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CLASS OF 2016 COURSE DOCUMENTATION 2013-2014

CLASS OF 2016 COURSE DOCUMENTATION

2013-2014

Welcome from the Dean of Preclinical Medicine

Dear Students,

Hello and welcome to the 2013 – 2014 academic year at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine. Healthcare today is as exciting as it has ever been. With the political advances in providing health care to those most in need in society to recent developments in technology; being a physician is, in my opinion, the most rewarding and exciting profession of all.

You are in the process of taking the first steps in becoming tomorrow’s physicians – congratulations.

It is the mission of Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine to ensure that you are one of the best educated of tomorrow’s doctors. In developing and implementing that mission, we have shaped our curriculum, as detailed in this document, to reflect many of the advancements in Osteopathic Medical education and evidence based medical education curriculum. For example, there has been a concerted approach to integrating Osteopathic principles with the core curriculum courses such as Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology. Another example is the exam schedule. Although the exam schedule is difficult, as you would expect in a medical school curriculum, the exams have been placed in a specific order to maximize learning by structuring the objectives in each course in a linear learning model. Furthermore, our Medical Simulation course is second to none. This course will allow you to experience some of the procedures and pressures of being a doctor while treating a simulated patient. This simulation course coupled with our Objective Structured Clinical Examination course (OSCE) will also allow you to experience the “feel” of being a doctor. Together, all of these parts of your education will allow you to reach your learning potential and best prepare you for the practice of medicine.

This curriculum was developed upon last year’s and includes the modular courses of Clinical Systems, Pathology, Pharmacology, Immunology and the second year Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (OMM) course. This will ensure that you will have a detailed understanding on when and where to use manipulative medicine in practice as well as the important question of why OMM is important in maintaining the patient’s overall health.

I am excited to present our faculty and this curriculum to you. Welcome to Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine!

Yours,

Welcome to Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine! Yours, David V. Lenihan Ph.D., J.D., MCC, CBiol MIBiol,

David V. Lenihan Ph.D., J.D., MCC, CBiol MIBiol, FRSM Dean – Preclinical Medicine Professor of Neuroscience and Neuroanatomy Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine

Table of Contents

WELCOME FROM THE DEAN OF PRECLINICAL MEDICINE

 

2

OVERVIEWS AND

DOCUMENTATION

10

YEAR TWO SCHEDULE OVERVIEW

 

11

ESTIMATED WEEKLY SCHEDULE

12

EXAM SCHEDULE BREAKDOWN

13

SEMESTER ONE

13

SEMESTER ONE FINALS WEEK

15

SEMESTER TWO

16

SEMESTER TWO FINALS WEEK

17

FACULTY OFFICE HOURS AND CONTACT INFORMATION

 

18

COURSE BREAKDOWN

19

ACADEMIC POLICIES

20

 

ACADEMIC POLICIES

20

LECTURES

20

E-Lectures

20

Traditional Lectures

 

20

ICLICKERS

20

 

iClicker Policies

20

ATTENDANCE

21

SEATING ASSIGNMENTS

21

EXAMS

21

Exam Taking Policy

 

21

ExamSoft and SofTest

22

Prior to Exam Day

22

On Exam Day

22

SofTest Tips and Tricks

23

ExamSoft Technical Support Resources:

23

Exam

Standardization

23

Exam

Reviewing Policy

24

END OF YEAR GRADING POLICY

24

STUDENT PROMOTION

25

GLOBAL STUDENT ASSESSMENT TOOLS

25

Early Warning System

 

25

Cross Course Performance Graph

26

COMMUNICATION

26

Student

Weekly Survey

26

Student

Town Hall Meetings

26

Twitter

 

27

Mandatory Evaluation

27

Office Hours and Email Communication

27

 

STUDENT RESOURCES

27

Resources

for Mental Health

27

Crises and Emergencies

 

27

27 Resources for Mental Health 27 Crises and Emergencies   27 *Document is subject to change
27 Resources for Mental Health 27 Crises and Emergencies   27 *Document is subject to change
 

Curriculum Specialist

 

27

Student Health Services Clinic

27

COPYRIGHT FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

27

 

What is the difference between Copyright Infringement and Plagiarism?

 

27

What is the purpose of Copyright and Patent in the United States?

28

What

is

Copyright?

28

What types of work are protected by Copyright?

 

28

What

is

Fair Use?

28

What is the current term of Copyright in the United States?

 

28

What does Copyright protect?

28

What

isn’t protected by Copyright?

28

What is required to have a work be protected by Copyright?

28

What is the Public Domain?

28

What

is

First Sale?

29

What

is

Copyleft?

29

2016

BOOKLIST

 

30

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

 

30

 

PC Requirements (Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8):

 

30

Mac Requirements (OS X 10.6, 10.7, 10.8):

30

BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE

 

30

 

Required Texts and Materials

 

30

Recommended Texts and Materials

30

CLINICAL SYSTEMS

 

31

 

Required Texts and Materials

 

31

Supplemental Texts and Materials

32

MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY

33

 

Required Texts and Materials

 

33

Recommended Texts and Materials

33

MEDICAL SIMULATION

 

34

Required Materials

 

34

OMM II

34

Required Texts and Materials

 

34

Recommended Texts and Materials OSCE

34

34

 

Required

Materials

 

34

Required

Texts

35

PATHOLOGY

 

35

 

Required Texts and Materials

 

35

Recommended

Texts and Materials

35

Supplementary Educational Materials

 

36

PHARMACOLOGY

 

37

 

Required Texts and Materials

 

37

Recommended Texts and Materials

37

PRIMARY CARE SKILLS

 

37

 

Required Texts and Materials

 

37

PROFESSIONALISM AND MEDICAL ETHICS

38

 

Required Textbook:

 

38

SEMESTER ONE SYLLABI

39

E THICS 38   Required Textbook:   38 SEMESTER ONE SYLLABI 39 *Document is subject to
E THICS 38   Required Textbook:   38 SEMESTER ONE SYLLABI 39 *Document is subject to

BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE SYLLABUS

40

COURSE DETAILS

40

COURSE DESCRIPTION

40

OVERALL COURSE GOALS

40

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

40

RECOMMENDED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

40

EXAM DATES

41

EXAM GRADE COMPUTATION

41

COURSE GRADE COMPUTATION

41

COURSE SCHEDULE

42

Lectures

42

CLINICAL SYSTEMS I SYLLABUS

 

46

COURSE DETAILS

46

COURSE DESCRIPTION

46

OVERALL COURSE GOALS

47

Course Objectives

47

Student Objectives

48

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

48

SUPPLEMENTAL TEXTS AND MATERIALS

49

EXAM DATES

51

EXAM GRADE COMPUTATION

51

COURSE GRADE COMPUTATION

51

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

52

Course

Format

52

Course

Presentation

52

Course Specific Attendance and Tardiness Policy

53

Accessing Up To Date Online Instructions

Systems Cardiology Module

53

Cardiac Auscultation Assignment Clinical

53

COURSE SCHEDULE

 

55

Lectures

55

MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY I SYLLABUS

85

COURSE DETAILS

85

COURSE DESCRIPTION

85

OVERALL COURSE GOALS

85

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

86

RECOMMENDED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

86

EXAM DATES

86

EXAM GRADE COMPUTATION

86

COURSE GRADE COMPUTATION

87

COURSE SCHEDULE

88

Lectures

88

MEDICAL SIMULATION ELECTIVE FALL SEMESTER SYLLABUS

101

COURSE DETAILS

101

COURSE DESCRIPTION

101

OVERALL COURSE GOALS

101

REQUIRED MATERIALS

101

ASSESSMENT

101

VERALL C OURSE G OALS 101 R EQUIRED M ATERIALS 101 A SSESSMENT 101 *Document is
VERALL C OURSE G OALS 101 R EQUIRED M ATERIALS 101 A SSESSMENT 101 *Document is

