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INSTRUCTIONAL

DESIGN

BUILDING SCHOOL-HOME CONNECTIONS


USING EDUBLOG

PROJECT

By: Angela Banks| 503 Summer 2012

Table of Contents
Synthesis .. 3 Topic Learning Goal 4 Audience Description 4 Rationale .... 4 Analysis Report Needs Description .. 5 Needs Analysis Survey .. 5 Needs Analysis Data Report . 6 Learning Context Description .. 7 Learning Context .. 7 Transfer Context ... 7 Learner Description .. 7 Planning Learning Objectives .. 10 Matrix of Objectives .. 10 Blooms Taxonomy 11 Assessment Plan . 11 ARCS Table 12 Instructor Guide .. 13 Learner Content Learning Materials 17 Formative/Summative Assessment Materials . 17 Technology Tool Justification .. 19 Formative Evaluation Plan Expert Review 19 One-to-One Evaluation . 19 Small Group Evaluation ... 20 Field Trial ... 20 Formative Evaluation Report Evaluation Survey/Rubric 21 Expert Review Report ... 21 Comments on Change 22 AECT Standards Grid 22 Appendices ... 29

Synthesis As an educator of nine years and having taken copious teacher trainings, I thought I had an excellent grasp on designing instruction. I was confident I knew how to create a plan that would keep my students interested and eager to learn more. And then I took this course. I have learned more about purposeful instruction in this course, Instructional Design, than I have over years of teaching. Learning the ADDIE model and breaking each step down into specific detail over these few weeks has brought new insight to my lesson planning. Every week I would follow the learning schedule, skim classroom data, construct my lesson and organize centers for practicing the skills learned. After taking this course and working on the design projects, I know see how thorough research, analysis, and development can greatly improve my lessons, and in turn, greatly improve student interest and learning. The most influential part of this course was in my ID project, when we had to complete the Matrix of Objectives. In teaching we have standards and learning objectives that have to be met, but there is no set way to assess each skill. We have benchmarks for the end of each unit, but its difficult to determine mastery of a skill based on two questions. While working on this section of my project I thought of how I can apply this matrix to the state standards and better assess my students learning. In our first project, Reading Quiz, I defined Instructional Design as the reflective process of creating a learning plan for a specific audience and learning purpose. Learning is systematically organized into plans for materials, activities, resources, and evaluation that is appealing to the user. The graphic representation used for this definition is the Lotus Temple in Delhi, India. I chose the Lotus Temple because it was designed around the religious beliefs of the Lotus flower. The designers spent years carefully researching the history of the Asian Indian culture and religion, and was meticulous in the specific form of the flower. After the temple was completed, people of all religions, cultures, and professions were (and still are) in awe of this breath taking work of art. Though most of us are not designing anything this grand, the same principles apply. When careful research and planning is done, and it is crafted with the learners needs in mind, the final project is more likely to be a success. I love teaching and have been told by many that I am a natural teacher. Though I enjoy my young students, I have a desire to work with adults in the field of educational or corporate training. Within our own school system though, I have noticed a shift in trainings. Many schools have gone from face-to-face instruction, to training videos and in-network share folders. Rossett and Donello (1999) suggest that as the interest in knowledge management continues to grow, instructional designers and other training professionals not only will be responsible for improving human performance, but also will be responsible for locating and improving access to useful organizational knowledge. 1 I feel that being knowledgeable in this type of informal collaborative learning and taking courses such as Instructional Design, are invaluable to my professional growth and will better prepare me when I am required to take on such as task. Not only would I know how to access and share the useful information, but I will also be proficient in designing professional instruction for those who need it.

A History of Instructional Design and Technology: Part II: A History of Instructional Design, Robert A. Reiser ETR&D, Vol. 49, No. 2, 2001, pp. 5767 ISSN 10421629

Part 1: Topic Part 1a: Learning Goal Teachers of all subject areas will participate in 2, 1.5-hour training on blogging. After the training, teachers will go online and use Edublog to create a basic classroom blog for assignment discussions, coursework submissions and grading.

Part 1b: Audience Description This project is designed for teachers/education professionals with basic computer literacy knowledge. All teachers are required by the County Public Schools to maintain Oncourse, which is an online site containing each teachers lesson plans, student information, grades, and school information. Oncourse will be linked to Edublog for students and parents to see their grades. Part 1c: Rationale I chose this project because there is a significant need for better communication between home and school. The majority of academic problems stem from lack of home support. This is not always the negative aspect of it. There are some parents that do little more than dress and feed their kids and push them out the door to walk to the bus stop. But there is another group of parents that I am mainly addressing, though this project does pertain to both groups. I (and many of my colleagues) have received numerous notes from parents saying that their child did not complete this assignment because the neither child, nor the parent, understood it. Many parents, even the most educated ones, are out of touch with todays teaching strategies, so when they try to help their kids, they often explain it very differently than how it was taught, causing the child to be confused. Using a blog can make this situation much easier by having the teacher post online his/her explanation of the expectations of the assignment. This way the parent and student have very clear instructions, and an example, of what is to be completed. I chose Edublog as the blog because it is user friendly and is designed for educational use. It is ad-controlled and safe for young children to use without them becoming distracted by pop-ups that could be harmful. It has a free edition that is adequate for basic use, and its pro-edition, which offers extras like mobile-apps and video uploading, is a mere $3 a month. The overall strategy of this project is primarily supplantive. The goals are clear and well laid out, and each step is provided in instruction. If the user becomes confused the website tutorials are readily available. Learners are able to get a lot done in a very short time period, with set-up assistance. Once site is created, learners only have to login and type a post. The major instructional strategy for this project is Procedural, because learners are expected to follow sequenced steps to complete a specific task. There are some parts that allow personal creativity, but they too require procedural strategies to be implemented.

