BGP-4 OC3/STM1
– Offers IP QoS per traffic flow
Internet
Access
PPPoE
PPPoA
Edge
DSLAM
BGP-4
OC3/STM1
OSPF
OC12/STM4
Bridged IP
IS-IS
DSLAM
ATM
IP over ATM
MPLS
Ethernet
Multicast
Ethernet
Switch
PPPoE
VPN
Metro Ethernet
DHCP
RADIUS Policies
Consumer Edge
B-RAS Subscribers
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 7
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
7

What Is a B-RAS?

Traditional Remote Access Servers provide connections for dial-up customers of service providers that use analog modems for IP network access. Dial-up services are sometimes called narrowband services because customer access line speeds usually fall in a range of 28 Kbps to 56 Kbps. A B-RAS supplies connection termination services for customers using high-speed access devices, such as an xDSL modem, xDSL router, Ethernet, or 802.11x interface. Speeds delivered by these services can range from 128 Kbps to 30 Mbps, or even faster, so these services are typically called broadband services.

A B-RAS is the intelligent layer 3 device that aggregates traffic from layer 2 devices, such as DSLAMs, Ethernet switches, and cable modem termination systems (CMTS). A B-RAS can provide Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) session termination and authentication in conjunction with RADIUS servers. The B-RAS also works closely with Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) servers or uses local IP address pools to provide IP addresses to subscribers. Operating as a B-RAS, the E-series router offers superior scalability and performance. The E-series router can also offer sophisticated IP QoS services per customer traffic flow.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-7

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

BB--RASRAS ApplicationsApplications

E-series router B-RAS applications

Traditional Internet access

Wholesaling using virtual routers

VPN services

– Video services using multicasting Internet Access PPPoE PPPoA Edge DSLAM BGP-4 OC3/STM1 OSPF OC12/STM4
– Video services using multicasting
Internet
Access
PPPoE
PPPoA
Edge
DSLAM
BGP-4
OC3/STM1
OSPF
OC12/STM4
ISP1
Bridged IP
IS- IS
DSLAM
ATM
IP over ATM
MPLS
Ethernet
Multicast
Ethernet
Switch
PPPoE
VPN
Metro Ethernet
DHCP
RADIUS Policies
Consumer Edge
B-RAS Subscribers
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 8
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
8

E-series Router B-RAS Applications

A service provider can use the B-RAS services provided by an E-series router to

support several kinds of products.

In

the traditional application, the service provider provides.traditional Internet access

to

its customers. In this application, it uses the E-series router to terminate residential

customer connections and provide them with connectivity to the Internet. Using virtual routers, the service provider can also wholesale part of its E-series router and network infrastructure to other service providers or retailers. The E-series system can support multiple virtual routers with separate, secure routing tables. Using virtual routers, the service provider can keep wholesale customers completely isolated from each other, as well as from the service provider's own retail customers.

A service provider can also use the E-series router to offer sophisticated virtual

private network (VPN) services.

Finally, a service provider can use the E-series router's multicasting capabilities to offer video services to its residential customers. IP multicasting improves network efficiency for the service provider by allowing a host to transmit a single datagram that is received by multiple end-user devices that are part of a targeted set.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-8

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

BB--RASRAS ConnectivityConnectivity

Subscriber interfaces

xDSL, cable modem, 802.11x, Ethernet with VLAN tags

IP over bridged Ethernet, IP over ATM, PPPoE, PPPoA

B-RAS interfaces

Dynamic interface and address assignment allowing over-subscription

– ATM, Ethernet Access Internet Edge PPPoE PPPoA DSLAM BGP-4 OC3/STM1 OC3/STM1 OSPF OC12/STM4 OC12/STM4
– ATM, Ethernet
Access
Internet
Edge
PPPoE
PPPoA
DSLAM
BGP-4
OC3/STM1
OC3/STM1
OSPF
OC12/STM4
OC12/STM4
Bridged IP
IS-IS
SONET/ATM
DSLAM
ATM
IP over ATM
MPLS
10 Gigabit
Ethernet
Multicast
Ethernet
Ethernet
PPPoE
Switch
VPN
Metro Ethernet
DHCP
RADIUS Policies
Consumer Edge B-RAS Subscribers
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
9

Subscriber Interfaces

B-RAS subscriber access methods include the family of xDSL technologies, cable modems, 802.11x wireless networks, and Ethernet using either copper- or fiber- based physical media. These customer lines are aggregated in a DSLAM, CMTS, or Ethernet switch.

To obtain service over these links, customers typically use either PPP over Ethernet (PPPoE) or PPP over Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) (PPPoA). These access methods maintain the current dial-up model, complete with centralized user authentication, authorization, and accounting (MA) using RADIUS. Customers can also use IP over bridged Ethernet or IP over ATM (IPoA) to gain access to the network. These last two approaches provide connections that are always on and require no authentication or authorization.

B-RAS Interfaces The B-RAS can aggregate customer traffic from multiple devices, such as ATM or Ethernet switches. DSLAMs typically connect to the E-series router through ATM or Ethernet connections, while CMTSs typically connect through Ethernet connections.

Continued on next page.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-9

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

B-RAS Interfaces (contd.)

With ATM-based access, the provider normally provisions an ATM permanent virtual circuit (PVC) to each xDSL device. This PVC allows each household member to establish a unique PPP session to the E-series router. The IP interfaces associated with this PPP session can be created dynamically. Dynamic IP interfaces can also be created for other B-RAS access methods. With Ethernet-based access, the provider typically implements stacked virtual local area networks (S-VLANs). In this environment, one VLAN is provisioned for each Ethernet-based DSLAM. Within this VLAN, additional VLAN are provisioned, one for each xDSL device. In contrast, dedicated access applications typically require static configuration of the customer's interface and IP addressing parameters.