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

102

Course

Format

102

Course

Fee

102

Course

Registration

102

Attendance, Tardiness & Absences

102

Latex Allergies or Latex Hypersensitivities

102

COURSE SCHEDULE

103

Lectures

103

OSTEOPATHIC MANIPULATIVE MEDICINE II PART 1 SYLLABUS

106

COURSE DETAILS

106

COURSE DESCRIPTION

106

OVERALL COURSE GOALS

106

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

106

RECOMMENDED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

107

EXAM DATES

107

EXAM GRADE COMPUTATION

107

COURSE GRADE COMPUTATION

108

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

108

Attendance and Grading Policy

COURSE SCHEDULE

108

111

Lectures

111

PATHOLOGY I SYLLABUS

124

COURSE DETAILS

124

COURSE DESCRIPTION

124

OVERALL COURSE GOALS

124

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

124

RECOMMENDED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

125

SUPPLEMENTARY EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS

125

EXAM DATES

126

EXAM GRADE COMPUTATION

126

COURSE GRADE COMPUTATION

127

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

127

Laboratory & Small group Session Rules

127

Participating Faculty

127

COURSE SCHEDULE

128

Lectures and Labs

128

PHARMACOLOGY I SYLLABUS

151

COURSE DETAILS

151

COURSE DESCRIPTION

151

OVERALL COURSE GOALS

151

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

151

RECOMMENDED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

152

EXAM DATES

152

EXAM GRADE COMPUTATION

152

COURSE GRADE COMPUTATION

153

COURSE SCHEDULE

154

Lectures

154

152 C OURSE G RADE C OMPUTATION 153 C OURSE S CHEDULE 154 Lectures 154 *Document
152 C OURSE G RADE C OMPUTATION 153 C OURSE S CHEDULE 154 Lectures 154 *Document

PRIMARY

CARE SKILLS SYLLABUS

163

COURSE DETAILS

163

COURSE DESCRIPTION

163

OVERALL COURSE GOALS

163

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

163

EXAM DATES

164

EXAM GRADE COMPUTATION

164

COURSE GRADE COMPUTATION

165

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

166

Course

Material

166

Course

Format

166

Course

Presentation

166

Course Specific Attendance and Tardiness Policy

167

Latex Allergies or Latex Hypersensitivities

167

COURSE SCHEDULE

168

Lectures

168

SEMESTER TWO SYLLABI

173

CLINICAL SYSTEMS II SYLLABUS

174

COURSE DETAILS

174

COURSE DESCRIPTION

174

OVERALL COURSE GOALS

175

Course Objectives

175

Student Objectives

175

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

176

SUPPLEMENTAL TEXTS AND MATERIALS

177

EXAM DATES

178

EXAM GRADE COMPUTATION

178

COURSE GRADE COMPUTATION

179

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

179

Course

Format

179

Course

Presentation

180

Course Specific Attendance and Tardiness Policy

180

Accessing Up to Date Online Instructions

180

HEENT, Ear Assignment

181

COURSE SCHEDULE

183

Lectures

183

MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY II SYLLABUS

215

COURSE DETAILS

215

COURSE DESCRIPTION

215

OVERALL COURSE GOALS

215

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

216

RECOMMENDED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

216

EXAM DATES

216

EXAM GRADE COMPUTATION

216

COURSE GRADE COMPUTATION

217

COURSE SCHEDULE

218

Lectures

218

216 C OURSE G RADE C OMPUTATION 217 C OURSE S CHEDULE 218 Lectures 218 *Document
216 C OURSE G RADE C OMPUTATION 217 C OURSE S CHEDULE 218 Lectures 218 *Document

MEDICAL SIMULATION ELECTIVE SPRING SEMESTER SYLLABUS

229

COURSE DETAILS

229

COURSE DESCRIPTION

229

OVERALL COURSE GOALS

229

REQUIRED MATERIALS

229

ASSESSMENT

229

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

230

Course

Format

230

Course

Fee

230

Course

Registration

230

Attendance, Tardiness & Absences

230

Latex Allergies or Latex Hypersensitivities

230

COURSE SCHEDULE

231

Lectures

231

OSTEOPATHIC MANIPULATIVE MEDICINE II PART 2 SYLLABUS

235

COURSE DETAILS

235

COURSE DESCRIPTION

235

OVERALL COURSE GOALS

235

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

235

RECOMMENDED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

236

EXAM DATES

236

EXAM GRADE COMPUTATION

236

COURSE GRADE COMPUTATION

237

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

237

Attendance and Grading Policy

COURSE SCHEDULE

237

240

Lectures

240

OBJECTIVE STRUCTURED CLINICAL EXAMINATION (OSCE) SYLLABUS

249

COURSE DETAILS

249

COURSE DESCRIPTION

249

OVERALL COURSE GOALS

249

REQUIRED MATERIALS

250

REQUIRED TEXTS

250

EXAM GRADE COMPUTATION

250

COURSE GRADE COMPUTATION

251

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

251

Course

Materials

251

Course

Format

251

Course

Presentation

252

Course Specific Attendance and Tardiness Policy

252

Latex Allergies or Latex Hypersensitivities

252

COURSE SCHEDULE

253

Lectures

253

PATHOLOGY II SYLLABUS

259

COURSE DETAILS

259

COURSE DESCRIPTION

259

OVERALL COURSE GOALS

259

D ETAILS 259 C OURSE D ESCRIPTION 259 O VERALL C OURSE G OALS 259 *Document
D ETAILS 259 C OURSE D ESCRIPTION 259 O VERALL C OURSE G OALS 259 *Document

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

259

RECOMMENDED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

260

SUPPLEMENTARY EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS

260

EXAM DATES

261

EXAM GRADE COMPUTATION

261

COURSE GRADE COMPUTATION

262

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

262

Laboratory & Small group Session Rules

262

Participating Faculty

262

COURSE SCHEDULE

263

Labs & Lectures

263

PHARMACOLOGY II SYLLABUS

275

COURSE DETAILS

275

COURSE DESCRIPTION

275

OVERALL COURSE GOALS

275

REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

275

RECOMMENDED TEXTS AND MATERIALS

276

EXAM DATES

276

EXAM GRADE COMPUTATION

276

COURSE GRADE COMPUTATION

277

COURSE SCHEDULE

278

Lectures

278

PROFESSIONALISM IN MEDICINE

289

COURSE DETAILS

289

COURSE DESCRIPTION

289

OVERALL COURSE GOALS

289

COURSE STRUCTURE

290

COURSE READINGS

290

Required Textbook:

290

iTunes Lectures

290

FORMAL COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

290

EXAM DATES

290

EXAM GRADE COMPUTATION

291

COURSE GRADE COMPUTATION

291

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

291

Academic Dishonesty

COURSE SCHEDULE

Lectures

291

292

292

I NFORMATION 291 Academic Dishonesty C OURSE S CHEDULE Lectures 291 292 292 *Document is subject
I NFORMATION 291 Academic Dishonesty C OURSE S CHEDULE Lectures 291 292 292 *Document is subject

Overviews and Documentation

Overviews and Documentation *Document is subject to change 10
Overviews and Documentation *Document is subject to change 10

