Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 18

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&)22(34&.

4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4&

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Does mobile media smart phones, iPads, iPods effect student engagement in classroom

Shaima A. Albloushi Ohio University 2012 EDRE 5010

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& &

Abstract:
Critical review for four articles related to the effects of mobile media on students engagement in classrooms. & Problem statement: Does mobile media smart phones, iPads, iPods effect student engagement in the classroom.
Teresa Franklin! 12/12/12 11:49 AM Deleted: does

In the resent years, mobile media have developed remarkably and it attracted educators to use them in their classrooms environments (Demlirbilek, 2010). Mobile media in all its forms gave the educators and instructors divers ways to enhance the teaching methods (Demlirbilek, 2010). What is remarkable about mobile media is that it provides an unlimted learning experience in the classroom breaking the barriers of time and location (Sandberg, Maris, & Geus, 2011). Since smart phones and mobile media are concurring every aspect of our life, this paper is exploring four different recourses that are related to the problem statement: Does mobile media smart phones, iPads, iPods affect student engagement in the classroom. The first article Investigating Attitudes Of Adult Educators Towards Educational Mobile Media and Games In Eight European Countries explores adult educators views and thoughts concerning using games and smart mobile in adult education. The educators opinions and point of view are very important because if they are convinced that mobile media could affect their student engagement and learning achievement positively, they might adopt using mobile media in their classrooms.
Teresa Franklin! 12/12/12 11:49 AM Deleted: d Teresa Franklin! 12/12/12 11:49 AM Deleted: Teresa Franklin! 12/12/12 11:49 AM
Deleted:

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& & The second paper Mobil English learning: An Evidence-based Study with Fifth Graders investigates how mobile media could enhance students achievement and engagement while learning English as a second language. The paper findings showed that using mobile media in learning zoo animal English vocabulary had a great positive effect on students accomplishment and engagement towards the learning experience. The third research paper Digital Game-Based Learning in High school Computes Science Education: Impact on educational Effectiveness and Student Motivation examined the use of digital games in enhancing students achievement and motivation in CS course in Greek high school. In away the paper didnt explore the effect of mobile devices on the students engagement, but the effect of gaming on students engagement. This article was chosen because it shows that digital games are part of mobile media, which relates to the problem statement. The last article was Got Motivation? Six Great Resources for instructor at Every level offers mutable recourses that could help educators engage their students in school work productively. In the next pages there will be excessive summaries of the four articles, showing how mobile media usage affects students engagement in the classroom.

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& &

1. Investigating Attitudes Of Adult Educators Towards Educational Mobile Media and Games In Eight European Countries The research paper Investigating Attitudes Of Adult Educators Towards Educational Mobile Media and Games In Eight European Countries by Muhammet Demlirbilek, (2010) investigates adult educators views and thoughts concerning using games and smart mobile in adult education. The research is based on a survey tool that contains both closed-ended and partly closed-ended questionnaires. The survey was distributed in 8 European countries (Bulgaria, Cyprus, Spain, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Romania, and Turkey) and translated to each countrys language. The total participants of all countries were one hundred and four adult education trainers. The questionnaires asked the adult educators about their use of technology in their classrooms. That survey data showed that most adult educators, nearly 97% of the participants, use technology in their classrooms. The survey also asked the participant about their use of digital games in their teaching. The result showed diversity of using games in the learning process. Spain, Bulgaria, and Cyprus were the most countries that used games in learning. In addition, the survey results showed that 50% of adult educators prefer using digital games in their teaching methods such as puzzles (18%), matching (12%), and simulation (12%), however with computers not with smart devices. The surveys pointed that a small percentage of the participant nearly seven present are using mobile media in their classrooms. Overall, a significant number of adult educators participants in the survey (76%) are enthusiastic to use games and mobile media that are out in the market in their teaching, but with certain

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& & modification in the applications to complement their teachings methods. Demlirbilek suggests that curriculum planners should cooperate with adult educators to enhance incorporated games and mobile technology in the future education. Although, the small number of participants limits the study and cannot be generalized, yet, the data showed that adult educators in eight Europeans countries are motivated to use mobile media and digital games in their future education if the proper applications were found.

