You are on page 1of 24

MENS BASKETBALL PREVIEW

THIS SEASON IS ALL ABOUT THE YOUNG PACK


GAINING EXPERIENCE. SEE HOW THE TEAM STACKS UP
IN THE WAC DURING THIS NEW ERA. C1-6

CONGRATS CLASS OF 2010 | FULL LIST OF UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES:


ADUATES: A5-6
A55

First copy free,


ee additional copies 50 each
SERVING THE UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO SINCE 1893

nevadasagebrush.com
nevadasagebru
d

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2010

VOLUME CXVII NUMBER 15

NEVADA 34, BOISE STATE 31 (OT)

The Wolf Pack beats the No. 4 Broncos in a historic win a victory that is simply

INCREDIBLE
Nov. 26
dubbed
Blue
Friday

All odds were


against them.
National pundits
thought they had
no chance. Their
opponent was
hailed as one of the
best in the nation.
But on a cold night,
in a town where so
much was wagered
against them, Wolf
Pack players proved
skeptics wrong.
THE FULL STORY
PAGE B1
Analysis | Life after the game
Player Profile | Rishard Matthews
Column | Aftereffects of the win

NEVADASAGEBRUSH.COM
Documentary | Relive Blue Friday
Highlight Reel | Top game plays
Video | Fans rush the field
Gallery | Historic snapshots
Blogs | The showdown through our eyes

ONLINE THIS WEEK AT NEVADASAGEBRUSH.COM


Mens basketball highlights: Check out highlights of this weeks
game against the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.
Graduation: Watch an audio slideshow of commencement.
Newscast: Watch The Nevada Sagebrushs broadcast of this
weeks news.

PHOTOS BY TONY CONTINI, CASEY DURKIN AND EMERSON MARCUS PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY JESSICA FRYMAN /NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

GREEK TROUBLE

IS THREE A CROWD?

UP ALL NIGHT

Read an update about the two


Greek houses that are under
suspension for underage
drinking infractions. Page A2

Discover the fun and safe way


to spice up your sex life when
adding another partner into
the mix. Page A7

Find out about the services


available to you late at night
in Reno.
Page A12

INDEX
WEEKLY UPDATE .............................................A3
CLASSIFIEDS ..............................................................A9
OPINION ............................................................................. A7
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT ...... A12
SPORTS .................................................................................... B1
AGATE ...................................................................................... B4

news

A2 NOVEMBER 30, 2010

Student voice of the University of


Nevada, Reno since 1893.

VOLUME CXVII ISSUE 15

nevadasagebrush.com

UNR Greek violations a growing issue

Editor in Chief Jessica Fryman


editor@nevadasagebrush.com

Managing Editor Juan Lpez


jlopez@nevadasagebrush.com

Senior Editor Emerson Marcus


emarcus@nevadasagebrush.com

Senior Producer Jay Balagna


jbalagna@nevadasagebrush.com

News Editor Don Weinland


dweinland@nevadasagebrush.com

Assistant News Editor Ben Miller


bmiller@nevadasagebrush.com

Sports Editor Lukas Eggen


leggen@nevadasagebrush.com

Assistant Sports Editor Cory Thomas


cthomas@nevadasagebrush.com

A & E Editor Casey OLear


colear@nevadasagebrush.com

Opinion Editor Patrick Connolly


pconnolly@nevadasagebrush.com

Design Editor Position Open


editor@nevadasagebrush.com

Photo Editor Tony Contini


tcontini@nevadasagebrush.com

Multimedia Editor Thomas Levine


tlevine@nevadasagebrush.com

Visual Assistant Position Open


editor@nevadasagebrush.com

Web Developer Position Open


editor@nevadasagebrush.com

Copy Editor Gianna Cruet


gcruet@nevadasagebrush.com

Copy Editor Kayla Johnson


kjohnson@nevadasagebrush.com

Copy Editor Stephen Ward


sward@nevadasagebrush.com

Designer Riley Snyder


rsnyder@nevadasagebrush.com

Staff Writer Position Open


editor@nevadasagebrush.com

Staff Photographer Casey Durkin


cdurkin@nevadasagebrush.com

Multimedia Producer Coree J. Hogan


chogan@nevadasagebrush.com

Interactive Producer Julian Rhodes


julianrhodes@nevadasagebrush.com

Illustrator Amy Balagna

TONY CONTINI/NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

A Nov. 5 incident involving four minors in possession and consumption of alcohol at the Sigma Nu house led to a suspension of the fraternity as well as Pi Beta Phi sorority one
of many suspensions involving Greek houses in recent years at the University of Nevada, Reno.

Strict policies, drinking culture contribute to recent conduct issues


By Ben Miller and
Stephen Ward

abalagna@nevadasagebrush.com

Newsroom Assistant Enjolie Esteve


eesteve@nevadasagebrush.com

Office Manager Beverly Rasberry


brasberry@nevadasagebrush.com

Advertising Manager Brooke Barlow


advertisingmgr@asun.unr.edu

Contributing Staffers:
Tarah Bowser, John Callahan, Carolina
Chacon, James DeHaven, Alexander Dietrick,
Marysa Falk, Katie Garner, Leanne Howard,
Michelle Jensen, Khanstoshea Johnson,
Becca Kitchen, Diamond Lambert, Jaime
Lehman, Brian Lester, Michael Lingberg,
Jacob Neely, Cambria Roth, Michael
Schembri, Catherine Stokes

CONTACT US:
Office: 775-784-4033
Fax: 775-327-5334
Mail Stop 058 Reno, NV 89557

The interim suspension of


a fraternity and sorority at the
University of Nevada, Reno reaffirmed a trend of higher Greek
suspension rates than at similar
universities.
Pi Beta Phi sorority and Sigma
Nu fraternity were suspended
in a Nov. 5 incident involving
four minors in possession and
consumption of alcohol at the
Sigma Nu house, said Sally
Morgan, director of the Office of
Student Conduct.
The action follows the suspension of Sigma Alpha Epsilon
fraternity last year and Alpha
Tau Omega in 2008.
Morgan said the university sees
about two disciplinary actions
against Greek organizations every year. Reasons for suspension

often include hazing and liquor


law violations, she said.
Washington State University,
a school with similar enrollment to UNR, issues about
one major Greek disciplinary
action every year, said Gerald
Marczynski, a UNR administrator who was employed as
WSUs associate vice president
of Student Affairs for four
years. The university has twice
the number of fraternities and
sororities on campus.
The high number of disciplinary action on campus
partially stems from the universitys punishment policy,
said Cameron Belt, president
of the Interfraternity Council.
The university holds chapters
responsible for one members
actions, he said.
Such procedures take away
chapters responsibility to regu-

late their own behavior, he said.


Many Greek leaders feel more
action should instead be taken
against individuals.
Its gotten into an us-versusthem mentality, he said.
The University of Idaho, also
with similar enrollment to UNR,
approaches Greek conduct by
relegating action to the chapter
in question except in severe instances, said Matthew Kurz, director of Fraternity and Sorority
Life at UI. Administrators try not
to harm their Greek community
because they make up about 20
percent of UIs undergraduate
students, Kurz said.
Removing a fraternity or sorority would have a huge impact
on student life, he said.
UIs last major disciplinary
action involved a fraternity that
disobeyed its national organizations alcohol rules, he said. The

The Nevada Sagebrush is a newspaper


operated by and for the students of the
University of Nevada, Reno. The contents
of this newspaper do not necessarily reflect
those opinions of the university or its
students. It is published by the students of
the University of Nevada, Reno and printed
by the Sierra Nevada Media Group.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: Must include


a phone number and/or e-mail address.
Letters should be relevant to student life or
major campus issues and no longer than 200
words. Letters can be submitted via e-mail
at letters@nevadasagebrush.com. Letters
are due via e-mail or mail by noon Saturday
before publication.

CORRECTIONS
The Nevada Sagebrush
fixes mistakes. If you find
an error, e-mail
editor@nevadasagebrush.com.

Th
The Pi B
Beta
t Phi sorority
it
and Sigma Nu fraternity were
placed on interim suspension
after University of Nevada,
Reno Police responded to
a disturbance call at the
fraternitys house Nov. 5. Four
students were charged with
being minors in possession
and consumption of alcohol,
said Sally Morgan, director
of the Office of Student
Conduct.
of the Greek community to step
up and take more of a stance
than they have, Belt said.
Ben Miller and Stephen Ward can
be reached at news@nevadasagebrush.com.

Board of Regents
to consider adding
fees, raising tuition
By Ben Miller and
Jay Balagna

ADVERTISING: For information about


display advertising and rates, please call
ASUN Advertising at 775-784-7773 or e-mail
advertisingmgr@asun.unr.edu.

SUBSCRIPTION: The Nevada Sagebrush


offers a yearly subscription service for $40
a year. Call The Nevada Sagebrush office for
more information. E-mail subscriptions and
downloadable PDFs are also available for
free at nevadasagebrush.com

SUSPENSIONS

NEVADA SYSTEM OF HIGHER EDUCATION

The Nevada Sagebrush and its staff are


accredited members of the Nevada Press
Association and Associated Collegiate Press.
Photographers subscribe to the National
Press Photographers Association code of
ethics. Designers are members of the Society
for News Design.

Classified advertising is available beginning


at $7. Contact the office at 775-784-4033
or classifieds manager at classifieds@
nevadasagebrush.com. Classifieds are due
Fridays at noon to the The Joe.

group was put on probation.


Morgan said alcohol violations may happen more at UNR
because of the state and citys
drinking mentality.
As a campus, we tend to have
more students drinking more
often, just because of our culture
here in Nevada, she said.
Greek and administrative efforts are under way to address
conduct issues and work toward
lower numbers of violations,
Marczynski said. The Greek
community underwent an assessment earlier this month to
analyze the goals and methods
of the system. Fraternity and
sorority leaders and university
administrators will discuss ways
to implement changes next
semester, Belt said.
Ultimately, change is up to
Greek students, he said.
I think its time for the leaders

MELINDA CHEMOR/NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Sen. Jonathan Moore speaks with Reynolds School of Journalism constituents at town hall meeting Nov.
17. Students spoke out on their dissatisfaction with student government at the meeting, Moore said.