Year Two Schedule Overview

Year Two Schedule Overview *Document is subject to change 11
Year Two Schedule Overview *Document is subject to change 11
Year Two Schedule Overview *Document is subject to change 11

Estimated Weekly Schedule

Estimated Weekly Schedule *Document is subject to change 12
Estimated Weekly Schedule *Document is subject to change 12
Estimated Weekly Schedule *Document is subject to change 12

Exam Schedule Breakdown

Semester One

Exam Schedule Breakdown Semester One *Document is subject to change 13
Exam Schedule Breakdown Semester One *Document is subject to change 13
Exam Schedule Breakdown Semester One *Document is subject to change 13
*Document is subject to change 14
*Document is subject to change 14
*Document is subject to change 14

Semester One Finals Week Schedule is not finalized – subject to change

Semester One Finals Week Schedule is not finalized – subject to change *Document is subject to
Semester One Finals Week Schedule is not finalized – subject to change *Document is subject to
Semester One Finals Week Schedule is not finalized – subject to change *Document is subject to

Semester Two

Semester Two *Document is subject to change 16
Semester Two *Document is subject to change 16
Semester Two *Document is subject to change 16

Semester Two Finals Week Schedule is not finalized – subject to change

Semester Two Finals Week Schedule is not finalized – subject to change *Document is subject to
Semester Two Finals Week Schedule is not finalized – subject to change *Document is subject to
Semester Two Finals Week Schedule is not finalized – subject to change *Document is subject to

Faculty Office Hours and Contact Information

       

Phone

 

Professor

Courses Taught

Room

E-mail

Number

Office Hours

Dr. Anthony

OSCE, PCS, MedSim

220

Esquire.Anthony@touro.edu

x4551

by appt. only

Dr. Bahri

 

Pathology

419

Tipsuda.Bahri@touro.edu

x4610

by appt. only

Dr.

         

Banihashem

 

OMM

420

Mary.Banihashem@touro.edu

x4618

by appt. only

Dr. Brown

OSCE, PCS, MedSim, Clinical Systems

220

Joyce.Brown@touro.edu

x4506

by appt. only

Dr. Capozzi

Clinical Systems, PCS, OSCE

220

Barbara.Capozzi@touro.edu

x4507

by appt. only

Dr. Delbridge

 

Pathology

427

Cheryl.Delbridge@touro.edu

x4606

Tues, by appt. only

 

Medical Microbiology

       

Dr. DiCaprio

&

Immunology

427

Kathleen.DiCaprio@touro.edu

x4608

by appt. only

Dr. Gardere

Behavioral Medicine

423

Jeffrey.Gardere@touro.edu

x4614

by appt. only

Dr. Grotticelli

OSCE, PCS, MedSim

220

Janet.Grotticelli@touro.edu

x4584

by appt. only

 

Medical Microbiology

     

Tues and Thurs 12-

Dr. Jones

&

Immunology

426

Stephen.Jones@touro.edu

x4609

2pm

Dr. Milani

 

OMM

443

Susan.Milani@touro.edu

x4619

by appt. only

Dr. Pino

Pharmacology

426

Maria.Pino@touro.edu

x4613

Wed and Thurs at noon or by appt.

Dr. Prancan

Pharmacology

425

Arthur.Prancan@touro.edu

x4612

Wed and Thurs at Noon

Dr. Sirota

OSCE, MedSim

225

Harold.Sirota@touro.edu

x4522

by appt. only

Dr. Stern

 

Pathology

419

Robert.Stern@touro.edu

x4611

by appt. only

Dr. Vasconez-

 

OSCE

Grace.Vasconez-

   

Pereira

 

OMM

(332)

Pereira@touro.edu

x4581

by appt. only

  Pereira   OMM (332) Pereira@touro.edu x4581 by appt. only *Document is subject to change 18
  Pereira   OMM (332) Pereira@touro.edu x4581 by appt. only *Document is subject to change 18

Course Breakdown

 

Year 2

   

Semester

Semester

Courses

Subtopics

1

2

Behavioral Medicine

 

2

-

Clinical Systems

(Includes module systems)

7

7

Introduction to

     

Clinical Rotations

-

1

Medical Microbiology and Immunology

(Includes module systems)

2

2

Medical Simulation Elective

 

-

-

OMM II

(Includes module system)

3

3

OSCE

 

-

1

Pathology

(Includes module systems)

5

5

Pharmacology

(Includes module systems)

4

4

Primary Care Skills

 

1

-

Professionalism and Medical Ethics

 

-

2

Total hours by semester for the second year

24

25

Ethics   - 2 Total hours by semester for the second year 24 25 *Document is
Ethics   - 2 Total hours by semester for the second year 24 25 *Document is

Academic Policies

Academic Policies

All official Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine academic policies can be found in the student handbook. These polices include our attendance policy, our policy on academic integrity, our policy on laboratory accommodations, and more. This handbook is most readily available online, at http://www.touro.edu/med/handbook.html.

If there is a conflict in policy between the Course Documentation Handbook and the Student Handbook, the Student Handbook prevails.

Lectures

E-Lectures

Most of your classes will be given using the E-Lecture system. Prerecorded lectures will be available on iTunes for you to download and watch.

In-class lectures will be Group Learning sessions that will be structured around Question-Answer sessions using the iClickers. It will be expected that the lecture video is watched before the corresponding Group Learning session. Each course’s syllabus will include which lecture videos to watch before the Group Learning session.

Some Group Learning sessions will be designated by lab group (A or B). Just like lab sessions, you will only be required to attend Group Learning sessions for your group.

Attending alternate Group Learning Sessions will only be permitted in situations when you would be missing your session for a school purpose (attending a conference, work study, etc.). Excused absences will not be sufficient to attend the alternate session. Additionally, any missed Group Learning Sessions will be deducted from your final grade calculation.

You can only receive points for a session that you attend. The alternate session is not there for you to attend when you need it.

Traditional Lectures

Courses that are not taught using the E-Lecture system will be taught using the traditional lecture system. Students will attend lectures that are given in class at their scheduled time.

iClickers

iClicker Policies

iClickers with a specific serial number will be assigned to each student at the beginning of the year. They will be used to see how well students understand the course material that is being taught, as well as used for in class quizzes and assignments. Each iClicker has an individual serial number that will be linked to your student ID which will be used to keep track of the answers you input. Scores will be posted on Blackboard under the proper course.

Students will be issued an iClicker for the year. You will be expected to bring the iClicker with you to class every day. If you do not bring the iClicker, your presence in the class will not be recorded, you will not receive points for any assignments given that day and you will be marked as absent for the day. Professors will not be accepting handwritten answers to the questions if you forget your iClicker.

not be accepting handwritten answers to the questions if you forget your iClicker. *Document is subject
not be accepting handwritten answers to the questions if you forget your iClicker. *Document is subject

Students will be responsible for making sure that their iClicker has batteries. If your iClicker is having a technical problem, contact Theodore Thompson (Theodore.thompson7@touro.edu). At the end of the school year, you will return the iClicker. If you do not return the iClicker, you will be charged $50 to replace and reprocess a new one.

Attendance

There will be no global attendance policy this year. Please see individual course syllabi for specific attendance policies.

Seating Assignments

Seating in Lecture Hall 2 will be operating on a First Come/First Serve basis. Saving seats will not be allowed.

Exams

Exam Taking Policy

TouroCOM uses ExamSoft, a computer-based exam program, to write and administer exams. For each exam, students download a password protected exam file and at exam time are given the password to begin the exam. Once the exam is finished, students upload their answer file to be graded.

