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Output Documents

from

Hevea Research Platform in Partnership


HRPP
The First Seminar and Workshops,
January 27th-28th, 2009, Bangkok, THAILAND

March 2009
Document Content

Document no. 1 Summary of outputs 1

Document no. 2 Summary of current projects (29 January 09) 5

Document no. 3 Workshop conclusions (28 January 09) 9

Document no. 4 Tables of HRPP projects by thematic 21

Document no. 5 Global Scientific Project of HRPP (29 January 2009) 27

Document no. 6 Contact list of participants 51

CD Content

Welcome addresses and opening speeches

Scientific presentations and abstracts

Selection of pictures

Output document (pdf file of the present document)


Document no. 1

Summary of Outputs

1
Hevea Research Platform in Partnership, HRPP
1st Annual Seminar, 27-28 January 2009
1st Scientific Committee, 29 January 2009
2nd Steering Committee, 29 January 2009
Miracle Grand Hotel, Bangkok

Summary of Main Outputs


03 February 2009

Introduction
The Hevea Research Platform in Partnership (HRPP) has been created on 26 May 2008,
following the signing ceremony of a SMOU between the 4 core members of the platform,
namely Kasetsart University, Prince of Songkla University, Department of Agriculture and
CIRAD. The first Annual Seminar of the platform was held at Bangkok from 27 to 29 January
2009, gathering more than 100 participants. The Associated Members of the Platform were
represented as follows: on the Thai side, Mahidol University, Khon Kaen University, Ubon
Rachathani University, on the French side, INRA, IRD, University of Montpellier II,
University Blaise Pascal of Clermont-Ferrand. Montpellier SupAgro was not able to attend
the seminar and addressed a letter to the Scientific Committee to apologize for its absence.

27 January: Introduction and Scientific Seminar


The HRPP 1st Annual Seminar started with welcoming addresses of representatives from the
Commission of Higher Education and from the French Embassy. Then, each of the 4 core
members gave introducing remarks followed by institutional presentations from Ubon
Ratchathanee University and Mae Jo University. The HRPP President concluded the
introduction of the Seminar, giving a summary of the last events and reminding the main
objectives of the HRPP Seminar and Workshops.
The Scientific Seminar started in the afternoon. Recent advances in research of the 4 main
scientific topics covered by the platform were presented through 8 oral communications (2
communications per topic): 1) Agronomy, Ecophysiology & Environment, 2) Biotechnology
and Genetics, 3) Socio-Economy, 4) Technology and Quality.

28 January 2009: Thematic Workshop Sessions


The second day of the Seminar was devoted to the thematic workshops gathering all the
involved HRPP researchers. Main objectives of these workshops were:
1) to have an in-depth look at the running projects (status, results, continuation, funding,
prospects),
2) to identify new centers of common interest in order to propose new projects to be started.
In addition to these 4 “scientific” workshops, a fifth one was devoted to Training and
Education, especially to the creation of a new curriculum of integrated training on rubber tree
and natural rubber. The President of the Thai Rubber Association (75% of the Thai natural
rubber production i.e. 1/4 of the world production) allowed to clearly identify the needs of the
Thai rubber sector in terms of high education: an Integrated Professional Master covering a
scope “from the rubber seed to the block rubber” is hoping to answer the needs of the sector.
A Working Group gathering one representative of each core members (and an active
participation of Montpellier SupAgro requested) has been set-up in order to write this new

2
curriculum by June 2009. It is hoped to launch this Rubber Master in June 2010. Building-up
this new curriculum is considered as a priority within the activities of HRPP.

Each of the 5 workshops issued a summary report (see Annex 1) and updated tables for all the
projects. Coordinators of each workshop gave a restitution of their working group during the
afternoon plenary session. Following the outputs of the workshops and discussion during the
plenary session, the coordinators worked for updating the HRPP Scientific Project document,
and the project summary table to be presented at the Scientific Committee Meeting on 29
January morning.

29 January 2009: Scientific and Steering Committees

1st Scientific Committee


Eleven out of the twelve members of the Scientific Committee were represented. The
representative of Montpellier SupAgro issued a letter to apologize for his absence and to
strongly recall the strong commitment of his institution to continue in contributing to
collaborate with the HRPP research projects (sandwich thesis) as well as in supporting the
building-up of a new training curriculum on Rubber.
Members of the Scientific Committee proceeded with the election of the Chairman: Assoc.
Professor Dr. Sayan Sdoodee, crop physiologist from Prince of Songkla University was
appointed for 1 year mandate.
Each member gave a short presentation of his institution.
The Scientific Committee debated the different outputs and conclusions of the thematic
workshop sessions and approved the updated HRPP scientific program, providing some minor
amendments. Major HRPP events in 2009 were discussed and a drafted Annual Operational
Plan proposed including the next Annual Seminar to be scheduled in October 2009.
Regarding this Seminar, the Scientific Committee proposed to rearrange the time sharing
between seminar and workshops (time for introductive speeches to be decreased, time for
workshops to be increased).
An activity report will be written by the Coordinator who will collect relevant information
including publication list and summary of activities from each project coordinator.
The Scientific Committee suggested to identifying active researchers in each project in order
to build-up a HRPP expertise database providing summary CVs, fields of expertise and
publications.
Finally, the Scientific Committee validated the candidacy of Mr. Chaiya Kongmanee, socio-
economist from Prince of Songkla University for the 2009 HRPP excellence scholarship
proposed by the French Embassy in Thailand (sandwich PhD.).

2nd Steering Committee


Each of the 4 core members of the Platform were represented at this second meeting of the
HRPP Steering Committee.
The HRPP Coordinator reported on debates and conclusions of the 1st Scientific Committee.
The Steering Committee validated the date of the next HRPP seminar (October 2009),
providing the complete funding of this meeting to be secured.
The different proposals from the Scientific Committee regarding the HRPP Annual Activity
Report and the construction of a data base on HRPP scientific expertise through the gathering
of simplified CVs of all HRPP researchers were validated.
The HRPP scientific program 2009 was adopted by the Steering Committee.
The Steering Committee accepted the candidacy of Mae Jo University as HRPP Associated
Member.

3
The 4 core members agreed to gather and share the financial and human resources
involvement of each of them devoted to HRPP training and research activities. When
completed, this information will show to potential external funding agencies the huge
financial involvement of core members in the on-going projects.
The Steering Committee wished to establishing general guidelines defining clear rules for the
entrance modalities of a new HRPP member (core, associated, others) as well as for the
proposal of a new scientific project to be included in the HRPP Scientific Program.
The 3 last issues debated by the Steering Committee concerned: 1) approval of the candidacy
of Mr. Chaiya Kongmanee, PSU Faculty of Economics regarding the French Embassy
scholarship; 2) necessity to quickly create an “HRPP Centre of Information” in order to
strengthen the communication between members; 3) necessity for HRPP to have its activities
to be evaluated by an external evaluation panel, as mentioned in the HRPP SMOU.
Finally, it must be underlined that an HRPP logo contest has been launched during the
seminar for all participants.

Contact Person: HRPP Coordinator laurent.vaysse@cirad.fr

4
Document no. 2

Summary of current projects


(Updated Table summarized from HRPP Global Scientific Project)
29 January 2009

5
HRPP PROJECT SUMMARY TABLE
updated JANUARY 2009
STATUS CORE MEMBERS PROPOSED ASSOCIATED MEMBERS

Universite Blaise
TITLE

Montpellier II
Montpellier
DOA/RRIT

Rajathanee
University
Universite
On Going

SupAgro
Finished

Proposal

CIRAD

Others
Pascal
INRA

Ubon
KKU
PSU

IRD

MU
KU
Projects (updated)
1. Socio-Economics Projects

1.1 Socioeconomic analysis of the tapping systems in different CMU,


fnr,
zones of Thailand  surat
34 XX MJU,
ORRAF
1.2 On-Farm Trials for Innovation on Tapping Systems
 fnr fe (crrc) 34 ORRAF

1.3 Socioeconomic feasibility of LITS in the south of Thailand


 fnr 34

1.4 Evolution of the Rubber Growing in the South


 fnr 34

1.5 Economic Impact of rubber growing in the low land area


 fnr 34

2. Agronomy, Physiology and Environment

2.1 Productivity of Rubber Tree and Latex Physiology

2.1.1 Operation 1: Development innovative tapping systems


(DCA strategy and others)  fagr fnr crrc 34 Agric

2.1.2 Operation 2: Relationships between starch metabolism


and latex production  fagr crrc 80/34 piaf

2.1.3 Operation 3: Interactions between mineral nutrition and


yield potential of rubber tree  crrc 80/34 XX Agric

2.2 Carbon, Water and Energy Exchanges of Rubber Ecosystems

2.2.1 Operation 4: Quantification and partitioning of CO2 and


water fluxes of a rubber plantation  fagr crrc 80 ephyse

2.2.2 Operation 5: Assessment of net primary productivity


(NPP) of rubber plantation.  fagr fnr crrc 80 Agric

2.2.3 Operation 6: Effect of environmental stresses on leaf gas


exchanges  fagr fnr crrc 80 piaf

2.2.4 Operation 7: Water relationships as related to tapping,


climate and soil conditions  fagr fnr crrc 80 piaf clifa fagpsnr

2.3 – Transversal operations

2.3.1 Operation 8: Development of new methodologies for


ecophysiological measurements  fagr fnr crrc 80 piaf clifa fagpsnr

2.3.2 Operation 9: Development of a database on multi-local


experiment  fagr fnr crrc 80 piaf clifa fagpsnr

3. Biotechnologies and the Performances of Rubber


Planting Material

3.1 Genetic Determinism and QTL Identification for Traits


fagr
Related with Rubber Cropping  cgeb
crrc 96 piaf

3.2 – Marker Aided Selection (MAS) in rubber tree fagr


 cgeb
crrc 96 clifa fsc

3.3 – Toward a map based cloning & sequencing of the latex


yield QTL identified in GENEMAP-1  crrc 96 clifa fsc biotec

3.4 – QTL mapping of drought tolerance from new progenie(s)


fagr
 cgeb
crrc 96 piaf piaf fsc biotec

3.5 Validation of molecular marker of stress (TPN) and of


proteic marker of yield  crrc 96 clifa fsc

3.6 Application of Somatic Embryogenesis for the Propagation


of New Clones on their own Roots  crrc 96

4. Technology and Rubber Quality

4.1 Non Consistency of NR : Effect of Non-Isoprene faind private


 kapi
fsit 62 sabp clifa fsc
sector
4.2 Characterization of Post-harvest Maturation of Cup faind private
Coagula  kapi
fsit 62 sabp
sector
4.3 Advanced technologies in NR processing to address
environmental issues  mstrc gpeb

Remark: Coordinators 6
Partners
6
Summary of HRPP projects - Jan 2009

Legend

34 Performance of tree crop-based systems research unit, Cirad Persyst


62 Agropolymer engineering and emerging technologies joint research unit Cirad Persyst , UM2, SupAgro, INRA
80 Functioning and management of tree-based planted ecosystems research unit, Cirad Persyst
96 Plant Development and Genetic ImprovementJoint research Unit Cirad Bios, UM2, SupAgro, INRA
cgeb Center for genetic engineering and Biotechnology, KU Kamphaeng Saen
clifa Climate and Functioning of Agroecosystems research unit, IRD
crrc Chachoengsao Rubber research Center, DOA
ephyse Functional ecology and environmental physic research unit, INRA
fagpsnr Faculty of Agriculture, department of plant science and natural resources, Kon Khaen University
fagr Faculty of Agriculture, KU Bangkhen
faind Faculty of agroindustry, KU Bangkhen
fem Faculty of environmental Management, PSU Hadyai
7

feng Faculty of Engineering, PSU Hadyai


fnr Faculty of natural ressources, PSU Hadyai
fsc Faculty of Sciences, MU Bangkok
fsit Faculty of sciences and industrial technologies, PSU Surat
gpeb Chemical engineering water and bioproducts joint research unit UM2, UM1, Cirad
irc Institut des region chaudes, Montpellier SupAgro
kapi Kasetsart Agricultural and Agro-Industrial Product. Improvement Institute, KU Bangkhen
mstrc MSTRC membrane Science and technology research center, PSU Hadyai
piaf Integrated physics and physiology of fruit and forest trees, joint research unit INRA, UBP
psp Polymer Sciences Program, Faculty of Science, PSU Hadyai
sabp Sciences for Agrobioprocesses Department , Montpellier SupAgro

7
8
Document no. 3

Workshop conclusions
28 January 2009

9
HEVEA RESEARCH PLATFORM IN PARTNERSHIP (HRPP)
Scientific Seminar on January 28th, 2009

WORKSHOP CONCLUSIONS

Conclusions of the workshop


“Agronomy, Physiology and Environment”
Animators of the session:
- Dr Sayan Sdodee, Prince of Songkla University
- Dr Frederic Gay, CIRAD

Number of participants: 21

The group reviewed each of the nine operations listed in the scientific project drawn up in 2007. For
each project, the group discussed the opportunity to carry it on in 2009, identified new partners
and/or new experimental sites, identified the researchers involved in and appointed a coordinator,
and set-up an action plan for 2009. The group also discussed proposal on new project. The project
table of the group was updated accordingly.

OP1 : Development of innovative tapping systems


This operation focuses since 2000 on the DCA system with trials in CRRC, Chantaburi and Songkla
provinces.
Ubon Rachatanee University has expressed is intention to join this operation and set-up a new trial in
its experimental plantation.
Dr E.Gohet expressed the great importance of this operation for his CIRAD research unit. He
therefore proposed to extend the scope of this operation to Controlled Upward Tapping systems
(CUTS) and Low Intensity Tapping Systems (LITS)
Plan for 2009 :
- carry on on-going DCA trials
- draft a project proposal on CUTS and LITS experiments
Coordinator : Dr Antoine Leconte, CIRAD, antoine.leconte@CIRAD.fr

OP2 : Impact of tapping on TPN


The group underlined that the scientific originality of this operation relies in the molecular approach
developed by the IRD/MU team. The design of the agronomic trial is indeed not different to what is
done in OP1.
Therefore, the group proposed that the “Genetic” group takes in charge this operation as of 2009.