The dynamic nature of a B-RAS also allows the E-series system to be oversubscribed, based on the assumption that not all end users are active at the same time. On the other hand, dedicated access applications typically allow for much less oversubscription, if any.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-10

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

BB--RASRAS--RelatedRelated ServicesServices andand ProtocolsProtocols

Required services

DHCP

RADIUS AAA

Associated protocols

PPP

DHCP

– L2TP Access Internet – IGMP Edge PPPoE DSLAM PPPoA BGP-4 OC3/STM1 OC3/STM1 OSPF OC12/STM4
– L2TP
Access
Internet
– IGMP
Edge
PPPoE
DSLAM
PPPoA
BGP-4
OC3/STM1
OC3/STM1
OSPF
OC12/STM4
OC12/STM4
IS-IS
SONET/ATM
Bridged IP
IP over ATM
DSLAM
ATM
MPLS
10 Gigabit
Ethernet
Multicast
Ethernet
Ethernet
PPPoE
Switch
Metro Ethernet
VPN
DHCP
RADIUS Policies
Consumer Edge B-RAS Subscribers
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
11

Main B-RAS Services

As a B-RAS, the E-series system must support specific services and protocols commonly deployed in B-RAS environments. In a consumer edge environment, workstations might use DHCP to obtain an IP address. Depending on the network application, you can configure the E-series system to support workstations getting IP addresses dynamically by acting as a DHCP relay agent, acting as a DHCP local server, or working together with external DHCP servers.

In dial-up environments using PPP, RADIUS AAA servers traditionally provided user password authentication, user authorization, and user accounting services to support billing for dial-up customers. The E-series system can work with RADIUS servers to maintain this traditional authentication and billing model for broadband technologies. Common B-RAS Protocols

When terminating PPPoA and PPPoE sessions, PPP and RADIUS provide the utilities required to authenticate customers and perform accounting services. The E- series system can also enable VPN support by tunnelling PPP sessions using the Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP). Any E-series B-RAS can act as an L2TP access concentrator (LAC). With the addition of a service module or a line module that supports the use of shared tunnel-server ports, the E-series system can also act as a L2TP network server (LNS).

Continued on next page.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-11

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

Common B-RAS Protocols (contd.)

The E-series system provides a comprehensive suite of IP multicast tools, including the Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP), the Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP), and Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) sparse and dense mode. These can be used to support content delivery services in a B-RAS environment.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-12

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

AgendaAgenda EE--seriesseries RouterRouter FeaturesFeatures && ApplicationsApplications

Juniper Networks Product Positioning

– The Edge vs. the Core

E-series Router B-RAS Applications E-series Router Dedicated Access Applications

The SDX-300 Provisioning Tool

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 13
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
13

E-series Router Dedicated Access Applications

The following slides discuss E-series edge router support for dedicated access applications.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-13

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

DedicatedDedicated AccessAccess OverviewOverview

What is dedicated access?

Private, static customer connection into the Internet or a VPN Connections between providers within the Internet Makes use of traditional Layer 2 protocols

• Frame Relay, PPP, or Ethernet

Wide range of physical connectivity

• T3/E3, CT3, COCx/STMx, GE, 10 GE, OCx/STMx Internet Access FT1/E1 ADM Edge BGP4 OC3/STM1
• T3/E3, CT3, COCx/STMx, GE, 10 GE, OCx/STMx
Internet
Access
FT1/E1
ADM
Edge
BGP4
OC3/STM1
T1/E1
CT3
OSPF
OC12/STM4
ADM
ADM
COC3/STM1
IS-IS
POS/ATM
COC12/STM4
L2TP
10 Gigabit
MPLS VPNs
Ethernet
Tier 2
Tier 2
Gigabit Ethernet
10 Gigabit Ethernet
VPN
ISP Network
ISP Network
Dedicated Access Enterprise Customers
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
14

What Is Dedicated Access?

Dedicated access defines the use of private (sometimes called leased) facilities to provide an individual business or enterprise site with a connection into the Internet or

a VPN. Internet service providers (ISPs) connect to other ISPs using dedicated

access connections. Typically, the IP addresses used on these connections are static

in nature, unlike broadband remote access server (B-RAS) access lines. Dedicated

access lines typically employ traditional Layer 2 protocols, such as the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP), Ethernet, ATM, and VLANs. In this application, the E-series router aggregates many private lines onto a single, high-speed uplink, which feeds into an IP backbone. These Layer 2 protocols can use a wide range of physical connectivity including T3/E3, channelized T3, channelized 0C3/STM1 and 0C12/STM4, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, 10-Gigabit Ethernet, 0C3/STM1, 0C12/STM4, and 0C48/STM16. This chapter discusses the configuration and troubleshooting of PPP, Ethernet, ATM, and VLAN interfaces.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-14

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

DedicatedDedicated AccessAccess ApplicationsApplications

Traditional private-line aggregation

Consolidating multiple low- and high-speed access lines into a single aggregation point

Virtual private networks

Layer 2 virtual circuits—Frame Relay or ATM

Virtual routers

BGP MPLS VPNs (RFC 2547)

IPSec

Traffic engineering using MPLS IP QoS

Multi-field classification

Rate limits

Policy routing

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 15
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
15

Private-Line Aggregation

The most common deployment model of routers supporting dedicated access services is the consolidation of numerous low-speed interfaces onto a few high- speed links to the network's core routers. The result is that a few high-speed links to the core can support the traffic received from, and destined to, many individual low- speed subscriber lines.

Virtual Private Networks

Service providers can also use dedicated access to support the establishment of VPN services. A VPN service provides a private network, so it enables the use of

private and/or overlapping address space and provides enhanced security through encryption, traffic segregation, or both. The E-series router can provide layer 2 and layer 3 VPN services using virtual routers, the Border Gateway Protocol

(BGP)/Multiprotocol

(IPSec).

and/or IP Security

Label

Switching

(MPLS), VPNs,

L2TP,

Continued on next page.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-15

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

Traffic Engineering

The E-series router can provide traffic engineering through MPLS-based virtual circuits, referred to as label-switched paths (LSPs). The E-series router uses LSPs to facilitate the efficient use of network capacity. By directing certain types of traffic over predefined paths, the service provider can override the forwarding decisions that would be made by the interior gateway protocol (IGP) to prevent congestion and to back up QoS guarantees. IP QoS

The E-series router allows a service provider to provide IP QoS to a dedicated access customer requiring specialized traffic handling as part of a particular service- level agreement (SLA). QoS classification can be based on various packet fields, and the router can provide traffic prioritization, rate limiting, and policy-based routing as needed.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-16