2. Mobil English learning: An Evidence-based Study with Fifth Graders The study Mobile English learning: An Evidence-based Study with Fifth Graders by jacobijn Sandberg, Martinus Maris, and Kaspar de Geus, (2011) was conducted on fifth graders in primary school learners who are studying English as a second language. The main objective of the study is to learn about zoo animals in English. The study was based on a quasi experiment design and pretest/posttest. Three groups of fifth graders students were selected to participate in the study. 85 students from different schools were selected to take part in the study. There were ten missing data in the study. The total numbers of participant were 75, 33 boys and 42 girls. The first group had a traditional lesson on animals in the classroom. The second group took the lesson as the first group and used mobile applications such as puzzle games, quizzes, memory games, and short answer games (yea/no) while they were in the local zoo. The third group also was taught the lesson similarly as the first and the second groups and visited the local zoo. This time, the third group took the mobile technology with them at home. The pretest/posttest measures the knowledge of the animals names in English. There were two kinds of questions; action and passive. Pictures of animals were integrated in both tests. The study interviewed each student in the study for pre/posttest and they were shown

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& & pictures of the animals and asked to answer accordingly with the pictures. Researchers presented cards to the students showing four animals and four possible answers. Questionnaires were also used in the study. One for the teachers, one for the students, and one for the third group parents. Questionnaires were formed to measure attitude and motivation towered using mobile media and digital games in learning. The results showed that the third group of student has the highest scores in the posttest. Furthermore, the study questioners indicated that the third group used the applications in their free time and that reflected positively on their learning. The Study recommended that the schools could adopt more informal ways to their traditional ways of teaching to enhance the learning experience. Though there are several limitation to the study. For example, the first group were supposed to receive the mobile application and work on them in school. However, the teacher in the first group did not proceed with the researchers recommendations because of time constrains. Another limitation in the study was that the mobile applications needed to be more advanced to make the student more engaged. The final obstacle was with the pre/posttest being difficult for the students.
Teresa Franklin! 12/12/12 11:50 AM Deleted: f

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& & 3. Digital Game-Based Learning in High school Computes Science Education: Impact on educational Effectiveness and Student Motivation The Study Digital Game-Based Learning in High school Computes Science Education: Impact on educational Effectiveness and Student Motivation by Marina Papastergiou, 2009 the study goal was to locate successful educational methods and understand what makes students want to learn. The study noted that students are not motivated toward their curriculum in their school, yet they are highly motivated when they play computer games. The study recognized the substantial popularity of digital games among students worldwide. Based on that, Digital games were designed for the computer science course in Greek high school to experiment on. Also, the study focused on the differences in motivation between male and female students. The study conducted a comparison between two computers applications on computer memory CS coerce in Greek high school. Both soft wares were similar in the educational objective of CS curriculum. Yet, only one of the applications used the gaming method in learning, which was labeled as group (A). The second group (B) used application that did not integrate games in it. Eighty-eight students participated in the study. 44 of them were girls and forty-six boys were assigned in two groups. Group A counted for 47 students and group B 41 students. The study used both quantitative and qualitative methods to investigate motivation and achievement in both gender. Three type of questioners were provided the students: 1. Pretest on biographical variables and knowledge on the computer memory coerce (Papastergiou, p. 6) 2. Posttest. 3. Posttest to investigate students reactions.
Teresa Franklin! 12/12/12 11:52 AM Comment [1]: 5(6(7&.4)74&)&.(#4(#3(&8$4'& )&#"/0(7& Teresa Franklin! 12/12/12 11:50 AM Deleted: 88

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& & The pretest showed that both groups A+B had similar background knowledge about the computer memory curriculum. Yet, the data showed that male students are more knowledgeable than female students. Also, it was observed the students in group A that used gaming applications to be more involved and engaged than group B. the data showed that boys are more involved in games than the girls. Yet, the study noted that the difference between gender performances was due to the boys experience in games than girls. The study concluded that digital games application in CS curriculum in Greek high school is more successful in learning outcomes and motivation than the non-gaming applications. Since the study pointed on the gender differences in involvement in playing games, the overall data showed that there were not significant differences in gender performance.