Exams are given on Mondays during the semester. Exam dates and times are listed in the Course Documentation Handbook on page 13 and in each individual class syllabus. Exams can be taken in either Lecture Halls 1 or 2. Exam times are subject to change; please refer to the Google calendar for the most accurate version of the schedule.

Students will use their own computer to take exams. Students who do not have a computer that fits the specifications to use ExamSoft can use the computers in the Histology lab. This room will also be available to students who have issues with their computers during the exam. The Histology lab is not available to students who have their own computer but would like a different environment. All students who are able to take the exam in one of the Lecture Halls are required to do so.

If you miss an exam or know that you will miss an exam in the future, contact Dr. Cammarata, Dean of Student Affairs, regarding an excused absence and Jennifer Engeleit to schedule a makeup exam. Makeup exams are held within one week after the exam date (the following Monday) and makeup exam grades are posted one week after the makeup exam is taken. Once you schedule a makeup exam with Ms. Engeleit, you are required to show up for your makeup exam. Rescheduling the makeup exam will necessitate another excused absence from Dr. Cammarata. Failure to do so or failure to attend your makeup exam will result in a 0% test grade.

The exam time listed in the syllabus is the time that the exam is scheduled to begin. Students should arrive in the lecture hall to take the exam thirty minutes before the exam is scheduled to begin to ensure enough time to get seated and download the exam. Students who arrive after the exam password has been released or after the exam has begun will not receive extra time to make up for what they have lost. If an exam begins at 10am, it is your responsibility to arrive before 10am so that you can start on time.

Students who are more than 15 minutes late to an exam will not be allowed to sit for the exam at that time. If this happens, contact Dr. Cammarata and Jennifer Engeleit to schedule a makeup exam.

All exams are proctored. Proctors will observe the exam takers to ensure there is no cheating or other academic dishonesty. Proctors have authority in an exam situation and can ask you to show them your scrap paper, your computer or any other items that you are using. If a proctor chooses to do so, they can ask for your name and ID number and submit a report on student behavior to the Deans’ office. This may result in a meeting with the Dean of Preclinical Medicine and a note in your file.

may result in a meeting with the Dean of Preclinical Medicine and a note in your
may result in a meeting with the Dean of Preclinical Medicine and a note in your

The following items are not allowed in an exam room:

Written notes or textbooks

Cellphones

iPods, or any other portable audio device

Loud or distracting food or drink

Headphones

Once all students have their personal items cleared from the room, the password will be posted for students to begin the exam. Students will follow the prompts until they get to a screen that requires them to type in the word “Begin,” where they will stop and wait for further instruction.

Once students are at the begin screen, they will receive their scrap paper. When every student has scrap paper, the proctors will give the room the instruction to begin together.

If a student needs to go to the bathroom or anywhere outside the test room during the exam, they should raise their hands and wait for the proctors for further instruction.

Students will get a 10 minute warning before the end of the exam. Once the proctors tell all students to close out of the exam, students must do so. If any conflict arises, do not argue with the proctors; instead request to have Jennifer Engeleit called and wait for her to arrive to have the matter resolved. Arguing with the proctors will result in a report on your behavior issued to the Dean.

After students have closed out of the exam, students must wait for their exam file to upload before leaving the room. Be sure to make sure your exam file uploads or else your answers will not be available to grade, which will result in there being no grade for the exam when grades are posted.

ExamSoft and SofTest

At the start of the academic year you will receive an email with your user name and password. You will use this user name and password to log onto our personal ExamSoft webpage at https://www.examsoft.com/dotnet/Default.aspx?f=tourocomny. From there you will download SofTest.

Prior to Exam Day

Once you have downloaded SofTest you will be ready to download your exam files as they are released to you. Generally exams will be released a few days before you are scheduled to take the exam.

To download your exam you will open SofTest and select the icon “Download Exam Files” (

open SofTest and select the icon “Download Exam Files” ( ). You will then log in

). You will then log in with your User ID and Password. From there you will select which exam you wish to download and press “Download.”

On Exam Day

you wish to download and press “Download.” On Exam Day On exam day you will open

On exam day you will open up SofTest and click the icon “Take an Exam” (

select your exam from the drop-down and enter the password that the proctor gives you. At this point your computer will switch into a secure mode and you will be brought into your exam. After agreeing to the honor code and reading the instructions you will be able to begin the exam. When you are finished you will submit your exam, the computer will revert back to the normal mode, and your answers will be automatically uploaded to ExamSoft for grading.

). You will then

your answers will be automatically uploaded to ExamSoft for grading. ). You will then *Document is
your answers will be automatically uploaded to ExamSoft for grading. ). You will then *Document is

SofTest Tips and Tricks

1. ExamSoft recommends disabling antivirus program before taking the test. The detailed instructions can be found at http://www.examsoft.com/dotnet/faqs/guides/kaspersky.html

2. Question Navigator enables you to see what questions you have not yet answered, mark any questions you want to go back to, and skip around to various questions

3. You can open and close any images by checking the “show image” box for applicable questions

4. You can view the exam instructions at any time by clicking “Exam Instructions” so that normal values and other information are never missing.

5. Your answers will automatically save when you go to the next question

6. You can “cross out” answer choices by right clicking

7. You can set a timer to automatically notify you when a set amount of time has passed

8. You can resume a test independently if your computer restarts or battery dies

9. Your receive a confirmation when your answers are submitted

10. Safeguards exist to ensure that you do not mistakenly submit and incomplete exam

11. Constant backups are made of your answers to protect against lost exams

12. You will have access to a built in calculator during some exams

13. And more!

ExamSoft Technical Support Resources:

Live Chat: Available Monday-Friday, 8:30am to 5:30pm through the ExamSoft website under (link can be found under “Technical Support”)

Email Support: support@examsoft.com

Student Hotline: (866) 429-8889 (option #3)

Exam Standardization

TouroCOM exams are standardized using a formula that is customized for each course. This formula compares the student’s raw percentages to the average of all successful student’s exam grades over the past three years in that course while controlling for the standard deviation of all successful student’s exam grades over the past three years in that course. Additionally faculty set a Faculty Adjustment value at the beginning of the year to ensure that the standard of their course is met.

By comparing student’s grades for each course to the grades of students who succeeded in the past in that course we are able to standardize grades to ensure that we measure student’s ability to succeed at TouroCOM. Additionally, this method of standardization encourages within class cooperation as it allows the curve to be set by the performance of previous TouroCOM students instead of by within class competition.

The formula used to calculate your standardized grade (Z-Score) from your raw percent is:

%

Though the raw percentage required to obtain a specific Z-Score changes from course to course (depending on the Mean, Standardization and Faculty Adjustment of the specific course), the Z-Scores required to obtain each final grade are standardized across all classes.

The breakdown of what z-score is required to each final grade is as follows:

classes. The breakdown of what z-score is required to each final grade is as follows: *Document
classes. The breakdown of what z-score is required to each final grade is as follows: *Document

A

0.75 ≤ Z-Score

B

-0.45 ≤ Z-Score < -0.75

C

-1.35 ≤ Z-Score < -0.45

U

Z-Score < -1.35

The breakdown of what is required to obtain these cutoffs is specified in each course’s syllabus. Below please find a graph depicting the range of percentages required for each cutoffs.

the range of percentages required for each cutoffs. Exam Reviewing Policy Exam grades are posted to

Exam Reviewing Policy

Exam grades are posted to Blackboard seven days after the exam is taken (usually the following Monday). Exam reports from ExamSoft are also released seven days after an exam is taken.