OP3 : Impact of tapping on carbohydrate reserves and sugar metabolism


This operation has been pending since the end of Dr. Pisamai’s PhD thesis.
Following the great relevance of this thematic to the understanding of mechanism of latex
production stressed by Dr. Gohet, the group proposed to boost this operation in 2009. The project
will focus on study of the enzymes involved in reserve formation and use in rubber tree. Next, Dr A.
Guilliot from UBP presented the background and scientific framework of this project.
Plan for 2009 :
- draft a detailed scientific project
- start preliminary work with a master degree student to be identified among the Thai
universities involved in the HRPP,
10
- look for a PhD student for 2010
Coordinator : Dr Pisamai Chantuma, DOA, CRRC, Pisamaichantuma@hotmail.com

OP4 : Mineral nutrition and tapping


This operation was proposed in 2007 to be discussed in 2008. Nothing has been done in 2008.
Actually, the origin of this proposal is not clear.
Dr. E.Gohet pointed out the complexity of fertilisation experiments as he set up this year for the IFC
group. He added that despite the great interest of his research unit for this topic, no researcher of his
unit will be available to help in setting-up such experiment.
Nevertheless, the group decided to keep this operation as mineral nutrition might be a limiting factor
of latex yield in very intensive tapping systems as the one used by Thai smallholders.
Plan for 2009 :
Draft a document with three objectives:
- identified HRPP members interested to be involved in this operation
- elaborate on the issue of fertilisation and mineral nutrition impact on rubber production in
Thailand based on update information about farmers’practices regarding fertilisation.
Collaboration with the socio-economic group would be useful for that.
- assess the feasibility of fertilisation experiments based on the protocol developed by Dr.
E.Gohet for the IFC project.
Coordinator : Asst. Pro. Dr. Manas Losirikul, UBU, manas@agri.ubu.ac.th

OP5 : Measurements of CO2, water and energy fluxes


There were no major comments on this operation which has been set-up in 2006 at CRRC. This
operation will get the financial support of the PHC program (soil carbon) for scientific exchanges
between France and Thailand.
Plan for 2009 :
- Carry on the experiment in CRRC
- Carry out a quantitative follow-up of soil respiration throughout the year with assessment
of heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration using the trench-plot method
- Setting up a training programme on eddy-correlation
Coordinator: Dr Frederic Gay, CIRAD, fgay@CIRAD.fr

OP6 : Biomass and net primary productivity (NPP)


This operation has been carried out in parallel of OP5 at CRRC. Activities have been concentrated
on the PhD thesis of Mr.Naruenat Chairungsee.
The group suggested that research on root growth carried out by the KKU/IRD team in Buriram
province is included in the operation. It also proposed to gather information about biomass
accumulation of rubber tree collected by the HRPP members in order to validate in a wide range o
eco-climatic conditions the model of Arak Chantuma that predicts tree biomass based on trunk girth.
This operation will get the financial support of the PHC program (Soil carbon) for scientific
exchanges between France and Thailand, and from the IFC programm “Soil and Water” for the
development of an automated system for acquisition of root picture from rhizotron.
Plan for 2009
- Carry on the experiment in CRRC
- Set-up the automated system for acquisition of root picture from rhizotron
- Collect information from HRRP members and set-up a network of experimental sites
Coordinator : Mr. Arak Chantuma, DOA, Arakchantuma2008@yahoo.com

OP7 : Effect of stress on leaf gas exchanges


Previously, this operation has focused on the effect of temperature on photosynthesis. The group
proposed to focus now on the effect of drought. Activities will be mainly carried out at CRRC with
possible extension to PSU.

11
Plan for 2009
- Experiments on effect of drought at CRRC
Coordinator : Assoc.Prof. Dr.Poonpipope Kasemsap, KU, agrpks@ku.ac.th

OP8 : Water relationships as related to tapping and climate


This operation was previously limited to activities carried out at CRRC by CIRAD, KU and DOA.
The group proposed to extend to research implemented in Buriram province by the IRD/KKU and
by PSU.
This operation will get the financial support of the PHC program “Water relationships of rubber
tree” for scientific exchange and of the IFC program “Soil and Water” for some specific
measurements.
The group also highlighted the necessity to train people in Thailand to the making of sap flow probes
as those probes are essential for basic research in plant water relationships.
Plan for 2009
- carry on experiments in CRRC, Buriram and PSU
- organise a scientific seminar in May or June to compare results obtained in the different
location and setting-up an action plan for 2009-2010.
- Set-up training on sap flow probes making
Coordinator : Dr. Frederic Do, IRD, frederic.do@ird.fr

OP9: Development of new methodologies for ecophysiological measurements.


The group agreed on the main objective of this operation “Developed low cost, handy, automated,
wireless, harmless devices applicable at field level for large scale field studies» .
The activities on automated system for root picture acquisition and soil respiration listed in this
operation in 2007 have been removed because those techniques are not made for specific research
activities not to help in large scale field study.
Plan for 2009 : for this year the operation will focused on the three following techniques
- hemispherical photographs for LAI estimation
- simplification of diagnostic latex for on-farm diagnosis
- application of the PEPIPIAF system for measurement of micro-variation of trunk
diameter
Coordinator: Dr. Frederic Gay, CIRAD, fgay@CIRAD.fr

Proposal of a new operation: Development of a database from multi-local experiments


This operation is set-up to address the following issue “How to develop a network of experimental
site along the agro-climatic gradient for rubber cultivation in Thailand to study the effect of agro-
climatic conditions on rubber performances ?”
In this perspective Dr. Frederic Gay proposed to build-up a database from similar experiments
implemented in different ecological conditions by HRPP members. Some people of the group
expressed their concern about sharing their data. Nevertheless, the group decided to launch this
operation in 2009 with the following activities :
- establish a database of researchers of the HRPP members who carry out activities in the
field of the Agronomy, Ecophysiology and Environment group with their name, complete
details and main research activities,
- build-up a database of the DCA experiments carried out within the operation1 including
latex production and climatic data.
Coordinator: Dr Frederic Gay, CIRAD, fgay@CIRAD.fr

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Conclusions of the workshop “Socio-economics”
Participants of the workshop

8 persons (permanent) + 1 visiting auditor

Dr. Buncha Somboonsuke, animator PSU/Hat Yai


Dr. Bénédicte Chambon, animator CIRAD RU34, Montpellier

Mr. Chaiya Kongmanee PSU/Hat Yai


Ms. Kanokporn Pacheerat PSU/Hat Yai
Ms. Pornpan Sae Wong PSU/Hat Yai
Ms. Narumon Preaksa PSU/Hat Yai
Dr. Suchart Choengthong PSU/Surat Thani
Mr. Prawit Wongsukon Ubon Ratchathani University

Dr. Wullop Santipracha PSU/Hat Yai

Updating of the projects

In 2007, three projects had been identified. After discussion, it was decided to maintain all the
projects with some minor modifications (title changed, expected outcomes specified). It should be
noted that:
- Project 1: due to their interest, PSU Surat Thani and Ubon Ratchathani will be involved in
this project in 2009.
- Project 2: we decided to limit the project to the South of Thailand in a first step (not extend
to the northern regions as proposed in 2007): continue the trial in the Songkhla province, and
possibly extend to Surat Thani if funding can be found.
- Project 3 of 2007 (now project 4): it has been redefined to take into consideration on going
studies notably one PhD in PSU Hat Yai concerning the impact of climatic variations and
also to take into account the fact that the conditions of rubber price are now very different
from 2007 (analyse impact of price fluctuations instead of high price).
- Project 3 and 5 are new proposals based on the need not to limit innovative tapping systems
to DCA but also to envisage other technical alternatives (LITS, project 3) and to analyse the
economic impact of a current dynamic observed in the Songkhla Province (rubber growing in
the lowlands, project 5)

Summary of discussions

There were a lot of discussion about the tapping systems: DCA and the possibility to use the
technique for a plantation which has been tapped for several years, reluctance of some participants to
test other innovative tapping systems on farm since LITS is not recommended by RRIT (except for
plantations above 18 years old) and control upward tapping was tested on farm in the past (European
Union project) but was not adopted by the smallholders.

Ubon Ratchathani University would be interesting to join more project of HRPP but due to financial
and human resources constraints has decided to limit its participation to Project 1 for the year 2009.

The involvement of PSU Surat Thani is limited because no funding is available for the projects
proposed within the framework of HRPP.

13
It was noted that for the socio economic issues, it would be interesting to cover all the areas of
Thailand. For the North, no partner was represented in the workshop but some contacts are already
identified in Chiang Mai University, Payab University and Mae Jo University. But, until now, there
is no partner identified to work in the central and eastern regions. We should look for new partners
to work in this area, possibly in Kasetsart University.

__

Conclusions of the workshop « Genomics and Biotechnologies »


15 participants:

Mr. Supanath Kanjanawattanawong Mahidol Univ., Bangkok


Dr .Jarunya Narangajavana Mahidol Univ., Bangkok
Mr. Hervé Chrestin, IRD, Mahidol Univ. Bangkok
Dr. Herve Cochard INRA, UMR PIAF, Clermont-Ferrand
Dr. Sithichoke Tangphatsornruang BIOTEC, Pathumthani
Dr. Thitaporn Phumichai RRIT-DOA, Chachoengsao
Dr. Chatchamon Daengkanit RRIT-DOA, Chachoengsao
Ms. Ratchanee Rattanawong RRIT-DOA, Chachoengsao
Ms. Piyanuch Piyatrakul RRIT-DOA, Chachoengsao
Ms.Supaporn Leamkheng PSU, Surat Thani Campus
Ms.Duangkhae Kaujanasopa PSU, Surat Thani Campus
Ms. Panida Kongsawadworakul Mahidol Univ., Bangkok
Ms. Uncheera Sookmark, Mahidol Univ., Bangkok

Animators:
Ms. Kanikar Tirawattanasuk RRIT-DOA, Chachoengsao
Dr. Marc Seguin CIRAD, UMR-dap, Montpellier

The participants of the Workshop agreed to propose to rename the Workshop/Thematic


“Biotechnologies” as “Genomics & Biotechnologies”.

Update of the scientific programme:

The projects listed in the previous scientific programme are confirmed:

1- GENMAP: renamed GENMAP-1 due to new projects which are the extension of research
activities originally developed in this project (QTL mapping of important agronomic traits). This
project will continue at least until the end of the Khun Rattanawong PhD course (mid 2010).

2- Genetic Mapping of Candidate-Genes Related with Rubber Cropping: this project is named
Genmap 2b. This operation has begun in 2008 with the PhD course of Khun Prapan (RRIT) and will
continue at least until the end of the PhD (2011). The activities will be made in MU laboratory (Dr
Chrestin & Jaranya) and in Montpellier (UMR-dap). The funding request submitted to PHC was not
accepted, and required funding for trip and research activities in Montpellier has to be found.

3- Application of Somatic Embryogenesis for the Propagation of New Clones on their own Roots:
this project involves only CIRAD and RRIT. It implies a technological transfer from CIRAD to
RRIT-DOA / CRRC.
14
Conclusions

The discussions were very fruitful and intensive with the implication of more members than
previously: INRA-PIAF, BIOTEC and stronger implication of MU in Genomics & Biotechnologies.
An important event is the presence during workshop of a new partner: BIOTEC. This partner will
express the official demand to integrate HRPP as associated member.

BIOTEC, MU and RRIT/CRRC, proposed 2 new projects (“Toward a map based cloning &
sequencing of the latex yield QTL identified in GENEMAP-1” and “QTL mapping of drought
tolerance from new progeny(ies)”).

It is very positive to observe that, thanks to the unexpected and very important results obtained in
“GENEMAP 1”, new partners and projects emerged from the workshop. Nevertheless new projects
are very ambitious, and will need significant additional funding in a sufficiently long term.

__

Conclusions of the workshop “Technology and Quality”

Dr. Claude Dupuy de Crescenzo, Montpellier II University


Dr. Suwaluk Wisunthorn, PSU Surat thani
Ms. Jutharat Intapun, PSU-SupAgro PhD Student
Ms. Chutamas Maneewong, Mae Jo University
Mr. Siwarote Boonrasri, Mae Jo University
Dr. Laurent Vaysse, CIRAD
Dr. Siriluck Liengprayoon, KU researcher
Ms. Natedao Musigamart, KU researcher
Ms. Ariya Phakagrong, KU MSc. Student

A-Updating of on-going projects

The technology and quality group has reviewed current and prospective research projects (See
attached table).

Projects can be classified into 3 categories:

1- Non consistency of natural rubber : effect of non-isoprene.


Those projects study the effect of lipids (esp. Vitamin E family, Phytosterol) on rubber properties
(physical properties including storage hardening). Samples are obtained with controlled processes
which involve different parameters: clones, tapping system, maturation time.

2- Characterization of post harvest maturation of cup coagula


Those projects focus on the consequences of the phenomena occurring after the harvest of latex on
the properties of obtained dry rubber.

15
3- Use of advanced technologies in NR processing.
Membrane technology could be used for both cleaning the industrial liquid waste and concentration
of the skim obtained after fresh latex centrifugation.

The two others categories which has been mentioned in last year proposal (i.e. “Rubber industry
waste as fertilizer”, and “new applications of natural rubber : biodegradable polymer, and electrical
wire”) have been removed because those actions have not started yet or because they involved only
one HRPP institution.

Therefore, five new projects have been added while 11 have been deleted.

In terms of PhD within our group :


- 1 sandwich PhD has been defended in France in March 2008
- 1 sandwich PhD will be defended in France in October 2009
- 4 sandwich PhDs are scheduled to start in 2009

B-Discussion Summary

Discussion was very friendly and fruitful:

Mae Jo University lecturers presented their topic of interest. Ms Chutamas will start soon a PhD with
Dr Klanarong team on the blend of biopolymer and natural rubber latex. Mr. Siwarot informs us
about his current work on the correlation between PRI and vulcanization characteristics. KU rubber
team is quite interested in this study and would like to exchange information. Mr. Siwarot performed
a preliminary study about hot melted adhesive from dry rubber and he would like to develop further
this topic, UM II is quite interested in this work.

Concerning Mahidol University, Gene-Quality project (SSH) has been discussed between CIRAD,
MU, and IRD. So far it has not been finalized. Other topics like relationship between specific lipid
and rubber properties could involve the rubber technology platform of Mahidol University in a near
future.