Part 2: Analysis Report Part 2a1: Needs Analysis Survey As a teacher of 8 years and having numerous conversations with teachers about student and parent issues, I am well aware of the communication problems that arise at any given moment. One of the most common problems is between what is taught at school and what is to be done at home. To get a better idea of the level of miscommunication, I created this survey for my coworkers to complete. The survey is made of 15 questions and was completed by 12 educators through email. The questions are related to student performance on take-home work and others are related to the teachers computer skills.

Part 2a2: Needs Analysis Data All 12 persons that participated in the survey are teachers of elementary and middle school students. The teachers are men and women, ages 25-55 and have varying years of professional teaching experience. Through my survey, I found that all of the educators have 20% or more of their students that do not complete homework on a regular basis. Of these students not turning in work, 15%-71% did not complete it due to misunderstandings or lack of parent support. Student participation within the classroom is average, and 83% of teachers said that their students tend to perform better when given an example or having watched a video. All 12 teachers are fairly knowledgeable on the basic computer functions. They have all created a PowerPoint presentation, and about 83% have added sound and/or videos to their presentation. As for blogging, 83% of the teachers have participated in a blog to some degree, but only 33% have created their own. As far as they know, none of their students participate in or have their own blogs. All teachers share the same ideas on what a classroom blog should contain; information about the teacher, class assignments & general information, links to appropriate educational sites to help in all subjects for the students, calendar of events and homework, and with parental permission, pictures and videos of student performance and activities.

Percentage of students by grade level, not doing homework and their reasons.

80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% grades k-2 grades 3-5 grades 6-8 no homework misunderstandings/lack of support

grades k-2 grades 3-5 grades 6-8

no misunderstandings/ homework lack of support 50% 71% 53% 47% 20% 15%

Teachers Experience with Blogs

Blog Subscribers
Read/Co mment Creators

Blogging Not a Blogger 17% Subscribe to a blog 83%

Blog Subscribers Only read or comment 67% Created their own blog 33%
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Part 2b: Description of Learning Content Part 2b1: Learning Context Learning will take place at the school during a faculty training session. It will be held in a room large enough to hold all teachers and has internet availability. The training will be broken into two separate days due to its length and to allow for questions. The necessary equipment includes a computer (preferably laptop) with wireless capability, large viewing screen that can be seen easily by all learners, and projector that can be connected to computer. After training learners may access the site to create their blogs wherever they wish.

Part 2b2: Transfer Context Learners will mostly use this knowledge for educational purposes, to strengthen communication outside of the classroom walls. Learners could create other blogs for personal or business purposes, or they could participate more in other areas of interest. If the learner should decide to change careers or schools, this blog, which shows that you have gone over and above the standard, would give them a competitive edge over someone else with the same credentials. Many business look for ways to better reach their current and future customers/clients, and blogging is becoming more and more popular as a way to find information. Part 2c: Learner Description My project was designed specifically for educators, so all persons that participated in the survey are teachers of elementary and middle school students. The teachers are ages 25-55 and have varying years of professional teaching experience. All 12 of the educators have at least 20% of their students that do not complete homework on a regular basis. One teacher had 90% of her class not turn in homework. Of these students not turning in work, 12-20% of them did not complete it due to misunderstandings and in k-2 grades, as much as 71% did not complete due to lack of parent support. Most of the teachers have basic computer skills needed to create and maintain a blog. All 12 teachers have created a PowerPoint presentation, and most have put video or sounds to it, which is a contrast to just over half, who uploaded videos online. I found that this was because most use their Wi-Fi enabled cellular phones to upload videos to the Internet, instead of a computer.

Survey Participation by Grade Levels


45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Teacher Participation

Grades K-2 Grades 3-5 Grades6-8

Grades Percentage of Teachers participating in this survey

K-2nd

3rd-5th

6th-8th

42%

33%

25%

Survey Participant by Age

Age in Years
25-35 36-45 46-55

Age in Years Percentage of Teachers participating in this survey

25-35

36-45

46-55

58%

25%

17%

Part 2d: Learning Task Analysis Learning Task Model

Learning Task: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Read through the Get Started Guide on the site. Choose your edition and sign up. Create your profile Follow prompts for page set-up In Dashboard-Posts, add a new post to welcome students publish In Dashboard-Links, add a new link and insert address for Oncourse website At any time of you are confused , visit help and support under Dashboard In Dashboard Users, add new user. Make sure you mark subscriber! (If you chose pro edition, then go to My Class and create a class. 9. Update assignment directions as needed.

Part 2d (continued) Detailed Step: #5- Adding a link in Edublog:

1. Login to Oncourse and click the tab for Website. 2. Update any information on your site by clicking on the yellow pencils located throughout the page. 3. At the top of your website there is an italicized link, THAT is your web address. Right click on that link to copy it. 4. Go back to your Edublog site and login. 5. Under Dashboard, go to Links. Add new links. 6. Name your link, ex. Oncourse 7. Left click on the Web Address box. Right click and choose paste. Your Oncourse link should appear in this box. If it doesnt, repeat step #3. 8. Describe your link. This lets others know what it is for, before they choose it. 9. Target blank. Choosing this will open the Oncourse site in a new window, which makes coming back to Edublog easier. 10. On top right of page, Add Link.