4. Got Motivation? Six Great Resources for instructor at Every level The paper Got Motivation? Six Great Resources for Instructor at Every level by Judy Lombardi, (2011) is exploring students motivation shortage in the classroom. The paper recommended six different books for the educators that convey solutions for uplifting students motivation. The Motivation Breakthrough: 6 secrets to Turning on the tuned Out Child(2007) is the first book Lombardi recommend and it gives tips for teachers to involve in their student activates. The second book Motivating Students to Learn(2010) is stressing on that the activities should be meaningful and relevant to the learning experience. Drive: The Surprising Truth about What Motivates Us (2009) is another book that offers techniques to a wake student motivation and gives tips on how to make the work place full of fun. Totally Positive Teaching: A five Stage Approach to Energizing Students and Teachers (2004) is emphasizing on

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& & sympathy and compassion with the student. The art of Changing the Brain: Enriching Teaching by Exploring the Biology of learning (2002) is give an insight on how the brine works and how it affects learning. The final book is Change Your Braine, Change Your life (1999) that gives a scientific point of view on how the brain affects our learning.

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& & Reference Demlirbilek, M. (2010). Investigating attitudes of adult educators towards educational mobile media and games in eight European countries. Journal of Information Technology Education, 9, 235-246. Lombardi, J. (2011). Got motivation? Six great resources for instructor at every level. College Teaching, 59, 150-153. Papastergiou, M. (2009). Digital game-based learning in high school computes science education: Impact on educational effectiveness and student motivation. Computers & Education, 52, 1-12. Sandberg, J., Maris, M., & Geus, K. (2011). Mobile English learning: An evidence-based study with fifth graders. Computers & Education, 57, 1334-1347.

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& &
Overall view of the class: That was my first educational research course class. I understand now how research is constructed. Class materials: very helpful. The PowerPoint, links, and the videos were very beneficial. It assisted me to understand the course. Weekly Adobe Connect meetings: the meetings were to me like I was in face-to-face class. Assignments: It was very helpful to have step-by-step assignments. It gave me time to understand and complete the final assignment. Exams: It was wonderful to have an open book exam and 4 days to completed them. Although, the mid-term exam consumed my energy, it was too long and to some extend was leaning to the difficult side. Yet, the final exam was fine. Dr. Franklin: you were very wonderful, helpful, and generous with your time. I really enjoyed your class. I hope all the beast for you.
Teresa Franklin! 12/12/12 11:52 AM
Comment [2]: 9')#:.&2-7&4'(&:$#*&8-7*.& ;&<)6(&)&%7()4&'-1$*)=>&&!& &

Thank you Shaima Albloushi

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& &
Full Text Database: Title: Author(s): Source: Peer Reviewed: ISSN: Descriptors: Investigating Attitudes of Adult Educators towards Educational Mobile Media and Games in Eight European Countries Demirbilek, Muhammet Journal of Information Technology Education, v9 p235-247 2010. 13 pp. Yes 1547-9714 Educational Games, Technology Uses in Education, Handheld Devices, Educational Trends, Trend Analysis, Teacher Attitudes, Educational Practices, Teaching Methods, Adult Education, Adult Educators, Foreign Countries, Regional Characteristics, Educational Technology, Questionnaires, Video Games, Adult Education, Higher Education Europe The purpose of this research was to investigate adult educators' attitudes and perceptions of the current use of technology, mobile devices, and educational games in adult education, which is defined as any formal or informal education or training aimed at an adult population that is older than traditional university students. Learning styles and needs of adults vary. Some will be active learners and want to do things, and others will be passive and want to be told the answers. Experience, personality, and prior knowledge have an effect on the learning styles. Regardless, digital games can be tailored to engage all types of adult learners. Researchers emphasize how digital games influence the learning processes of students, as well as their effects on the educational process in general (Gee, 2004; Kafai, 1998; Prensky, 2001; Squire & Jenkins, 2003). Basic elements of game play, such as intrinsically motivating, effectively engaging, and immersive (de Feritas, Savill-Smith, & Attewell, 2006; Maleno, 1981), make digital games a potential and powerful learning activity. In addition to the basic elements of digital games, mobile game play has portability, connectivity social interactivity, context sensitivity, and individuality characteristics (Klopfer, Squire, & Jenkins 2002). The ubiquitous future of mobile devices provides unique opportunities for context- and content- aware ubiquitous learning in everyday life. With the recent advent of 3G smart mobile devices mobile media learning is gaining more ground and receiving ongoing attention in both formal and informal learning environments. Furthermore mobile games are increasingly becoming popular among students, regardless of their age, due to fast diffusion of mobile devices and improvement of their technologies. A fundamental survey was conducted among adult educators (We are using the term "adult educators" to mean educators of adults.) in eight European countries to outline the current state of adult educators' attitudes and perceptions toward the use of mobile games in education. Our goal was to discover emerging trends and future directions. We collected 113 surveys from eight European countries. The results of this study show that, while some adult educators do not employ any technology in their classes, in general, adult educators are aware of the use of technology and present positive attitudes towards mobile media technologies. While slightly more than half of those studied used electronic games for teaching, almost all of this activity involved computers, not cell phones or similar portable devices. According to the data,