__

Conclusions of the workshop “High Education Project on Rubber”


Participants: 11 persons (permanent)

Dr. Poonpipope Kasemsap (animator) KU


Dr. Antoine Leconte (animator) CIRAD RU34, Thailand
Dr. Eric Gohet CIRAD RU34, France
Dr. Abdo Malac French Embassy
Ms. Caroline Cochet French Embassy
Dr. Wullop Santipracha Dean FNR, PSU/Hat Yai
Dr. Chutima Tantikitti Vice-Dean FNR, PSU/Hat Yai
Dr. Luckchai Kittipol TRA President
Dr. Supasit Rodkwan KU
Ms. Piyaraj Arayamathalert THR
Mr. Preecha Nobnorn THR

16
Background: Higher Education and Capacity Building in HRPP
Strengthen human capacities in natural rubber Research and Development project is part of the
overall objective of the platform.
4 actions are concerned:
• PhD program
• Scientific exchanges
• Short term training
• Development of a new curriculum in Rubber Sciences
Thus, it is planned that HRPP could give support to a regional innovative curriculum on Rubber
Sciences in order:
• to set up innovative international post-graduate and doctoral programmes in Thailand,
opened to other Asian countries;
• to develop a master degree on major topics in rubber sector, including economics and
management;
• to improve and consolidate existing academic network between Asian and European Higher
education institutions, by encouraging scientific exchanges;
• to implement innovative methods related to educational engineering, emphasizing field and
professional experience associated to standard academic education of a master degree;
• to implement short term training programs in order to develop local industry human
capacities

On the French side, CIRAD and Montpellier SupAgro are willing to build-up this new curriculum in
cooperation with the academic partners of the HRPP (KU, PSU, other universities?) with
involvement of RRIT/DOA.

Rationale: Major Issues


Training Needs Assessment
In order to tailor the curriculum to the actual requirements of the sector (e.g. to be sure that the
students will be able to find a job) , it has been considered as necessary to get the advice of both
academic and professional sectors on the needs of the rubber sector in terms of education on rubber.
Thus, a questionnaire was built (in French, then translated into English and Thai) to assess these
needs through interviews or meetings with rubber associations, rubber industry and planters.
However, this methodology appeared difficult to carry out. There were few feed back from
distributed questionnaires and the representatives of the rubber sector were not really approached to
conduct interviews.
A new strategy has been considered, taking the opportunity of the present workshop to receive
opinion and comments from representatives of the rubber sector and universities regarding the
current and future status of human resources in the Thai rubber sector and from examples of possible
curriculums.

Description of existing degrees


The other main issue in building-up this new curriculum was the necessity to have a good and
complete picture of the current degrees related to natural rubber existing in Thailand in order to
avoid any overlapping of the new curriculum to be designed.

Main Workshop Outputs

1. Training Needs Assessment


Dr. Luckchai Kittipol, President of the Thai Rubber Association (TRA), confirmed to the group that
an integrated curriculum on rubber covering the whole commodity chain from upstream to
downstream does not exist yet in Thailand and would be very useful to fit the human resources needs
of the sector.

17
Such a curriculum will be also very useful to the capacity building for the global rubber society.
It has been acted there was a clear need from the rubber industry for a more complete rubber HRD
system, especially a “Professional” MSc. with integrated knowledge in the whole rubber value chain
(up-stream, mid-stream, and down-stream).
Participants agreed that this draft curriculum program should be elaborated by the core members of
the HRPP (KU, PSU, DOA, CIRAD), and will be presented to the professional sector (TRA,
ORRAF…) to check its accuracy to fit the actual demand of the stakeholders.
The proposed and agreed scope of this curriculum should be “From Seed to block rubber”, starting
with rubber tree biology & agronomy (GAP), ending with the first transformation of natural rubber
from the field + marketing, economics, socio-economics, management…

2. Description of existing degrees and possible gap to be filled


A table summarizing a list of existing degrees related to rubber has been issued by KU from data
found in the CHE website + book giving details of the curricula.
PSU issued a table + details of curriculums related to rubber (see Table below). Several degrees (BS,
MS, PhD) and curriculums are clearly related to Rubber and Polymer Technology, as well as Rubber
Industry Management. Curriculums on Plant Science are discipline-oriented, there is no clear
specific curriculum on “Agronomy of Rubber”.

Faculty Degree Curriculum Courses offered Thesis-Para Rubber

B.Sc. Rubber Technology


Rubber and Plastic Materials v

Additives for Rubbers and Plastics

Polymer Technology Advanced Processing of Rubber

Testing of Rubber and Plastics


Science and Technology
(Pattani Campus)
M.Sc.
Latex and Emulsion Technology

Mechanical Properties of Plastics and Rubber v


Physical Polymer
Testing of Rubber and Plastics

Applied Chemistry Rubber and Plastic Materials v

Ph.D. Polymer Technology


B.Sc. Rubber Industry Management
Technology and
Management (Surathani B.Sc. Bioprocessing Technology Rubber Technology
Campus)
Bioproduction Rubber Chemistry

Plant Science Para rubber production and mangement is integrated in related disciplines

Pest Management for example, Para Rubber, Physiology of Crop Production,


B.Sc.
Earth Science Crop Biotechnology, Soil Fertility, Principle of Agroforestry,

Agricultural Development Business Forecasting Techniques in Agriculture

Plant Science v

Fac.of Natural Resources Plant Pathology v

M.Sc. Entomology v

Soil Resource Management v

Agricultural Development v

Plant Science v
Ph.D.
Tropical Ag. Resources Management v

PSU has the project to re-organize the existing courses and body of knowledge to bring out the
curriculum on “Rubber”. Partners of HRPP, namely KU and CIRAD agree to coordinately draft the
new program (waiting for the feedback from SupAgro which was not able to attend the present
seminar/workshop)

3. Draft Curriculum
The Figure below has been prepared by PSU, showing a possible study plan for a 2 Years Master
program according to the Thai system:

18
Proposed Study Plan for 2 Year-M.Sc. Program in Rubber Science

Study Plan and Credit


Plan A (1)* Plan A (2)@ Plan B#
Compulsory courses - 6
30
Elective courses - 18
Thesis 36 At least 12 -
Minor thesis (IS) - - 6
Total 36 36

With
industry
* Research oriented
@ Credits for compulsory and elective courses are flexible depending upon

agreement among partners.


# Professional Master

Regarding the feasibility of associating different Thai and French universities and research
institutions, the example of Joint Graduate School of a Consortium on Energy and Environment has
been presented as follows:

KMIT-NB

CMU PSU
Energy &
Environment

KMUTT SIIT

Elective courses

Master’s Program
Ph.D. Program

Joint Graduate School of a Consortium of Energy and Environment


This project is already functioning in Thailand for 6-7 years and its structure could be applied to the
project of Rubber Master Program under the framework of the HRPP as follows: association of the 4
core members and SupAgro, and involvement of the rubber sector (TRA, …) to get their advice from
the beginning of the construction.

19
CIRAD

KU PSU
HRPP
TRA, ...

DOA SupAgro

Elective courses
Associate Members

Master’s Program – for Thais and international students


Short Training Courses for farmers and industries

4. Actions to be taken
Time table: aiming to a possible launching (implementation) of the program by June 2010, the new
curriculum must be finished to be drafted and developed by June 2009 to be processed through
university approval procedure.

Milestone for Program Development

Curriculum development from


Now - June 2009

Final draft should be completed by June 2009

Final approval step at the university level April 2010

Program implementation in June 2010

The participants agreed on the creation of a Working Group to continue the process of building-up
the curriculum in permanent connection with the rubber sector. This group will be composed of:
Dr. Chutima Tantikitti (PSU/FNR); Dr. Poonpipope Kasemsap (KU); Dr. Antoine Leconte (CIRAD)
A representative from DOA to join the group is to be identified.
Next meeting of the working group will be held on 12 February 2009 and hosted by PSU/FNR at Hat
Yai.Main target is to achieve a first draft of the curriculum by the end of March 2009.
Dr. Luckchai, President from TRA will then invite the working group to present the project at the
monthly meeting of TRA members which will be held in Hat Yai on early April 2009.

In the meantime, a feedback must be obtained from SupAgro regarding its involvement in the project
(Antoine Leconte & Eric Gohet to help for contacting SupAgro).

20
Document no. 4

Tables of HRPP projects by thematic


28 January 2009

21
WORKSHOP AGRONOMY - HRPP SEMINAR 28 JANUARY 2009
CURRENT/NEW CURRENT/NEW RESEARCHERS IN RESEARCHERS IN FINANCIAL
OP STATUS PROPOSAL FOR 2009
PARTNERS LOCALISATION THAILAND France SUPPORT

Carry-on trials
OP1 : Development innovative CIRAD, DOA, PSU,KU A.Leconte , Pisamaï C. , Priority project
CRRC, PS, Chantaburi Propose a project about upward tapping system
tapping systems On-going / UBU?, Rubber Sayan S. , KU E.Gohet, R.Lacote for CIRAD
/ UBU? (CUT) and reduced frequency tapping systems
Enterprise Ass.? representative (UPR34)
(LITS, Low Intensity Tapping Systems)

OP2 : Impact of tapping


CIRAD, DOA, IRD, A.Leconte, H, Chrestin, Agronomy aspect link to OP1, Molecular aspects
systems on Trunk Phloem On-going CRRC
MU Pisamai C. take in charge by the Genetic Group
Necrosis

P.Thaler , E.Gohet, Priority project


OP3 : Impact of tapping on CIRAD, DOA, KU, Pisamaï C., F.Gay, Work on the scientific project / Launch MsC
Pending CRRC A.Guilliot, A.Clement- for CIRAD
carbohydrate reserves INRA/UBP Poonpipope K. research work/ Look for PhD student for 2010/
Vidal (UPR34)

Interest for Thailand/ Feasibility of


OP4 : Tapping and Mineral CIRAD, DOA / UBU, Dr. Manas , F.Gay, Dr fertilisation experiment/ Collect/update
Proposal ? E.Gohet
nutrition KKU Kirriya information about farmer's practices in relation
with socio-economics group
F.Gay, Poonpipope K., Arak
OP5 : Rubber flux (CO2 and CIRAD, KU, DOA, P.Thaler , JM
On-going CRRC C., Kumut S.,Jate S. PHC SOIL Soil respiration, Training program
water) INRA Bonnefond
D.Satakhun, Jessada

Arak C., F.Gay, Poonpipope


CIRAD, KU, DOA, P.Thaler C.Jourdan L.St Extend/collect observations and mesaurements
22

OP6 : Biomass, NPP and Root On-going CRRC / KKU K. , Jate S., Mr Warit, PHC SOIL
INRA / KKU Andre to others sites (Surathani, Ubon Rachtanee…)
Santimaitree

F.Gay, Poonpipope K.,


OP7 : Impact of stress on leaf CIRAD, KU, DOA, Jate S. , Arak C. P.Thaler, T.Ameglio,
On-going CRRC / PSU Work on drought effect
gas exchange INRA / PSU Boonthida K., Jessada, H.Cochard
Sayan S.

PHC WATER
F.Gay, F.Do Kumut S.
OP8 : Water relationships as CIRAD, KU, DOA, P.Thaler, H.Cochard JP IFC Seminar in may-june, think about how to build-up
On-going CRRC, KK, PS Poonpipope K. Arak C.,
related to climate INRA, PSU, IRD Lhomme «€Soil/Water€» sap flow probes in Thailand (spare parts)
Supat, Sayan S.
PROGRAM

F.Gay, F.Do, Sayan E.Gohet


OP9 : New methods for LAI estimation with hemispherical photographs /
CIRAD, KU, DOA,
ecophysiological and Proposal CRRC / PSU Poonpipope K. , Pisamai R.Lacote Simplification of latex diagnosis / wireless micro-
INRA / PSU, IRD
physiological measurements A.Clement-Vidal , dendrometer (PEPIPIAF)
J.Satornkich
T.Ameglio
F.Gay, Poonpipope,
New OP: Database development Establish database of researchers involved in
Proposal ALL HRPP MEMBERS Pisamai, Sayan, Dr Manas, T.Chapuset
and management Agronomy group / Work on network of DCA trial
F.Do, Supat

22
WORKSHOP BIOTECHNOLOGY - HRPP SEMINAR 28 JANUARY 2009
Project /operation Expected outcomes Partners (institutions) Researchers Leader Duration Location Financial support
PRESENT PROJECTS
Axis 1 Genome mapping
Genetic Determinism and QTL Heritabilities, genetic values, genetic Cirad, KU, RRIT/CRRC Ms Ratchanee Rattanawong (PhD course), Mr Clement-Demange; clement- 2002-2010 RRIT-CRRC, Cirad- Agropolis foundation, Montpellier-
Identification for Traits Related with correlations, QTLs, molecular markers for Ms Kanlaya Prapan, Dr Napawan Lekawipat, demange@cirad.fr Montpellier France (2002-2003); MAE
Rubber Cropping (GENEMAP-1) Marker Aided Selection (MAS) Ms Kannikar Teerawattanasuk, Prof
Poonpipope Kasemsap, Mr Andre Clement-
Demange, Dr Marc Seguin

NEW PROJECTS (ongoing)


Axis 1 & 2 Genome mapping & Functional genomics
GENEMAP-2B: Genetic Mapping of Molecular expression, physiological markers of Cirad, KU, MU, Ms Kanlaya Prapan (PhD course), Ms Dr Herve Chrestin; 2008-2011 RRIT-CRRC, Cirad- PHC 2008;
Candidate-Genes Related with Rubber stress, mapped candidate genes RRIT/CRRC Ratchanee Rattanawong, Ms Kannikar herve.chrestin@ird.fr Montpellier, IRD-MU Looking for additional funding for
Cropping Teerawattanasuk, Prof Poonpipope training of Khun Prapan in
Kasemsap, Mr Andre Clement-Demange, Dr Montpellier (Cirad)
NEW PROJECTS (proposal)
Axis 3 Genetic diversity & Plant material propagation
Application of Somatic Embryogenesis for Performance comparisons of grafted vs Cirad, RRIT/CRRC … Dr Pascal Montoro, Dr Ludovic Lardet, Dr Dr Pascal Montoro; 2009-? Cirad/montpellier, IFC: post-doc fellowship
the Propagation of New Clones on their own Primary embryos for 4 cultivated clones Marc-Philippe Caron, Ms Kannikar pascal.montoro@cirad.fr RRIT/CRRC…?
Roots Teerawattanasuk
Axis 1 Genome mapping
23