Part 3: Planning Part 3a: Learning Objectives


Learners will

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1. Assess their class needs and determine if the free or professional edition is best for their level of communication. 2. Follow sequenced directions to create a blog site. 3. Demonstrate ability to upload pictures to their blog site. 4. Create a working web-link to an existing site (Oncourse). 5. Construct a student list by inviting others to the blog. 6. Compose at least one post every 1-2 weeks that is descriptive of the assignment. 7. Choose student work and post to site every 2-3 weeks. 8. Justify the reasoning for posting, or commenting on, a particular students work. 9. Manage blog site by updating calendar information, events and assignments every 1-2 weeks.

Part 3b: Matrix of Objectives, Blooms Taxonomy, and Assessment Plans


Learning Objective 1.0 Blooms Taxonomy Classification Evaluation Format of Assessment Paper/pencil Description of Test Form Short Answer Observation Of final product Observation Assessment Items

2.0

Application

Performance

What school-home communication difficulties are you having in your class and how is blog this going to help relieve that issue? Basic blog site with working email is viewable.

3.0

Application

Performance

Uploaded profile picture is on blog site.

4.0

Application/ Comprehensio n

Performance Or Paper/pencil

Observation Or Constructed answer Observation with checklist Observation/ Short answer Observation

Link should take observer to listed site with no problems, OR Explain the steps in sequence to create a web-link.

5.0

Application

Performance

Students (subscribers) should be listed on the blog page. Several posts are evident on page with a detailed description of the current task, OR Write an example of a post you would compose to explain the fraction 3/14. Uploaded picture or document of work is on blog site.

6.0

Comprehensio n

Performance Or Pencil/paper Performance

7.0

Evaluation

8.0

Evaluation

9.0

Synthesis

Paper/pencil Or Performance performance

Short answer/ Observation Observation with Checklist

Write a commentary for this piece of student work. Explain how it meets the standard, OR, Justification for posted work is mentioned on blog. Events, homework and class assignments, grades and any notes are up-to-date.

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Part 3c: ARCS Table MOTIVATIONAL CATEGORIES OF THE ARCS MODEL


Categories & Subcategories ATTENTION A.1. Perceptual arousal A.2. Inquiry arousal A.3. Variability RELEVANCE R.1. Goal orientation R.2. Motive matching R.3. Familiarity Show the survey data about student homework, and show how blogging can help with that situation Remind learners that this is a classroom blog, not a personal one. During training, model correct topics to post. Compare blogging to texting or Facebook Process Questions

Friendliness, ask about the school and weather, get them comfortable Asking the learners questions about teaching issues. Some can be questions from the survey. Short lecturing time, group involvement, slideshows, handouts

CONFIDENCE C.1. Learning requirements C.2. Success opportunities C.3. Personal control

SATISFACTION S.1. Natural consequences S.2. Positive consequences S.3. Equity

Remind learners that this is a lot like Facebook. Go through each step carefully with them an give thorough directions Let learners now that the more they put into this, the more they get out of it. Suggest that they take time at the end of Monday to allow students to help make the post before going home. That way, ALL students will get the reminder and know what it is explaining. Hopefully within the first week or two, learners will see an increase in correctly completed homework and at-home projects Let learners now that the more they put into this, the more they get out of it. Suggest that they take time at the end of Monday to allow students to help make the post before going home. Learners will be excited to see their page develop as they continue to work on it and get feedback and comments from subscribers. Also, seeing improvements in student work is a positive! The outcome of the product alone will contribute to the positive feeling, especially if they involve the students 12

Part 4: Instructor Guide Training Day 1 Introduction: Instructor (I) welcomes all the learners (L) to the training, introductions, exchange a few pleasantries, comment about the school or weather. Begin PowerPoint presentation. Introduce the topic with this activity: (I) says, Im going to ask you some questions and all you have to do is raise your hands of I am describing you. Are you a teacher/educator?(L) Raise hands. (I) says Alright, do you have students? (L) Raise hands. (I) says, So far so good! Do you give homework? (L) Raise hands. (I) says, Excellent, and now do you have students that you give homework to, they dont complete it and give you some excuse as to why they didnt complete it, i.e. I forgot, didnt know how, I was confused, or I didnt have a help, etc. (L) Raise hands. (I) say, And that is why Im here! As (I) brings up slideshow, continue talking with the (L) about the purpose of the training. (I) says, Most of your older students say 2nd or 3rd grade and up, are probably spending some time on the computer doing everything other than school related work. So what I am going to show you is way to reach those students that we mentioned before (dont complete homework), where they already areon the internet! And how are we going to do that? By blogging! (I) states the learning goal - Teachers of all subject areas will be able to go online and use Edublog to create a basic classroom blog for assignment discussions, coursework submissions and grading.

Body: CREATE A BLOG Instructor (I) talks about the survey results as it pertains to student homework performance. (I) says, Survey results found that all of the educators have 20% -53% of their students that do not complete homework on a regular basis. Of these students not turning in work, many did not complete it due to misunderstandings or lack of parent support. If you notice, k-2 grades had the highest percentage (71%) of students without homework support, and 3-5 grades had the highest (53%) not turning in work at all. Student participation within the classroom is average and 83% of teachers said that their students tend to perform better when given an example or having watched a video. Explain how blogging can help with this problem. (I) says, With blogging, the child can essentially take the classroom teacher into their home to get the extra support. When doing a classroom blog, you are posting (typing onto your page or uploading a video) the lesson, or an explanation of what is expected to be completed. So all the student needs to do, is login (they can set up the same login info as their district issued one) and read or watch and listen. Its like Facebook for school! Lets take a look at some of these examples.
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Show 4 examples of blog pages (linked). Have one personal, one business, and 2 educational. (I) and (L) discuss the similarities and differences in each one (I) tells about Edublog and why it was chosen. Go over some of the elements of Edublog. Be sure to mention the two different editions (basic/free, and professional/$3.50 per month). Do not go into specific detail about the similarities and differences. Only mention a few key points like mobile apps and video uploading. Emphasize that (L) can make their own personal choice as to which edition they want to use. (I) gives a handout to (L) with a large picture of the learning task model on it. This is for the (L) to easily refer back to it and make notes throughout the training. Go over each part of the model. Using a slideshow of Edublog screen-shots, guide (L) through each step of the set-up process and show where the help guide is at the bottom of the page if they should need assistance. 1. Get started guide/user guide this will help throughout the entire process 2. Sign up and login