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

DedicatedDedicated Access:Access: RoutingRouting ProtocolsProtocols

E-series router supports carrier-grade routing protocols

BGP

OSPF

IS-IS

RIP

Dedicated Access Enterprise Customers Access Internet FT1/E1 ADM Edge BGP-4 OC3/STM1 OSPF OC12/STM4 T1/E1 CT3
Dedicated Access Enterprise Customers
Access
Internet
FT1/E1
ADM
Edge
BGP-4
OC3/STM1
OSPF
OC12/STM4
T1/E1
CT3
ADM
IS-IS
ADM
CHOC3/STM1
SONET/ATM
L2TP
CHOC12/STM4
10 Gigabit
Ethernet
MPLS VPNs
Tier 2
Tier 2
Gigabit Ethernet
10 Gigabit Ethernet
VPN
ISP Network
ISP Network
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
17

Routing Protocols

The E-series system is a carrier-class router that fully supports both the interior and exterior standards-based IP routing protocols used by service providers. The E-series system supports the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) as an exterior gateway protocol (EGP). The system also supports all of the standards-based IGPs. Service providers typically use the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) and Intermediate System-to- Intermediate System (IS-IS) routing protocols to provide routing within their network. The E-series router also supports the Routing Information Protocol (RIP), which is sometimes used to receive dynamic routing information from customers on customer- facing interfaces.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-17

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

AgendaAgenda EE--seriesseries RouterRouter FeaturesFeatures && ApplicationsApplications

Juniper Networks Product Positioning

– The Edge vs. the Core

E-series Router B-RAS Applications E-series Router Dedicated Access Applications

The SDX-300 Provisioning Tool

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 18
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
18

The SDX-300 Policy and Network Management System

The following slides discuss the functionality of the SDX-300 policy and network resource management system.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-18

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

SDXSDX--300300 OverviewOverview

What is it?

Web-based portal for on-demand subscriber service selection and service activation

Residential and enterprise environments

activation – Residential and enterprise environments Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 19
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
19

What Is the SDX-300?

The Service Deployment System (SDX-300) is a Web-based portal that supports on- demand subscriber service selection and service activation. A sample deployment might be to support residential B-RAS customers who want to dynamically manage and control their own Internet connections. Through the portal, residential subscribers can upgrade or downgrade the speed of their Internet connections. The residential subscriber can activate a content service, such as on-line gaming or videos on demand, and only be charged for the content service while it is active.

An enterprise deployment might allow an IT manager to control the access lines within an enterprise network. With the SDX-300, the IT manager can give certain types of traffic preference over others. Using the SDX-300, the IT manager can assign voice-over-IP (VolP) traffic to a higher queue and normal Web traffic to a lower queue on the E-series router. The IT manager might also want to dynamically increase the bandwidth on a specific access line during end-of-month processing.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-19

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

TheThe SDXSDX--300300 ToolTool KitKit

Service Activation Service Accounting RADIUS Subscriber Subscriber Profile Profile Service Profile Service Profile
Service Activation
Service Accounting
RADIUS
Subscriber
Subscriber
Profile
Profile
Service Profile
Service Profile
Application Profile
Application Profile
Service
Service
Customized
Customized
Network Profile
Network Profile
DNS/DHCP, Radius
DNS/DHCP, Radius
Engine
Engine
Server Integration
Server Integration
LDAP
Subscribers &
Subscribers &
Services Directory
Services Directory
COPS
Policies via
COPS
ISP1
Residential
Subscribers
E-series
ISP2
Content
Provider
Enterprise
Subscribers
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
20

The SDX-300 Tool Kit

You can think of the SDX-300 as a software toolkit. A few of the tools in the kit include a demonstration portal that service providers can use as a starting point for customized portal development, a Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP)- based directory for storing subscriber and service information, a Service engine for activating services on subscriber interfaces, and a RADIUS server for service accounting. Service providers can use these tools to quickly define and deploy new revenue-generating services and enhance their subscribers' network experience, while retaining full control of their underlying network.

The SDX-300 enables service providers to take full advantage of Juniper Networks E-series routers' ability to assign policies to individual IP interfaces and provide a variety of sophisticated IP services. When a subscriber selects a particular service using the SDX-300's service selection portal, the SDX-300's service engine retrieves the appropriate service policies and subscriber profiles from an LDAP-based directory. Using the Common Open Policy Service (COPS) protocol, the service activation engine dynamically configures policies on the subscriber's IP interface. Using these dynamic policy rules, the E-series router manages the subscriber's service and generates RADIUS service accounting records. These service accounting records are stored in a RADIUS database, where they can later be accessed by billing applications.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-20

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

ReviewReview QuestionsQuestions

1.What are two ways in which core and edge routers differ?

2.What are two similarities and two differences between B- RAS and dedicated access services?

3.In what two ways can the SDX-300 provisioning system be deployed?

4.What is the purpose of the NMC-RX application?

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 21
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
21

This Chapter Discussed:

• The differing requirements of edge and core routers;

• The E-series router B-RAS applications;

• The E-series router dedicated access applications; and

• The SDX-300 policy and network resource management system.

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-21

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

CopyrightCopyright ©© 20062006 JuniperJuniper Networks,Networks, Inc.Inc. ProprietaryProprietary andand
CopyrightCopyright ©© 20062006 JuniperJuniper Networks,Networks, Inc.Inc.
ProprietaryProprietary andand ConfidentialConfidential
www.juniper.netwww.juniper.net
22 22

Module 1: Overview E-series Router Features and Applications

1-22

ChapterChapter 2:2: EE--seriesseries RouterRouter HardwareHardware ArchitectureArchitecture OverviewOverview Copyright
ChapterChapter 2:2:
EE--seriesseries RouterRouter
HardwareHardware ArchitectureArchitecture
OverviewOverview
Copyright © 2008 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
1

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

ModuleModule ObjectivesObjectives

After successfully completing this module, you will be able to:

Identify the Juniper Networks, Inc. E-series routers

Describe the E-series system’s carrier reliability features

List and describe basic E-series router system architecture and hardware components

Understand factors affecting wire-speed performance and how to control oversubscription

Understand the basic packet flow through an E-series router

Describe SRP redundancy options

Describe line module redundancy configuration and operation

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 2
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks,
Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
2

This Chapter Discusses:

• Juniper Networks, Inc. E-series routers;

• The E-series system's carrier reliability features;

• The E-series system architecture and hardware components;

• Factors affecting wire-speed performance and how to control oversubscription;

• The packet flow through an E-series router;

• Switch route processor (SRP) redundancy; and

• Line module redundancy configuration and operation.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

Agenda:Agenda: EE--seriesseries RouterRouter HardwareHardware ArchitectureArchitecture