GENEMAP-2A: From GENEMAP-1 to Marker Application of MAS to yield and growth Cirad, RRIT/CRRC, INRA, X (PhD course 2010-2013), Ms Kannikar Mr Clément-Demange; clement- 2009-? Cirad/Montpellier,
Aided Selection improvement; QTL detection in other "water UBP, KU Teerawattanasuk, Mr Andre Clement- demange@cirad.fr RRIT/CRRC
stress" contexts; usefulness of hydraulic Demange, Dr Marc Seguin, Dr Herve
traits evaluation for QTL mapping Cochard, Dr Teerayut Toonjida

QTL mapping of drought tolerance from new QTL mapping of drought tolerance from new RRIT, MU, CIRAD, INRA, Ms Ratchanee Rattanawong, Ms Kannikar RRIT researcher (X?) 2009 or 2010 -?
genetic backgrounds, i.e. new progenies progeny/ies UBP, KU + BIOTEC Teerawattanasuk, Prof Poonpipope
(RRII105 x ???) Kasemsap, Mr Andre Clement-Demange, Dr
Marc Seguin, Dr Herve Cochard, Dr
Kanokporn Triwittayakorn

Toward a map based cloning & sequencing of Physical mapping of the g16 latex yield QTL; Cirad, MU, RRIT + Dr Thitaporn Phumichai, Ms Kannikar
the latex yield QTL (g16) identified in BAC clones and sequences; Genes cloning BIOTEC Teerawattanasuk, Dr Marc Seguin, Dr
GENEMAP-1 Sithichoke Tangphatsornruang, Dr Jarunya
Narangajavana

23
WORKSHOP SOCIO-ECONOMICS - HRPP SEMINAR 28 JANUARY 2009
Researchers (specify
Project /operation Expected outcomes Partners (institutions) Duration Location Financial support
leader and e-mail)

Buncha Somboonsuke
Identification of the existing
(buncha.s@psu.ac.th)
tapping systems in the different
Chaiya Kongmanee
zones of Thailand ; determinants PSU, Ubon Ratchathani
Kanokporn Pacheerat PSU Hat Yai (Thai
of choice of tapping systems University, Cirad (Chiang
Socio-economic analysis of the tapping Pornpan Sae Wong May 2009 - South, Northeast, Rubber Fund) Ubon
(internal of the farm = socio Mai University, Mae Jo
systems in different zones in Thailand Somyot Thungwa Manas May 2010 (North) Ratchatani
economics of farm and external = University, Payab
Losirikul Suchart University
climate, price…) ; economic University), ORRAF
Choengthong Msc
performances of different tapping
Students Bénédicte
syst
Chambon

Buncha Somboonsuke
Conditions for the adoption of the
(buncha.s@psu.ac.th)
DCA (double cut alternative)
On-farm trials for innovation on tapping PSU, Cirad, ORRAF?, Chaiya Kongmanee PSU Hat Yai (Thai
Improvement of DCA to fit the 2007- Songkhla province
systems in the Southern Thailand RRIT? Somyot Thungwa Msc Rubber Fund)
smallholder needs Impact of DCA
Students Bénédicte
on the rubber farmers
Chambon

Bénédicte Chambon
(benedicte.chambon@
Socio-economic feasability of low Conditions and importance of
24

cirad.fr) Buncha Cirad (french


intensity tapping systems in the South of present use of low intensity
PSU, Cirad Somboonsuke Chaiya 2010 Songkhla province trainee) PSU Hat
Thailand (labour issues and opportunity tapping systems (LITS);
Kongmanee Kanokporn Yai
of off farm incomes) feasability of testing LITS on-farm
Pacheerat Msc students
(french and thai)
Chaiya Kongmanee
Identification of the changing in
(chaiya.k@psu.ac.th)
resource management as a
Buncha Somboonsuke
Evolution of the rubber growing in the consequence of climatic variation PSU Hat Yai, Cirad
PSU, Cirad Somyot Thungwa 2009-2011 Songkhla province
south and price fluctuation; expectation (french trainee)
Narumon Preaksa Msc
of the smallholders; impact on the
Students Bénédicte
livelihood of the smallholders
Chambon
Reason for farmers to plant Buncha Somboonsuke
rubber in flooded areas (known (buncha.s@psu.ac.th)
as poorly suitable); Description of Chaiya Kongmanee
the current rubber farm Somyot Thungwa Msc
Economic impact of rubber growing in Phattalung, Nakorn
management in the flooded area; PSU, Cirad Students Bénédicte 2009-2010 PSU Hat Yai
the lowland area si thammarat
economics performances of Chambon
these rubber plantations;
identification of alternatives (oil
palm, …)

24
WORKSHOP TECHNOLOGY -HRPP SEMINAR 28 JANUARY 2009

Operation Expected outcomes Partners (institutions) Researchers Duration Location Financial Support/status email address of the leader (s)

PROJECT 1 : Non consistency of natural rubber : effect of non-isoprene.


Effect of innovative tapping systems Validate the new tapping system in terms KU Cirad SupAgro Laurent Vaysse Oct 2006-Oct Chantaburi Kurdi / end 2010 aapsrl@ku.ac.th
on lipid composition and properties of of quality Eric Dubreucq 2010 /bangkok One ongoing master student
natural rubber (Bsc + MSc) Siriluck Liengprayoon

Analysis of non saponifiable from Comprehensive picture of unsaponifiable KU Cirad Siriluck Liengprayoon Oct 2007-Oct Chantaburi Kurdi / end Oct 09 aapsrl@ku.ac.th
Natural rubber composition of natural rubber Laurent Vaysse 2008 /bangkok KAPI / 2009

Gene/quality relationship by SSH New molecular marker related to quality Cirad+ MU Jerome Sainte Beuve 2009- Bangkok Proposal, no fund. jerome.sainte-beuve@cirad.fr
approach indicators + IRD private partner Laurent Vaysse
Krisda Suchiva
Hervé Chrestiin
Lipid composition of maturated sample Relationship btw lipid composition and PSU-KU-SupAgro-Cirad Siriluck Liengprayoon 2009- Surat Thani On going KAPI 2009 (+1 researcher Oil) + laurent.vaysse@cirad.fr
change of rubber properties during Jutharat Intapun Bangkok PHC 2009-2010
maturation Eric Dubreucq Montpellier
Laurent Vaysse
Natedao Musigamart
Effect of native antioxidant lipids on Quantification methodology of KU-Cirad-SupAGro-MU Natedao Musigamart 2009-2013 Chantaburi / PHC + laurent.vaysse@cirad.fr
rubber properties antioxydant lipids (vitamin E group). Siriluck Liengprayoon Bangkok
Relation with PRI Laurent Vaysse
Krisda Suchiva
Storage hardening of natural Understanding of Storage hardening PSU Pattani/Surat-CIRAD Charoen Nakason 2009-2013 Pattani PSU + scholarship frederic.bonfils@cirad.fr
rubber: influence of clones and phenomenum Frederic Bonfils
lipids, Suwaluk Wisunthorn
effect(s) of the phenomenon on Laurent Vaysse
structure and properties Siriluck Liengprayoon
25

PROJECT 2 : Characterization of post harvest maturation of cup coagula


Maturation of cup coagula and its Control of maturation conditions for a PSU-MontpellierSupAgro- Jutharat Intapun 2005-2009 SuratThani, On going PHC 2009-2010 laurent.vaysse@cirad.fr
effect on the properties (PhD) higher quality and consistency of natural CIRAD Pr Eric Dubreucq Thailand
rubber Dr Laurent Vaysse Montpellier,
France
Influence of farmer's behavior on cup To Improve quality of TSR20 through PSU Surat Thani Suwaluk Wisunthorn Oct07-Sept09 Surat Thani PSU + PHC 2009-2010 swisunth@yahoo.com
coagula properties better farmer's practices Cirad Benedicte Chambon
Laurent Vaysse
Properties of cup coagula coagulated To Improve quality of TSR20 through PSU Surat Thani Suwaluk Wisunthorn Oct07-Sept09 Surat Thani PSU/On going. swisunth@yahoo.com
by natural materials better farmer's practices Cirad Laurent Vaysse

Effect of post harvest treatment on PSU-CIRAD-KU-Sup Agro Varaporn Tanrattanakul 2009-2013 Hadyai PSU + scholarship jerome.sainte-beuve@cirad.fr
rubber properties Jerome Sainte Beuve
Laurent Vaysse
Siriluck Liengprayoon

Maturation Cup Coagula : mode of understanding microbila maturation of PSU-CIRAD-KU-SupAgro Jutharat Intapun 2009-2013 PHC laurent.vaysse@cirad.fr
action of microorganisms rubber in oreder to propose processing Pr Eric Dubreucq
improvement to manufacturer Dr Laurent Vaysse
PROJECT 3 : Use of advanced technologies in NR processing . Coord : PSU (Porntip) and UM2-Cirad (D.Pioch)
Development of a clean process of - Skim concentration and new co-products UM2-Cirad Claude Dupuy (UMII) 2009- Thailande/France Work plan and fund to be set up. dupuyc@univ-montp2.fr
valorization of NR factories skim (ultrafiltration) PSU Surat Thani Serge Palu (Cirad)
and effluent by filtration - Clean effluent (Membrance Bioreactor) PSU Hadyai Christelle Wisniesky (UMI)
technologies Watsa Kongnakorn (PSU
Surat)
Porntip Sridang ( PSU
Hadyai)
Somtip Danteravanich (PSU
Hadyai)

25
26
Document no. 5

Global Scientific Project of HRPP


29 January 2009

27
ANNEX 1
of the Specific Memorandum of Understanding
creating the Hevea Research Platform in Partnership (HRPP)
in Thailand
- SCIENTIFIC PROJECT 2009-
APPROVED by Scientific and Steering Committees on Jan 29th ,2009

Hevea Research Platform in Partnership


CIRAD – Kasetsart University- Prince of Songkla University
Rubber Research Institute of Thailand, Department Of Agriculture

I - Introduction
CIRAD, which has been involved in scientific cooperation on natural rubber
and its production systems with Thai partners for several decades, considers
that bringing the teams closer together in a joint scientific programme could
create synergies that would improve the impact of its activity. Such
collaboration could be established within a specific operational framework
known as a Research Platform in Partnership It would provide a hub where
teams from France and Europe would meet teams from national and regional
agricultural research systems which are in direct contact with the ecological,
economic and social realities of agricultural and rural communities.

The purpose of this research platform in partnership is as follows:

• To promote high quality scientific research about rubber tree


cultivation and natural rubber material addressing the main
developmental issues according to national priorities;
• To build up sustainable research teams associating Thai and French
scientists;
• To provide scientists with an optimum environment to conduct their
research and make them recognized by the international scientific
community;
• To strengthen human capacity in rubber R&D, notably through a
specific higher education programme and short-term training.

2 - Challenges
In 2006, natural rubber accounted for more than 40% of the world elastomer
market. Natural rubber has highly specific properties, in terms of elasticity,
low heat build-up and high manufacturing tack, which make it unavoidable
even today in the automobile and aeronautics industries (tyres for heavy

28
goods vehicles and aircraft, silent blocks, etc.) but also in the medical
industry (latex gloves, etc.).
Since 1997, Thailand has been the world's leading natural rubber producer,
with a total estimated output of more than 3 million tonnes in 2007,
amounting to 32% of world production. Of that amount, around 88% was
exported as raw material, making natural rubber a major export material for
the country. Rubber wood also provides substantial additional income for
farmers when they replant. In addition, the 330,000 tonnes consumed
locally, mostly for dipped goods such as gloves, represent a sector that
creates jobs and attracts foreign investors. It is thus estimated that the
rubber sector as a whole directly or indirectly involves around 10% of the
total population of Thailand.
The tremendous development of rubber smallholdings in Thailand is the
outcome of work undertaken by the Rubber Research Institute of Thailand
(RRIT-DOA) and the Office of Rubber Replanting Aid Fund (ORRAF). More
than 2 million hectares are planted to rubber, mainly in the southern
provinces of the country, 95% of which belong to smallholders. So far, the
increase in production has mainly come from an extension of the areas
planted, replanting policies (ORRAF and RRIT-DOA) consisting in using
higher-yielding planting material (clones such as RRIM600) and the rising
age of those newly created plantations.
After a long period where prices were not particularly lucrative, there has
been a very strong rise in the price of natural rubber (+40% in 2007). This
has led Thailand to create the Agriculture Futures Exchange of Thailand
(AFET), onto which natural rubber was the first commodity to be introduced,
even before rice.
At the same time, there has been a sustained rise in world demand for
rubber, notably driven by strong economic growth in China and in countries
of the ASEAN group. Within a few years, that is likely to result in a
supply/demand imbalance. The pending foreseeable shortage of natural
rubber on the world market, combined with a sharp rise in natural rubber
prices that is likely to result, might encourage an increase in the market
share of synthetic rubbers. However, those rubbers, which are made from
fossil fuels, depend on the price of a barrel of oil. In addition, this growing
competition between natural rubber and synthetic rubber risks being
worsened by variability in natural rubber properties. In fact, the properties of
this agricultural material, which are variable because they are of biological
origin, are not yet precise enough to predict its processability, due to an
absence of indicators. Conversely, synthetic rubber possesses perfectly
constant technological properties, which is a major comparative advantage
compared to natural rubber.
The risk of a qualified labour shortage for rubber tree tapping in plantations
due to the ageing of rural populations (farmers and tappers) is also growing.
Crop sustainability requires an increase in tapping output, enabling an
increase in tapper wages and in farmer incomes, thereby making the field
work more attractive to the younger, but also more educated, generations.

29
In addition, recent developments on the rubber wood market, along with
worthwhile prospects for the introduction of Clean Development Mechanisms
(CDM) also make speculative research on the creation of biomass and carbon
sequestration by rubber trees much more strategic for Thailand and for the
countries in the Greater Mekong Subregion.
In order to take up these social, economic and environmental challenges, a
scientific project has been drawn up and is intended to:
i. Reduce the risks of a natural rubber shortage by increasing production
ii. Improve tapping output to reduce the risks of a labour shortage
iii. Reduce the risks of natural rubber being replaced by its synthetic
counterparts
iv. Participate in the sustainable development of rubber growing in non-
traditional growing zones – North and Northeast Thailand – to be ready
for the consequences of climate change
v. Estimate the carbon sequestration potential of rubber plantations, and
their possible eligibility in Clean Development Mechanisms (CDM) due to
be set in place under the Kyoto protocol
vi. Increase the efficiency of innovation transfer through better knowledge of
the constraints facing smallholders.
This project is largely based on an existing programme entitled
"Improvement of the Productivity of Rubber Trees" 2005–2008, which was
submitted to and accepted by the Franco-Thai Cooperation Programme for
Higher Education and Research.