ASUN seeks student voice


By Don Weinland
Poor interaction between
students and their senators is
rendering student representation feeble during a period of
unprecedented education cuts,
Associated Students of the University of Nevada senators said.
Only one senator, Jonathan
Moore of the Reynolds School of
Journalism, held interactive forums with constituents, Senate
Speaker Brandon Bishop said.
Nathan Demuth, commissioner
of clubs and organizations, held
forums for communication with
club members.
The ASUN Senate organized
town hall forums with students
throughout the 1990s and early
2000s, Bishop said. During the
78th Senate session, student
voice in ASUN has waned due
to the more formal and rigid
structure adopted by the Senate.
There are tons and tons of
issues that get brought up in
colleges every day that never get
heard, Bishop said.
Sen. Moore, who conducted
three town hall meetings in

October and November, said his


town hall meetings were host to
an abundance of frustration at
ASUN.
The thing turned into more
of a discussion on why nothing
is happening in Senate this
semester, he said.
Dissatisfaction with ASUN
is evident in the few town hall
meetings that were held, Bishop
said.
I think we see from the last
town hall meeting that the
students are upset with the way
the Senate has conducted itself
during the first half of the session, he said.
College of Liberal Arts Senator
Christopher Day said he speaks
with his constituents informally.
The college has discussed town
hall meetings but have yet to
hold one. Bringing together the
College of Liberal Arts is difficult
due to its size, Day said.
Disconnects with the student
body could leave students
unprepared for huge changes
looming over the University of
Nevada, Renos budgetary horizon, Bishop said.
I think what happened in

the 77th session will be minute


compared to what will happen in
the second half of this session,
Bishop said, referring to the cutting of academic programs that
happened last school year.
If we get engaged, it will be far
better then if we sit quietly and
humbly.
Bishop will propose an
issue-based caucus system
during the spring semester, he
said. Caucuses would provide
students opportunities to voice
their opinions and get informed
on pressing issues. The proposal
will require the effort of the entire Senate during winter break
to have a system prepared by
the beginning of next semester,
he said.
Moore introduced legislation
to the Senate last Wednesday
that proposed an award system
for senator interaction with
students. The bill, which is in
committee, would grant $225 in
ASUN Bookstore credit to senators who hold at least three town
hall or open house events.
Don Weinland can be reached at
dweinland@nevadasagebrush.com.

The Nevada System of Higher


Educations Board of Regents
will hold its final regular meeting of the year Thursday at the
Desert Research Institute in
Las Vegas.
The meeting will include
votes on fee raises for University of Nevada, Reno students
as well as a differential tuition
plan for the schools engineering students.
The meeting will be streamed
live online on the NSHE and
DRI websites, Scott Wasserman,
the chief executive officer for
the system, said.

STUDENT FEES
Fee increases at UNR include
a new fee for students, a deposit
requirement for freshmen and a
fee raise.
Under the new fee plan,
incoming freshmen would pay
a $250 deposit before enrolling in classes at the university.
New students would also pay
a new $130 fee. The fee for
international students would
increase from $145 to $525 per
semester.
The plan also includes one
fee increase and one new fee
for students at the University of
Nevada School of Medicine.
First-year students at UNSOM
will need to pay a new $450 exam
fee while third- and fourth-year
students will see an increase in
a simulation lab fee from $577
total to $700 per year.

DIFFERENTIAL TUITION
AND FEES
The Board will vote on a
proposal to implement higher
tuition and fees, or differential

ONLINE
F
For the
th full
f ll agenda
d off the
th
Board of Regents meeting
Thursday and Friday as well
as exclusive online coverage
of the meeting, go online.

NEVADASAGEBRUSH.COM
fees, for upper-level undergraduate and graduate courses
in the College of Engineering.
A $21.25 fee would be added
to all 300-and 400-level classes
in the college, as well as all
graduate engineering courses
and some engineering-related
classes in the College of Science,
said Emmanuel Maragakis, the
dean of the college. A $25 fee
would be added to all graduate
courses. The fees would double
in fall 2012 and again in fall
2013.
The fees will be used to enhance growth of the college and
are unrelated to budget cuts,
Maragakis said.
(Engineering) has been nationally prioritized, he said.
Any differential fees approved
would stay within the college
and would be allocated with
advice from committees formed
between engineering students,
faculty and administrators,
Maragakis said.
The Board of Regents passed
a policy in September that
recognized the high cost of
programs such as engineering
and established the guidelines
of submitting differential tuition and fee proposals for such
programs.
Ben Miller and Jay Balagna can
be reached at news@nevadasagebrush.com.

Weekly Update
nevadasagebrush.com

MUSLIM STUDENTS EDUCATE UNIVERSITY ABOUT ISLAM WITH EID AL-ADHA

NOVEMBER 30, 2010

A3

Campus
Events
For a full listing:
nevadasagebrush.com/
calendar

WEDNESDAY/1

UNIVERSITY BIG BAND


WITH GUEST TIA FULLER
When: 7:30-9:30 p.m.
Where: Nightingale Concert
Hall, Church Fine Arts Building
The University Big Band
will perform with guest
saxophonist Tia Fuller. This is
a free event.
For more information,
contact CJ Walters at
775-784-4278 or at
arts365@unr.edu.

THURSDAY/2

DISCOVER SCIENCE: THE


WORLD WATER CRISIS
When: 7-9 p.m.
Where: Davidson
Mathematics and Science
Center, Redfield Auditorium
TONY CONTINI/ NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Students get henna tattoos and pile food onto their plates last Tuesday at a celebration of the Islamic holiday Eid al-Adha in the Joe Crowley Student Union, put on by the Muslim
Student Association. Guests were read a section of the Quran, listened to a speech about the holiday and had their names written in Arabic.

NEWS BRIEFS

POLICE BLOTTER
NOVEMBER 28

NOVEMBER 26

Police responded to a report


of petit larceny involving
a wallet at Argenta Hall.

A suspect was arrested for


MIPC at Mackay Stadium.

NOVEMBER 27

A suspect was cited for


MIPC at Mackay Stadium.

An officer responded to
a report of grand larceny
involving a coat and various
food items at the Paul Laxalt
Mineral Engineering Building.

A suspect was cited for MIPC


and public intoxication
at Mackay Stadium.

A suspect was arrested for


driving under the influence
and careless driving at
North Virginia Street.

Police responded to a report


of grand larceny involving a
laptop and headphones at the
Mackay Science Building.

Four suspects were cited for


being minors in possession
and consumption and public
intoxication at West Eleventh
and North Sierra streets.

NOVEMBER 22

NOVEMBER 25

An officer responded to a
report of commercial burglary
and destruction of property
at Ansari Business Building.

UNR HEALTH CENTER TO


OFFER FREE STD TESTING
The University of Nevada,
Renos Student Health Center
will offer free testing for sexually transmitted diseases to students from today until Dec. 10,
according to Joanne McGee, a
registered nurse at the Student
Health Center.
The tests, which usually cost
$43, will check for chlamydia,
gonorrhea and syphilis through
blood and urine testing.
Chlamydia infects more
students on campus than any
other STD, McGee said.
Of the 971 women tested last
year, 41 tested positive for chlamydia. Twenty-nine of the 400
men tested last year also tested
positive for chlamydia.

McGee said many students


dont realize they have STDs.
Students who want to receive
any of the free tests must arrive
at the Student Health Center
before 3 p.m. every day during
the testing period.

UNR
STUDENT
LIFE
SERVICES TO HOST FORUM
FOR ASSISTANT DEAN
CANDIDATES
The University of Nevada,
Renos department of Student
Life Services will host a series of
open question forums in order
to allow students to meet and
hear from three candidates running for the position of assistant
dean of students, according to
Gerald Marczynski, associate
vice president for Student Life

Morning campus
temperature:
Afternoon campus
temperature:

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

Mostly cloudy

Mostly cloud,
west winds 5
mph

Chance of rain/
snow mix

Chance of rain/
snow

27
37

30
46

32
47

28
44

WEEKEND

Chance of
of snow
showers

ALPINE
MEADOWS

SIERRA-ATTAHOE

BOREAL

HEAVENLY

52
67
55

MOUNT ROSE

Lows: 25-30
Highs: 40 -45

UNR WEEKLY WEATHER DISCUSSION: A cold day on Tuesday will lead to a slight warmup through the rest of the week.
A shortwave trough enters the region late Wednesday, bringing a slight chance of showers. There is some uncertainty
with the long term forecast but precipitation will be back over the Truckee Meadows. The temperatures will be warmer.

FRIDAY/3

GLOBAL WARMING
When: 7-8:30 p.m.
Where: Davidson
Mathematics and Science
Center, Redfield Auditorium
Learn about how to take
action to help reverse the
effects of global warming.
For more information,
contact Tony Berendsen at
tony@sciencenevada.org.
RESORT SPECIALS

POWDER REPORT

WEATHER FORECAST
Forecast prepared by
the Reno-Lake Tahoe
student chapter of the
American Meteorological
Society. For more
information visit their
Web site at http://www.
ametsoc.org/chapters/
renotahoe/

Services and dean of students .


Candidates Eddy Ruiz, Louis
Bombardier and Sharon Stead
will each hold their own forums
in which they will take questions from students.
The candidates will also answer three questions prepared
by Student Life Services. Questions will put a special emphasis on sophomore students and
transfer students, Marczynski
said.
The first forum will take place
Wednesday. The second forum
will happen Dec. 7 and the third
will take place on Dec. 16. All
events will be in Room 422 of
the Joe Crowley Student Union.
For more information about
the forums, contact JoAnn
Hoskins at jhoskins@unr.edu.

Dr. Charles R. Goldman, a


professor of limnology at the
University of California, Davis
will present Lake Tahoe: Five
Decades of Change and the
World Water Crisis.
For more information, contact
Melissa Bell 775-682-8796
or at bell@unr.edu.

36
54
41

NORTHSTAR

DISCUSSION: Early in the week will be mostly


cloudy and breezy with winds reaching 10 mph. A
series of ridge gusts will hit at 50-70 mph. There
is a high chance of snow for the rest of the week,
beginning Thursday morning. The snow level will
be at 6,200 feet by Thursday night.

Northstar: Purchase a SixPack ski lift ticket for any


six days during the 2010-11
season. Tickets are $259 for
students 23 and younger and
$319 for those older than 23.
Heavenly: Purchase a season
pass for 2010-11 for $379 for
unlimited skiing and snowboarding.
Boreal: Buy an adult all-day
lift ticket on any two days during the 2010-11 season and
receive a third day free with
the purchase of an iRIDE rewards card.
Mount Rose: Present your
previous Saturday or Sunday
lift ticket to receive a Monday
ticket for only $29.