E-series Product Family and Chassis Types

ERX-14xx/7xx/310 Architecture

ERX320 Architecture Packet Flow

Redundancy Hardware installation Notes

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 3
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
3

E-series Product Family and Chassis Types

This chapter discusses the E-series router's hardware architecture. The following slides discuss the E- series product family, including the different chassis types and carrier reliability features.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

EE--seriesseries ProductProduct FamilyFamily (1(1 ofof 2)2)

ERX-320 Router

Family Family (1 (1 of of 2) 2)  ERX-320 Router – Large POPs and mega-POPs

Large POPs and mega-POPs

Wire-speed performance to line module’s capacity

12 slots for line modules

100-Gbps or 320-Gbps switch fabric

ERX-1440 Router

Large POPs

Wire-speed performance through OC48c

12 slots for line module

40-Gbps switching capacity

ERX-1410 Router

Medium to large POP

12 slots for line module

10-Gbps switching capacity

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 4
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
4

E320 Router

The E320 router is specifically designed to deliver high-bandwidth edge connectivity with wire-rate forwarding and quality of service (QoS). The chassis supports 12 line modules. With the 100-Gbps switch fabric configuration, the E320 router is designed to allocate 10-Gbps throughput (in each direction) to each of the turbo slots (slots 2-3 and slots 4-5) and can terminate up to 64,000 subscriber connections.

With the 320-Gbps switch fabric configuration, the E320 router allocates 10 Gbps of overall bandwidth to each regular slot and is capable of allocating 40 Gbps of overall bandwidth to each of the turbo slots. Using the 320-Gbps switch fabric configuration, the E320 router can terminate up to 96,000 subscriber connections. The shipping system will scale to support 128,000 subscribers in the future. The release notes identify all system maximums for a given software release. The E320 router supports SONET connections from 0C3c/STM1 through 0C48c/STM16, ATM, packet over SONET (POS), Gigabit Ethernet, and 10-Gigabit Ethernet.

The E320 router does not share hardware components with the ERX-xxx routers, but it does run JUNOSe software.

ERX-1440 Router

The ERX-1440 router is well suited for the larger points of presence (POPs) or locations requiring high- bandwidth configurations. This system has 12 slots for line modules and has a switching capacity of 40 Gbps. The ERX-1440 router aggregates thousands of subscribers—both broadband remote access server (B-RAS) and private line—onto high-bandwidth uplinks, such as 0C48c/STM16.

ERX-1410 Router

The ERX-1410 router is well suited for medium to large POPs. This system supports 12 line modules and has a switching capacity of 10 Gbps. It supports a variety of interfaces, ranging in speed from CT1/CE1 to 0C12c/STM4.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

EE--seriesseries ProductProduct FamilyFamily (2(2 ofof 2)2)

ERX-705 and ERX-710 Routers

Environments where space is at a premium

5 slots for line modules

5-Gbps or 10-Gbps switch fabric

slots for line modules – 5-Gbps or 10-Gbps switch fabric  ERX-310 Router – Small, distributed
slots for line modules – 5-Gbps or 10-Gbps switch fabric  ERX-310 Router – Small, distributed

ERX-310 Router

Small, distributed environments

2 slots for line module

10-Gbps switch fabric

ERX-1440, ERX-1410, ERX-7xx, and ERX 310 routers share common line modules and input/output (I/O) modules

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 5
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
5

ERX-7xx Router

The ERX-705 and ERX-710 routers are well-suited for small or medium POPs. This system supports up to five line modules and has a switching capacity of 5 Gbps (ERX-705) or 10 Gbps (ERX-710). Like the ERX-1410 router, the ERX-7xx routers aggregate both B-RAS and private-line subscribers onto high-bandwidth uplinks, such as 0C3c/STM1 or 0C12c/STM4.

ERX-310 Router

The ERX-310 router is designed for small, distributed environments. This router supports two line modules and has a switching capacity of 10 Gbps. The ERX-310 router supports connections up to 0C12c/STM4 and Gigabit Ethernet.

Common Line Modules

All E-series routers allow service providers to offer broadband session termination for some users, private-line services for others, and wholesale support for partners. The ERX-1440, ERX-1410, ERX- 7xx, and ERX-310 routers perform these functions using the same line modules, allowing you to use a single set of spares for all these models as well as allowing you to easily migrate between models. However, there are some compatibility restrictions. Please refer to the ERX Module Guide for detailed module compatibility information.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

CarrierCarrier ReliabilityReliability

Designed for continuous availability

Redundant line modules

Redundant file system

Hot-swappable components

Distributed DC power

Maximum rack density

NEBS Level 3 compliant

ERX-310 does not offer redundant SRPs, line modules or file system

does not offer redundant SRPs, line modules or file system Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 6
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
6

Nonstop Performance

The E-series router is designed for continuous availability. The E-series router offers 1:n line module redundancy. In a redundant configuration, one standby line module can back up n number of active modules. In the case of line card failure, the redundant line module can take control without requiring a technician to swap cables. The services continue to run, and the subscriber downtime is minimal. In the event of a failure, system disruption is minimal, as you can remove and replace the line modules while the system is powered on. The file system is stored on redundant PCMCIA flash cards that can be synchronized automatically.

The E-series router also supports redundant switch route processors (SRPs) and can seamlessly switch from the active to standby SRP in many configurations. The E320 switch fabric is also designed to provide redundancy with seamless failover.

The E-series router runs on -48-volt DC power. The power distribution panel has redundant connections for the -48 volts, which are applied to redundant power busses on the system's midplane. Each line module is equipped with its own power conversion module, which draws on the -48 volts and generates the operating voltages for the card. With this innovative design, there is no central power supply whose failure would affect the entire chassis. (We also offer the ERX-310 platform in an AC- powered model. In that model, each power supply contains a power converter to supply DC power to the chassis.)

Continued on next page.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

Nonstop Performance (contd.)

In the ERX-14xx series, air is drawn in through a built-in plenum on the bottom front of the unit, across the line modules, and out through a fan tray in the top of the chassis. Each ERX-14xx series router has an angled piece of metal built into the bottom of the chassis, allowing up to three units to be stacked in a single equipment rack. If an

ERX-7xx router must be racked above an ERX-14xx series router, you must install a plenum on top of the ERX-14xx series router to allow adequate airflow. The plenum is not integrated into the ERX-7xx series routers.