Students wishing to challenge a question on the exam will have 14 days after the exam is given to contact their professor and challenge the question. Any challenges that have been accepted will be considered when grading the exam. If a challenge is accepted after the grades are posted, the exam will be regraded and new scores will be posted after the 14 day challenge period ends. After the 14 day period ends, grades are final and question challenges will not be accepted.

Generally students will not be allowed to review exam questions for security purposes. If a faculty member wishes to allow students to review their exam questions it is up to their discretion, however any review must occur under the faculty member’s supervision.

End of Year Grading Policy

Students will receive a final letter grade (A, B, C, or U) that corresponds to their final Z-Score at the end of the semester. Final course grades will be computed using the computation method specified in the course syllabus. However professors have the ability to, at the end of the semester, curve their course grades up to one standard deviation up or down.

of the semester, curve their course grades up to one standard deviation up or down. *Document
of the semester, curve their course grades up to one standard deviation up or down. *Document
Student Promotion Student Promotion is the ability of a student to move to the next
Student Promotion Student Promotion is the ability of a student to move to the next

Student Promotion

Student Promotion is the ability of a student to move to the next year of their medical education and is decided by the Student Promotions Committee.

The subject of Student Promotion is detailed in the Student Handbook, which is available online at http://www.touro.edu/med/handbook.html.

Global Student Assessment Tools

Early Warning System

In order to help ensure our students’ success, TouroCOM has created an Early Warning system which helps us monitor student performance and will alert us if a student’s grades begin to drop. This system takes into account a number of factors, including if your average exam score up to the present date, your rank and current GPA.

Three times each semester an Early Warning report is run and the students with the highest Concern Levels are contacted. These students will meet with Dr. Lenihan to discuss their situation and their study habits and to ensure that

with Dr. Lenihan to discuss their situation and their study habits and to ensure that *Document
with Dr. Lenihan to discuss their situation and their study habits and to ensure that *Document

they have all the resources that they need. These emails and meetings are not indicative that you are doing poorly or are in danger of failing, just that we are concerned about the trending of your performance and would like to talk to you about maximizing your education and getting you any help that you need.

Cross Course Performance Graph

you any help that you need. Cross Course Performance Graph After an Early Warning quarter, your

After an Early Warning quarter, your faculty advisor might ask to meet with you regarding your performance. Advisors will be issued the above graph for their advisees. This graph shows your performance in each course (the blue bars) compared to the class average (the red line). It is up to your advisor’s discretion to show or give you your graph if they have them, but Performance Graphs will not be generated for students at their request. If you would like to compare your performance to your peers on your own, please refer to the exam statistics released with the ExamSoft answer keys and the class distribution graphs that are released after each exam. If you would like to compare your performance to your peers on your own, please reference the exam statistics released with the ExamSoft answer keys and the class distribution released after each exam.

Communication

Student Weekly Survey

During the semester, TouroCOM distributes a short weekly survey to the first and second year students. This survey helps us monitor the pulse of student satisfaction with the faculty, administration and the SGA. The survey can be taken through your email account and takes about 3 minutes to complete.

Student Town Hall Meetings

During the semester, the Preclinical Dean will hold Student Town Hall meetings to discuss any pertinent topics that may need clarification and to get feedback on any issues that the students feel warrant discussion.

Students attending the meeting will have the chance to ask questions about school policies and raise concerns on any other issues that they deem necessary.

about school policies and raise concerns on any other issues that they deem necessary. *Document is
about school policies and raise concerns on any other issues that they deem necessary. *Document is

Twitter

Dr. Lenihan, Dean of Preclinical Medicine, has set up a twitter account, @PreclinicalDean, to write about TouroCOM and its students.

Feel free to follow, @reply or retweet anything posted on his Twitter.

Mandatory Evaluation

At the end of each semester, online faculty evaluations will be available for you to complete about your professors. The answers you select will be anonymous, but your participation will be recorded to ensure that all students complete an evaluation for each faculty member. Until all evaluations are submitted, final course grades will not be posted on TCWeb.

Office Hours and Email Communication

Faculty office hours are posted on page 18 of this book. Additionally, any member of the TouroCOM faculty, staff or administration can be contacted by their Touro email, (First Name).(Last Name)@touro.edu.

Student Resources

Resources for Mental Health

Ms. Kari Tabag, LCSW 646-981-4562, Room 312 Kari.Tabag@touro.edu All services are free and confidential

Crises and Emergencies

Dr. Cammarata, Dean of Students

917-597-9362

Jerry.Cammarata@touro.edu

Curriculum Specialist

Dr. Gray Frank.Gray@touro.edu

Student Health Services Clinic

Dr. Patel Medical Office Hemant Patel MD PC 33 West 125 Street New York, NY 10027

212-289-5795

Copyright Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

What is the difference between Copyright Infringement and Plagiarism?

Infringement is an illegal act where one has exercised one of the exclusive rights of a copyright owner beyond the exemptions permitted under law and without permission. Plagiarism is the unethical act of using someone else’s expression or ideas without giving that person credit. If you copy a work beyond the amount permitted by fair use it is infringement — even if you cite the author. If you take an idea from some else and do NOT cite the author it is plagiarism, even if the work is in the public domain or you did not copy protected expression.

even if the work is in the public domain or you did not copy protected expression.
even if the work is in the public domain or you did not copy protected expression.

What is the purpose of Copyright and Patent in the United States?

To promote the progress of science and the useful arts.

What is Copyright?

Copyright is a bundle of rights that grants the copyright owner of a work the exclusive right to: reproduce; prepare derivative works; distribute copies to the public by sale, other transfer of ownership, rental, lease or lending; perform the work publicly, or display the work publicly. Authors of certain works of visual art also have the right of attribution (to be recognized as the creator of the work) and the right of integrity (not to have a work changed without their permission). In the United States the Copyright Office is part of the Library of Congress. More information can be found at http://www.copyright.gov/. Of particular interest of librarians and educators is circular 21 at http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ21.pdf .

What types of work are protected by Copyright?

Original works of authorship fixed in a tangible medium of expression readable by the unaided human eye or via machines. This includes: literary works; musical works, including any accompanying words; dramatic works, including any accompanying music; pantomimes and choreographic works; pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works; motion pictures and other audiovisual works; sound recordings; architectural works, software, and vessel hulls.

What is Fair Use?

Fair Use is a general exemption to the exclusive rights of the owner. It allows anyone to use a limited portion of a work for criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research. There are no bright line guidelines as to whether any particular use is fair. For this reason fair use is often referred to as an equitable rule of reason. Fair use was first created as a judicial doctrine then incorporated into copyright law in the 1978 revision. Fair Use does not necessarily apply to works that are licensed. To determine whether a particular use is fair four factors need to be considered: 1) the purpose of the use, 2) the nature of the work (highly creative works are generally more protected than factual works), 3) amount taken, and 4) effect on the market value of the work.

What is the current term of Copyright in the United States?

Works by an identified author(s) - life of author plus 70 years, Anonymous, pseudonymous works and works for hire - 95 years from first publication or 120 years from creation, whichever expires first (see Laura Gasaway’s site http://www.unc.edu/~unclng/public-d.htm for a complete chart of when work’s pass into the public domain.)

What does Copyright protect?

Copyright protects the expression embedded in the work (the actual words, images, notes, etc.).

What isn’t protected by Copyright?

Facts, concepts, ideas, processes, procedures, works by the United States government

What is required to have a work be protected by Copyright?

There is currently no requirement for registration or for a copyright notice for a work to be protected. Once a work is fixed it is covered by copyright. However, in order to sue someone for copyright infringement in the United States the work must be registered, even if the registration takes place after the infringement took place.