WebCampus is Learning from Students

On Dec.1, a link to a WebCampus survey will be emailed to all students. ASUN is asking you to take the survey so we can better serve you
academically. What is new with WebCampus? WebCampus is going to a new course management system, Blackboard Learn +, in Fall 2011.
So what does this mean for you? We are looking for input from students regarding how they would like to see their professors use the new
WebCampus. How do you respond to the survey? Check your email (the one listed in ePaws) for an invitation and link to the survey. The survey is
anonymous.
t Provide input on effective uses of WebCampus.
t Help professors understand what students value in using WebCampus.
t Have a chance to win $50 gift card (15 available).
You must respond to the survey before the gift card drawing in order to qualify. The drawing will be on Wednesday December 8.

news

A4 NOVEMBER 30, 2010

nevadasagebrush.com

New restaurants offer convenience


By Riley Snyder
New eateries at the University
of Nevada, Reno are providing
students with more varied and
convenient food options.
The new locations that opened
this semester are Elements,
located in the Davidson Mathematics and Science Center,
and Pathways, in the Center for
Molecular Medicine.
Russell Meyer, associate director of Housing Operations and
Dining Services at UNR, said the
locations were chosen based on
their proximity to other restaurants. Elements is farther south
and east than any other eateries
on campus.
Folks in that corner of campus have never had a place to
eat, Meyer said.
Both operations were placed
in parts of campus with no other
food options, Meyer said.
People want to have food
where they are, Meyer said.
As of fall 2010, students have
more than 15 places to eat on
campus, from national chains
like Starbucks and Panda Express
to smaller eateries like Las Trojes
Express and Cantina Del Lobo.
Students like 21-year-old business major Jake Knudsen, who
works at the Port of Subs on the
second floor of the Joe Crowley
Student Union, are satisfied
with the food options available
on campus. Knudsen said he
believes students have a variety
of places to choose from.
I feel like students (can) eat
wherever they want, Knudsen
said.
However, Meyer said that,
compared to other similar-sized

ASUN

Justice
censure
dropped
Staff Report

TONY CONTINI/NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Jasmine Sotoodeh, a 22-year-old speech-language pathology major, eats soup at Pathways, a new dining facility in the Center for Molecular
Medicine.
campuses, UNR has about or
below an average number of
eateries. Adding more can be
difficult financially, said Chuck
Price, director of The Joe.
There is variety on campus;
we try to make sure that we give
opportunities to students and
staff, but we also want to make
sure that the businesses are
financially stable, Price said.

Housing Operations and Dining Services and the Board of


Regents are considering restaurants to be opened next year.
The Nevada System of Higher
Education Board of Regents will
vote Friday to approve a lease
for an Einstein Brother Bagels
in the Joe Crowley Student
Union, according to the Board
of Regents Agenda.

If approved, it will open in fall


2011 and will take up spaces previously held by Tahoe Creamery
and Spudistro.
The Board of Regents will
most likely vote in favor of the
new lease, Price said.
The Board of Regents has
been very supportive of the university approving the tenants,
Price said.

Also coming in spring is a


breakfast diner that will be
located the second floor of
Sierra Hall, Meyer said. It will
serve breakfast Monday through
Friday, and will be used primarily by students who live in Sierra
Hall, Meyer said.
Riley Snyder can be reached at
rsnyder@nevadasagebrush.com.

A resolution proposing the


censure of the Associated
Students of the University of
Nevadas chief justice weeks
before her graduation will not
be pursued by in the Senate,
Sen. Mitch Bottoset said.
The resolution, which Bottoset introduced Nov. 3, sought
to censure Chief Justice Jessica
Hoese from her position saying Hoese misrepresented her
ability to execute the duties of
her office by failing to disclose
her plans to graduate midway
through her appointed term.
Bottoset withdrew the resolution during the weekend,
Senate
Speaker
Brandon
Bishop said. In the withdrawal,
Bottoset said the resolution
was in poor judgment.
ASUN justices are appointed
by the Senate and are expected
to serve for the entire school
year, Bottoset said.
The resolution, which is on
the agenda for Wednesdays
Senate meeting, said Hoese
failed to adequately train new
justices and that the Senate
is greatly disappointed by the
way Jessica Hoese has utilized
her position.
The Nevada Sagebrush news
desk can be reached at news@
nevadasagebrush.com.

Korean Peninsula conflict disconcerts UNR students


By Don Weinland
A shower of North Korean
artillery Nov. 23 on a disputed
island claimed by South Korea
caught the attention of a number
of University of Nevada, Reno
students and faculty with ties to
the region.
Im worried about my parents, said Liu Ning, a Chinese
graduate student at UNR whose
home is a five-hour car ride from
the China-North Korean border.
Its too close to my hometown.
Liu said the incendiary effects
on U.S.-Sino relations worry
her. Armed conflict between the
two Koreas could stir tension
between China and the United
States, bringing unwanted difficulty to Lius studies at UNR.
I dont know what the relationship between China and the U.S.
would become, she said. This

could have a negative effect.


UNR hosts 254 international
students from South Korea,
Japan and China the three
countries most affected by North
Korean instability, according
to the Office of International
Students and Scholars.
War between the two would
likely mean volatility in northern
China, said Zhu Jiangnan, a political science professor at UNR.
There might be many refugees from North Korea to China,
which could affect the economy,
security and social stability
there, she said.
Two South Korean marines and
two civilians died in the Nov. 23
shelling. Tension has been high
on the peninsula since a South
Korean battleship sunk in March
killing 46 sailors. South Korea accused the North for the sinking.
Hiroyuki Kyam, an interna-

tional student from Japan, said


he pays attention to news regarding North Korea. After more
than half a century of peace,
Japanese seldom consider the
possibility of war.
Im too used to peace, said
Kyam, who comes from Okinawa. Ive never been in a war
or experienced a disaster I
couldnt imagine my hometown
being attacked by North Korea.
The University Studies Abroad
Consortium has sent UNR students to Seoul, South Korea, for
the past seven years, said Carmelo
Urza, director of the consortium.
USAC has five students in the
country this semester, none of
whom are from UNR.
USAC is closely monitoring
the U.S. State Department and
the situation on the peninsula,
Urza said.
There is a level of escalation

RECENT CONFLICTS
April
A il 2008:
2008 North
N th Korea
K

fires a Taepodong Missile


over northern Japan.
March 2010: The sinking
of a South Korean battleship
is blamed on North Korea.
Nov. 23: North Korea fires
artillery onto Yeonpyeong
Island, South Korea.
that I have not seen in the past,
he said. But theres also a history of North Korea trying to get
the attention of the west.
The United States has more
than 28,000 troops in South
Korea, Maj. Jerome Guerrero
of the UNR Reserve Officers
Training Corps said. Reigniting the Korean War, which
ended with an armistice in
1953, is unlikely given Chinas

DON WEINLAND/NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

The effects of the Nov. 23 shelling have spread far beyond South
Korea. International students at Nevada are watching the peninsula.
political weight in the region.
A war would mean economic
problems for all counties in the
northeast Asian neighborhood,

he said.
Don Weinland can be reached at
dweinland@nevadasagebrush.com.

class of 2010

nevadasagebrush.com

COLLEGE OF
AGRICULTURE,
BIOTECHNOLOGY AND
NATURAL RESOURCES
Ronald Pardini, Dean

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
August 2010
Phillip Mark Barlow
Marissa Gwen Hammond
Yousef Zachary Khwaja
Kavan Hickman Lynn
Janell Jacqueta Morris
Regina Munguia
Shanti Aaron Wolfe-Payton

December 2010

Kelli Jade Aaron


Pamela Abreu
Tatsunori Akaiwa
Eduardo Gamaliel Alvizo
Tamayo
Brittney Anne Askew
Seth Bard
Robert Allan Bolduc
Jamie Marie Bunkers
Jessica Erin Courtwright
Christina Lee Darnell
Amira Christine Dittrich
Lindsay Marie Dugas
Jessica Lisset Echegoyen
William Robert Engel
Michaela Ann Flagg
Tyler Robert Freeman
Robert Carl Gillingham
Terra Leigh Gleeson
Antionette Nicole Gray
Ryann Michele Healy
Sarah Andrea Hills
Bradley Scott Humphreys
Delynn Renee Kamps
Ian Hunter Knight
Kyle Wade Leabo
James Tristen Ludlow
David Alan Maine
Wanchen Marley
Gabriel Anthony Uy Matute
Rebecca Michelle Merryman
Emily Nicole Mullen
Jacob Paul Munson-Decker
Justin David Norvell
Jessica Erin Poole
Grace Lindsay Ray
Emily Rose Rollins
Matthew Schneider
David Daniel Shirley
Jamie Lynn Shirley
Heather D. Slimak
Arianne Whitman Smith
Erin Marie Smith
Scott Raymond Soletti
Barbara Ann Stefani
Karen Elizabeth Szillat
Saori Tada
Robert J. Tedder
Anita Brilliana Thompson
Luke Perez Tiano
Cassandra Iris Torrealday
Kasey L. Turley
Thinh Duc Truong Vu
Breanna Michelle Wilson

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION

Gregory Mosier, Dean

BACHELOR OF ARTS
August 2010
James Daniel Elston
Barkin Ozogul

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
August 2010

Simon George Amadin


Joanna Aileen Andrae
Roger B. Arnaud
Elana Marie Asselin
William Biddle
Hsiao-Tzu Chen
Woo Jin Chong
William Charles Day
Joseph Allen Dragon
Eric Brice Emm
Christopher David Goolsbee
Walter Shahed Hinchman
Robert Dean Huston
Andrea Rene Ishmael
Rena Kinoshita
Shane Kyle Krieger
Daniel Aldrich Lesnick
Zachary William Little
Dervis Mahmutcehajic
Azusa Nakamura
Brett James Phelps
Kaitlynn Rianna Romig
Manu Sharma
Mana Shoji
Dustin Alan Steffey
Jordan Francis Stratigakes
Erica Rose Tabano
Leah Marie Taboada
Lizbeth Torres
Crysta Turnage
Daniel Week
Andrew Charles Wulf

December 2010

Karan Ahuja
Shawn Derek Anders
Ryan Robert Bailey
Nathan Nigel Bain
John Waldemar Bender
Ashley Betz
Tiffany Lanora Billman
Kristyn Lynne Bishop
David Allen Bissell
Daniel Thomas Blau
Erick Kenneth Brand
Christopher S. Broce
Antone Steven Bulich III
Matthew Calvin Jack Caplinger
Andrew William Carr
John Anthony Carrico
Garrett William Chambers
Erica Chavez
Jianfeng Chen
Jarad Scott Clark
Nicholas Ryan Clark
Cody Michael Cohen