The E-series routers are Level 3 Network Equipment Building Systems (NEBS) certified. NEBS verification, based on Telecordia guidelines, certifies that the system is optically, electrically, and physically compatible with new and existing network environments.

ERX-310 Router

The ERX-310 router's design reflects the fact that it was designed to operate in a different environment than the other E-series routers. Its small form factor is designed for locations where space is at a premium. Additionally, it supports AC power inputs, as it might be deployed in locations without pre- existing DC power. However, due to its small size, it does not support redundant SRPs, switch fabrics, line modules, or file systems.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

Agenda:Agenda: EE--seriesseries RouterRouter HardwareHardware ArchitectureArchitecture

E-series Product Family and Chassis Types

ERX-14xx/7xx/310 Architecture

ERX320 Architecture Packet Flow

Redundancy Hardware installation Notes

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 8
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
8

ERX-14xx/7xV310 Architecture

The following slides discuss the ERX-14xx, ERX-7xx, and ERX-310 router architecture, including the switching capacity of each model, oversubscription, and the significance of slot groups.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

ERXERX--310,310, ERXERX--7xx7xx && ERXERX--14xx14xx SystemSystem ArchitectureArchitecture

Rear SRP I/O Module I/O Modules Slot # 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Rear
SRP I/O Module
I/O Modules
Slot #
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Connection
via
Passive Midplane
Front
Line Modules

SRP with Optional Redundant SRP

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 9
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
9

ERX-310, ERX-7xx, and ERX-14xx System Architecture Overview

The E-series router uses a highly distributed, multiprocessor architecture that pushes packet processing functions to each line module in the system. The midplane is built with passive components and provides the connections for distributing the clock and enabling module-to-module communication. The modules that attach to the midplane include:

Line modules: These modules are located in the front of the E-series router and handle packet processing and packet forwarding. They do not have physical connectors. The ERX- 1410 chassis supports 12 line modules. The ERX-705 chassis supports five line modules installed horizontally (not shown). The ERX-310 chassis supports two line modules installed horizontally (not shown).

Input/output modules: I/O modules are installed in the rear of the E-series system and provide the physical ports for the network connections. These modules have passive components and a high mean time between failure (MTBF). The I/O modules are mated with compatible line modules through a passive midplane. The I/O modules and line modules are manufactured to prevent an I/O module from being mated with an incompatible line module.

Switch route processor: The SRP connects all the internal data paths in the chassis via the switch fabric. It also performs the routing protocol processing. The route processor runs the routing protocol processes, such as OSPF and BGP, and sends routing tables and updates to the line modules. Each line module maintains separate forwarding tables, enabling it to make forwarding decisions locally. This design takes the route processor out of the forwarding path for most traffic. The SRPs are installed in slot 0 in the ERX-310 router, slots 0 and 1 in the ERX-7xx router, and in slots 6 and 7 in the ERX-14xx router. The SRP used in the ERX-310 is not interchangeable with the SRP used in the ERX-710 and ERX-1410, even though both have 10-Gbps switch fabrics.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

ERXERX--310,310, ERXERX--7xx7xx andand ERXERX--14xx14xx SRPsSRPs

Route processor

Monitors and manages the system

Processes routing protocol messages, maintain routing table

Provides management interface (CLI, SNMP)

Manages the chassis clock

Switch fabric

Manages internal connections between ingress and egress ports

5, 10 cell-based

40 Gbps frame-based

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 10
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
10

Route Processor

The route processor is responsible for the following tasks:

Software image and configuration file storage using a PCMCIA flash card (currently, a 1 gigabyte flash card ships with each SRP);

Booting the system and downloading the executable software image to each line module;

Running all routing protocol processes, such as BGP, OSPF or IS-IS;

Monitoring fans, power, and temperature;

Controlling the SRP I/O module, which provides a RS232 console port via a null modem cable as well as a 10/100 Ethernet port for management; and

Managing the command-line interface.

Switch Fabric

The switch fabric is a high-performance 5-, 10-, or 40-Gbps switching fabric that connects all the internal data paths in the chassis. The 5-Gbps and 10-Gbps switching fabric is cell-based and the 40- Gbps switching fabric uses a high-speed serial interface. The The fabric's functions include buffer management, queuing, scheduling, and packet discard. It also manages the internal connections between ingress and egress ports.

Each ERX-310, ERX-7xx, and ERX-14xx router requires one SRP; however, an additional SRP is typically installed for redundancy. The ERX-310 router only supports a single SRP.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

55--GbpsGbps andand 1010--GbpsGbps SwitchSwitch FabricFabric

Switch Fabric 5 or 10 Gbps

Line Module
Line
Module
Line Module
Line
Module

2 x UTOPIA II 622 Mbps

(622*2=1.25)

Slot

Group 1

2.5 Gbps

Slot

Group 2

2.5 Gbps

Line Module
Line
Module

Slot

Line Module Slot
Line
Module
Slot

Group 3

Group 4

2.5 Gbps

2.5 Gbps

How do the line modules connect to the switch fabric?

What is a slot group?

2 x UTOPIA II 622 Mbps

(622*2=1.25)

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 11
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
11

Line Module and Switch Fabric Connection

The E-series router uses the switch fabric to interconnect all line modules within the router. The switch fabric operates at 5 Gbps (ERX-705), 10 Gbps (ERX-310, ERX-710, and ERX-1410), or 40 Gbps (ERX-1440). The line modules use Universal Test and Operations Physical Interface ATM (UTOPIA II) buses to communicate with the switch fabric. Both the ERX-7xx and ERX-1410 routers support eight pairs of UTOPIA II buses.

Slot Groups

Each UTOPIA II bus is wired to a specific group of line modules. We refer to this specific group of line modules as a slot group. When an SRP-5G+ (providing a 5-Gbps switch fabric) or SRP-10G (providing a 10-Gbps switch fabric) is installed in an ERX -7xx or ERX-1410 router, each slot group has two active UTOPIA II buses. For example, this slide shows a 10-Gbps switch fabric. If this fabric was installed in an ERX-1410 router, then you would see that the router has four slot groups with three line modules per slot group. Each slot within a slot group shares the pair of UTOPIA II buses.