What is the Public Domain?

If a work is no longer protected by copyright or not eligible to be protected by copyright it is in the public domain. That means there is no copyright owner authorized to exercise exclusive rights, so anyone can create a derivate version of the work, or reproduce, sell, distribute, display and perform the work without permission or fee.

reproduce, sell, distribute, display and perform the work without permission or fee. *Document is subject to
reproduce, sell, distribute, display and perform the work without permission or fee. *Document is subject to

What is First Sale?

Once an individual buys an object in which copyright expression is embedded the buyer has the right to control that object, this includes lending, selling, and destroying –anything in fact but making a copy. It is the right of first sale that permits libraries to buy materials and circulate them. First sale does not necessarily apply to works that are licensed rather than purchased.

What is Copyleft?

This is a movement to release works with only a few specified restrictions. Where copyright takes the stance that all uses not permitted are restricted, Copyleft takes the approach all uses not restricted are permitted. See The Creative Commons at http://creativecommons.org/.

restricted are permitted. See The Creative Commons at http://creativecommons.org/ . *Document is subject to change 29
restricted are permitted. See The Creative Commons at http://creativecommons.org/ . *Document is subject to change 29

2016 Booklist

General Requirements

1 laptop computer or iPad that fits the following minimum requirements (to take exams with SofTest):

Note: these requirements are as of May 15, 2013. Hardware compatibility may change by Fall 2013. Please check

http://support.examsoft.com/link/portal/15157/15194/Article/162/What-are-the-minimum-system-requirements-to-

run-SofTest for the most recent requirements.

PC Requirements (Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8):

CPU = 2GHz Intel® Core™/Celeron™ or equivalent x86 processor (CPU Info)

RAM = highest recommended for the operating system or 2GB

Hard Drive = highest recommended for the operating system or 1GB of free space

Operating System = English 32-bit Versions of Windows XP, 32-bit and 64-bit Versions of Windows Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8

SofTest cannot be used on virtual operating systems such as Microsoft's Virtual Machine, Parallels or VMware, VMware Fusion or any other virtual environments, unless approved for the institution.

Software = Internet Explorer 7.0 or later

Internet connection for SofTest Installation, Exam Download and Upload

Screen Resolution must be 1024x768 or higher

Administrator level account permissions

Mac Requirements (OS X 10.6, 10.7, 10.8):

CPU = Intel processor

RAM = 2 GB

Hard Drive = 1 GB of free disk space

Operating System = MAC OS X 10.6 (Snow Leopard), 10.7 (Lion), or 10.8 (Mountain Lion)

Server version of Mac OS X is not supported

SofTest may not be used in a virtual operating systems

Software = Internet connection for SofTest installation, Exam Download and Upload

Administrator account

Behavioral Medicine

Required Texts and Materials

COMLEX Level 1 Lecture Notes – Behavioral Sciences and OMM by Kaplan Medical *This will be distributed by the school.

Recommended Texts and Materials

1. Kaplan and Sadock’s Synopsis of Psychiatry: Behavioral Sciences/Clinical Psychiatry by Benjamin J. Sadock and Virginia A. Sadock (ISBN: 9978-0-7817-7327-0, 0-7817-7327-X

by Benjamin J. Sadock and Virginia A. Sadock (ISBN: 9978-0-7817-7327-0, 0-7817-7327-X *Document is subject to change
by Benjamin J. Sadock and Virginia A. Sadock (ISBN: 9978-0-7817-7327-0, 0-7817-7327-X *Document is subject to change

Clinical Systems

Required Texts and Materials

1. Title: Cecil Medicine 24th Edition

a. By: Lee Goldman (editor)

b. Publisher: Saunders; 24th edition (July 25, 2011)

c. ISBN: 978-1-4160-2805-5

2. Title: Nelson Essentials of Pediatrics 6th Edition

a. By: Robert Kliegman(Author)

b. Publisher: Saunders; 6 edition (March 31, 2010)

c. ISBN: 978-1-4377-0643-7

3. Title: Rapid Interpretation of EKGs, Sixth Edition

a. By: Dale Dubin (Author)

b. Publisher: Cover Publishing Company; 6 edition (October 15, 2000)

c. ISBN: 978-0-9129-1206-6

4. Title: Hacker & Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology

a. By: Neville F. Hacker MD

b. Publisher: Saunders; 5 edition (February 4, 2009)

c. ISBN: 978-1-4160-5940-0

5. Title: Bates’ Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking 10th Edition

a. By: Lynn S. Bickley

b. Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 10th edition (December 10, 2008)

c. ISBN: 978-1-6054-7803-6

6. Title: Pathophysiology

a. By: Ivan Damjanov MD PhD

b. Publisher: Saunders; 1 Pap/Psc edition (April 30, 2008)

c. ISBN: 978-1-4160-0229-1

7. Title: Primer on the Rheumatic Diseases

a. By: John H. Klippel

b. Publisher: Springer; 13th ed. 2008

c. ISBN: 978-0-387356648

8. Title: Bates' Visual Guide to Physical Examination

a. By: Barbara Bates, Lynn S Bickley

b. Imprint: Philadelphia, Pa. : Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, c2005, c2007

c. ISBN: 978-0-7817-5861-1

d. Call # (for Touro-Harlem Medical Library): WB 205 B329 2007

9. Title: Physical Examination of the Spine and Extremities

a. By: Stanley Hoppenfeld

b. Publisher: Prentice Hall; 1st Edition (June 5, 1976)

c. ISBN: 978-0-838578537

10. Title: Renal Notebook*

a. By: James Agresti, DO

b. Will be posted on Blackboard prior to the Renal Module.

a. By: James Agresti, DO b. Will be posted on Blackboard prior to the Renal Module.
a. By: James Agresti, DO b. Will be posted on Blackboard prior to the Renal Module.

Supplemental Texts and Materials

1. Title: Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine 18 Th. Edition

a. By: Anthony S.Fauci

b. Publisher: McGraw-Hill

c. ISBN: 978-0-0714-6633-2

2. Title: Rakel Textbook of Family Medicine

a. By: Robert E. Rakel

b. Publisher: Saunders; 8 Th. Edition (April 25, 2007)

c. ISBN: 978-1-4160-2467-5

3. Title: Rakel Essential Family Medicine: Fundamentals and Case Studies, Third edition

a. By: Robert E. Rakel

b. Publisher: Saunders, Elsevir

c. ISBN: 978-1-4160-2377-7

4. Title: Kochar’s Clinical Medicine for Students: Fifth Edition

a. By: Dario Torre

b. Publisher: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Fifth Edition (2009)

c. ISBN: 978-0-7817-6699-9

5. Title: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics 18 Th. Edition

a. By: Robert M. Kliegman

b. Publisher:Elsevier Science Health Science Division

c. ISBN: 978-1-4160-2450-7

6. Title: Minor Emergencies: Splinters to Fractures

a. By: Philip Buttaravoli

b. Publisher: Mosby; 2 nd. Edition

c. ISBN: 978-0-323-04026-6.