Elinor Cohen
Sean Chauncey Collin
Brian Wayne Crouse
Leanne Simms Cuneo
Anita Maria Czyz
Alexandre J. Daruty De
Grandpre
Stephanie Lynn Demma
Joseph Michael Diarte
Stoney James Ellis
Cecilia Ruth Lynn Enright
Leah Marissa Fernandez
Benjamin Joseph Fry
Eliane Edith Fuentes
Timothy Fuller
Cesar Garibaldo
Steven John Garrett
Shirin Ghanavati
Alexander David Gilmour
Whitney Jeanette Gilson
Cord James Gitchell
Jace Daniel Glover
Brigette Juanita Glynn
Byron L. Golden
Janeth Contreras Gonzalez
Chad Michael Grayot
Kevin Alexander Grimes
Alexandria Danielle Gurule
Haley Gwinn
Zachary Victor Haffner
Christy Marie Harris
James Maxwell Harrison
Justine Rae Hayes
Adam Alexander Heaivilin
William Lynn Heard
Randi Kristine Hecht
Kern Carlin Herron
Cathy Hill
K.T. Hunter
Jamie L. Istrice
Kazunari Izumi
Ryan Robert Johnson
Lauren M. Jones
Colin Rand Kaepernick
Shane Timothy Kent
Ronald James Kimball
Yurie Kuroda
Jesse Dean Laca
Kelli J. Lay
Joelle Leigh Lipsman
Jenna Noel Lundemo
Valerie Monique MacFarlane
Jason Michael Machutta
Uchechukwu Olivia Maduka
Kate Elizabeth Maloy
Lizi Mao
Cecelia Rose Mastin
Rachel Elizabeth McClintock
Justin Cody McQuoid
Brian Scott Meinert
Kyle Ashton Mickelson
Travis Aaron Mitchell
Anthony Daniel Moore
Heather Brooke Moreno
Grace Lynelle Morris
Joshua Scott Morrow
Andrew James Moser
Ryan Robinson Moser
Augustin Myard
Keiko Namiki
Zachary Aaron Newell
Margaret Ruth OBrien
Rachel Lauren Paulsen
Jennifer Lynn Perry
Geno Victor Pescio
Brent Lloyd Peterson
Jillian Claire Pinocchio
Alia Rose Pirruccello
David Andrew Price
Crystal Pulido
Sophia C. Raphael Cardinal
Clinton Reeves
Michael A. Reniva
Randy James Reynolds
Erika Ashlee Richardson
James Ripsom
Luis A. Rivera
Alejandro Robert Rosa
Lauren Michelle Rosensteel
Chelsea Rose Sawyer
Steven T. Senft
Michael James Sharenbrock
Raja Harpreet Singh
Jordan Benjamin Suwinski
Jennifer Mae Sweet
Jarod David Theiss
Kimberly Ann Treece
Devan Edward Walker
Kellen Noboru Watabu
John Ryan Whitesitt
Sierra R. Williams
Patrick James Wright
Yin Yang
Jenna Noelle Yered
Zhibai Zhang
Luke Quinn Zimmerman

COLLEGE OF
EDUCATION

Christine Cheney, Dean

BACHELOR OF ARTS
IN EDUCATION
August 2010
Cara Ann Childs
David Kulikowski
Steven Ray Sullivan

December 2010

Kristina Erin Anderson


Breanna Christine Antila
Amanda Jean Barnett
Amber Rose Best
Emily Ann Braile
Jonathan William Browning
Felipe Cisneros, Jr.
Amanda Paige Ford
Gladiss Alexa Iniguez
Amanda Jackson
John Paul Jansen
Kelley David Josten
Kasey Faye Kaskie
Jason Russell Klein-Manchester
Diana Lynn Malarchik
Toni Josephine Marchian
KatiJo Matthews
Stephanie Lynn Modglin
McAvoy
Morgan McKay
Amanda Michelle Nooner
Victoria Jean Pace
Arthur Angelo Pascual

NOVEMBER 30, 2010 A5

All undergraduate
candidates
Candidates presented by the dean of each school and college
Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude, Summa Cum Laude, High Distinction, Distinction
Jessica A. Purney
Jenny Katherine Sayles
Amy Elizabeth Stair
Tyler Earl Wicks
Elena Grace Willoughby

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
August 2010
Jennifer Lisa Beede
Natalee Krista Maturino
Virginia Anne Munsterman

December 2010

Elizabeth Aranda
Reena Arias
Amy Heather Artman
Maria Elena Brannum
Kristin Nancy Marie Caniglia
Annah Colleen Mae Comstock
Tyler Scott Creel
Ashley Lynn Davis
Nina Christine Dougherty
Dominique Danielle Gerkhardt
Viviana Gonzalez
Suzanna Denise Grove
Maritza Herrera
Jaleesa Margine Jeffery
Alexandria E. Jones-Patten
Natalie Rose Kane
Dana Clare Lewis
Laura Elena Lopez
Alison Joan Martin
Morgan Blaire Nazemian
Karri Ort
Kirsten Lynn Rang
Mallory Ann Redl

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN EDUCATION
August 2010
Kristine Liane Currier
Tony Alan Fleming
Julie Booth Ha
Melanie Brooke Hansston
Robert Harold Mullin
Sophia Marie Tartaglia
Carolelee Walker

December 2010

Kristina Denise Acciari


Catherine Anne Allen
Wyatt Lloyd Aping
Kristie Lee Belding
Peter Jeffrey Borowski
Kristen Aleece Buchanan
Ashley Danielle Bunch
Ashlyn E. Butcher
Danielle May Daly
Amber Lee Emhoff
Michael Joseph Escobar
Amy Leigh Fessler
Kristin Nicole Finney
Anna Marie Gardikiotis
Keddie Kathleen Geraghty
Jennee Lynn Harris
Carrie A. Jarrett
Jenny Lynn Jones
Leland Wyvern Jones
Ruth Edna Kennison
Kristie Michelle Kirkbride
Felicia M. Krouse
Steven Frederick Kunold
Juliann Campbell Lambson
Michelle Lynn MacKay
Louis Marini
Renae Elizabeth McCabe
Ashley Chattel Mehrer
Tiffany Renee Merlino
Andrew David Meyer
Karly Lynn Millar
Nicolle Lynn Moffatt
Holly Liberty Olsen
David Anthony Palakanis
Tricia Lee Palupe
Patrick Peter Pantages
Kelsey Marie Reeves
Veronica Ileana Rodriguez
Cassandra Leanne Ross
Julie Elizabeth Rucker
Leah N. Russell
Kelsey Schuster
Elaenia Phillips Serdehely
Sarah A. Snyder
Elizabeth Nicole Stengel
Neil Aaron Stokely
Maria Guadalupe Velazquez
Arynn Constance Voss
Megan Leigh Weinhold
Megan Elise Wood
Melissa Rochelle Zinser

COLLEGE OF
ENGINEERING

Manos Maragakis, Dean

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
December 2010
Adam Nathan Carda

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN CIVIL ENGINEERING
December 2010

Kamrun Ahmadi
Daniel James Biggs
Caitlin Grace Brennan
Timothy Michael CecereWaters
Mark Eli Cukrov
Donald Paul Demosthenes
Tabitha Marie Ellifritz
Katie May Ezell
Benjamin Michael Faeth
Nicholas Raymond Graziano
Alex Jeffrey Greenblat
Mitchell Cody Holland

Harrison Hogan Holley


Andrew Vasan Jayankura
Luis Angel Martinez
Alan Todd Mushynski
Tiffany Maryanne Reichert
Adam William Shochat
Timothy Andrew Simpson
Ryan Thomas Spreeman
Mark R. Talavera
Jaime James Palma Tuddao, Jr.
Chad Nicholas Walling
Robert E. Wimer, Jr.
John-George Yvon Yvon

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN COMPUTER AND
INFORMATION ENGINEERING
December 2010
Gareth Bruce Ferneyhough
Jeffrey Allen Fiddler
Mikaal Ali Zaidi

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
August 2010
Johnny Young Kim

December 2010

Kathryn May Browne


Michael Cox
Douglas Crossley
Anthony Joseph Henriques
Ryan Charles Jones
Raymond Isaac Martinez
Aaron Moses Pena
Troy N. Sedgwick

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
August 2010
Macy Diane Magstadt

December 2010

Alexandr Vladimirovich Bajenov


Jose Guadalupe Cordero
Victor Profito

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
December 2010
Clifford Michael Bliese

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN ENVIRONMENTAL
ENGINEERING
December 2010
Christopher Marc Boyce
Nicholas Steven Brothers

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
August 2010
Brett J. Barlow
Chase Davis Hancock

December 2010

Barry Belmont
Daniel A. Berger
Brett John Burgard
Jonathan Matthew Dethmers
Kyle Richard Egelhofer
Jeffery Edward Fenwick
Noah Matthew Gehr
Stephen Carlisle Greenan
Christopher Lyle Hegge
Austin Patrick Lynch
Barkin Ozogul
Lisa Denelle Pappas
Lisa Nhu Lam Pham
Kyle Lee Pruett
Zane Christopher Ricks
Gregory Scott Ryan
Steven John Schwade
Matthew Ryan Walsh
Bryan Young

Travis Lee Prange


Rochelle Marie Rosa
Abigail Lynn Schulz
Caitlin J. Shanley
Adrienne Kayla Stauffer
Ashley Rose Stern
Carmen Michelle Stork
Mayumi Swetland
Shannon Marie Tharp
Gina Katherine Trovato
Katherine Marie Welling
Ryan Lee Wilson

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN NURSING
August 2010
Windi Lynn Goodman

December 2010

Allyson Armida Achey


Granville Kai Amundsen
Edith Berejnaya
Yara Bragg
Stephen Michael Buccambuso
Amy Marie Cameron
Melanie Carrara
Stephanie Christine Contreras
Jennifer Ann Cosenza
Ashley Fetter Davis
Ashley Jean Dimpel
Jaspreet Kaur Dulai
Cameron Gene Duncan
Kelly Coleen Fitch
Emily Louise Fletcher
James Raymond Fletcher
Tatsiana N. Furman
Allison E. Gauvain
Chelsea Marie Ghidossi
Melanie June Gill
Courtney Marie Gust
Karla Ashley Hansen
Krystina Diane Hashimoto
Cassandra Ann Hawkins
Christine Lynn Hockemier
Haruna Inoue
Young Soon Keum
Matthew Lynwood Lamb
Nichole Elisse McCune
Darlene Waterman Oertle
Anya C. Pearce
Jacqueline Marie Premo
Monica Maribel Reynolds
Melissa Samboy
Priscilla Ann Sells
Barbara Shields
Michelle Renee Stout
Jane Marie Templin
Jennifer Lurena Torres
David Rene Vega
Barrett Ann Walker
Michael J. Wright
Ashley Zavadel