Identifiers: Abstract:

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& &
adult educators prefer puzzles, quizzes, matching and simulation as game genres. They view language learning, communication skills, cultural themes, computer literacy and problem solving as topics that are more suitable for mobile games. Furthermore, the research reveals that most of the adult educators expressed their interest to use mobile games in their teaching. 76 % of adult educators expressed their interest to use mobile devices in their learning activities. In all countries, adult educators indicated a willingness to employ electronic games on mobile devices. Half of participants (50%) preferred synchronous games. Participants also indicated positive attitudes towards commercial games as better quality products. Furthermore 33% of subjects think that open source games would be better learning games due to the ongoing possibilities for future modification and development. (Contains 8 tables.) As Provided 42 13 Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative Informing Science Institute. 131 Brookhill Court, Santa Rosa, CA 95409. Tel: 707-537-2211; Fax: 480-247-5724; Web site: http://JITE.org http://www.jite.org/documents/Vol9/JITEv9p235-247Demirbilek777.pdf JUL2011 2011 EJ930340 http://search.ebscohost.com/login.asp]=?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ930340& site=ehost-live <a href="http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ930 340&site=ehost-live">Investigating Attitudes of Adult Educators towards Educational Mobile Media and Games in Eight European Countries</a> ERIC Investigating Attitudes of Adult Educators towards Educational Mobile Media and Games in Eight European Countries

Abstractor: Number of References: Number of Pages: Publication Type: Availability: URL: Journal Code: Entry Date: Accession Number: Persistent link to this record (Permalink): Cut and Paste:

Database:

Unknown Field Code Changed

& & & Title: Author(s): Source: Peer Reviewed: ISSN: Descriptors: Abstract: Mobile English Learning: An Evidence-Based Study with Fifth Graders Sandberg, Jacobijn ; Maris, Marinus ; de Geus, Kaspar Computers & Education, v57 n1 p1334-1347 Aug 2011. 14 pp. Yes 0360-1315 Grade 5, Internet, English (Second Language), Primary Education, Pretests Posttests, Telecommunications, Comparative Analysis, Task Analysis, Student Attitudes, Student Motivation, Grade 5 Three groups participated in a study on the added value of mobile technology for

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& &
learning English as a second language for primary school students. The first group had classroom lessons in English about zoo animals and their characteristics. The second group took classroom lessons and worked with a mobile application on location in a public zoo. The third group received the same treatment as the second but, as an extension, was allowed to take the mobile application home for a fortnight. A pre- and a posttest were conducted to measure the individual change in mastery of a set of targeted English words. The results showed that the group which took the mobile phone home improved the most. However, when the additional learning time, spent apart from school, of this third group was controlled for, the superior performance of the group disappeared. The results indicate that students are motivated to use the application in their spare time and that this benefits their learning. The conclusion is that formal school learning can be augmented by learning in an informal context, away from school. As Provided 14 Journal Articles; Reports - Research Elsevier. 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, FL 32887-4800. Tel: 877-839-7126; Tel: 407-345-4020; Fax: 407-363-1354; e-mail: usjcs@elsevier.com; Web site: http://www.elsevier.com http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2011.01.015 APR2011 2011 EJ918745 http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ918745&site= ehost-live <a href="http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ918745 &site=ehost-live">Mobile English Learning: An Evidence-Based Study with Fifth Graders</a>