7. Title: ENT Secrets, Third Edition

a. By: Bruce W. Jafek, M.D.

b. Publisher: Mosby; 3 rd. Edition

c. ISBN: 978-1560536178

8. Title: Obstetrics and Gynecology

a. By: Charles RB Beckmann (Editor)

b. Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 6 Edition (May 1, 2009)

c. ISBN: 978-0-7817-8807-6

9. Title: Williams Obstetrics

a. By: F. Gary Cunningham

b. Publisher: McGraw- Hill; 23rd Edition

c. ISBN: 978-0-0714-9701-5

10. Title: Learning Radiology: Recognizing the Basics

a. By: William Herring MD (Author)

b. Publisher: Mosby; 1 Pap/Pas edition (May 1, 2007)

c. ISBN: 978-0-3230-4317-5

11. Title: A Practical Approach to Radiology

a. By: Nancy M. Major, M.D.

b. Publisher: Saunders; 1 edition (August 25, 2006)

c. ISBN: 978-1-4160-2341-8

M.D. b. Publisher: Saunders; 1 edition (August 25, 2006) c. ISBN: 978-1-4160-2341-8 *Document is subject to
M.D. b. Publisher: Saunders; 1 edition (August 25, 2006) c. ISBN: 978-1-4160-2341-8 *Document is subject to

12.

Title: Ferri's Best Test: A Practical Guide to Laboratory Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging

a. By: Fred F. Ferri MD FACP (Author)

b. Publisher: Mosby; 2 edition (April 7, 2009)

c. ISBN: 978-0-3230-5759-2

13. Title: Primary Care Geriatrics, 5th Edition: A Case Based Approach

a. By: Ellen Flaherty, PhD APRN BC (Author)

b. Publisher: Mosby; 5 edition (September 18, 2006)

c. ISBN-13: 978-0-3230-3930-7

14. Title: Essentials of Surgery

a. By: James M. Becker, M.D., FACS

b. Publisher: Saunders

c. ISBN: 978-0-7216-8186-3

15. Title: The Complete Guide to Nutrition in Primary Care

a. By: Darwin Deen , Lisa Hark

b. Publisher: Blackwell

c. ISBN: 978-1-4051-0474-6

Medical Microbiology and Immunology

Required Texts and Materials

1. Microbiology: A Clinical Approach

a. ISBN#: 978-0-815-36514-3

b. Edition: 1st

c. Publisher: Garland science

d. Year: 2010

2. Essentials of Clinical Immunology

a. ISBN#: 978-1-4051-2761-5

b. Edition: 5th

c. Publisher: John Wiley and Sons Inc

d. Year: 2006

Recommended Texts and Materials

1. Rubin’s Pathology: Clinicopathologic foundations of medicine

a. ISBN#: 0-7817-9516-8

b. Edition: 5th

c. Publisher: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

d. Year: 2008

2. Schaechter’s Mechanisms of Microbial Disease

a. ISBN#: 978-0-7817-53425

b. Edition: 4th

c. Publisher: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

d. Year: 2006

3. Lippincott’s Illustrated Q&A Review of Microbiology and Immunology

a. ISBN#: 987-1-58255-857-8

b. Publisher: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

c. Year: 2010

ISBN#: 987-1-58255-857-8 b. Publisher: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins c. Year: 2010 *Document is subject to change
ISBN#: 987-1-58255-857-8 b. Publisher: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins c. Year: 2010 *Document is subject to change

Medical Simulation

Required Materials

Stethoscope

Scrubs

White lab coat

OMM II

Required Texts and Materials

1. Osteopathic Considerations in Systemic Dysfunction, Revised 2nd Edition,

a. Author - Kuchera, M.

b. ISBN -1-57074-154-9

2. Foundations of Osteopathic Medicine, 3rd Edition

a. Editor -Chila, Anthony

b. ISBN -978-0-7817-6671-5

3. An Osteopathic Approach to Diagnosis & Treatment

a. Author-DiGiovanna et al

b. ISBN -978-0-7817-6671-5

4. Physical Examination of the Spine & Extremities

a. Author-HoppenfeldI S.

b. ISBN -0-8385-7853-5

Recommended Texts and Materials

1. Somatic Dysfunction in Osteopathic Family Medicine

a. Editor -Nelson, Kenneth

b. ISBN-13 =978-1-4051-0475-3

2. Teachings in the Science of Osteopathy

a. Author-Sutherland, William

b. ISBN-0-930298-00-5

3. A Pocket Manual of OMT

a. Author- Steele, Karen M.

b. ISBN-13 978-1405104807

4. The 5-Minute Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine Consult

a. Author-Channel,Millicent King

b. ISBN 13: 978-0781779531

OSCE

Required Materials

Stethoscope with a dual head (separate diaphragm and bell)

Adult blood pressure cuff (latex free)

Ophthalmoscope with a coaxial head. A panoptic head is not acceptable.

Otoscope with a pneumatic bulb. Otoscope head must be compatible with plastic disposable specula.

Reflex hammer

Two tuning forks (one that is between 512-1024 Hz and that is 128 Hz)

hammer • Two tuning forks (one that is between 512-1024 Hz and that is 128 Hz)
hammer • Two tuning forks (one that is between 512-1024 Hz and that is 128 Hz)

Penlight

Student length/consultation white laboratory coat

Required Texts

1. Bates’ Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking, 10 th Edition

a. Author=Lynn S. Bickley

b. Editor =Bickley

c. Publisher =Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

d. Publisher Webpage=http://www.lww.com

e. Publication Date =2009

f. ISBN =978-0-7817-8058-2

2. Physical Examination of the Spine and Extremities

a. Author=Stanley Hoppenfeld

b. Editor =Hoppenfeld

c. Publisher =Prentice Hall

d. Publisher Webpage=http://www.prenticehall.com

e. Publication Date = 1976

f. ISBN = 0-8385-7853-5

3. Bates’ Visual Guide to Physical Examination DVD Series Volumes 1-19, 4th Edition*

a. Author = Lynn S. Bickely

b. ISBN = 9780781757645 *This is available on via streaming video through the TouroCOM library. Instructions for access and viewing are posted on Blackboard.

Pathology

Required Texts and Materials

If you have purchased the Robbin’s Basic, Big Robbin’s, or Rubin’s and do not want to change textbooks, then that is fine. The required reading will be based upon Robbin’s Basic Pathology (see schedule).

1. Robbins Basic Pathology, 9th Edition (2012) [8th edition (2007) will also suffice]

a. Kumar, Abbas, Fausto, and Mitchell

b. ISBN-13: 978-1-4160-2973-7 from Elsevier (Saunders)

--OR--

2. Rubin’s Pathology: Clinicopathologic foundations of medicine, 5th or 6th edition (2011)

a. Rubin and Strayer

b. 5th edition: ISBN: 0-7817-9516-8; 6th edition ISBN: 9781605479682 from Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

3. Blueprints Medicine, 5th edition (2010) [For Clinico-pharmacologic correlation]

a. Young, Chick, Kormos, & Goroll

b. ISBN:

4. Rapid Review Laboratory Testing in Clinical Medicine (2008) [For Lab medicine correlation]

a. Goljan and Sloka

b. ISBN: 978-0-323-03646-7 from Elsevier (Mosby)

Recommended Texts and Materials

Listed in order of highly recommended to least recommended:

Texts and Materials Listed in order of highly recommended to least recommended: *Document is subject to
Texts and Materials Listed in order of highly recommended to least recommended: *Document is subject to

1.