BACHELOR OF SOCIAL WORK


August 2010
Tammy Kathleen Harris

December 2010

Trina Jo Hofbauer

DONALD W. REYNOLDS
SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Jerry Ceppos, Dean

BACHELOR OF ARTS
August 2010
Courtney Paige Atkinson
Natasha Shanel Courtney
Jocelynn Vanessa de Luna
Kristen Patricia Glaze
Elizabeth Joleigh Guile
Whitney Marie Lewis
Krystal Marie McMullen
Christopher Joel Muller
Devanny Novak
Jessica Ann Pacheco

December 2010

DIVISION OF
HEALTH SCIENCES

Denise Montcalm, Dean

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
August 2010
Kyle William Bateson
Elizabeth Anne Coomes
Karlie Marie Knighton
Misty Lauraine Manktelow
Raul Mazariego
Carrigan Ann Pellegrini
Courtney Marie Pennacchio
James Gerald Pierce
Zachary Patrick Tavcar
Jeremiah Edward Todd

December 2010

Samantha Marie Bradford


Jaclyn Diane Durant
Ashley Kathleen Ensminger
Ayla Joan Ferguson
Gabriel Alexander Grobben
Kristina Michelle Harvey
Wesley Arthur Herring
Devon William Hume
Lindsay Elizabeth Lutsch
Alison Marie Manning
Hope Charity Manzano
Sarah Ann Marquez
Christopher Gales Mendoza
Christine Tyann Mundy
Joshua Newman
Vanessa Harumi Niimi
Whitney Jean Parks
Brittany Danielle Paulson
Luis Alberto Pimentel-Mendia
Kaitlan Cooper Polkinhorn

Ashley A. Allen
Catherine Nicole Ammon
Kevin Howard Brigman
Melinda Rebecca Chemor
Heather Aleen Chiappini
Jessica Marie Crilley
Cara Lynn Dohnansky
Jessica Leanne Essad
Lindsey Leigh Felsch
Morgan Bethany Fielding
Wendy Firestone
Talia Marie Henderson
Lauren Michelle Kohler
Courtney Katherine Law
William Joseph Lee
Emerson Bunting Marcus
Ana Maria Montoya
Miranda Lynn Moore
Krystal Jean-Marie Pyatt
Rebekka Rizzo
Brittany Lyn Rubenau
Margaret Jeanne Sherman
Matthew Neil Shuckerow
Mary Kaitlin Skau
Anthony Vinson Sodenkamp
Steven Martin Spigelmyer
Jorgan Staker
Lindsey Michelle Stull
David Torres
Karen M. Tshimanga-Kashama
Abbie Anne Walker
Kazuki Watanabe
Carissa Marie Williams
Chelsea Anne Williams
Mark Kenneth Zaski

COLLEGE OF
LIBERAL ARTS

Heather Hardy, Dean

BACHELOR OF ARTS
August 2010
Joanautumn Kirsten Appel
Burak Avci
Rachel Elizabeth Baez
Heather-Ann Bussiere
Melissa Ann Caffaratti
Norah Alejandra Castedo
Lara Anne Cleeland
Christopher William Cook
Christina Joycelyn Cullen
Janel Adena Davis
Tiffany Nicole Eid
Kevin Michael Flom
Megan Mary Gilbert
Adam H. Giuliano
Tristan J. Hall
Rosemary Ann Hanten
Omar Topiltzin Huichapa
Steven F. Keim
Matyas Edgar Kreidler
Robert A. Locklear
Jenny Claribel Lopez
Zachary Swain Lyford
Megan Lee Lytle
Elizabeth Ann Minnix
Stacy Jean Mitchell
Spencer Ann Moulden
Brian T. Neppl
Cassady King ONeal
Jeffrey Alan Pannell
Ron Scott Peoples
Nikita Raquel Pierce
Matthew Myles Renfree
Kristin Ronnestrand
Lindsey Arlene Sanford
Kiera Louise Sears
Rusty James Torell
Sarah Dyan Traver
Tyler Mckenzie Wade

December 2010

Stephen Jarred Achurra


Adam K. Allen
Christopher C. Anderson
Harry Leo Baker, Jr.
Casey Anna Ballinger
Amanda Marie Barnes
Jessica Leigh Barry
Joshua Allen Bauer
Jake LaMar Bells
Angelica Beltran Beltran
Kathleen Susan Berigtold
Doris E. Blackburn
Sarah Ann Sigrid Boka
Stefany Dale Bonnet
Karen Lyn Bowers
Tarah Arizu Bowser
Gabriela Alejandra Breazeale
Sheena Marie Britschgi
Rorie Michelle Brock
Holly Dora Callaghan
Olga Cirlugea
Corinne Lindsay Clark
Nicholette Jean Codding
Brian Tobin Combs
Caitlin Cope
Jaime Alicia DUrso
Jaime Marie Darretta
Kummyya Tache Dixon
Ronald Joseph Dreher
Amanda Divine Drummond
David Sebastian Elcano
Samantha Kay Elliott
Emily Suzanne Erickson
Fania Victoria Espinoza
Shayn Ryan Etheridge
Dayton Joy Faraco
Desiree Clara Jean Felker
James William Ferguson
Andrea Franzoia
Joshua Addison Gabel
Brooke Nadine Gauthier
Sarah Lynn Gee
Janet Christine Genung
Gracie Lynn Geremia
Benjamin Paul Gibson
David Michael Giguere
Yeeymmy Patricia Giron
Seth Joseph Glass
Jessica LaVonne Gollnick
Edith Gonzalez Duarte
Stephen Greer
Geri Rose Griffin
Joanne Christine Hall
Heather Nicole Hamilton
Kara Faith Hammer
Richard Edward Hansen
Yurika Hara
Adam Shane Harris
Gemma Louise Hartley
Samantha J. Hebert
Christine Hedrick
Audrey Vanessa Hernandez
Yasuhiro Hirashima
Kimberly Jo Hiscox
John Douglas Hladky
Kelsey Michelle Hodge
Nicholas Lynn Hoffman
Timothy Gerard Howland
Roman Lee Hruska
Gregory William Hull
Dominoe Leann Imus
Yoshie Itamura
Anne G. Jackson
Ashley Lynn Jarvis
Jonathan David Johnson
Julia Kohlenberger
Alexander Taylor Korostinsky
Daisuke Kumakura
Kathryn Mary Lambrecht
Matthew Stephen Lastwika
Erin Elizabeth Lawrence
Mariana Stella Letunic
Adam Edward Liranzo
Sonja Ja-Ming Liu
Ashley Elizabeth Loghry
Sabrina Anne Loureiro
Seth Evan Love
James Tristen Ludlow
Christopher Bolos Lyon
Christopher Thomas Lyons
Chelsea Anne Lysne
Jessica Maddox
Gloria Nicole Maillard
Jeremy Manipon
Sairiel Marin
Andres Mariscal

Erin Martin
Haruna Matsui
Stephanie Lynn Modglin McAvoy
Edward Joseph McDonald
Jeffrey Micheal Mitchell
JoAnna Kathleen Moreno
Terra Janel Moser
Hallie Lynn Hoffman Murphy
Jenny Viktoria Nelson
Mandy Lee Nicholson
Devin Margaret Noe
Chrystal Rose OConnor
Ashley Margaret ONeill
Rebecca Roselynne Ogden
Brendan Tyler Palomo
Lisa Denelle Pappas
Faith Elizabeth Peabody
Samantha Ruby Peck
Nicolas David Peele
Bonnie Clara Pileggi
Thomas Eli Moore Pillar
Nancy J. Pitta
Bailey Leilani Polifka
Charles Andrew Polisso, Jr.
Jaclyn Ann Prescott
Nicole Carlin Proctor
Cassandra Lynn Puccinelli
Gina Quesada
Azmi Halim Ramzi
Britney Renee Rauh
Nicholas Walter Rebholtz
Guillermina Redei
Elise Marie Kathleen Robinson
Kevin Christopher Rodland
Emily Rose Rollins
Steven Lee Schlanger
Daniel Alan Schoenberg
Matthew Jameson Silva
Travis Craig Simas
Clinton James Sleeper
Catherine Rose Sloan
Tawney Elizabeth Smith
Zachary Scott Smith
Jeffrey Wade Steere
Erica Helen Stichter
Kari Allison Sweeney
Hitomi Takano
Sheldon McKay Taylor
Jessica Whitney Thomas
Garrett Bret Thompson
Bryan Mark Thorsell
Ian Ronald Tipton
Ryan Scott Tittle
David Lindsay Tole
Melva Trevino-Pena
Ryoko Uchino
Chelsea Marie Utick
Thinh Duc Truong Vu
Erin Leigh Ward
Sean Patrick Warren
Robert C. Whitefield
Brandon Thomas Wiltzius
Michael George Wood
Kristopher Lee Woodall
Jadeen Pearl Young
Danielle Marie Zayac
Heather Zepeda
Kristopher Joseph Zigich
Christina Marie Zirkel
Rodolfo Lingad Zorrilla III
Justin Randall Zuniga

BACHELOR OF ARTS
IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
August 2010
Brian Nelson Sullivan
Danielle Jazmine Williams

December 2010

Jasmine Marie Arreola


Kristy Sue Blades
Vanessa Ashley Brock
Kimberly Lynn Cameron
Zachary Hansen Chauncy
Timothy Chen
Alana Don Cooler
Kathryn Sarah Coughlin
Tsuyoshi Michael Curtis
Matthew Joseph Duplantis
Branden Evan Earp
Alejandro Esquibel
Lysette Antionette Flores
Alex Jeffery Foster
Sara Kate Garfinkle
John Michael Gradert
Andrew Henry Granata
Virgil Leo Green II
Adan Guzman
Raelynn Hansen
Kasen Corey Haslem
Aren Kiyoki Hirano
Jessica Barbara Hoese
Ashley Joy Huff
Michael A. Jacques-OGorman
Amanda Michelle Jarding
Nathaniel Read Johnson
Francesca Nicole Jones
Race B. Kennedy
Maximillian A. Lahoud-Watson
Christopher Thomas Lyons
Jordan William Macrander
Zachary Allen May
Cedric Monroe Mclaurin
Carlos Alberto Mendoza
Abram Ray Minnitte
Jennifer Michelle Miron
Katie Elizabeth Nolin
Courtney Patricia Pape-Howard
Yolanda Rangel
Timothy Alden Rich
Carlos Alberto Sandoval
Vanessa Faviola Santiago
Daniel Keith Schwedhelm
Shanley Amber Shanklin
Danielle Marie Snow
Shayla Sage Whitaker
Ruben Zarate