The older SRP-5G, which is no longer sold, used only one of the wired UTOPIA II buses in each slot group.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

ERXERX--14101410 andand ERXERX--705705 SlotSlot GroupsGroups

ERX-1410 Edge Routing Switch • • • • • • • • • • •
ERX-1410
Edge Routing Switch
• •
0
1 3
2
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Slot
Slot
Group
Group
3
1
Slot
Slot
Group
Group
4
2

Slot Group 4

6

5

Slot Group 3

4

3

Slot Group 2

Slot Group 1

 

2

   

1

0

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 12
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
12

ERX-1410 and ERX-705 Slot Groups

A slot group is a specific group of card slots that share common UTOPIA II buses. The E-series router is organized into slot groups through the system's midplane. A slot group in an ERX-1410 router is made up of three adjacent chassis slots.

The ERX-1410 slot groups are:

• Slot group 1: slots 0-2;

• Slot group 2: slots 3-5;

• Slot group 3: slots 8-10; and

• Slot group 4: slots 11-13.

The ERX-705 slot groups are:

• Slot group 1: slots 2-3;

• Slot group 2: slot 4;

• Slot group 3: slot 5; and

• Slot group 4: slot 6.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

CalculatingCalculating SwitchingSwitching CapacityCapacity (Part(Part 11 ofof 2)2)

Switch Fabric 10 Gbps (5 Gbps per switch)

Line Module
Line
Module
Line Module
Line
Module

2 x UTOPIA II 622 Mbps

(622*2=1.25)

Slot

Slot

Line Module
Line
Module

Slot

Line Module Slot
Line
Module
Slot

2 x UTOPIA II 622 Mbps

(622*2=1.25)

Group 1

Group 2

Group 3

Group 4

2.5 Gbps

2.5 Gbps

2.5 Gbps

2.5 Gbps

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 13
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
13

Calculating Switching Capacity

Each UTOPIA II bus operates at 622 Mbps, full duplex. A 10-Gbps switch fabric provides two UTOPIA II buses to each slot group and two UTOPIA II buses from each slot group. Each slot group provides 1.25-Gbps full-duplex bandwidth, or approximately 2.5-Gbps total bandwidth. There are four slot groups per E-series router. Therefore, [(622 * 2 inbound bandwidth) + (622 * 2 outbound bandwidth)] * 4 slot groups = 10 Gbps.

Two 5-Gbps switches—referred to as the top and bottom switches—provide the 10-Gbps switch fabric capacity. Each of the two UTOPIA II buses from each slot group each connect to a different switch. The same is true for the connections from the switches to the slot group. So, each switch provides half the bandwidth available to each slot group (622 Mbps per switch in each direction, or 1.25 Gbps in total). Each kind of line module is designed to use a particular switch, to use both switches, or to use either switch.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

CalculatingCalculating SwitchingSwitching CapacityCapacity (Part(Part 22 ofof 2)2)

Switch Fabric 5 Gbps (2.5 Gbps per switch)

Line Module
Line
Module
Line Module
Line
Module

2 x UTOPIA II 622 Mbps

(622*2=1.25)

Slot

Group 1

2.5 Gbps

Slot

Group 2

2.5 Gbps

Line Module
Line
Module

Slot

Line Module Slot
Line
Module
Slot

Group 3

Group 4

2.5 Gbps

2.5 Gbps

2 x UTOPIA II 622 Mbps

(622*2=1.25)

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 14
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
14

Calculating Switching Capacity

Each UTOPIA II bus operates at 622 Mbps, full duplex. With the 5-Gbps switch fabric (found on the SRP-5G+), all UTOPIA II busses are active, but the overall switch fabric capacity is still only 5 Gbps. Bandwidth is allocated to each slot group based on the requirements of the installed line modules. Like the 10-Gbps switch fabric, the 5-Gbps switch fabric has two switches that each provide 2.5 Gbps of switching capacity. The two UTOPIA II buses from each slot group each connect to a different switch. The same is true for the connections from the switches to the slot group. So, each switch provides half the bandwidth available to each slot group (622 Mbps per switch in each direction, or 1.25 Gbps in total).

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

GuaranteeingGuaranteeing WireWire--RateRate PerformancePerformance

ERX-1410 Edge Routing Switch • • • • • • • • • • •
ERX-1410
Edge Routing Switch
• •
0
1 5
2
3
4
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Slot
Slot
Group
Group
3
1
Slot
Slot
Group
Group
4
2

To guarantee full line-rate

performance on the ERX-

7xx/1410:

Sum of the line modules’

bandwidth cannot exceed the slot group overall bandwidth

Sum of the line modules’ bandwidth per switch cannot

exceed the slot group

bandwidth for that switch

ERX-705 only : sum of all line

modules’ bandwidth cannot exceed 5 Gbps

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 15
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
15

Guaranteeing Full Wire-Rate Performance

The system proportionally allocates bandwidth to each line module within a slot group based on the line modules' bandwidth requirements. If one line module within a slot group is busy and one line module is idle, the available bandwidth is dynamically reallocated to the busy line module. When the idle line module becomes active, the bandwidth is once again reallocated. Note, however, that bandwidth cannot be shared between slot groups.

For line modules to offer wire-rate performance, the sum of the line module bandwidths in a slot group cannot exceed the slot group bandwidth nor can the sum of the bandwidth the line modules in a slot group require of each switch exceed the amount of bandwidth that switch can provide to that slot group. Also, for the ERX-705 the sum of the bandwidth of all cards in the chassis cannot exceed 5 Gbps.

The default behavior on the E-series router is to have bandwidth oversubscription enabled. You can configure the E-series router to prohibit oversubscription with the CLI command no bandwidth oversubscription.

The JUNOSe System Basics Configuration Guide documents the amount of bandwidth each line module requires and the switch(es) it uses.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

WireWire--RateRate PerformancePerformance ExamplesExamples

ERX-1410 Edge Routing Switch • • • • • • • • • • •
ERX-1410
Edge Routing Switch
• •
0
1 3
2
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Slot
Slot
Group
Group
3
1
Slot
Slot
Group
Group
4
2

Example

ERX-7xx router with SRP-10G

Gigabit Ethernet line module

consumes approxximately 2.46 Gbps and uses both switches

Install only one GE line module per slot group

Example

ERX-1410 router with SRP-10G

OCx/STMx ATM line module

consumes 1.22 Gbps and uses

both switches

Install no more two OCx/STMx ATM line module per slot group

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 16
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
16

Example 1

Assume we have an ERX-710 router. This configuration provides 2.5-Gbps total bandwidth to each slot group, half of which is provided by each switch. A Gigabit Ethernet line module requires 2.46-Gbps bandwidth and uses both switches. To guarantee wire-rate performance, we can install only one Gigabit Ethernet module in a slot group. The other slots in the slot group must remain unoccupied.