**Use my Edublog Baby Broncos - for examples and practice.** POSTING

After creating the blog, (I) briefly talk about the Dashboard area. This is the working page of a blog. Demonstrate how to make a post. (I) go to Dashboard and scroll down to Post. *Show screen shot of directions with link to video.* Ask (L) what they would want to put in a first post, which welcomes the subscribers (students) and readers to the page. *keep it simple* Create a post (on my page) by typing into the editing area and then click post. Do another post or two, allowing the (L) to give directions on how to do it. *Suggest the (L) involve their own students in creating posts at the beginning of the week. This may take some stress of off them, and students that dont have access will still get to see the post.*

Conclusion: Review the purpose of a blog for educational use. Remind how to use the guide for set-up and for assistance afterwards. Allow for questions. Give a brief overview of what they are going to learn at the next training.

**As homework, (L) are to create their own blog on Edublog, and have at least one post on their page and a profile picture.**
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Training Day 2 Introduction: Instructor (I) reintroduce yourself to everyone. Ask if there are any new learners (L), or anyone who missed the last training on classroom blogs. Briefly review the last training and learning goal, and ask if anyone has created their blog. Allow (L) to share their experience and ask a few questions for the good of the group. (I) has (L) break into groups by grade levels. Each group is to come up with 5 important things they should have on their blog site (use survey results to start out). Allow about 3 minutes for this discussion. Have one (L) from each group share what they came up with. Every group will/should mention having a link to Oncourse and the County and School websites. If they dont, suggest it. (I) says, Now that we know what we want on our page, I will show how to get it there. **open up my Edublog - Baby Broncos - for practice**

Body:

LINKS: (I) says, There are two types of links. One is a link within the post, and the other is a category link in the side columns. (I) show a screen-shot of each step in Edublog on how to create a link. Watch the video. (I) Show the detailed step#5 model. Read the steps on how to create a category link. Start with linking Oncourse to my blog. Review the steps again and have (L) talk the (I) through the steps as (I) links the School website to the blog. (I) says, I think you guys did pretty well with that, and that was the hardest part!! I will let you put the rest of your links or whatever you want on your page on your own time. Now, we are going to invite some subscribers, or in your case, STUDENTS! ADDING STUDENTS (I) will go to, Dashboard, and talk through Edublog steps with the (L) on how to invite subscribers/students to their blog. In the pro-edition, it is listed under Add a Class. Inform (L) that they will need an email address for each subscriber. *For students, this may need to be the parents email address. It is only needed for the blog login, the student
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cannot login to their parents email account.* Edublog will send an email to the address prompting the person to join and create a profile. When choosing a role for the students, read carefully over the different roles. Subscribers and Contributors have different responsibility allowances. Use a teacher email as a live example.

POSTING PICTURES Explain to (L) that uploading pictures and commenting on them can all be done in the same step. Watch video and screen shots. (I) shows the dashboard and selects post. Have (L) make note of the little picture attachment in the tool box above the editing area. Click the picture box and it will prompt you to browse. Click browse and search your computer for the picture you want posted. Double click that picture and its link will appear in your browse box. When you come back to your editing box, simply type in what you want to say about the picture, such as why you chose to post it, and then post. (I) does one more picture post and allow the (L) to talk the (I) through the steps. Uploading a video Inform (L) that video uploading can only be done if you have the professional edition. So do not go into great detail about it. Give one example and then continue with the training.

Conclusion: Review the purpose of a blog for educational use. Review what was taught show the model for adding links, have (L) help you run through the steps for uploading pictures and adding students. Remind (L) of the help guide at the bottom of the blog page. Allow for questions. Thank all (L) be sure to thank leadership, for allowing you to be their instructor. Compliment the (L) for (hopefully) being well behaved, and listening. Encourage them to continue working on their blogs.

**Follow up and Assessment: For the (L) who choose to use this blog within their class, inform them that in about two-three weeks, a Summative Assessment will be done to see how well they did and make some suggestions.**

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Part 5: Learner Content Part 5a: Learning Materials To achieve this learning goal, learners will need very few materials. Every learner will need a computer or device with Internet access. This can be a computer, laptop, tablet (iPad, Nook, etc.), Smartphone, or any other device that you are comfortable working on the Internet with. Whatever device you are using, it is advised to have a picture or two on it that you may like to use as your profile picture. Learners may use their tools during the lesson, and create their blog site along with the instructor, or they can take notes on the handouts provided by instructor, and complete their page at their convenience. Part 5b: Summative Assessment Materials The summative assessment is a combination of checklist and short answer questions, to be completed with 3-5 weeks after the last training day. Short answer questions can be done through email, and instructor/evaluator can look up blogs by email for Assessment.