3- Detailed Analysis of Developmental Issues and Related Questions for


Research

During a meeting held in Bangkok on January 27-28th, 2009 with core


members and associated members of the platform, 4 scientific workgroups
analysed the mains issues for natural rubber in Thailand and determined
related questions for research in :

 socio-economics
 agronomy, physiology and environment
 genetics and biotechnology
 technology and rubber quality

The ultimate goal is to optimize the productivity and quality of natural


rubber in Thailand and to characterize the environmental impact of Rubber
Plantations.

3. 1 - Low Tapping Productivity of the Smallholder Plantations


Continuous decrease of the size of Thai rubber smallholdings for the last two
decades (now less than 2 ha, keeping on decreasing) has led to general
adoption of very intensive tapping systems by Thai rubber farmers.

30
Implementation of tapping systems such as 2d/3, 3d/4 or 5d/6, associated
with shortened tapping cut (1/3S) are common, resulting in overexploitation
of the trees, high tapping panel dryness (TPD) rates, short life-cycle of
plantations and a general low tapping productivity, leading to rather low
tappers and planters incomes. Therefore, improving the tapping productivity
of the smallholder plantations is a priority. Understanding the existing
tapping systems and their evolution is necessary to suggest some possible
improvements.

►Questions to research:
What are the current tapping systems, their determinants and their impacts
on the economic performances of the rubber plantations? What are the
advantages and constraints for the different tapping systems? What are the
relationships between the tapping systems and the socio-economic
characteristics of the farms (area of the rubber plantation, labour situation,
existence of other farming and non farming activities/incomes)? What are
the conditions for innovative tapping systems (Double Cut Alternative…) to
be adopted by the smallholders (adoption by the experimental farmers and
possible spontaneous diffusion to neighbouring farmers)? Considering the
socio-economic situation of the rubber farmers in the South of Thailand, are
low intensity tapping systems technical alternatives to improve tapping
productivity? To which extent the improved tapping systems would improve
the sustainable livelihood of the farmers?

3. 2 – Sustainability of the Rubber Production in the South of Thailand


In the South of Thailand, notably in the Songkhla Province, farmers have to
face some constraints which can have an impact on the production of
natural rubber:
- important land pressure: the land suitable for rubber growing is
already planted leading farmers to plant rubber in low lands,
- high cost of production (fertilisers, labour cost),
- labour shortage for tapping: many farmers rent labour for tapping
(that concerns 50% of the farms according to ORRAF) but there is a
lack of qualified labour for this task, especially when rubber price is
low.
Moreover, rubber has to compete with other farming (such as fruit trees…) or
non farming activities (industry, tourism). So, there is a risk for rubber
production to decrease in this area.
From the available climatic data (30 years), some climatic variations have
been recently observed in Songkhla province, which may influence leaf fall
and the number of tapping days per year …
Finally, farmers are facing important fluctuations of rubber prices forcing
them to adjust the management of their farm in order to maintain the
economic sustainability.

31
►Questions to research:
What are the strategies of the farmers to adapt to the rubber price
fluctuations and labour shortage? What are the adjustments of the practices
and management of the rubber plantations in lowlands? What is the
economic impact of planting rubber in the lowlands (known as poorly
suitable areas for rubber plantations)? What are the impacts of climatic
variations on the change in the farm management and on the economic
performances?

3. 3 - Productivity of tapping systems


The possible short-term shortage of natural rubber on the world market,
together associated with an important raise of the rubber price, is likely to
encourage a possible switch of consumption from natural rubber to
synthetic rubber by large users as tire manufacturers.
Besides, the risk of skilled manpower shortage in rubber plantation,
regularly increases. Sustainability of the commodity requires an
improvement of tapping labor productivity in order to increase tapping wages
and make the tapping work more attractive. However, low frequency tapping
strategies (improving yield per tapping day) can hardly be adapted to small
size of rubber farms in Thailand. On the contrary, actual tapping systems
used by farmers are very intensive with rather low labor productivity. The
possibility to increase productivity relies on both farmer’s constraints and
tree physiology, as tapping brings about major changes in resources (carbon,
water) allocation within the tree.

►Questions to research:
How increase labor productivity as well as land productivity in smallholder
farms? Which consequences of traditional and innovative tapping systems
on latex metabolism and tree physiology?

3.4 - Performances of rubber plantations in non-traditional planting


areas and under adverse environmental conditions
Current and future extensions of rubber area are limited in the traditional,
climatically favourable area (Southern Thailand), due to lack of available
land, competition with other crops such as oil palm, and protection of
forests. Therefore rubber plantations are expanding in non-traditional areas
(North and Northeastern Thailand) where climatic and soil conditions are
less favourable. In the North, winter temperatures can be too low and in the
Northeast, dry season is long. Therefore, ecophysiological performances of
rubber trees in such conditions are of first importance to assess capability of
trees to survive, grow and produce latex under drought stress.
Even in the southern region, transient water stress occurs, that may be
overcome by irrigation. On the other hand, frequent flooding occurs in some
areas, the physiological consequences of it remaining poorly understood.

32
Finally, global climatic change is likely to induce more erratic and stressful
climate in the near future. Behaviour of rubber trees, as compared to other
tree crops, in such variable conditions is another issue.

► Questions to research:
What are the effects of climatic stresses (T°, drought, flooding,…) on rubber
tree physiology, particularly on leaf gas exchanges and water use ? What are
the impacts on rubber yield and interactions with effects of tapping ? What
are their incidences on the onset of TPD and TPN ?

3.5 - Environmental Impact of Rubber Plantations


As related to the previous issue, large scale development of rubber
plantations in non-traditional areas is likely to affect local environment.
Particularly, changes from annual crops such as cassava and sugarcane to a
forest-like cover with rubber plantations will change local water balance and
energy exchanges between atmosphere, plant cover and soil.
Another major environmental issue is the carbon sequestration by rubber
plantations and the possible added-value that can be obtained through CDM
(Clean Development Mechanism) under the Kyoto Protocol, as tree
plantations can trap large amounts of atmospheric CO2 (greenhouse gas)
and store it into biomass. However, sole biomass measurements
underestimate carbon fluxes and give no information on processes involved.
They cannot be used alone to model and forecast carbon balance under a
changing climate and according to tapping systems.
Therefore precise and reliable assessment of CO2, water and energy fluxes of
rubber tree plantations ecosystems is a necessity.

► Questions to research :
What is the impact of rubber plantations on water use and energy balance?
What is the carbon sequestration potential of rubber plantations? How
climate interacts with main ecosystem functions (photosynthesis,
respiration, growth, water uptake and transpiration) driving exchanges
between soil, plants and atmosphere? What is the impact of tapping on such
functions?

3.6 - Performances of Rubber Planting Material


In every crop, varieties, seeds and other planting material provide the
farmers with the genetic contribution to profitability. Since more than 40
years, the varietal type used in rubber plantations is made of clones budded
onto unselected seedlings that are used as rootstocks. In Thailand, past
development was based quite exclusively on the sole clone RRIM600. Clonal
diversification should prepare the move to more performing clones.
Increasing latex production is the main target, in relation with sucrose
availability and adaptation to the stress of tapping and ethylene stimulation.
But global warming will emphasize the importance of water stress that all
the plantations have to cope with during the dry season and other water-
limited periods. Clonal selection also has to address the issue of the

33
adaptation of clones to more productive tapping systems, their influence on
the quality of the rubber material, and their adaptation to rubber wood
production. Whereas rubber breeding is a 20-year long process, improving
the accuracy of genetic estimations as soon as at the first stage should
increase its efficiency. Moreover, budded clones that concern only the aerial
part of the tree might not be the most performing varietal type, and new
types should be investigated.

► Questions to research:
How to increase the efficiency of rubber breeding with the new tools of
genomics and transcriptomics? How to develop and assess new varietal types
with the tools of in vitro cultivation?

3.7 - Non consistency of Raw NR


As every natural product, it is difficult to produce raw NR with a constant
quality all around the year. This is one of the major issues facing NR
factories in Thailand as their clients are asking for more consistency in
terms of properties. This problem is getting crucial as the second
transformation processes are more and more automated which results in a
lower ability to cope with non consistent raw material. On the contrary,
synthetic counterparts of NR are much more constant. Fortunately, their
over-all qualities are still lower than that of NR. So far, the international or
national standards (ISO, STR, SMR, SVR, SCR,…) defining ranges of
acceptable properties are useful but not sufficient to predict the
manufacturing behavior. One recent demand from private sector was to
understand better the phenomenon called storage hardening which occurs
to natural rubber when stored in low humidy conditions.

► Questions to research:
What are the determinants of NR quality? How can we explain variations of
important properties such as Po, PRI and storage hardening? How define
more pertinent quality criteria, indicators?

3.8 - Environmental Impact of Rubber Processing


NR industry faces different environmental problems such as
 high fossil energy consumption,
 production of liquid waste containing high level of organic matter
(serum, …), chemicals (sulfuric acid, ammonia, stabilizing agent)
 production of solid waste (rubber from process, sludge from ponds, …)
 mal-odor from storage area and dryer

► Questions to research:
How could we reduce the global energy input of rubber factories?
Are there some technological innovations which can reduce the emission of
waste, allow their recycling and suppress malodor?

34
4 - Scientific Projects

4.1 - Socio-Economics Projects

4.1.1 – Socio-economic analysis of the Tapping Systems in different


zones of Thailand

Leader: Dr Buncha Somboonsuke, PSU Hat Yai


Core partners: PSU Hat Yai and PSU Surat Thani, CIRAD
Associated partners: Ubon Ratchatani,
Other partners : Chiang Mai University, Mae Jo University, Payab University,
ORRAF to be confirmed

The objective of this project is to identify the existing tapping systems, their
determinants (internal to the farm and external) in Songkla Province and to
analyse (and compare) the economic performances of the different existing
tapping systems. For this purpose, a first survey will be carried out on a
large sample to make a description and a classification of the rubber based
farms as well as a characterisation of the existing tapping systems. Then, a
second survey will be implemented with some selected farms to analyse the
economic performances of the different tapping systems and farms. The
results of these surveys could lead to make some proposals to improve the
tapping productivity of the smallholders.

4.1.2 - On-Farm Trials for Innovation on Tapping Systems in the


Southern Thailand (Songkhla province)

Leader: Dr Buncha Somboonsuke, PSU Hat Yai


Core partners: PSU/FNR, PSU/FE, CIRAD, RRIT (to be confirmed)
Associated members: - ; Other partners: ORRAF

A new tapping system called “Double Cut Alternative” (DCA) has been tested
in research station (CRRC) from 2000 onwards under the umbrella of the
project “Towards the improvement of rubber tree productivity” (KU-RRIT-
CIRAD cooperation). Following the good results obtained, a test of this new
tapping system under real conditions (on-farm trial) has been launched in
2007 in the Songkla Province, associating PSU (Faculty of Natural
Resources, Faculty of Economics) and CIRAD as main partners. At the
present time, the project is focused on the agronomical study of the new
tapping system (yield and growth).

In order to test the feasibility of the DCA, there is a need to complete the on-
going study with a socio-economic approach. A characterization of the farms
involved in the trial will be implemented in order to:
 verify that those farms are representative of the rubber farms of the
Songkhla Province

35
 be able to analyse later a possible relationship between the
characteristics and strategies of the farms and the adoption (or non
adoption) of the new technique.
A yearly assessment of the new tapping system by the farmers involved in
the trial will be carried out.
Last, the spontaneous diffusion of the technique to neighbouring farmers
will be analyse (extent and process).
The expected outcomes of this project could be the identification of the
conditions for the adoption of the DCA, the possible improvements to be
suggested to fit the smallholders need and the impact of DCA on the rubber
farmers.

4.1.3 – Socio-economic feasibility of low intensity tapping systems in


the South of Thailand

Leader: Dr Bénédicte Chambon, CIRAD


Core members: CIRAD, PSU Hat Yai
Associated members:
Low intensity tapping systems (LITS) is known as a technique to improve
tapping productivity. It is widely used in industrial plantations and it is also
used in smallholder plantations in some countries. However, until now, LITS
is very little used in Thailand. So, there is a need to identify the extent and
conditions of utilisation of LITS in the South of Thailand and to analyse the
interest of this technique considering the socio-economic conditions of the
farmers in this area. For this, a survey will be implemented in two steps:
first, very short survey with a large number of farmers to know if they use
LITS and describe the conditions of use. Then a second survey will be
implemented on labour issues (including the relationships between the
owner and the tapper) and off farm activities. The expected outcome is to
determine if the LITS could be proposed to the smallholders as an alternative
to improve their labour productivity (and so, start some on-farm trials).

4.1. 4 - Evolution of the Rubber Growing in the South

Leader: Chaiya Kongmanee, PSU Hat Yai


Core members: PSU Hat Yai, CIRAD
Associated members:

The aim of this project is to get a better knowledge of the recent changes in
the farm management in the South of Thailand as a consequence of changes
in the environmental and economic conditions. For this, two surveys will be
carried out on a large sample of farmers in different districts of the Songkla
Province, selecting farmers in the three different agro ecological zones. This
should result in the identification of the changes in resource management as
a consequence of climatic variations and price fluctuation, the expectation of
the smallholders and in an evaluation of the impact on the livelihood of the
smallholders

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4.1. 5 – Economic impact of rubber growing in the lowland areas

Leader: Dr Buncha Somboonsuke, PSU Hat Yai


Core members: PSU Hat Yai, CIRAD
Associated members:

Due to the increased land pressure and the need of farmers to maintain their
livelihoods, rubber trees are planted in the lowlands (flooded) areas. These
conditions are known to be poorly suitable for rubber plantations. The
smallholders may adapt the practices and management of the farms to adapt
to these conditions. There is also a need to evaluate the economic impact of
growing rubber and identify some possible alternative choices to the use of
these lowlands. A first survey will be implemented to analyse decision
making for planting rubber in the lowlands and characterise the current
farm practices and management. A second survey will evaluate the economic
performances of these practices and management. Some technico-economic
simulations should allow identifying possible alternatives to rubber in the
lowlands. The expected outcome of this project is to provide
information/advice to the smallholders for the sustainability of their
livelihoods.