Example 2

To consider another example, assume we have an ERX-1410 router with a 10-Gbps switch fabric. This configuration provides 2.5-Gbps total bandwidth to each slot group, half of which is provided by each switch. An OCx/STMx ATM line module requires 1.22-Gbps bandwidth and uses both switches. To guarantee wire-rate performance, we can only install two OCx/STMx line modules in a slot group. The other slots in the slot group must remain unoccupied.

If we want to ensure that we do not accidentally install cards later that will cause oversubscription, we must configure the system with the no bandwidth oversubscription configuration option. We must reboot the router for this configuration change to take effect. We can verify this configuration option using the CLI command show bandwidth oversubscription.

For more examples of card combinations that guarantee line-rate performance, refer to the JUNOSe System Basics Configuration Guide. Also, note that some line modules are not compatible with all systems. Please refer to the [-series Module Guide for detailed module compatibility information.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

OversubscribingOversubscribing aa SlotSlot GroupGroup

 

To allow slot group bandwidth oversubscription:

   
    ERX-1400  
   

ERX-1400

 
    ERX-1400  

Use any combination of cards in a slot group

Edge Routing Switch

 
•   • • •   • • • • • • • • •

 

• •

 

•   • • •   • • • • • • • • • •

Line modules automatically adjust bandwidth depending on bandwidth available

0   2 1 3   4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

0

 

2

1 3

 

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

0   2 1 3   4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
   

Slot

   

Slot

 

Dual-port OC3 and FE-2 line modules do not adjust bandwidth

Group

1

Group

3

       

Slot

         

Slot

 

Example:

Group

Group

2

4

ERX-1410 router with 10-Gbps fabric

– ERX-1410 router with 10-Gbps fabric            
           
– ERX-1410 router with 10-Gbps fabric            

Gigabit Ethernet line module consumes approximately 2.46 Mbps

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Install two or three Gigabit Ethernet line modules per slot group

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 17
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
17

Allowing Slot Group Bandwidth Oversubscription

If less than wire-rate performance is acceptable, the sum of the line module bandwidths in a slot group can exceed the slot group bandwidth. This behavior is allowed if the configuration command bandwidth oversubscription is configured, which is the default configuration on the E-series router. To allow lower than wire-rate performance, you can use any combination of line modules in any slot. In this mode, all line modules automatically adjust their bandwidth use depending on the bandwidth available. For example, if one line module is idle, the other line modules in the slot group can take advantage of the extra bandwidth.

Example

Assume we have an ERX-710 router. This configuration provides 2.5-Gbps total bandwidth to each slot group, half of which is provided by each switch. A Gigabit Ethernet line module requires approximately 2.46-Gbps bandwidth. To oversubscribe the slot group and allow lower than wire-rate performance, two or three Gigabit Ethernet line modules can be installed in a single slot group.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

RouteRoute UpdateUpdate ProcessingProcessing 25 Mbps in-band for routing updates UTOPIA I Switch Fabric 10 Gbps
RouteRoute UpdateUpdate ProcessingProcessing
25 Mbps in-band
for routing updates
UTOPIA I
Switch Fabric 10 Gbps
Route
UTOPIA I
Routing table updates every
3 seconds
Processor
Control Bus
(Serial)
Line
Line
Line
Line
Module
Module
Module
Module
Route
Update
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
18

Routing Table Processing

The route processor function of the SRP runs the routing protocols and generates the routing tables distributed to the individual line modules. When a routing update arrives at a line module, the destination address is evaluated for forwarding. All packets with a local destination address or a well- known multicast address are sent to the route processor. There are mechanisms in place to prevent a traffic storm from overwhelming the SRP or its connection to the switch fabric. The route processor evaluates the information received in the routing update packet and determines if any routing information needs to be updated.

Every 3 seconds, the route processor distributes routing table changes to each affected line module. Routing tables are distributed from the route processor to the line modules using a 25-Mbps in-band UTOPIA I interface. If no change occurred, the route processor does not send any updates.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

ERXERX--14401440 HardwareHardware ArchitectureArchitecture

140 Mbps

(proprietary bus)

Route

Processor

Switch Fabric (40 Gbps)

bus) Route Processor Switch Fabric (40 Gbps) 1.25 5.0 Gbps 5.0 Gbps Gbps 1.25 1.25 1.25
1.25 5.0 Gbps 5.0 Gbps Gbps 1.25 1.25 1.25 Gbps Gbps Gbps 5.0 Gbps 5.0
1.25
5.0 Gbps
5.0 Gbps
Gbps
1.25
1.25
1.25
Gbps
Gbps
Gbps
5.0 Gbps
5.0 Gbps
Gbps 1.25 1.25 1.25 Gbps Gbps Gbps 5.0 Gbps 5.0 Gbps Line Line Line Line Line
Gbps 1.25 1.25 1.25 Gbps Gbps Gbps 5.0 Gbps 5.0 Gbps Line Line Line Line Line
Gbps 1.25 1.25 1.25 Gbps Gbps Gbps 5.0 Gbps 5.0 Gbps Line Line Line Line Line
Gbps 1.25 1.25 1.25 Gbps Gbps Gbps 5.0 Gbps 5.0 Gbps Line Line Line Line Line
Gbps 1.25 1.25 1.25 Gbps Gbps Gbps 5.0 Gbps 5.0 Gbps Line Line Line Line Line
Gbps 1.25 1.25 1.25 Gbps Gbps Gbps 5.0 Gbps 5.0 Gbps Line Line Line Line Line
Gbps 1.25 1.25 1.25 Gbps Gbps Gbps 5.0 Gbps 5.0 Gbps Line Line Line Line Line
Gbps 1.25 1.25 1.25 Gbps Gbps Gbps 5.0 Gbps 5.0 Gbps Line Line Line Line Line
Line Line Line Line Line Line Card Card Card Card Card Card Slot Slot Slot
Line
Line
Line
Line
Line
Line
Card
Card
Card
Card
Card
Card
Slot
Slot
Slot
Slot
Slot
Slot
0
1
2
3
5
4
I/OA
I/OA
I/OA
I/OA
I/OA
I/OA