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS


December 2010
Brian Kearn Annis
Kevin Andrew Davies

BACHELOR OF
GENERAL STUDIES
August 2010
Damon Logan Booth
Jorge Alberto Cordova
Courtney Diane Eads
Lenore Beatrice Espinoza

class of 2010

A6 NOVEMBER 30, 2010


Anthony Vito Farnsworth
Derek Russell Keaveney
Rachel Lynn King
Ellen Catherine ORourke
Chad Joseph Peters
Heather Danae Prosser
Tyler Stuart Ramsey
Jany Clarissa Rojas
Jessica Rae Stafford
Erinn Lori Thomas
Garrett Wayne Voss

December 2010

Michael Joseph Andrews


Diane Christine Barnette
Michael James Bethea
Sarah Kristin Binger-Grosjean
Thomas Phillip Buswell
Ryan Kieth Coulson
Ashley Autowanie DAndrade
James Guy Darrough
Diana Patricia Dean
Elsie Ruby Dupree
Cory Thomas Eastwood
Richard James Edmiston
Patricia L. Gates
Kelly Ann Glynn
Mark Stephen Gonda
Tyler Lewis Graham
Kathleen A. Hadley
Brett James Hart
Nicole Harwood
Samantha Lee Hayek
Laura Ellen Hayes

GRADUATE SCHOOL
Marsha Read, Dean

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION
August 2010
Lisa Marie Evans

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
August 2010
Julie Marie Amador
James Edward Bishop
Morgan Rae Blanchard
Ruth Anne Gentry
Clare Terese Pettis
Dee Anna Phares
Deidre Marie Pike
Larry Dee Pruitt
Andrew Lloyd Rost
Reginald Chhen Stewart
Alan Frederick Talhelm
Stephanie Shelly Watts
Danice Evelyn Wilkins
Michael Thomas Wiwchar

December 2010

Juan G. Arias Acosta


Tristan John Ashcroft
Tidiane Aw
Hasan Aydin
Abraham Ayebo
Mohamed Ibrahim Ayoub
Ihsan Antoine Azzam
Peter Orlinov Bayguinov
Monica Baze
Mehmet Bilgi
Laurence Christine Bray
Kara Bunting
Karen Marie Carpenter
Narayana Rao Chalasani
Walter Harlen Coulter
Carlos Cruz Noguez
Violeta Gonda Demillo
Heidi Julene Eilers
Hongyan Gao
Tesfamichael Berhane Ghidey
Susan Gale Harris
Ali Issa Ismail
Amila K. Jeewandara
Yuxi Jin
Dominique Ardena Kagele
Narasimharao Venkata Kondamudi
Krishna Prasad Lamichhane
Michael Ernest Leverington
Yiheng Li
David Marquard
Esmaeel Mohammed Masadeh
Conor Mccann
Ricky Lee Medina
Susan Jane Merideth
Rohini Mishra
John Mason Moran, Jr.
Muhanna Ahmad Hejab Muhanna
Sabina Kavutha Mutisya
Taisuke Nagayama
Sarah Christine Negrete
Diane Marie Nicolet
Nicholas David Ouart
Lora Beth Perkins
Jeyasuthan Dhivianand
Pooranampillai
Sharlet Dawn Rafacz
Morgan Lind Robinson
Krishna Prasad Sahteli
Chad D. Sanada
Margaret Almut Shanafield
Ishor Kumar Shrestha
Melisa Andrea Soland
Ruth Loh Viboh
Ashkan Vosooghi
Xi Wang
Kenneth Martin Williamson
Essam Salah Yasin
Zenghui Zhao
Erqian Zhu

EDUCATION SPECIALIST
December 2010
Karen Lee Foote
Counseling and Educational
Psychology
Karen Lynne Gordon
Educational Leadership
Mary Kathryn Hardin
Counseling and Educational
Psychology
Siobain Christina Monahan
Educational Leadership
Jason Micah Shipman
Educational Leadership

MASTER OF ACCOUNTANCY
August 2010
Joseph Daniel Chrisman

December 2010

Emil Adamowicz
Kelsey Linnea Anderson
Michael A. Beers
Dong Rae Cho

Erik William Dean Hensler


Katie Marie Holverson
Teryn Carol Jackson
Brittany Rae Jones
Andrew Joel Keebler
Alma Angelica Kiker
Casey Harrison Knerr
Hector Magana Lara
Sarah Leysath
Cody LaVerne Lindstrom
Mary E. McClain
Megan Lynn McLeod
Matthew Walker McMullen
James Michael Morman
Daniel Sean Mulligan
Krystle Monet Neal
Sean Eamon Nichols
Melissa Sue Oglesby
Bryan Donald Pearce
Christopher Matthew Robinson
Kevin Paul Schlange
Elizabeth Marie Selin
Carole Tobin Smith
Dustin Smith
Vailala Lima Taua
Emma Rosa Thompson
Natalie E. Valentine
Kelly Ann VandeBurgt
Shelley M. Walker
Jessica Cathleen Welmerink
Brittany Elizabeth White
Timothy Michael Williams
Teran William Winter

Undergraduate
candidates continued
Cole Edwin Anderson
Lauren Noel Baker
Alan Michael Crosswhite
Kelly Mahoney Davison
Minsung Jung
Lyndsey Margaret Kemper
Kerry Elizabeth McLeran
Nati Linn Ordas

December 2010
Greyson Keith Boydstun
Kyle Joesph Kimber
Cristina Diane Liguori
Jessica Nicole Turell
Amanda K. Watts

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

December 2010

August 2010

Carolina Leonor Carson


Scott Allen Evans
Stephanie Gasway
Bahar Najafi
Amber N. Smith

Megan Lee Lytle


Stephen Robert Owens
Joseph Richardo Sanders

December 2010

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE
Jeffrey Thompson, Dean

BACHELOR OF ARTS

Martha Lucia Acevedo-Vera


Angelica Joyce Adrian
Arianna Joelle Beckett
Barry Belmont
Torechart Chartkunchand
Alison Ann Cook
Jeffrey Todd Cullen

Cristina Valerie Dawson


Dominic Allen DiPrinzio
Corey Robin Eaton
Cherie Angelique Eliot
Kaitlin Christine Fernbach
Joshua Addison Gabel
Michael C. Gallaspy
Amy Leigh Gattone
Justin Eric Gilmore
Bryan William Grant
Rachael Lynn Hadley
Laura Lynn Hall
Eric Daniel Hasty
Jane Courtney Ince
Alyse McKinley Iverson
Anthony David Kamikawa
Michael Joseph Koch
Daniel John Carlos Kozar
Howard Andrew Lenox
Amy Maria Mauseth
Cristina Noel Milner
Leslie Grace Parawan
Joseph S. Phillips
Cassandra Lynn Puccinelli

All graduate
candidates

August 2010
Cassandra Jean Albush

Ean Trevor Barnett


Anthropology
Rebecca Jo Bryant
Educational Leadership
Elizabeth Louise Carter
Elementary Education
Yu-Hua Chang
Teaching English to Speakers of
Other Languages
Claire Esther Clowers-Vernon
Counseling and Educational
Psychology
Tara Dawn Connolly
Educational Leadership
Heather Cosby
Journalism
Ana Luiza Valverde da Silva
Journalism
Nicholas James Di Meo
English
Nichole Racine Dickman
Counseling and Educational
Psychology
Amanda Katherine Feehan
Counseling and Educational
Psychology
Tamara Maureen Gabel
Journalism
Scott Allen Gayer
Journalism
Megan Elizabeth Gibson
Journalism
Jonathan Samuel Grant
Anthropology
Kimberley Robin Halen
Psychology
Minobu Hasegawa
Psychology
Melissa Renee Holland
Counseling and Educational
Psychology
Masanori Ishibashi
Psychology
Jennifer Janzen
Anthropology
Shu-Hwei Ke
Psychology
Megan Zola Keller
Counseling and Educational
Psychology
Ayako Kurihara
Counseling and Educational
Psychology
Frank Dickson Landes
Political Science
Chaehyun Lee
Teaching English to Speakers of
Other Languages
Keith Nathaniel Lynch

December 2010

BACHELOR OF MUSIC

MASTER OF ARTS

December 2010

August 2010

Mathew Adam Work

Sojidmaa Jadanbazar
Brittany Angela Johnson

Anthropology
Mia Celine Bosetti
Criminal Justice
Michelle Gamble Brown
Counseling and Educational
Psychology
Chih Liang Chen
Psychology
Hui-Hung Chen
Psychology
Jennifer Yee-Ting Chin
Psychology
Sarah Emily Congress
English
Matthew Brett Eck
Educational Leadership
Curtis Pete Ferlisi
Teaching English to Speakers of
Other Languages
Yunju Rachel Huang
Psychology
Jennifer Alyssa Kaufman
Criminal Justice
Janice Bugayong Mislang
Psychology
Morgan Patricia Mundy
Elementary Education
Jillian Diana Murdock
Educational Leadership
Daniela Ortiz
Psychology
Kelley Riegner
Educational Leadership
Jie Shao
Psychology
Michael Boyd Stoker
Criminal Justice
Samantha Donna Swing
Political Science
Xuyen Thi To
Psychology
Allegra Corine Turner
Psychology

nevadasagebrush.com

Candidates presented by the dean

Counseling and Educational


Psychology
Tara Elizabeth Madden
Educational Leadership
Lara Alice Mather
Anthropology
Joshua Luke Medjuck
Psychology
Juan Eduardo Miranda
Foreign Language and
Literature
Tobey Deana Morris
Counseling and Educational
Psychology
Ranna Mohammad Nash
Educational Leadership
Matthew Brian Oates
Elementary Education
Batyr Odeyev
Political Science
Whitney R. Parks
Journalism
Marcos Ivan Pico Renteria
Foreign Language and
Literature
William Kyle Sites
Journalism
Marcy Ann Swiatek
Counseling and Educational
Psychology
Nicholas Robert Thomas
Counseling and Educational
Psychology
Megan Elizabeth Tilton
Elementary Education
Carla Louise Trounson
History
Brandi Nicole Vigen
Speech Communication
Carlie Rose Wilhite
Journalism
Trevor Michael Wojcik
Economics
Shoko Yamazaki
Teaching English to Speakers Of
Other Languages
Sarah Michelle Yeats
Anthropology