Abstractor: Number of Pages: Publication Type: Availability: URL: Journal Code: Entry Date: Accession Number: Persistent link to this record (Permalink): Cut and Paste:

Database: ERIC & ?,@+&& '44A+BB888C.3$(#3(*$7(34C3-/B.3$(#3(B)74$31(BA$$BDEFGEHFHIHHEEHJKL&& & &

Title: Author(s): Source: Peer Reviewed: ISSN:

Got Motivation? Six Great Resources for Instructors at Every Level Lombardi, Judy College Teaching, v59 n4 p150-153 2011. 4 pp. Yes 8756-7555

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& &
Descriptor s: Abstract: Motivation, Teaching Methods, Motivation Techniques, Educational Resources, Learning Motivation, Student Motivation, Learner Engagement, Change Strategies, Educational Strategies, Educational Practices, Classroom Techniques, Aptitude Treatment Interaction, Teaching Guides, Higher Education Motivation is a challenge for educators at every level, given the competition from smart phones, social networking, and other outside distractions. The motivation field is rich with resources, Web sites, multimedia, materials, and books on how to identify motivation challenges and address them. Our motivation group at the Center for Teaching and Learning at California State University Northridge read, reviewed, discussed, and can ultimately recommend six great resources on motivation for instructors at every level. As Provided 13 4 Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive Routledge. Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106. Tel: 800-354-1420; Fax: 215-625-2940; Web site: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/87567555.2011.591455 JAN2012 2012 EJ949041 http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ949041&site=ehostlive

Abstractor : Number of Reference s: Number of Pages: Publicatio n Type: Availabilit y: URL: Journal Code: Entry Date: Accession Number: Persistent link to this record (Permalink ): Cut and Paste: Database: & Title:

<a href="http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ949041&site=e host-live">Got Motivation? Six Great Resources for Instructors at Every Level</a> ERIC PDF: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/87567555.2011.591455

Digital Game-Based Learning in high school Computer Science education: Impact on

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& &
educational effectiveness and student motivation Marina Papastergiou ! Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, University of Thessaly, Karyes, 42100 Trikala, Greece In Computers & Education 52(1):1-12 Elsevier Ltd Interactive learning environments Multimedia/hypermedia systems Applications in subject areas Secondary education Gender studies The aim of this study was to assess the learning effectiveness and motivational appeal of a computer game for learning computer memory concepts, which was designed according to the curricular objectives and the subject matter of the Greek high school Computer Science (CS) curriculum, as compared to a similar application, encompassing identical learning objectives and content but lacking the gaming aspect. The study also investigated potential gender differences in the games learning effectiveness and motivational appeal. The sample was 88 students, who were randomly assigned to two groups, one of which used the gaming application (Group A, N=47) and the other one the non-gaming one (Group B, N=41). A Computer Memory Knowledge Test (CMKT) was used as the pretest and posttest. Students were also observed during the interventions. Furthermore, after the interventions, students views on the application they had used were elicited through a feedback questionnaire. Data analyses showed that the gaming approach was both more effective in promoting students knowledge of computer memory concepts and more motivational than the non-gaming approach. Despite boys greater involvement with, liking of and experience in computer gaming, and their greater initial computer memory knowledge, the learning gains that boys and girls achieved

Authors : Affiliati on:

Source: Publish er: Keywor ds:

Abstrac t:

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& &
through the use of the game did not differ significantly, and the game was found to be equally motivational for boys and girls. The results suggest that within high school CS, educational computer games can be exploited as effective and motivational learning environments, regardless of students gender. Article 0360-1315 10.1016/j.compedu.2008.06.004 S0360131508000845

Docume nt Type: ISSN: DOI: Accessi on Number : Copyrig ht: Persiste nt link to this record (Permal ink):

Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved. http://proxy.library.ohiou.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true& db=edselp&AN=S0360131508000845&site=eds-live&scope=site

Digital+Game-Based+Learning.pdf
Unknown Field Code Changed

!"##$#%&'()*+&,-(.&/-0$1(&/(*$)&(22(34&.4"*(#4&(#%)%(/(#4& &