SRP

Slot

6

I/OA

SRP

Slot

7

I/OA

Line Line Line Line Line Line Card Card Card Card Card Card Slot Slot Slot
Line
Line
Line
Line
Line
Line
Card
Card
Card
Card
Card
Card
Slot
Slot
Slot
Slot
Slot
Slot
8
9
10
11
12
13
I/OA
I/OA
I/OA
I/OA
I/OA
I/OA

Control Bus

(Serial)

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 19
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
19

ERX-1440 Hardware Architecture

Architecturally, the ERX-1440 router operates in the same fashion as the ERX-705 and ERX-1410 routers. The main difference is the switch fabric capacity. The ERX-1440 uses the same basic chassis enclosure as the ERX-1410 router, but it supports a new midplane and the 40-Gbps switch fabric. The ERX-1440 router supports the existing ASIC line modules but does not support the low-speed, non- ASIC line modules. For detailed line module compatibility information, please refer to the E-series Module Guide.

The 40-Gbps switch fabric is measured in the same way as the 5-Gbps and 10-Gbps fabrics (40 Gbps total, 20 Gbps in each direction). This switch fabric sends and receives data at a rate of 1.25 Gbps in each direction per slot. With this fabric, all line modules operate at wire speed, eliminating previous slot group configuration limitations.

Juniper Networks designed the 40-Gbps switch fabric for customers who require both full-performance bandwidth as well as 0C48c network uplinks. The fabric includes two slots with additional bandwidth (10 Gbps total, 5 Gbps in each direction) to support 0C48 line modules. The 0C48 line module is a double-wide card that can only be installed in slots 2/3 and 4/5. Configuring both 0C48 slots on the same side of the switch fabric allows the E-series router to support a redundancy midplane for the 0C48 line card. These slots also support regular, single-slot, ASIC-based cards. The card type— single-wide versus double-wide—is automatically detected when installed.

Line modules connect to the 40-Gbps switch fabric using a high-speed serial link instead of UTOPIA II buses. Line modules actually have two different types of connections installed: a high-speed serial interface and the UTOPIA II buses. When a line module is connected to the 5- or 10-Gbps fabric, the UTOPIA II buses are active. When a line module is connected to the 40-Gbps fabric, the high-speed serial interface is active.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

Agenda:Agenda: EE--seriesseries RouterRouter HardwareHardware ArchitectureArchitecture

E-series Product Family and Chassis Types

ERX-14xx/7xx/310 Architecture

ERX-320 Architecture Packet Flow

Redundancy Hardware installation Notes

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 20
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
20

E320 Architecture This following slides discuss the architecture of the E320 Broadband Services Router.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

E320E320 ArchitectureArchitecture

PDU and SRP I/O Adapter Rear I/O Adapters Slot # 0 1 2 3 4
PDU and SRP
I/O Adapter
Rear
I/O Adapters
Slot #
0
1
2
3
4
5
11
12
13
14
15
16
Connection
via
Passive Midplane
Front
Line Modules
•Access
•Uplink

SRPs (slot 6 and 7 positioned on top) and Switch Fabric Modules (slots 8-10 on the bottom)

Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc. Proprietary and Confidential www.juniper.net 21
Copyright © 2006 Juniper Networks, Inc.
Proprietary and Confidential
www.juniper.net
21

E320 Architecture Overview

Like the other E-series routers, the E320 router uses a highly distributed, multiprocessor architecture to allow distributed wire-rate forwarding and QoS. The components include:

Input/output adapters: I/O adapters are installed in the rear of the E-series system and provide the physical ports for the network connections. Up to two half-height or one full- height I/O adapter can be installed in each slot. The E320 I/O adapters handle some of the layer 2 processing and communicate the frames to the line modules in a standardized way. This design allows the line modules to operate in the same way regardless of the type of I/O adapter installed, allowing a single line module to support different kinds of I/O adapters. The I/O adapters are mated with the line modules through a passive midplane. Most I/O adapters provide the physical interconnection to the network using small form-factor pluggable transceivers (SFPs).

Line modules: These modules are located in the front of the E-series router and handle packet processing and packet forwarding. They do not have physical connectors, as the physical connectors reside on the I/O adapters. The E320 router supports up to 12 line modules. A single line module can support any I/O adapter or combination of I/O adapters that communicates with it at a compatible speed.

You can use a line module for either access or uplink. Access line modules receive traffic from low-speed circuits, and the system routes the traffic onto higher-speed uplink line modules and then to the core of the network. Currently, three line modules are available: the LM-4 and LM-10 access line modules and the LM-10 uplink line module. Line module slot placement is dependant on the switch fabric bandwidth. We discuss this topic in greater detail later in the chapter.

Continued on next page.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

E320 Architecture Overview (contd.)

Switch route processor: The switch route processor (SRP) runs the routing protocol processes, such as OSPF and BGP, and sends routing tables and routing table updates to the line modules. Each line module maintains separate forwarding tables, enabling it to make forwarding decisions locally. This takes the route processor out of the forwarding path for most traffic. Each SRP card also contains a switch fabric module, which is logically separate from the route processor even though they both reside on the same physical card. The SRPs are half-height cards that reside in slots 6 and 7.

Switch fabric modules: The E320 router has a distributed, shared memory switch fabric. Five switch fabric modules (SFMs), two located on the SRP cards and three on standalone cards, form the redundant switch fabric for the system. The standalone switch fabric modules are half-height cards installed in slots 8, 9, and 10. The switch fabric modules and SRPs must all be designed for the same switch fabric bandwidth.

Introduction to Juniper Networks Routers—E-series

E320E320 100100--GbpsGbps SwitchSwitch FabricFabric Switch Fabric (100 Gbps) 3.43 13.7 13.7 Gbps Gbps 3.43 3.43
E320E320 100100--GbpsGbps SwitchSwitch FabricFabric
Switch Fabric (100 Gbps)
3.43
13.7
13.7
Gbps
Gbps
3.43
3.43
Gbps
3.43
Gbps
Gbps
Gbps
13.7
13.7
Gbps
Gbps
Route
Control Plane
Processor
Line
Line
Line
Line
Line
Line
Line
Line
Line
Line
Line
Line
(200 Mbps)
Card
Card
Card
Card
Card
Card
Card
Card
Card
Card
Card
Card
Slot
Slot
Slot