4.2 - Agronomy, Physiology and Environment

4.2.1 - Productivity of Rubber Tree and Latex Physiology

Operation 1: Development of innovative tapping systems (DCA strategy and


others)

Coordinators : Dr Antoine Leconte, CIRAD


Involved core members: DOA, KU, PSU, CIRAD
Associated members: URU

Innovative tapping systems have been developed during the previous phases
by RRIT, CIRAD and KU and are still under evaluation in CRRC, particularly
the Double Cut Alternative system (DCA) that may enhance productivity of
both land and labour with minimal investment. On-farm trials of these
systems have been first implemented in Chantaburi Province by CIRAD and
KU (from 2004 onwards), then started in Songkla Province by PSU and
CIRAD (from 2007 onwards) to test feasibility of such a system in
smallholdings.

Evaluation of 1/2S d/2 based DCA (alternated tapping on each half of the
trunk every two days) will continue in CRRC. On-farms trials in Chantaburi
and Songkla Provinces will continue and be extended, together with socio-
economical evaluation of such systems (see socio-economics part of the

37
program). The DCA concept is already extended to other basic systems such
as 1/3S 2d/3 (third of the trunk tapped 2 days in 3) and 1/3S 3d/4 (third of
the trunk tapped 3 days in 4). Implication of RRIT in such extensions is to be
discussed (not planned so far).

Other possible tapping strategies aiming to increase both land and labour
productivity are related to the use of low intensity tapping systems (LITS),
i.e. tapping systems using reduced tapping frequencies (d/3, d/4) combined
with the utilization of stimulation with ethephon, and the development of
controlled upward tapping systems (CUT). Some trials in station (CRRC) and
on-farm (Chantaburi) are under implementation and could be extended.

Operation 2: Relationships between starch metabolism and latex production

Coordinators: Dr. Pisamaï Chantuma, DOA


Core members: CIRAD, DOA, KU
Associated members: UBP

Although tapping creates an artificial sink for carbohydrates for regeneration


of the exported latex, results of previous phase of the cooperative researches
showed that tapped trees accumulate more carbohydrate reserves than
untapped controls.

To better understand reserves dynamics, main limiting enzymes related to


reserve formation (starch biosynthesis) and reserve use (starch hydrolysis,
sucrose biosynthesis) would be studied as related to season, phenology and
tapping intensity and history. Multi-location, multi-clonal tapping trials
would be used for such a purpose.

In addition to the previous studies on wood starch content, this would be a


complementary tool to forecast long-term performances of clones and help
for hevea breeding.

Operation 3: Interactions between mineral nutrition and yield potential of


rubber tree.

Coordinators: Dr. Manas Losirikul, Ubon Rachatanee University


Core members: CIRAD, DOA
Associated members: URU, KKU

Despite numerous fertilizer trials in all rubber growing countries, no


conclusive relationships have been shown between mineral fertilization and
latex yield. This is a surprising result, contrary to what is obtained in most
crops, where management of mineral nutrition is the key factor for yield
improvement. Usual explanations are that amounts of exported minerals in
rubber are low as compared to other crops and that other limitations (latex
flow, carbon supply to laticiferous cells) are occurring.

38
However, new circumstances bring new interest to this topic. First, wood is
now exported too from rubber plantations, so that mineral exports are much
higher. Together with repeated replanting now occurring on the same
location, this is likely to induce soil mineral limitations to latex yield.
Second, a new hypothesis as recently emerged, postulating that the lack of
results in previous fertilizer trials was due to the use of usual tapping
systems in these trials. If the demand induced by tapping, based on tapping
systems developed without fertilizers, does not increase with fertilizer input,
there’s no reason that the latex yield changes. Indeed fertilizers might be
considered as a way to increase tapping intensity.
In the first place, the activities will concentrate on updating data on
farmers’practices regarding fertilisation and assessing the feasibility of
fertilisation experiment in Thailand.

4.2.2 - Carbon, Water and Energy Exchanges of Rubber Ecosystems

Operation 4: Quantification and partitioning of CO2 and water fluxes of a


rubber plantation

Coordinator : Dr Frederic Gay, CIRAD


Core members: KU, CIRAD, DOA
Associated members: INRA (UR Ephyse, Bordeaux)

Rubber Flux aims at providing a complete picture of CO2, water and energy
budget of a rubber plantation in Eastern Thailand.
Beyond the evaluation of the fluxes based on the eddy correlation method,
our purpose is to partition them among the different components of the
plantation ecosystem (canopy, trunks, roots, under storey, soil) and the
different functions (photosynthesis, respiration, evapotranspiration ) in order
to understand the factors controlling the carbon and water.
So far the only operational site is located at CRRC (Eastern Thailand), but a
duplication of this operation in the traditional area (Surathani Rubber
Research Center) is proposed.

Operation 5: Assessment of net primary productivity (NPP) of rubber


plantation.

Coordinator : M. Arak Chantuma, DOA


Core members: KU, CIRAD, DOA, PSU
Associated members: URU

Dynamics of whole tree biomass at plot scale is another method to assess


the carbon balance and sequestration of a rubber plantation. This method is
based on measurement of tree growth increment (G), litter fall (L) and
biomass exports (E).

39
The objectives of this operation are (i) to quantify the NPP of a rubber
plantation located at CRRC through direct measurements of the three
components (G+L+E), (ii) develop a predictive model of biomass increment
based on girth and height measurement, (iii) study the correlation between
NPP, its components and climatic factors.
The main difficulty in this method is the estimation of the contribution of the
root systems to G and L. Therefore, the research activities of this operation
are mainly focused in the development of specific methods such as rhizotron
and in-growth cores to study root biomass dynamics, and particularly fine
roots.
Beside this work, it is proposed to set-up a network of experimental sites
along the ecoclimatic gradient for rubber cultivation in Thailand to build-up
a database of girth/tree biomass data.

Operation 6: Effect of environmental stresses on leaf gas exchanges

Coordinator : Dr. Poonpipope Kasemsap, KU


Core members: KU, CIRAD, DOA, PSU
Associated members: INRA (UMR PIAF )

Temperature and water stresses are the main abiotic constraints that limit
rubber growth and yield in marginal areas for rubber tree cultivation. Those
stresses affect the carbon assimilation at the tree level through regulation of
the leaf gas exchanges.
Previous work have studied the effect of low and high temperature. A well-
accepted photosynthesis model has been parametrized. Next work will focus
on the effect of drought.
The expected output is the development of a comprehensive model of
photosynthesis at the leaf level that could be combined in the future to a
model of canopy architecture in order to assess carbon assimilation at the
tree level. Such a model will be useful to predict carbon assimilation in new
planting areas, and to understand dynamics of net C ecosystem exchange
(NEE).

Operation 7: Water relationships as related to tapping, climate and soil


conditions

Coordinator : Dr. Frederic Do, IRD


Core members: PSU, KU, CIRAD, DOA (CRRC, SRRC)
Associated members: KKU, IRD, INRA (UMR PIAF)

Dynamics of leaf water potential and sap flow, as related to soil humidity
and climate are currently studied in mature plantations of drought-prone
areas to determine canopy conductance, water use, water stress thresholds.
This is done mainly in CRRC and in a smallholder plantation of Buriram
Province. Those works will be extended to southern region (Surathani, Hat
Yai) in collaboration with PSU. The introduction of irrigation treatment will

40
facilitate the analysis of water constraint along the eco-climatic gradient.
Such trials will also test the possibility to tap during dry season.
In an other hand, flooding events also occur in rubber plantation.. Their
effects are poorly documented.
Therefore, it is proposed to both consider the effect shortage and excess of
water on tree water relationships, growth and production.
Modelling tools will be applied to integrate and compare the data collected
along the eco-climatic gradient.

4.2.3 – Transversal operations

Operation 8: Development of new methodologies for ecophysiological


measurements.

Coordinator : Dr. Frederic Gay, CIRAD


Core members: KU, CIRAD, DOA , PSU
Associated members: INRA (UMR PIAF), IRD, KKU

This operation aims at developing inexpensive, handy, automated, field


applicable and harmless devices to enhance/make easier data acquisition
and data processing capacities in agro-physiological studies.

Three activities have been identified in relation with the scientific operations
described above:
- simplification of the Diagnostic Latex to application in smallholders
plantation,
- development of the hemispherical picture method to estimate the
dynamic of LAI of a rubber plantation,
- application of the PEPIPIAF system to monitor the micro-variation of
trunk diameter in rubber plantation

Operation 9: Development of a database on multi-local experiment

Coordinator : Dr. Frederic Gay, CIRAD


Core members: KU, CIRAD, DOA , PSU
Associated members: INRA (UMR PIAF), IRD, KKU

This operation aims at developing and analysing a database build-up with


the results of experimental network setting-up by HRPP members along the
eco-climatic gradient for rubber tree cultivation in Thailand. Such a
database will help in assessing the effect of climatic conditions on the
performances and ecophysiology of rubber trees.
Three of the operations described above have developed network of
experimental sites in different ecological conditions :
- OP1 with trial on DCA in CRRC, Chantaburi and Songkhla provinces
- OP5 with main measurements of biomass accumulation at CRRC but
also in several locations in the Souther provinces
- OP7 with experiments on water relationships of rubber trees but also
irrigation trials in CRRC, Songkla and Buriram provinces.

41
It is proposed to first build-up a database of the DCA trials including
daily records of latex production and climatic data with the objective of
analysing the correlation between climatic factor (rain, radiation,
temperature, humidity) and latex production.

4.3 – Genomics, Biotechnologies and the Performances of Rubber


Planting Material

RRIT-DOA has the mandate to create clones and rubber planting material
through its rubber breeding programme. This programme has gained
experience of in vitro cultivation, notably through past cooperation with
CIRAD. The project aims at developing and validating new tools that will be
further implemented by the breeding programme. This project, such as the
other projects, associates research and graduate training of Thai researchers
and students in the framework of the participation of Kasetsart University
Mahidol University and other universities.

Since 2000 and up to the year 2010, the “Genmap 1” operation is being
developed as a research application of the use of molecular genetic markers
for assistance to rubber breeding. It is based on genetic mapping and field
phenotyping for the identification of QTLs (Quantitative Traits Loci) that can
be used after validation for Markers-Assisted Selection (MAS). A second
operation (“Genmap 2”) takes the advantage of this map for MAS
implementation in rubber breeding program in Thailand. This operation will
be developed following 2 approaches: the first one (“Genmap 2a”) aims at
selecting the best individuals from the Genmap population based on their
genotype at the 3 microsatellite markers identified as tightly linked to the 2
main QTLs identified in Genmap 1; the second one (“Genmap 2b”) aims at
integrating a set of candidate-genes that were isolated by CIRAD, IRD, and
Mahidol University in the microsatellite/AFLP map built during Genmap 1
operation in order to assess the impact of these genes on the behaviour of
rubber trees and make possible a direct MAS among the variability of the
allelic forms of these genes.

Also based on Genmap 1 results, a third operation is planed: attempt to


make a map based cloning & sequencing of the major QTL located on linkage
group g16, underlying latex yield. Details of the working plan of this
operation is still under discussion between partners (CIRAD, Biotec, MU and
RRIT).

In complement to the QTL mapping developed on the Genmap 1 progeny, a


QTL mapping approach is also implemented for drought tolerance using one
or several new progeny(ies).

A fifth operation (“In vitro” now at discussion stage) should apply CIRAD in
vitro biotechnologies to somatic embryogenesis of three clones important for
Thai rubber cropping, with view to make possible the development of these
clones “on their own roots”, without budding nor external rootstock.

42
Most of these operations will associate one Ph.D. preparation by one Thai
researcher/student under academic supervision of Thai and/or French
universities.

4.3.1 - Genetic Determinism and QTL Identification for Traits Related


with Rubber Cropping (Genmap 1)

Coordinator: Mr Andre Clement-Demange (CIRAD)


Core members: KU, CIRAD, RRIT-DOA at CRRC
Associated members: INRA-PIAF for analysis of xylem vulnerability to
embolism.

The family RRIM600 x PB217 was created by RRIT at CRRC in 2000. The
genetic map was made (genotyping and map building) from 2002 to 2005 by
2 Thai researchers at CIRAD-Montpellier. This map is based on 445 non-
expressed DNA molecular genetic markers (microsatellites and AFLP) issued
from genomic research.

The field trial was set in 2002 for phenotyping and will be closed in 2010.
The Ph.D. that is performed under supervision of Kasetsart University will be
defended in 2010. The first results are very encouraging (heritabilities,
genetic values of 198 clones, genetic correlations, 2 important QTLs
detected). Field measurements will be continued in 2008 and 2009.
Validation of the QTLs and their application to rubber breeding should be
carried out by the rubber breeding programme. Extension of this research to
new ecological sites can be considered, notably for assessing the response of
the family to more stressful conditions (water stress). Extension of this
research to new families can also be considered.

4.3.2 – Marker Aided Selection (MAS) in rubber tree

This project is subdivided in 2 operations:

4.3.2.1 – Application of MAS using QTLs and markers identified in the


Genmap 1 operation (Genmap 2a)

Coordinator: Mr Andre Clement-Demange (CIRAD)


Core members: KU, CIRAD, RRIT-DOA at CRRC

The Genmap population issued of the RRIM600 x PB217 cross encompasses


more than 600 individuals available at CRRC. Nevertheless, QTL detection
was applied only on a sub-sample of 196 of them. A first objective is to better
valorize the complete progeny for the microsatellite marker based selection:
using only the 3 molecular markers tightly linked to the 2 major QTLs
identified for growth and latex yield, it is planed to select the best individuals

43
at the markers. This clones will be put into the conventional breeding
scheme of CRRC and analysed for agronomic value in the perspective of
varietal creation. A second objective is to confirm (or not) the efficiency of
these 2 major QTLs in different ecological contexts (severe water stress vs.
optimum water provision). The number of individuals that will be analysed in
these multi-local trials is not yet definitely established.

In addition, it is proposed to test physiological traits (hydraulic traits such


as cavitation...) can be used as additional traits for QTL analysis on this
progeny. The segregation of these traits will be checked on a sub-sample of
this progeny. In case of clear segregation and of suspected sufficient
heritability, this traits could be measured on al the 196 individuals of the
Genmap population.

4.3.2.2 - Genetic Mapping of Candidate-Genes Related with Rubber


Cropping (Genmap 2b)

Coordinator: Dr Herve Chrestin (IRD)


Core members: CIRAD, RRIT-DOA at CRRC
Associated members: MU and IRD

Direct investigation about the genes underlying the QTLs, through the way of
fine mapping, chromosome walking and positional cloning will not be
implemented due to the cost and time investment that should be necessary.
The short-cut of the candidate-genes approach will be privileged as it is
thought more diversified and more profitable.