MASTER OF BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION
August 2010
Kevin Kalima Ashman
Jessica Eve Ferrato
Lance Ferrato

December 2010

Christine A. Adams
Matthew Bryan Dent
Kyle Matthew Dixon
John Dwayne Ellis
Amber Rene Gentry
Scott Andrew Hall
Amanda Lauren Belmont Hinds
Frederic Jayet
Ludwig Joseph
Kimberly Nicole LeFever
Michael Scott Lemons
Sun-Hua Lin
Siraj Malik
Dawn Haddan Martens
Jason Alan Martin
Patrick Edmond McDermott
Candice Dianne Noel
Simon David Parrott
Luke Fredrick Paschall
Zeina Randall
Joseph Evan Ray
Jeffrey Ray Rogers
Joanne K. Ryan
Amanda Harker Safford
Erik Schiffke
Edita Sirusaite
Aron Robert Swan
Tony Mathew Thekkekara
David Daniel Webster
Jennifer Denise Wells
Megan Louise Wiley
Adam Christopher Winkler
Robert Thomas Woods

MASTER OF EDUCATION
August 2010
Christy Jean Clayton
Secondary Education
Elizabeth Jacqueline Delage
Special Education

Carla Hulsey
Special Education
Cynthia Joncas
Special Education
Pamela Jean Larmouth
Special Education
Janice Irene Lester
Special Education
Xiao Ling
Special Education
Maren Nicole Oates
Secondary Education
Amanda Brunet Tibbits
Literacy Studies

December 2010

Leroy Albin
Educational Leadership
Nicole Michelle Baird
Elementary Education
Kenneth Daniel Baker
Educational Leadership
Ashley Alyssa Barlow
Counseling and Educational
Psychology
Sarah Bennett
Special Education
Adam Scott Cilonis
Educational Leadership
Victoria Lynn Coates
Counseling and Educational
Psychology
Lori J. Conforti
Elementary Education
Amy J Engelbert
Educational Leadership
Hillary Noel Flak
Secondary Education
Alexander Rockwell Gauvain
Elementary Education
Sharon Marie Goldrup
Special Education
Melany Dawn Johnson
Special Education
Morgan Michelle Leets
Special Education
Maral Michael Malakian
Secondary Education
Lindsey Catherine Niedzielski
Secondary Education
Nichole Jacqueline von dem
Bussche
Special Education
Katherine Marie Williams
Special Education

MASTER OF JUDICIAL STUDIES


December 2010
Greg Gerard Guidry
Trial Judges

MASTER OF JUSTICE
MANAGEMENT
August 2010
Renee Angela Keel

December 2010

David Michael Koch


Andrew Eric Mennear
Katie Lynn Ogden
Andrea Louise Pawling
Brent Matthew Pawling
Tracy Nichole Schmitz
Tara Leigh Tushbant
Lenard Vare
Janine Wilson
Ivy Renee Wright Bryan

MASTER OF MUSIC
August 2010
Shauna Ruth Gilberti

December 2010

Brittany Page Iverson

MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH


August 2010
Zheng Li
Hsiu-Hui Tai

December 2010
Rama Kumar Gurugubelli
Donna Rae Murphy-Sharp

MASTER OF SCIENCE
August 2010
Tapas Chandra Acharjee
Chemical Engineering

Mahmoud Sayed Ali Ahmed


Physics
Elizabeth Anne Bancroft
Nutrition
Sudhir Baral
Materials Science and
Engineering
Tiana Louise Bowlen
Economics
Silas Reid Callahan
Civil and Environmental
Engineering
Charles Benjamin Carpenter
Mechanical Engineering
Voravee Amporn Chakreeyarat
Resource and Applied
Economics
Patrick Shane Cleary
Geography
Jose Pablo Corrales Azofeifa
Civil and Environmental
Engineering
Mahesh Singh Dhar
Geophysics
Karen Elaine Dotson
Hydrogeology
Molly Jean Ferry
Environmental and Natural
Resource Sciences
Bharman Gulati
Finance
Farida Dwi Handayani
Cellular And Molecular Biology
Joel Martin Jacobson
Hydrogeology
Sumant Jha
Geophysics
Kathleen Suzanne Jones
Biology
Andrew Muliika Kasozi
Civil Engineering
Jillian Allyse Knight
Human Development and
Family Studies
Gregory Thomas Kraus
Mechanical Engineering
Karel Edith Malloy
Nutrition
Anthony Joseph Menicucci
Geology
Serife Ozger
Civil and Environmental
Engineering
Ashwin Panday
Materials Science and
Engineering
Anand Sunil Patil
Metallurgical Engineering
Jeremiah Michael Rich
Mathematics
Serena Dora Rogers
Biology
Abdullah Sevincer
Computer Science
April Jaylene Shackelford
Environmental and Natural
Resource Sciences
EmilieAuguste Steinhoff
Materials Science and
Engineering
Kelley Marie Sterle
Hydrogeology
Jessica Rae Stewart
Speech Pathology and
Audiology
Shawn Eric Stickler
Mining Engineering
Sean Allan Thomas
Hydrogeology
Mayo Thompson
Geophysics
Matthew David van den Berg
Land Use Planning
Stephanie Vega
Equity and Diversity in
Educational Settings
Benjamin Doren Weston
Geological Engineering
Gerald Franklin Wozniak
Civil and Environmental
Engineering
Ananta Lakshmi Yennamani
Mining Engineering

December 2010
Bonnie Susan Akbar
Elementary Education
Sridhar Reddy Anumandla
Computer Science

Nicholas Patrick Richardson


Stephanie Michelle Rodriguez
Alisa Singratanakul
Michael Kenneth Taylor
Rosalicia Dolan Torres
Samantha Rochele VanWilgen
John Robert Walter
Megan Leigh Weinhold
Bailey Weston
Ashley Victoria York

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN CHEMISTRY
December 2010
Carolyn Carr
Silvija Denkler
Charles Raymond Martin

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN GEOGRAPHY
August 2010

Murphy Allen Gardner


Jason Henderson
Daniel Justin Kough
Mary Annerose Wanberg

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN GEOLOGY
August 2010
Griffin Patrick Burke-Ruhl
Robert Alan Ghiglieri

December 2010

Brendan Scott Kallaus


Eric Matthew Kiefer
Janice Lynn Kukuk
Garry Nam Richardson
Russell Jay Turner

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN HYDROGEOLOGY
December 2010
Liam Kyle Cahill

Brett Allen Rodela

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
August 2010

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN MINING ENGINEERING
December 2010
Tanner Paul Thetford

Stephen Robert Maples

December 2010

Blake Jackson Easby


Sean Ryan Flores

Jaspreet Billing
Electrical Engineering
Tracy Blair
Human Development and
Family Studies
Corina Borroel
Civil and Environmental
Engineering
Joao Paulo Pinto Braz
Materials Science and
Engineering
Jacquelyn Diane Brownstein
Environmental and Natural
Resource Sciences
Juan Camilo Builes Mejia
Civil Engineering
Dakota Blue Casserly
Land Use Planning
Eric Yun Chang
Biochemistry
Lise Marie Comartin
Hydrogeology
Megan Conley
Elementary Education
Holly Renee Cooke
Elementary Education
Nicole K. Cutler
Hydrology
Jinyi Deng
Materials Science and
Engineering
Murat Dinc
Mechanical Engineering
Melonie Lynn DiPietro
Elementary Education
John Brittan Elder
Civil Engineering
Elsa C. Farias
Human Development and
Family Studies
Melissa Ann Farinha
Environmental and Natural
Resource Sciences
Lauren La Croix Fields
Geology
Terry Thomas Fisk
Hydrogeology
Corwin Andrew Fleming
Computer Science
Jakob Foley
Finance
Kevin Phillip Friskel
Civil Engineering
Andrew Joel Gorzalski
Biochemistry
Patricia Gray
Elementary Education
Rajeev Gunda
Mechanical Engineering
Nathan William Harrison
Civil Engineering
Jason Thomas Hastings
Materials Science and
Engineering
Sara N.H. Holm
Educational Specialties
Kendra H. Iwahashi
Civil and Environmental
Engineering
Hema Andal Jayaprakash Narayanan
Computer Science
Vandana Jha
Electrical Engineering
Kira Lenae Joseph
Elementary Education
Christopher Patrick Jung
Finance
Hakan Kardes
Computer Science
Arun Kumar Karnati
Computer Science
Richard Kyle Keller
Environmental and Natural
Resource Sciences
Samer Pierre Kesrouani
Mechanical Engineering
Sohana Khanal
Materials Science and Engineering
Jeffrey Guy Kinder
Hydrogeology
Colin John Rodney King
Computer Science
Karen Lynne King
Elementary Education
Kristien C. King
Atmospheric Science
Hilda Kwan
Hydrology
Michael Ernest Leverington
Computer Science
Yanbo Li
Computer Science
Elizabeth Freeman Littlefield
Geophysics
Xunzi Lu
Finance
Michael Powell Matheus
Chemical Engineering
Melissa M. McGovern
Human Development and Family

Studies
Tara Katheryn McHenry-Chapman
Elementary Education
Stephen Gregory McKay
Civil and Environmental
Engineering
Michael Joseph McKee
Mechanical Engineering
Prathyusha Mekala
Materials Science and Engineering
Christopher James Mello
Economics
Jianing Min
Finance
Charles David Moeser
Hydrology
Todd Owen Morken
Geophysics
Ramesh Mulupuri
Electrical Engineering
Praveen Mysore
Mechanical Engineering
Nick John Nauslar
Atmospheric Science
Lum-Ngwegia Ngwa Nforbi
Materials Science And Engineering
Rasanayagam Nitharsan
Civil and Environmental
Engineering
Pete Mathieu Noles
Geography
Nicholas Jay Nussbaum
Civil and Environmental
Engineering
Timothy James ODonnell
Cellular and Molecular Biology
Talha Oz
Computer Science
John Haydon Parker
Hydrology
Ruby Louise Pierce
Elementary Education
Tia Renee Pilikian
Biology
Catherine Jean Pozarski
Elementary Education
Crystal L. Robinson
Geology
Lisa Ann Robinson
Counseling and Educational
Psychology
Emilio Sanchez
Civil Engineering
David Smith Shelley
Computer Science
Anton Shevchenko
Finance
Ni Ketut Susilarini
Cellular and Molecular Biology
Palasuntharam Thushanthan
Civil and Environmental
Engineering
Channon Marie Toles
Elementary Education
Joseph Patrick Trischetti
Secondary Education
Anusha Uppaluri
Computer Science
Jennilyn Mae Vallejera
Civil Engineering
Ryan Alfred Wahrenbrock
Elementary Education
Braden A. Wesgate
E lementary Education
Ross James Whitmore
Geology
Joseph Daniel Wieser
Civil Engineering
Boqun Yin
Civil and Environmental
Engineering