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Name: Grade/Subject: Blog Address:

#1 (short answer) Which edition did you choose and how is blog this going to help relieve your home-school communication issue? #2 (checklist) a. Site is registered and viewable b. Blog has a title #3 (checklist) a. Uploaded profile picture is on blog site. #4 (checklist/short answer) Links a. At least 2 links are in posts b. At least 2 links are in side bar c. When clicked, user is forwarded to correct site OR Explain the steps in sequence to create a web-link. #5 (checklist) Students (subscribers/contributors) are listed on the blog page. #6 (checklist/short answer) Posts a. 1-2 posts are made within 2 weeks b. 3 or more posts are made within 3 weeks c. Each posts contain 4 or more sentences describing the current task OR Write an example of a post you would compose to explain the fraction 3/14. #7 (checklist/short answer) Pictures a. Profile picture is uploaded and appropriate b. Picture document is uploaded on a post. OR, Write the steps for uploading a picture. #8 (short answer/checklist) Response Reasoning Write a commentary for this piece of student work (have a picture of student work). Explain how it meets the standard. OR, a. Justification for posted work is mentioned on blog. b. Teacher justification is clear and based on grade standards. #9 (checklist) Site Management a. Events and any notes are up-to-date. b. Homework and class assignments are posted and explained c. Grades(Oncourse)

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Part 5c: Technology Tool Justification Tools needed for this lesson are a computer device with Internet access, projector, large white viewing screen, PowerPoint presentation, and four blog sites. The computer with Internet connection will be used to access Edublog and view the PowerPoint presentation. The projector and screen are to show what is on the computer to the entire audience. The four blog sites are 4th grade (http://mskreul.edublogs.org/), 6th grade (http://mrmillersblog.com/), business (http://blogs.hbr.org/), and personal (http://www.whenathoughtblooms.com/). I chose these sites to give examples of the main types of blogs that are created, and for the learners to compare and contrast each one. I also want learners to see the different styles of blogs and get ideas as to how they may want to organize their own for their class.

Part 6: Formative Evaluation Plan Part 6a: Expert Review


The Subject Matter Expert (SME) I chose is Mrs. Tenika Fryson. Mrs. Fryson is a teacher and Instructional Coach for our county school system. She is currently working on her Doctorates Degree in Instructional leadership and has been teaching 6 years. I have asked her to evaluate my document and materials on its content and instruction.

Part 6b: One-to-One Evaluation


I would randomly select about 3-5 volunteers to read through the Instructors Guide and PowerPoint presentation as it would be presented to a large group. Each person would have a list of general and specific questions to help critique the presentation. They would be encouraged to refer any other questions and major issues to the designer immediately. This can be done through email, phone calls, or in-person conversation. One-to-One Questions: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Is the overall content mostly understandable? What major errors did you notice (spelling, grammar, incorrect instructions, etc)? Where you able to follow the Instructor Guide without a large amount of difficulty? Is the PowerPoint aligned with the Instructor Guide? Did the PowerPoint Presentation flow easily from one step to the next? Are the graphs and models easy to read and understand? What specific areas are concerning to you, or more difficult to follow? Did you try to create a blog by following the steps and guide? If you did create a blog, please use the space below to share your experience. What other suggestions or comments do you have? 19

Having a One-to-One evaluation allows a more in-depth discussion on the learners thoughts as it pertains to this project. Major errors and misunderstandings will be corrected, so when it is presented to the larger groups the goals and overall instruction is clear.

Part 6c: Small Group Evaluation


As this project is created for a target audience, the Small Group Evaluation would be the final practice run (Field Trial) before it is presented to the entire faculty. This would be a presentation to about 10-12 educators of varying grades and experience. They would be given a list of questions similar to the Oneto-One group, to answer throughout the lesson. The instructor will go through the presentation focusing on the major points only. He/she will not spend a lot of time on introductions and survey graphs. Learners are encouraged to point out any errors they notice or are unclear on instructions. Small Group Questions: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. How much of this information did you know before today (none, some, half, most, all)? Did the lesson accurately cover each learning goal? How is the time of the presentation (too short, just right, too long)? Does the PowerPoint presentation flow easily from one step to the next? Was this information too easy, just right, or too difficult? Do any specific areas of this lesson need more or less instruction? Please explain.

In this evaluation I am looking to see how the revised instruction is for a more varied group of learners. How well does it flow and if learners are able to follow the format with few problems.

Part 6d: Field Trial


If this was designed for a much larger audience, I would use the entire faculty as my field trial. During the evaluation, the instructor would go through the entire presentation. Each learner would receive handouts with both learning models and written steps, so it is easier to refer to at training and for later use. After the presentation, each participating learner will be given a questionnaire to answer and return. This information will be used to determine the effectiveness of the instruction and design. Field Trial Questionnaire Please answer: Strongly Agree, Agree, Disagree, Strongly Disagree, or Not Sure 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. The instruction and materials were adequate for proper instruction of this lesson. The learning goals were clearly stated. It was clearly explained during instruction, how to meet the learning goals. The lesson was completed in a timely manner. The instructor was knowledgeable of the content. The instructor was helpful when asked questions. Graphs and learning models are clear and easy to understand. 20

8. This information is helpful to me. 9. After this presentation, I feel confident in creating and using a blog for class purposes. 10. I would like more training on this topic. Additional Comments:

Part 7: Formative Evaluation Report Part 7a: Evaluation Survey The questions below were created to guide the SME (Subject Matter Expert) in her evaluation. I also allowed space for additional comments if there is anything she wanted to add that I did not ask.
Expert Instructional Questions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Is the content appropriate for the target audience? Are all learning goals/objectives covered in the instruction? Is the Instructors Guide clearly written? Are the Instructors Guide and PowerPoint presentation accurately aligned? Does the lesson structure flow easily from one section to the next? Are graphs and models clear and easy to understand? Do the specific sections (posting, links, uploads, and adding students) provide clear directions? Is the language too easy or difficult for learners? Additional Comments/Suggestions:

Part 7b: SME Review Results I was pleased to see that Mrs. Frysons commentary was positive overall. She was very thorough in her evaluation and gave very specific suggestions. The most common errors she found were grammar and punctuation, which were easily fixed. Mrs. Fryson also suggested changing the font craft of the Instructors commentary, to differentiate what is to be said from what is to be done. There were some differences in data between the Instructor Guide and the PowerPoint presentation. Because of these differences and lack of explanations of the data, it led Mrs. Fryson to believe my survey was fictitious. She noted that the data on the teachers themselves was not clear and made the graphs that are provided somewhat difficult to understand.
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She did commend me on my project choice, and felt it was appropriate for the audience. The language is user friendly, and the content steps and directions flow very nicely. Part 7c: Comments on Change One major change in my project is that one of my SMEs did not return an evaluation. This person was to evaluate the project from a bloggers point of view. Because his information was not provided, I deleted his section from the report. Per Mrs. Frysons suggestions, I italicized what the instructor is to say in the Instructors Guide. This makes it much easier to see what they are to say from what is to be done. I also reviewed my survey data and corrected the results, so that my graphs and explanations are now consistent throughout. Grammar and punctuation was also closely reviewed and corrected.

Part 8: AECT Standards Grid Professional Standards Addressed (AECT) The following standards, developed by the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT), and used in the accreditation process established by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), are addressed to some degree in this course. The numbers of the standards correspond to the numbers next to the course tasks show on the list of assignments. Not all standards are addressed explicitly through student work. Assignments meeting standard in whole or part Standard 1: DESIGN 1.1 Instructional Systems Design (ISD) 1.1.1 Analyzing 1.1.2 Designing 1.1.3 Developing 1.1.4 Implementing 1.1.5 Evaluating 1.2 Message Design 1.3 Instructional Strategies 1.4 Learner Characteristics Standard 2: DEVELOPMENT 2.0 (includes 2.0.1 to 2.0.8) 2.1 Print Technologies 2.2 Audiovisual Technologies ID Project X X X X X X ID Project ID Project ID Project ID Project Selected Discussion Forums; ID Project

X ID Project X ID Project

X ID Project X Reading Quiz; ID Projects


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2.3 Computer-Based Technologies 2.4 Integrated Technologies Standard 3: UTILIZATION 3.0 (includes 3.0.1 & 3.0.2) 3.1 Media Utilization 3.2 Diffusion of Innovations 3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization 3.4 Policies and Regulations Standard 4: MANAGEMENT 4.0 (includes 4.0.1 & 4.0.3) 4.1 Project Management 4.2 Resource Management 4.3 Delivery System Management 4.4 Information Management Standard 5: EVALUATION 5.1 Problem Analysis 5.2 Criterion-Referenced Measurement 5.3 Formative and Summative Evaluation 5.4 Long-Range Planning

X (all assignments)

X (all assignments) ID Project X

X ID Project X ID Project X

COURSE GOALS & OBJECTIVES The overall goal for the course is for each student to consider and use the systematic process of instructional design to create an instructional product. To achieve this goal, students will engage in activities that promote reflective practice, emphasize realistic contexts, and employ a number of communications technologies. Following the course, students will be able to:

1. Discuss the historical development of the practice of instructional design with regard to factors that led to its development and the rationale for its use 2. Describe at least two reasons why instructional design models are useful 3. Identify at least six instructional design models and classify them according to their use 4. Compare and contrast the major elements of three theories of learning as they relate to instructional design
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5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Define instructional design. Define the word systematic as it relates to instructional design Define learning and synthesize its definition with the practice of instructional design Relate the design of instruction to the term educational (or instructional) technology Describe the major components of the instructional design process and the functions of models in the design process 10. Provide a succinct summary of various learning contexts (declarative knowledge, conceptual, declarative, principle, problem-solving, cognitive, attitudinal, and psychomotor)

11. Build an instructional design product that integrates major aspects of the systematic process and make this available on the web. a. Describe the rationale for and processes associated with needs, learner, context, goal, and task analyses i. Create and conduct various aspects of a front-end analysis ii. Identify methods and materials for communicating subject matter that are contextually relevant b. Describe the rationale for and processes associated with creating design documents (objectives, motivation, etc.) i. Construct clear instructional goals and objectives ii. Develop a motivational design for a specific instructional task iii. Develop assessments that accurately measure performance objectives c. Select and implement instructional strategies for selected learning tasks i. Select appropriate media tools that support instructional design decisions d. Describe the rationale and processes associated with the formative evaluation of instructional products i. Create a plan for formative evaluation 12. Identify and use technology resources to enable and empower learners with diverse backgrounds, characteristics, and abilities. 13. Apply state and national content standards to the development of instructional products 14. Meet selected professional standards developed by the Association for Educational Communications and Technology 15. Use various technological tools for instructional and professional communication

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AECT STANDARDS (Applicable to EDTECH 503)

1.0 Design 1.1 Instructional Systems Design 1.1.a Utilize and implement design principles which specify optimal conditions for learning. 1.1.b Identify a variety of instructional systems design models and apply at least one model. 1.1.1 Analyzing 1.1.1.a Write appropriate objectives for specific content and outcome levels. 1.1.1.b Analyze instructional tasks, content, and context. 1.1.2 Designing 1.1.2.a Create a plan for a topic of a content area (e.g., a thematic unit, a text chapter, an interdisciplinary unit) to demonstrate application of the principles of macro-level design. 1.1.2.b Create instructional plans (micro-level design) that address the needs of all learners, including appropriate accommodations for learners with special needs. 1.1.2.d Incorporate contemporary instructional technology processes in the development of interactive lessons that promote student learning. 1.1.3 Developing 1.1.3.a Produce instructional materials which require the use of multiple media (e.g., computers, video, projection). 1.1.3.b Demonstrate personal skill development with at least one: computer authoring application, video tool, or electronic communication application. 1.1.4 Implementing
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1.1.4.a Use instructional plans and materials which they have produced in contextualized instructional settings (e.g., practica, field experiences, training) that address the needs of all learners, including appropriate accommodations for learners with special needs. 1.1.5 Evaluating 1.1.5.a Utilize a variety of assessment measures to determine the adequacy of learning and instruction. 1.1.5.b Demonstrate the use of formative and summative evaluation within practice and contextualized field experiences. 1.1.5.c Demonstrate congruency among goals/objectives, instructional strategies, and assessment measures.