Transcriptomics covers research devoted to RNA extracted from trees


submitted to various treatments. Messenger RNAs are the products of the
expression of genes as a response to the treatments. RNA is then converted
into cDNA that are used for designing probes, isolating and cloning the
corresponding genes that are assumed to play a significant role in the
treatments (“candidate-genes”). Such candidate-genes are becoming more
and more available.

Localization of the candidate-genes on the genetic map will open various


possibilities :
 assessing their actual involvement in the expression of traits (in the
conditions of the field trial) by taking advantage of the already
available phenotypic data,
 assessing their co-localization with some of the genetic markers on the
map that could be used for selection applied to those genes,
 discovering possible co-localization with the identified QTLs, thereby
lightening the biological meaning of those QTLs.

The main challenge of this research is to find, for each candidate-gene on the
two parents RRIM600 and PB217, some allelic polymorphism that can be
used for genotyping the progenies and localizing the candidate-genes.

44
For the most promising candidate-genes, extension of the operation should
be devoted to an accurate analysis of their expression in different genotypes
by quantitative PCR amplification.

4.3.3 – Toward a map based cloning & sequencing of the latex yield QTL
identified in GENEMAP-1
(Proposal still under discussion between partners)
Coordinator: Dr. Marc Seguin
Core members: CIRAD, RRIT-DOA at CRRC
Associated members: MU, IRD
Other partners : BIOTEC

Thanks to the relatively precise location of the yield QTL on g16 linkage
group from Genmap 1, it is prosposed to make an attempt of a map based
cloning of the underlying gene(s). The RO 38 BAC library created by CIRAD
(UMR-dap, Montpellier), is available for that purpose. The possibility to
create a complementary BAC library has to be discussed. A PhD graduate
researcher from RRIT, will spend 4 – 6 months in Montpellier for BAC clones
selection. Physical mapping, chromosomal walking and sequencing will be
continued at BIOTEC lab in Thailand.

4.3.4 – QTL mapping of drought tolerance from new progenie(s)


(Proposal still under discussion between partners)
Coordinator: RRIT
Core members: CIRAD, KU, RRIT-DOA at CRRC
Associated members: MU, INRA-PIAF, UBP-PIAF
Other partners : BIOTEC

QTL mapping approach will be also applied to drought tolerance using one or
several new progeny(ies) implying the susceptible clone RRII105. The choice
of mapping population(s) is not yet fixed and will depend of the possibility to
obtain a sufficiently large progeny from RRI105 x [tolerant clone] following
the 2009 pollination campain in 2009. Hydraulic (cavitation, conductance...),
and delta-C13 measures will be used for a more accurate estimate of the
drough tolerance level of all individuals. The molecular genotyping of the
progeny(ies) will be made using expressed genes/ESTs derived markers.
Nevertheles, in order to allow map alignments with reference maps, it will be
necessary to integrate a subset of at least 36 genomic microsatellite markers
(2 per chromosome) in this RRI105 derived map(s).

4.3.5 – Validation of molecular marker of stress (TPN) and of proteic


marker of yield

Coordinator: Dr. Jarunya Narangajavana (MU)


Core members: RRIT-DOA at CRRC, CIRAD
Associated members: IRD, MU

45
This operation has been developed since 2007, with the following scientific
objectives: to use new biochemical and molecular tools, to gain better
knowledge on the physiological and molecular mechanisms leading to the
onset and development of the rubber tree physiological bark diseases (TPN &
TPD), or in the contrary involved in higher rubber yield,
To identify or validate biochemical and/or molecular markers of
sensitivity/tolerance to the exploitation and other abiotic stresses, leading to
cessation of latex production (TPD, TPN,…), or in the contrary to high rubber
yield.
The experiment (2007-2009), called “Studies of stress markers and organic
nitrogen nutrients use in latex and bark for yield optimization and panel
diseases control in clone BPM24” is aimed to:
 study of productivity, assessment of latex metabolism, carbohydrate
and organic nitrogen reserves under contrasted conditions of stress,
 study of the metabolic partition of assimilates (competition between
sinks: growth, rubber production...),
 validate the available molecular markers of stress and physiological
bark diseases (TPD/TPN),
 improve and optimize rubber yield and productivity.

4.3.6 - Application of Somatic Embryogenesis for the Propagation of


New Clones on their own Roots

Coordinator: Dr Pascal Montoro (CIRAD)


Core members: CIRAD, RRIT-DOA at CRRC.

This proposal aims at opening CIRAD biotechnologies to one Thai researcher


for producing embryogenic friable callus lines suitable for large-scale
propagation of elite clones. Based on the production of somatic embryos
from short-term procedure developed by RRIT, CIRAD proposes a strategy
combining the establishment of friable embryogenic callus lines and their
cryopreservation, then the screening of callus lines with high capacity for
plant regeneration and preparation of large stock of the selected
cryopreserved callus lines. Field evaluation of vitroplants will be conducted
by RRIT in order to insure the quality of planting material before large-scale
propagation from cryoconserved stock.

This proposal includes one 2-year period of one Thai Ph.D. researcher at
CIRAD-Montpellier for the production of callus lines with high plant
regeneration capacity for one clone chosen by Thai partners, then one 2-year
period at RRIT-DOA for the production of vitroplants. A third phase, beyond
the time-table of the operation, will be devoted to setting up field trials and
assessing the vitroplants for agricultural performance.

46
4.4 - Technology and Rubber Quality

4.4.1 - Non Consistency of NR : Effect of Non-Isoprene

Coordinators: Siriluck Liengprayoon (KU), Laurent Vaysse (CIRAD)


Core member: KU, PSU, CIRAD
Associated members: SupAgro, MU, IRD
In association with private sector

Compared with its synthetic counterpart (synthetic poly(cis-1,4-isoprene))


which shows a consistent quality, NR contains a relatively important non-
polymer part (>5%). The assumption which is made for this study is that the
non-consistency of NR properties may be due to its non-isoprene part.

Therefore non-isoprene, and more specifically lipids of NR, are studied.


Methodological development has been performed in KU-CIRAD joint
laboratory well equipped for lipid extraction and analysis. The initial model
of dry rubber was USS (unsmoked sheet) in order to work on monoclonal
sample and to be able to repeat rigorously the making process at small scale
(workshop in rubber field). This small scale process allows also the study of
the effect of tapping system on lipid and properties. Moreover works on more
degraded samples are on going with the mini-creping and drying process
developed in Surat Thani (maturated coagula) and the maturated USS
process developed in Chantaburi workshop.

Most of the operations of this project deal with the comparison of lipid
composition (Phospho, glyco, neutral lipids, unsaponifiable, fatty acid
composition) and some properties of NR: physical properties (gel, molar mass
distribution, averaged molar masses), as well as rheological behaviors
(plasticity, plasticity retention index, viscosity, breakdown index,
vulcanization behavior, storage hardening…). Obtained correlation could
provide new pertinent predictive indicators of manufacturing behavior.

When studying either non-isoprene composition or properties, clonal origin


appears to be one of the most discriminatory parameter. Therefore a
molecular biology (SSH approach) is envisaged on two clones displaying clear
difference in terms of manufacturing properties (defined by a private partner)
as well as of non-isoprene composition.

4.4.2 - Characterization of Post-harvest Maturation of Cup Coagula

Coordinators: Suwaluk Wisunthorn (PSU), Laurent Vaysse, CIRAD.


Core members: KU, PSU, CIRAD
Associated member: SupAgro
In association with private sector

47
In Technically Specified Rubber (TSR) factories, cup coagula are stored in
pile for a variable period of time before being processed. During this so-
called “maturation” period, neither the microbiological phenomena
occurring, nor their implications on properties of raw NR are known. The
purpose of the first operation of this project is to study this phenomenon
under laboratory controlled conditions. For this aim, a dedicated device has
been build where temperature, relative humidity, and oxygen content are
independently controlled. This system allows also to work under sterile
condition in order to test the effect of selected enzyme/microorganisms. In
addition, a mini creping and drying process has been also developed and
adjusted by comparison with standard industrial process. Microorganisms
involvement has been proven in our study. A second PhD work would study
the mode of action of microorganisms that impacts the quality of rubber,
especially PRI. Output of this study could be the definition of optimal
parameters of maturation in terms of physico-chemical condition as well as
microbiological activity for a higher and more consistent quality.

Upstream studies are on-going to better characterize the origin of cup


coagula in Surat Thani Province. For this purpose, a preliminary survey has
been performed in small holder plantations (collaboration with Socio-
economy group) in order to get a typology of cupcoagula making local
practices (tapping system, tapping frequency, natural coagulation/acid,
harvest time, local storage condition. …). Control of quality of cup coagula
will be performed for each identified type. This should lead to the proposal of
improved practices. Process innovation, such as use of natural coagulant,
will be also tested.

A new study will also start to compare the effect of various post harvest
processing (USS, TSR5, TSR20 with different coagula maturation time) on
physical properties of raw and vulcanized rubber. Parallel biochemical and
structural analyses would be performed on the samples.

4.4.3 - Advanced technologies in NR processing to address


environmental issues: development of a clean process of valorization of
NR factory skim and effluent by filtration technologies

Coordinators: Watsa Kongnakorn (PSU), Claude Dupuy (UM2)


Core Member: PSU
Associated Member: UM2

Micro and ultrafiltration are promising technologies used more and more in
agro industrial processes. Two applications of filtration technology are
envisaged:
 - Skim concentration and obtention of new value added co-products
using ultrafiltration technologies.The purpose of this project is to
recover small rubber particles from skim latex by ultrafiltration to
replace the sulfuric acid use. This would lead to a new latex grade with
potential new applications. The main activities would be to
:Characterize skim, concentrate latex and permeate, skim latex cross

48
flow optimization (hydrodynamic parameters, fouling and scaling
control of membrane by adding surfactants, optimization of membrane
cleaning….), valorize skim latex concentrate as adhesives for the wood
industry.
- Application of membrane bioreactor technology to improve the quality of
rubber industry effluents.
for
5 - Higher Education and Capacity Building
Strengthen human capacities in natural rubber research and development
project is part of the overall objective of the platform. 4 actions are
concerned:

- Ph.D. programme
- Scientific exchanges
- Short term training
- Development of a new curriculum in rubber science

The objectives of this action are to strengthen human resources through


support to a regional innovative curriculum on rubber sciences in order:
- to set up innovative international post-graduate and doctoral
programmes in Thailand, opened to other Asian countries;
- to develop a master degree on major topics in rubber sector, including
economics and management;
- to improve and consolidate existing academic network between Asian
and European higher education institutions, by encouraging scientific
exchanges;
- to implement innovative methods related to educational engineering,
emphasizing field and professional experience associated to standard
academic education of a master degree;
- to implement short term training programmes in order to develop local
industry human capacities.

Current status of this action:


In order to tailor the curriculum to the actual requirements of the sector, it has
been considered as necessary to get the advice of both academic and professional
sectors to assess the needs of the rubber sector in terms of education and training
on rubber. This training needs assessment was planned to be carried out through
the implementation of a specific questionnaire during interviews or meetings with
rubber associations, rubber industry and planters but this strategy failed to be
implemented properly. Thus, a new approach has been considered, taking the
opportunity of the workshop on Training and Education held on 28 January 2009
during the first annual HRPP seminar to receive opinion and comments from
representatives of the rubber sector and universities regarding the current and
future status of Human Resources in the Thai rubber sector.
The other main issue in building-up this new curriculum was the necessity to have
a good and complete picture of the current degrees related to natural rubber
existing in Thailand in order to avoid any overlapping of the new curriculum to be
designed.

49
Main output of the workshop on Training and Education (28 January 2009):
From comments done by the representative of the Thai Rubber Association (TRA), it
has been acted there was a clear need from the rubber industry for a more complete
rubber HRD system, especially a “Professional” MSc. with integrated knowledge in
the whole rubber value chain (up-stream, mid-stream, and down-stream).
Participants agreed that this draft curriculum program should be elaborated by the
core members of the HRPP (KU, PSU, DOA, CIRAD), and will be presented to the
professional sector (TRA, ORRAF…) to check its accuracy to fit the actual demand of
the stakeholders.
The proposed and agreed scope of this curriculum should be “From Seed to block
rubber”, starting with rubber tree biology & agronomy (GAP), ending with the first
transformation of natural rubber from the field + marketing, economics, socio-
economics, management…
Regarding the description of existing degrees, different tables summarizing the list
of existing degrees related to rubber were issued by KU from data found in the CHE
website and by PSU. Details of curriculums related to rubber were also available.
Several degrees (BS, MS, PhD) and curriculums are clearly related to Rubber and
Polymer Technology, as well as Rubber Industry Management. But curriculums on
Plant Science appeared mainly to be discipline-oriented, there is no clear specific
curriculum on “Agronomy of Rubber”.
PSU has the project to re-organize the existing courses and body of knowledge to
bring out the curriculum on “Rubber”. Partners of HRPP, namely KU and CIRAD
agreed to coordinately draft the new program (waiting for the feedback from
SupAgro which was not able to attend the present seminar/workshop).
Actions to be taken
Time table: aiming to a possible launching (implementation) of the program by June
2010, the new curriculum must be finished to be drafted and developed by June
2009 to be processed through University approval procedure.
The participants agreed on the creation of a Working Group to continue the
process of building-up the curriculum in permanent connection with the rubber
sector. This group will be composed of:
Dr. Chutima Tantikitti (PSU/FNR)
Dr. Poonpipope Kasemsap (KU)
Dr. Antoine Leconte (CIRAD)
A representative from DOA to join the group is to be identified.
Next meeting of the working group will be held on 12 February 2009 and hosted by
PSU/FNR at Hat Yai.
Main target is to achieve a first draft of the curriculum by the end of March 2009.
TRA will then invite the working group to present the project at the monthly
meeting of TRA members which will be held in Hat Yai on early April 2009.
In the meantime, a feedback must be obtained from SupAgro regarding its
involvement in the project.