Rapid Review Pathology, 3rd edition 2011

a. Goljan

b. ISBN 9780323068628 from Elsevier (Mosby)

2. First Aid of the USMLE Step1, 2013 edition

a. Bhusan & Le

b. ISBN: 9780071475310 McGraw-Hill

3. Pathophysiology 2009

a. Damjanov

b. ISBN-13: 978-1-4160-0229-1 from Elsevier (Saunders)

4. Robbin’s & Cotran Review of Pathology, 3rd edition

a. Klatt, Vinay, & Kumar

b. ISBN: 9781416049302 from Elsevier (Saunders)

5. Lippincott's Review of Pathology (2006)

a. Fenderson and Rubin

b. ISBN: 9781416049302 from Elsevier (Saunders)

Supplementary Educational Materials

Textbooks:

1. Robbins and Cotran, 8th edition

a. Kumar, Abbas, Fausto, Aster

b. ISBN: 9781437707922 from Elsevier (Saunders)

2. Essentials of Rubin’s pathology, 5th edition

a. Rubin and Reisner

b. ISBN-10: 0-7817-7324-5 from Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

3. Renal Pathophysiology: the Essentials 3rd edition

a. Rennke and Denker

b. ISBN: 0781799953

4. Pathology Flash cards 2009

a. Baron and Lee

b. 0071613056 McGraw-Hill

5. Andreoli and Carpenter’s Cecil Essentials of Medicine, 7th edition

a. Andreoli

b. ISBN-10: 1-4160-2933-8 from Elsevier (Saunders)

Websites:

Pathology:

1. http://library.med.utah.edu/WebPath/webpath.html {Great images, tutorials, and review questions}

Histology/Pathology:

1. http://zoomify.lumc.edu/path/virtualpath.htm {Virtual pathology: Online glass slide review}

2. http://www.meddean.luc.edu/lumen/gme.htm {Interesting multi-disciplinary case studies}

3. http://www.medicine.virginia.edu/clinical/departments/pathology/Case%20Studies/known-pathologycases

Radiology:

Radiology: *Document is subject to change 36
Radiology: *Document is subject to change 36

1.

http://www.med-ed.virginia.edu/courses/rad/ {Great source on reading XRays, CT scans, etc}

Pharmacology

Required Texts and Materials

1. Study Guide and Lecture Notes

a. Arthur Prancan, Ph.D; Maria A. Pino, Ph.D.

b. Posted on Blackboard

Recommended Texts and Materials

1. Basic and Clinical Pharmacology, 12th edition

a. Editor = Bertram Katzung

b. Publisher = McGraw-Hill Companies

c. Publication Date = 2011

d. ISBN = 978-0-07-160405-5

Primary Care Skills

Required Texts and Materials

1. Stethoscope with a dual head (separate diaphragm and bell)

2. Adult blood pressure cuff (latex free is recommended)

3. Ophthalmoscope with a coaxial head. A panoptic head is not acceptable.

4. Otoscope with a pneumatic bulb. Otoscope head must be compatible with plastic disposable specula.

5. Reflex hammer

6. Two tuning forks (512-1024 Hz and 128 Hz)

7. Penlight

8. Student/consultation length white laboratory coat

9. Bates’ Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking, 10th Edition

a. Author=Lynn S. Bickley

b. Editor =Bickley

c. Publisher =Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

d. Publisher Webpage=http://www.lww.com

e. Publication Date =2009

f. ISBN =978-0-7817-8058-2

10. Physical Examination of the Spine and Extremities

a. Author=Stanley Hoppenfeld

b. Editor =Hoppenfeld

c. Publisher =Prentice Hall

d. Publisher Webpage=http://www.prenticehall.com

e. Publication Date = 1976

f. ISBN = 0-8385-7853-5

11. Bates’ Visual Guide to Physical Examination DVD Series Volumes 1-19, 4th Edition*

a. Author = Lynn S. Bickely

b. ISBN = 9780781757645 *This is available on via streaming video through the TouroCOM library. Instructions for access and viewing are posted on Blackboard.

the TouroCOM library. Instructions for access and viewing are posted on Blackboard. *Document is subject to
the TouroCOM library. Instructions for access and viewing are posted on Blackboard. *Document is subject to

Professionalism and Medical Ethics

Required Textbook:

1. Medical Ethics: A Very Short Introduction by Tony Hope

2. Master the Boards USMLE Medical Ethics: The Only USMLE Ethics High-Yield Review by Conrad Fischer

Boards USMLE Medical Ethics: The Only USMLE Ethics High-Yield Review by Conrad Fischer *Document is subject
Boards USMLE Medical Ethics: The Only USMLE Ethics High-Yield Review by Conrad Fischer *Document is subject

Semester One Syllabi

Semester One Syllabi *Document is subject to change 39
Semester One Syllabi *Document is subject to change 39

Behavioral Medicine Syllabus

Course Details

Course Title

Behavioral Medicine I

Course Number

PRCR-626-E

Department

Basic Sciences

Credit Hours

2

Duration Grading Type Course Director Course Coordinator

18 weeks Letter Dr. Jeff Gardere, PhD Dr. Jeff Gardere, PhD

Director’s Campus Phone

917-312-4497

Director’s Email Office Hours

Jeffrey.gardere@touro.edu By appointment only

Course Description

This course explores behavioral aspects of medicine and psychopathology. This is a challenging field in that it requires integration across multiple frames of reference: biological, psychological, and sociocultural and dealing with irrational ideas. Students learn the basics of normal and abnormal patterns of psychological and social development and their effect on the health of individuals. Students learn about signs, symptoms, diagnostic testing, and treatments of mental illness and management plans. The epidemiology, descriptive psychopathology, etiology, and prognosis of the major child and adult mental disorders are presented. The focus is both on common problems encountered by primary care physicians and on the chronic, severe mental disorders; “schizophrenia”, bipolar disorder, depression and alcoholism, which affect as much as 20 percent of the population.

Overall Course Goals

1. Describe the basics of normal and abnormal patterns of psychological and social development and their effect on the health of individuals.

2. Learn about signs, symptoms, diagnostic testing, and treatments of mental illness and management plans.

3. Learn the value of integrating psychiatry in medicine. Mentally ill are underserved, and treating them reduces health disparities.

4. Understand the public health and policy consequences of the global burden of mental illness and issues in health care reform.

5. Ensure that the elements of the Core Competencies are met.

Required Texts and Materials

COMLEX Level 1 Lecture Notes – Behavioral Sciences and OMM by Kaplan Medical *This will be distributed by the school.

Recommended Texts and Materials

1. Kaplan and Sadock’s Synopsis of Psychiatry: Behavioral Sciences/Clinical Psychiatry by Benjamin J. Sadock and Virginia A. Sadock (ISBN: 9978-0-7817-7327-0, 0-7817-7327-X

2. Kaplan and Sadock’s Study Guide and Self-Examination Review in Psychiatry, Eighth Edition, Wolters Kluver/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007.

Wolters Kluver/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007. Behavioral Medicine *Document is subject to change; please
Wolters Kluver/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007. Behavioral Medicine *Document is subject to change; please

Exam Dates

These dates are subject to change.

Exam I – 10/7/2013

Exam II – 12/11/2013

Exam Grade Computation

For this course the following breakdown will be used, where exam Z-Scores greater than and equal to 0.75 are an A, exam Z-Scores less than 0.75 and greater than and equal to -0.45 and are a B, exam Z-Scores less than -0.45 and greater than and equal to -1.35 are a C and exam Z-Scores below -1.35 are an F. For the raw percentages required to achieve these Z-Scores for this course, please see the chart below.

Letter Grade

Z-Score

Percent

A

0.75 ≤ Z

88.91% ≤ %

B

-0.45 ≤ Z < 0.75

79.96% ≤ % < 88.91%

C

-1.35 ≤ Z < -0.45

73.25% ≤ % < 79.96%

F

Z < -1.35

% < 73.25%

Z-Scores are calculated using the following formula:

%

The mean, standard deviation and faculty adjustment used to calculate your Z-Score is listed below.

Course

Behavioral Medicine

Faculty Adjustment

15.00%

Mean

84.44%

Standard Deviation

7.46%

Course Grade Computation

Quizzes