1.3 Instructional Strategies 1.3.a Select instructional strategies appropriate for a variety of learner characteristics and learning situations. 1.3.b Identify at least one instructional model and demonstrate appropriate contextualized application within practice and field experiences. 1.3.c Analyze their selection of instructional strategies and/or models as influenced by the learning situation, nature of the specific content, and type of learner objective. 1.3.d Select motivational strategies appropriate for the target learners, task, and learning situation. 1.4 Learner Characteristics 1.4.a Identify a broad range of observed and hypothetical learner characteristics for their particular area(s) of preparation. 1.4.b Describe and/or document specific learner characteristics which influence the selection of instructional strategies. 1.4.c Describe and/or document specific learner characteristics which influence the implementation of instructional strategies. 2.0 Development
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2.0.1 Select appropriate media to produce effective learning environments using technology resources. 2.0.2 Use appropriate analog and digital productivity tools to develop instructional and professional products. 2.0.3 Apply instructional design principles to select appropriate technological tools for the development of instructional and professional products. 2.0.4 Apply appropriate learning and psychological theories to the selection of appropriate technological tools and to the development of instructional and professional products. 2.0.5 Apply appropriate evaluation strategies and techniques for assessing effectiveness of instructional and professional products. 2.0.6 Use the results of evaluation methods and techniques to revise and update instructional and professional products. 2.0.7 Contribute to a professional portfolio by developing and selecting a variety of productions for inclusion in the portfolio. 2.1 Print Technologies 2.1.3 Use presentation application software to produce presentations and supplementary materials for instructional and professional purposes. 2.1.4 Produce instructional and professional products using various aspects of integrated application programs. 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies 2.3.2 Design, produce, and use digital information with computer-based technologies.

3.0 Utilization 3.1 Media Utilization 3.1.1 Identify key factors in selecting and using technologies appropriate for learning situations specified in the instructional design process. 3.1.2 Use educational communications and instructional technology (SMETS) resources in a variety of learning contexts.
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3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization 3.3.1 Use appropriate instructional materials and strategies in various learning contexts. 3.3.2 Identify and apply techniques for integrating SMETS innovations in various learning contexts. 3.3.3 Identify strategies to maintain use after initial adoption.

4.0 Management (none specifically addressed in 503)

5.0 Evaluation 5.1 Problem Analysis 5.1.1 Identify and apply problem analysis skills in appropriate school media and educational technology (SMET) contexts (e.g., conduct needs assessments, identify and define problems, identify constraints, identify resources, define learner characteristics, define goals and objectives in instructional systems design, media development and utilization, program management, and evaluation). 5.2 Criterion-referenced Measurement 5.2.1 Develop and apply criterion-referenced measures in a variety of SMET contexts. 5.3 Formative and Summative Evaluation 5.3.1 Develop and apply formative and summative evaluation strategies in a variety of SMET contexts.

SMET = School Media & Educational Technologies

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Appendix A. Instructor PowerPoint (screen shots)


WELCOME!! Day 1
Topic of Today Introductions Learning goal Why blog? Create your blog Make a post Review Homework

Blogging
Building a connection from School to Home

Raise your hands, raise your haaaands, if youre Sure!

Learning Goal
Teachers of all subject areas will be able to go online and use Edublog to create a basic classroom blog for assignment discussions, coursework submissions and grading.
80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% grades k-2 grades 3-5 grades 6-8

Why Blog?
no homework misunderstandings/lack of support
grades k-2 grades 3-5 grades 6-8 no homework 50% 53% 20% misunderstandings/ lack of support 71% 47% 15%

Many parents, even the most educated ones, are out of touch with todays teaching strategies, so when they try to help their kids, they often explain it very differently than how it was taught, causing the child to be confused. Using a blog can make this situation much easier by having the teacher post online his/her explanation of the expectations of the assignment. This way the parent and student have very clear instructions, and an example, of what is to be completed. When doing a classroom blog, you are posting (typing onto your page or uploading a video) the lesson, or an explanation of what is expected to be completed. So all the student needs to do, is login (they can set up the same login info as their district issued one) and read or watch and listen. Its like Facebook for school!

All 12 persons that participated in the survey are teachers of elementary and middle school students. The teachers are men and women, ages 25-55 and have varying years of professional teaching experience.

Why Edublog?
Example Blogs
4th Grade 6th Grade Harvard Business Review When a Thought Blooms Discuss some similarities and differences between the types of blogs.
Safe and Reliable Blogs can be completely private or open to the public. Since they only host education related content, Edublogs are allowed by most school filters where other blogging platforms are not. They have comprehensive videos, manuals, help forums, and even live support sessions and webinars. Absolutely no adult content and no exposure to other blogs Edublogs Free - Free, easy and basic option, great for students Storage 32 MB, Privacy to search engines Edublogs Pro - The ultimate blog package for individual teachers From $3.33 p/month, Embed videos, Mobile blogging, 100+ Premium Themes, Storage 10 GB, Full privacy options Both editions - Create posts and pages , Post images & audio, 30 Free Themes

Create Your Blog

Getting started with your blog


Getting Started Guide Signing up for your blog Logging into your blog dashboard Using your blog dashboard Writing your First Post Editing Posts Differences between Posts and Pages Writing Pages What is An About Page Blogging with Students Set up class blog Set up Rules & Guidelines Teaching Quality Commenting Helping Families connect with your blog Adding students to class blogs Set up Student blogs Add student blogs to your class blogroll Add student blogs to Google Reader

Sign up and login!