50
Document no. 6

Contact List of Participants

51
First HRPP Seminar : January 2009 Contact list of Participants
Name Position Institute Place Telephone Fax E-mail

Kasetsart University
Assoc.Prof.Dr. Sornprach Thanisawanyangkura President of HRPP KU Bangkok 02-9427623 02-9427624 fscistw@ku.ac.th

Miss Phacharavadee Paerattakul Assistant to the President KU Bangkok 02-9428500 ext 4408 psdphp@yahoo.com

Assoc.Prof.Dr. Poonpipope Kasemsap Director of International Studies Center KU Bangkok 0-2562-0985 0-2562-0985 agrpks@ku.ac.th

Deputy Director for Academic of Kasetsart


Assoc.Prof.Dr. Klanarong Sriroth Agricultural and Agro-Industrial Product KU Bangkok 02-942-8600-3 02-562-0338 klanarong.s@ku.ac.th
improvement Institute

Mr. Somsakdi Tabtimthong Director of International Affair Division KU Bangkok 02-9428173 02-9428170 fro@ku.ac.th

Lecturer, Department of Biotechnology,


Dr. Pakamon Chitprasert KU Bangkok 02-9405634 02-9405634 aappmc@ku.ac.th
Faculty of Agro-Indrustry
Department of mechanical Engineering,
Dr. Suphasit Rodkwan KU Bangkok 02-942-8555 02-579-4576 fengssr@ku.ac.th
Faculty of Engineering
Lecturer, Faculty of Natural Resources and
Dr. Jessada Phattaralerphong KU Sakonnakorn 042-725036 042-725037 csnjdp@ku.ac.th
Agro-Industry

Dr. Duangrat Satakhun Researcher, DORAS Center KU Bangkok 02-9427623 02-9427624 psddrsk@ku.ac.th

Miss Sudarat Chamchaoi Staff, DORAS Center KU Bangkok 02-9427623 02-9427624

Miss Dokkaew Jura Staff, DORAS Center KU Bangkok 02-9427623 02-9427624

Miss Wichuda Vongpraseard Staff, DORAS Center KU Bangkok 02-9427623 02-9427624

Miss Thidabhon Ngamsan Staff, DORAS Center KU Bangkok 02-9427623 02-9427624

Dr. Siriluck Liengprayoon Reseacher, KAPI KU Bangkok 02-9405634 02-9405634 aapsrl@ku.ac.th

Miss Natedao Musikamart Researcher, KAPI KU Bangkok 02-9405634 02-9405634 aapndm@ku.ac.th

Miss Roungrong Thongtan Researcher, KAPI KU Bangkok 02-9405634 02-9405634

Miss Ornuma Dungyam International Studies Center KU Bangkok 0-2562-0985 0-2562-0985 oomd@ku.ac.th

Researcher, Department of Horticulture,


Mr. Jate Sathornkich KU Bangkok psdjate@ku.ac.th
Faculty of Agriculture

Mr. Pongphan Siripornphaldeekul Ph.D. Student KU Bangkok talenoi@hotmail.com

Miss Boonthida Kositsup Ph.D. Student KU Bangkok 0-2218-5485 0-2252-8979 boonthida.k@chula.ac.th

Mrs. Rasamee Suravanit Ph.D. Student KU Bangkok

Mr. Sumit Kunjet Ph.D. Student KU Bangkok skunjet@yahoo.com

Mr. Naruenat Chairungsee Ph.D. Student KU Bangkok chairungsee53@yahoo.com


rratchanee@hotmail.com,
Miss Ratchanee Rattanawong Ph.D. Student KU Bangkok
ratchaneetum@yahoo.com
Miss Thittayaporn Leeraungsi Master Student KU Bangkok

Miss Ariya Phakagrong Master Student KU Bangkok g5170054@ku.ac.th

Prince of Songkla University


Vice President for Research and Graduate
Assoc.Prof. Dr. Surapon Arrykul PSU Hat Yai 074-282810 074-212839 surapon.a@psu.ac.th
Studies

Assoc.Prof. Perapong Tekasakul Director of Research and Development PSU Hat Yai 074-212808 074-212839 perapong.t@psu.ac.th

Assoc.Prof. Dr. Wullop Santipracha Dean of Faculty of Natural Ressources PSU Hat Yai 074-286016 074-211122 wullop.s@psu.ac.th

Vice Dean for Academic Affairs and


Dr. Chutima Tantikitti Graduate Studies, Faculty of Natural PSU Hat Yai 074-286016 074-212845 chutima.t@psu.ac.th
Resources

Miss Narumon Preaksa Lecturer, Faculty of Natural Resources PSU Hat Yai 074-286134 074-212839 npreaksa@hotmail.com

Assistant to President for International


Dr. Suwaluk Wisunthorn PSU Suratthani 077-355453 077-355453 suwaluk.w@psu.ac.th
Affairs and Research in Surat Thani

Lecturer, Department of Agricultural


Assoc.Prof. Dr. Buncha Somboonsuke PSU Hat Yai 074-286016 074-211122 buncha.s@psu.ac.th
Development, Faculty of Natural Resources

Lecturer, Department of Plant Science,


Assoc.Prof. Dr. Sayan Sdoodee PSU Hat Yai 074-286016 074-211122 sayan.s@psu.ac.th
Faculty of Natural Resources

Miss Pornpan Sae-Wong Student, Faculty of Natural Resources PSU Hat Yai 074-286134 074-212839 s4910620041@psu.ac.th

Miss Kanokporn Phacheerat Lecturer, Faculty of Economics PSU Hat Yai 074-286238 074-459353 kanokporn.p@psu.ac.th

Mr. Chaiya Kongmanee Lecturer, Faculty of Economics PSU Hat Yai 074-286238 074-459353 chaiya.k@psu.ac.th
Lecturer, Faculty of Sciences and Industrial
Miss Jutharat Intapun Technology PSU Suratthani 077-355453 077-355453 jintapun@yahoo.com

Lecturer, Faculty of Sciences and Industrial


Dr. Duangkae kanjanasopa Technology PSU Suratthani 077-355453 077-355453 duangkhae11@yahoo.com

Dr. Supaporn Ieamkaeng Lecturer PSU Suratthani ieamkhang@hotmail.com

Dr. Suchart Choengtong Lecturer PSU Suratthani 074-286238 074-459353 suchart.c@psu.ac.th

52
First HRPP Seminar : January 2009 Contact list of Participants
Name Position Institute Place Telephone Fax E-mail

Rubber Research Institute of Thailand, DOA


Mr. Pichet Prommon Steering Committee RRIT, DOA Bangkok 02-5797557-8 02-5614744 bbprommoon@yahoo.com

Dr. Thitaporn Phumichai Researcher RRIT, DOA Bangkok 02-5791576 ext 302 02-5614744 thitaporns@gmail.com

Mrs.Kanlaya Prapan Researcher RRIT, CRRC Bangkok 038-136225-6 038-136225-6

Dr. Pisamai Chuntuma Researcher RRIT, CRRC ChaChengSao 038-136225-6 038-136225-6 Pisamaichantuma@hotmail.com

Miss Kanikar Teerawatanasuk Researcher RRIT, CRRC ChaChengSao 038-136225-6 038-136225-6 kanikar2001@yahoo.com

Mr.Therachart Vichitchonlachai Director CRRC RRIT, CRRC ChaChengSao 038-136225-6 038-136225-6

Mr. Warit Khaenkhong Researcher RRIT, CRRC ChaChengSao 038-136225-6 038-136225-6 makmju@hotmail.com

Mr. Arak Chuntuma Researcher RRIT, CRRC ChaChengSao 038-136225-6 038-136225-6 Arakchantuma2008@yahoo.com

Miss Piyanuch Piyatrakul Researcher RRIT, CRRC ChaChengSao 038-136225-6 038-136225-6 nuch1505@yahoo.com

Dr. Kritsada Sangsing Researcher RRIT, Suratthani Suratthani 077-274097 077-286913 krissada45@yahoo.com

Mrs. Chatchamon Daengkanit Researcher RRIT, Suratthani Suratthani 077-274097 077-286913 chchmon@yahoo.com

Mrs. Rasamee Suravanit Researcher / KU PhD stduent RRIT Bangkok 02-5797557-8 02-5614744

Khon Khaen University


Dr.Kittichai Triratanasirichai President KKU Kon Khaen 043-202011 043-202015 kittri@kku.ac.th

Dr. Anan Polthanee Dean of Faculty of Agriculture KKU Kon Khaen 043-202360 043-202361 panan@kku.ac.th

Lecturer, Department of Horticulture, isupat@kku.ac.th,


Mr.Supat Isarangkool Na Ayutthaya KKU Kon Khaen 043-342949 043-364636
Faculty of Agriculture supatisa@yahoo.com

Miss Junya Junnjittakarn PhD Student IRD KKU Kon Khaen 043-202943 043-203212 junya_junjittakarn@yahoo.com
sangon41@hotmail.com,
Miss Santimaitree Gonkhamdee PhD Student IRD KKU Kon Khaen 043-342949 043-364636
gsanti@kku.ac.th

Mahidol University
Lecturer, Department of Chemistry, Faculty
Dr. Krisda Suchiva MU Bangkok 02-2015121 02-3547151 krisdasc@mtec.or.th
of Science
Lecturer, Department of Biotechnology,
Assoc. Prof Dr Jarunya Narangajavana MU Bangkok 02-2015319 02-3547160 scjnr@mahidol.ac.th
Faculty of Science

Dr. Kanokporn Triwitayakorn Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics MU Bangkok 02-4419906 mbktw@mahidol.ac.th

Lecturer, Department of Biotechnology,


Dr. Unchera Sookmark MU Bangkok 02-2015235 02-3547172 scusm@mahidol.ac.th
Faculty of Science
Lecturer, Department of Biotechnology,
Dr. Panida Kongsawadworakul MU Bangkok 02-2015232 02-3547172 scpkw@mahidol.ac.th
Faculty of Science

Miss Manassawe Lertpanyasampatha Student MU Bangkok mo_mon@hotmail.com

Miss Wipada Polsri Student MU Bangkok ladytakko@hotmail.com

Miss Paweena Chuenwarin Student MU Bangkok bowling08kpn@hotmail.com

Ubon Rajchathani University


Head of Department of Agronomy, Faculty
Asst.Prof.Dr. Manas Losirikul UBU Ubon Rajchathani 045-353500 045-282373 manas@agri.ubu.ac.th
of Agriculture
Department of Agronomy, Faculty of
Mr. Prawit Wongsukon UBU Ubon Rajchathani 045-353500 045-282373 prawitwongs@hotmail.com
Agriculture

Mae Jo University
Lecturer, Department of Biology, Faculty of
Mr. Siwarote Boonrasri Mae Jo Chiang Mai 053-873535 053-878225 siwaroj@mju.ac.th
Science
Lecturer, Department of Biology, Faculty of
Miss Chutamas Maneewong Mae Jo Chiang Mai 053-873535 053-878225 chutamas@mju.ac.th
Science

CIRAD
Dr. Benedicte Chambon Researcher CIRAD Montpellier, France +33467616573 +33467616590 benedicte.chambon@cirad.fr

Dr. Marc Seguin Researcher CIRAD Montpellier, France +33467617127 +33467615793 marc.seguin@cirad.rf

Dr. Eric Gohet Head of Research Unit 34 CIRAD Montpellier, France +33467617178 +33467616590 eric.gohet@cirad.fr

Dr. Jean Charles Maillard Cirad Regional Director CIRAD Vietnam +84437346775 +84437346783 maillard@cirad.fr

Dr. Antoine Leconte CIRAD Representative in Thailand CIRAD KU Bangkok +6629427627 +6629427628 antoine.leconte@cirad.fr

Dr. Laurent Vaysse Researcher, HRPP Coordinator CIRAD KU Bangkok +6629427627 +6629427628 laurent.vaysse@cirad.fr

Dr. Frederic Gay Researcher CIRAD KU Bangkok +6629427627 +6629427628 frederic.gay@cirad.fr

Dr Jerome Sainte-Beuve (could not attend) Rubber Advisor of Cirad CIRAD Montpellier, France +33467617128 +33467615515 jerome.sainte-beuve@cirad.fr

INRA
Dr. Herve Cochard Researcher PIAF, INRA Clermont, France cochard@clermont.inra.fr

53
First HRPP Seminar : January 2009 Contact list of Participants
Name Position Institute Place Telephone Fax E-mail

IRD
Dr. Frederic Do Researcher IRD KK +6643202943 +6643203212 frederic.do@ird.fr

Dr. Herve Chrestin Researcher IRD Bangkok Herve.Chrestin@ird.fr

Dr. Regine Lefait-Robin IRD representative, Thailand IRD Bangkok +6626272190 +6626272194 regine.lefait-robin@ird.fr

Montpellier SupAgro
Dr Eric Dubreucq (could not attend) Professor Montpellier SupAgro Montpellier, France +33499612364 Eric.Dubreucq@supagro.inra.fr

Blaise Pascal University (Clermont-Ferrand)


Dr. Agnes Guilliot Lecturer/Researcher UBP Clermont, France +33473407931 +33473407916 Agnes.GUILLIOT@univ-bpclermont.fr

Montpellier II University
Dr. Claude Dupuy de Cresenzo Professor UMII Montpellier, France dupuyc@univ-montp2.fr

French Embassy
Attache for Scientific and Higher Education
Dr. Abdo Malac French Embassy Bangkok Abdo.MALAC@diplomatie.gouv.fr
Cooperation

Others participants
Dr. Somvong Tragoonrung Head of DNA Technology Laboratory BIOTECH Bangkok 02-5646700 ext 3245 02-5646584

Dr. Sithichoke Tangphatsornrung Researcher BIOTECH Bangkok 02-5646700 ext 3259 02-5646584 sithichoke.tan@biotec.or.th

Miss Urapchata Sasipreejun NRCT Bangkok 02-5702286 02-5702286

Dr. Poolpat Prugsananon ORRAF Bangkok 02-4340180-91 02-4351112

Mr. Phoolsak Intarayotha ORRAF Bangkok 02-4340180-91 02-4351112

The Thai Rubber


Dr. Luckchai Kittipol President Bangkok 074-429011-2 074-429312
Association (TRA)

The Thai Rubber


Miss Pongpen Summapan Bangkok 02-7517022
Association (TRA)

The Federation of Thai


Mr.Chanchai Chiarakul Deputy Secretarial General Industries Rubber- Bangkok 02-3451163 02-3451281 c_chiarakul@hotmail.com
based Industry Club

54
HRPP
Hevea Research Platform in Partnership
DORAS Centre
Research & Development Building, 3rd Floor
Kasetsart University
50 Phaholyothin Road, Chatuchak,
Bangkok 10900. THAILAND
Contacts: Dr.Laurent Vaysse (laurent.vaysse@cirad.fr)
Ms.Natedao Musigamart (aapndm@ku.ac.th)