How to Read the Dashboard

Make sure you write down your password if you use our no email option otherwise you wont be able to reset it.

Posting

Review
Purpose for educational blog Use the Get Started and User Guides for help How do you make a post? Questions?? Next time..

Now all you need to do to write a post is: 1. Give your post a Title 2. Add your content 3. Add your tags and categories 4. When finished writing click Publish.

Topics of Today Introductions and review Group Discussion Create a link Add Students/ Subscribers Post pictures Review

Day 2

Watch video

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Previously..
Learning Goal Dashboard and Posting Care to share?

Group Work
Get into your grade level teams Think of 5 important things you would want on your blog page Share

Links
Watch the video

Today..
Group Discussion

Links Adding students Posting Pictures

Category Links

Add Students
There are two main ways to add users to a class blog on Edublogs: Using Blogs and Users Creator use on Edublogs Pro and Campus blog. Using Add New use on a free Edublogs blog. 1. Go to Users > Blog & User Creator 2. Click on the Add New Users tab 3. Add suitable usernames. 4. Add their email address. 5. Add their password. Its best to use the county preset password 6. Select their role (contributor).

Posting Pictures
Watch video tutorial You insert an image from your hard drive into a blog post as follows: 1. Click on Add an Image icon

2. In the Add an Image window click on the Select Files button 3. Locate the images on your hard drive 4. Click Open to start uploading the images. 5. While your images are uploading you will see a progress bar. 6. In the image option screen you need to:
Enter a title for the image Choose how you want the image align (None, Left, Center or Right) Select size of image you want to insert (Thumbnail, Medium, Large or Full Size) Then click Insert into Post to add the image to the post

7. Your Add an Image window should be closed and your image should now be inserted in your post.

Video
Uploading a Video or Audio File from your computer You insert a video or audio file from your hard drive into a blog post as follows: 1. Click on Add Video or Add Audio Icon

Conclusion
Purpose of classroom blogging Review blog model Help Guide Dashboard Questions Thank you and Have Fun!!

2. In the Add Video/Audio window click on the Select Files button 3. Locate the video or audio file on your hard drive 4. Click Open to start uploading the file. 5. While your file is uploading you will see a progress bar. 6. In the video/audio option screen insert a suitable title for the video or audio file. When your file is added to your post this title is the link your readers see so is best to use a title they can identify with. 7. Click Insert into Post

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Appendix B. SME evaluation results


1. 2. Is the content appropriate for the target audience? The content is appropriate for the audience. Are all learning goals/objectives covered in the instruction? Your goal is not clearly written. Perhaps you may use this: Teachers will be able to go online and use Edublog to create a basic classroom blog for assignment discussions, coursework submissions, and grading. (Your goal was not written the same on your guide and PowerPoint.) Is the Instructors Guide clearly written? It can be improved. Try using different font or different text craft to differentiate when you are speaking or an action is occurring. For example, Instructor (I) welcomes all the learners (L) to the training, introductions, exchange a few pleasantries, comment about the school or weather. Introduce the topic with this activity: (I) says, Im going to ask you some questions and all you have to do is raise your hands of I am describing you. Are you a teacher/educator?(L) raise hands. (I) says Alright, do you have students? (L) raise hands. (I) says, So far so good! Do you give homework? (L) raise hands. (I) says, Excellent, and now do you have students that you give homework to, they dont complete it and give you some excuse as to why they didnt complete it, i.e. I forgot, didnt know how, I was confused, or I didnt have a help, etc. (L) raise hands. (I) says, And that is why Im here! As (I) brings up slideshow, continue talking with the (L) about the purpose of the training. (I) says, most of your older students say 2nd or 3rd grade and up, are probably spending some time on the computer doing everything other than school related work. So what I am going to show you is way to reach those students that we mentioned before (dont complete homework), where they already areon the internet! And how are we going to do that? By blogging! (I) states the learning goal - Teachers will use Edublog to create a basic classroom blog for assignment discussions, coursework submissions and grading. In addition, there are some punctuation errors that need to be fixed. Here is a rewritten version of your second bullet. Introduce the topic with this activity: (I) says, Im going to ask you some questions and all you have to do is raise your hands if I am describing you. Are you a teacher/educator?(L) raise hands. (I) says Alright, do you have students? (L) raise hands. (I) says, So far so good! Do you give homework? (L) raise hands. (I) says, Excellent! Now, do you give homework to your students and they dont complete it or give you some excuse as to why they didnt complete it, such as I forgot, didnt know how, I was confused, or I didnt have a help, etc. (L) raise hands. (I) says, And that is why Im here! Are the Instructors Guide and PowerPoint presentation accurately aligned? Your graph in your PowerPoint does not match the data you discuss in your guide. Make it little clearer. Does the lesson structure flow easily from one section to the next? Your steps flow very nicely Are graphs and models clear and easy to understand? Is the survey fictitious? How many teachers were K-2 and etc out of the 12 teachers? There needs to be a little more explanation about your survey and graph that provides the pictorial view. Do the specific sections (posting, links, uploads, and adding students) provide clear directions? Your directions are clear. Just check for punctuation and grammatical errors. Is the language too easy or difficult for learners? You used user friendly language.

3. -

4. 5. 6.

7. 8.

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