DUAL DEGREE BACHELOR OF


SCIENCE/MASTER OF SCIENCE
August 2010
Ryan Marcus Ghan
Biotechnology

December 2010

Sarah Elizabeth Buzby


Biotechnology

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
December 2010
Tanya Eloisa Acordagoitia
Ryan Martin Ruppert
Eric Thornton

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING


December 2010
Sandra Marie Olguin

Opinion
A7

LETTERS
TO THE
EDITOR
On Nov. 17, submitted via
e-mail:
Impact on enrollments is one
of the main issues to be addressed when a differential
fee program is proposed. I
read with great interest your
staff editorial article in the
November 16, 2010 Nevada
Sagebrush and I would like to
add some facts that our students and other stakeholders
should know to better evaluate this important issue.
In a recent study entitled
Differential Tuition by Undergraduate major: Its Use,
Amount, and Impact at Public
Research Universities*, it is
reported that In general, total
enrollment and enrollment
in programs with differential
tuition was not reported to be
impacted by the implementation of differential tuition
by undergraduate program
or major. Furthermore, the
College of Engineering performed a detailed tuition
comparison to identify the impact of the proposed increase
on our competitiveness with
regards to tuition. We compared the College of Engineering at UNR with Colleges of
Engineering of 11 Western
Land Grant Institutions, the
Six-Pac Universities and 13
other major regional Universities. With its current tuition
structure, UNR ranks 10th out
of 11 Land Grant Schools, 6th
out of 6 Six-Pac Universities
and 13th out of 13 regional
universities.
Lets see now what happens
if the proposed differential
fees are implemented. For
the freshman and sophomore
years there is no increase
so the standings remain the
same. If we consider the
junior, senior and graduate
students that will be affected
by the proposed increase
and if we assume that during
the next three years no other
school will increase tuition,
which is highly unlikely, then
the UNRs College of Engineering rank after the implementation of the proposed
increase will be: 7th out of 11
Land Grant institutions, last
among the Six-Pac group and
10th out o13 regional Universities. The complete analysis
and data are presented in the
proposal.
I believe that these comparisons clearly demonstrate that
our College will continue to
present a great value. It will
still be a College of Engineering with a very competitive
tuition structure and, with the
use of the generated revenue,
will make the specialized improvements needed to offer
a first-class state-of-the-art
globally competitive engineering education. I am confident that our students will
see the value and the quality
education we will continue to
offer and will realize that our
College will continue to present a unique, cost effective
educational experience of the
highest quality to help them
fulfill their educational goals
at both the undergraduate and
graduate levels and engage in
a highly paid profession.
Best regards,
Manos Maragakis,
Dean, College of Engineering

NOVEMBER 30, 2010

STAFF EDITORIAL I ASUN

Senator pay must be taken seriously

enators in the Associated Students of the


University of Nevada
Senate serve an invaluable role. In addition to their
legislative duties, they act as
representatives for thousands
of students in their respective
colleges, providing them with a
democratically chosen voice in
decisions they would otherwise have no influence over.
In order to perform this duty
to the fullest extent, senators
must actively seek input from
their constituents throughout
their terms. This body, by its
leaders own admission, has

largely failed to do that this


year.
Senators are busy, often
more so than the average
student they represent. As this
newspaper has argued before,
their work within ASUN is
often not worth the time it
takes when compared with the
payment they receive.
Current efforts to provide
compensation for senators
in the form of credit at the
campus bookstore as incentive to meet with students are
admirable, but sidestep the
real issue these officials
should be paid more. Rather

A REVELATION

what theyre worth. This does


nothing to change that.
After measures to raise the
senators pay next session
earlier this fall never materialized, this move is nothing
more than a step backward. If
it passes, future moves toward
pay raises will be negated by
arguments in favor of this
cheaper approach.
The job of an ASUN senator
is just that a job. Students
have bills to pay every month
and should be compensated
for their time in a way that
allows them to make ends
meet without being forced

than attack that issue head on


and work with the executive
branch to ensure passage
of any pay raise instead of a
late-term veto la last years
session, this senate is seeking
a mediocre solution to the
problem.
A $225 bookstore credit
for senators to perform an
essential duty is nothing
more than a bush-league
attempt to ignore the larger
problem that future sessions
deserve higher pay. When
compared to schools of similar
size, ASUN pays its elected
officials barely a fraction of

into purchasing textbooks


on campus or a Wolf Pack
sweatshirt that they may
neither need nor want.
Failing to do so does nothing
more than practically exclude
all students with the slightest
monetary concerns from
holding an office they should
be eligible to run for.
If we only allow those
students wealthy enough to
run, we will be misrepresenting our student body.
The Nevada Sagebrush can be
reached at editor@nevadasagebrush.com.

EDITORIAL CARTOON

My crush on
a crazy, rightwing woman

cant handle this any longer. Ive been hiding a


secret from my friends and family for far too long
now, and I feel the time has come to tell the truth.
Im coming out as a young, moderate Democrat
who actually kinda likes Sarah Palin or at least finds
her to be an incredibly interesting individual.
Within three years, she has gone from being the
practically-unknown governor of Alaska to a political
and pop culture icon whose popularity and recognition
rivals that of Lady Gaga. Shes already releasing her
second book, her daughter almost won Dancing
with the Stars, she makes millions
of dollars on the lecture circuit and
Sarah Palins Alaska is one of the
most addicting shows Ive seen in a
long time.
I believe, however, this is exactly
where Palin needs to stay in the
realm of pop culture, not politics.
She was not yet qualified to be the
vice presidential nominee, and her
continuing influence and support for
Patrick
the Tea Party is nothing more than an
Connolly
annoyance.
While I dont want Sarah Palin
to run for office again, I dont think enough people
understand how she was probably more qualified to be
vice president than Barack Obama is to be president.
Palin has been in the realm of politics since 1992
when she was first elected to Wasilla City Council. She
was continuously reelected to different positions such
as mayor. Later, she showed her executive power and
an ability to lead when she became the governor of
Alaska in 2006.
Her governorship is important because it showed
executive experience, leadership skills, an ability to
communicate and her ability to actually relate to her
constituents.
Obama, however, does not have executive qualifications like Palin. He has accomplishments in the Illinois
State Senate and did serve a brief term as the United
States Senator for Illinois. But he did not develop
executive skills like Palin.
He learned how to be a legislator (it was his job), but
did not showcase any sort of leadership skill that would
qualify him to be president of the United States. But
thats enough about him.
Palin is a fascinating person to study because of
the way she resonates with the people. Not only does
she continue to motivate tea partiers and Americans
around the nation, but her opposition is obsessed with
her as well. People are inspired by her religious faith
and her family life.
With a simple look at her Facebook page, you can see
her fans admiration. One post says Sarah!!! We need
a woman of God like you in the White House, while
others praise the support you show for us (veterans)
and our sacrifices does not go unnoticed god bless
you!!
And in terms of her opposition, a progressive
magazine was so obsessed with being anti-Palin that
they released a faux-memoir attempting to derail the
popularity of her book Going Rogue.
Whether or not you like Palin is not the important
point. But if you study her and her brief pop-culture
history, you might be surprised how much more to her
there actually is.
Hell, you might even end up kinda liking her.

Patrick Connolly is the opinion editor of the Nevada


Sagebrush. He studies journalism and French. He can be
reached at pconnolly@nevadasagebrush.com.

WEB
NOTES

AMY BALAGNA /NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Boise State not being in a BCS bowl game: loss of about $500,000. Beating the Broncos: Priceless.

SEX AND ROMANCE

Orgies, multiple sex partners can


spice up relationships if done right

ex is an art form where


I love to bring theatre
into the mix. Role play
does wonders in sparking up the passion. Sometimes
things get a little interesting,
like when the roommate comes
home and there I am, props
and all, in the kitchen acting
out a two-character scene with
a fellow actor.
Luckily, the roomie was
great at improv, and the scene
carried on with an added cast
member.
Maybe
it was the
spilled
nutmeg
taking effect,
but the third
dimension
really seemed
to spice up
the scene in
Tarah
that kitchen!
Bowser
If, as John
Donne
claims, art is indeed the most
passionate orgy within mans
reach, does that not make the
reverse, Orgies are the most
passionate art within mans
reach, also true? A thousand
times, yes! Im no distinguished
poet, but I think I just revised
good-old Johns work for the
better. Do you have too much
libido to give to just one person
at a time?

Try sharing with more than


one. It should seem obvious
that if one sexual partner can
please you, two can please
you twice as much. And if
this translates to double the
orgasm (it does) then need I say
more? Imagine all the fun and
satisfaction that can come from
having a threesome, foursome,
fivesome, etc.
Whether you have ever
actually been involved in a
threesome, or other combinations of group sex, Im willing
to bet most of you have at least
pictured yourself in a situation
along such lines. For some, it
would be an act contrary to
moral beliefs, and I respect
that. But, those people are
missing out!
For all of the rest of you
sinners (myself included), let
me say there are so many possibilities when sex transcends
the two-dimensional status.
You can spice up role-playing,
positions, as well as combinations of males or females
involved. Dont be ashamed to
try out multiple partners if you
want to. Just because you like
it freaky does not make you a
freak! And if it does, who the
hell cares?
At least you can say you are
an excellent multi-tasker.
However, for the safety of
all people involved, I do have

some advice.
First of all, if you are in a
monogamous relationship,
make sure you and your
partner are fully aware and OK
with including others in your
sex life. Jealousy can be easily
triggered and cause massive
destruction to the relationship.
Secondly, keep in mind that
the more people you have
sex with, the more open to
sexually transmitted diseases
you become. Be sure that you
are protecting yourself and use
some discretion when selecting
your bumpin buddies.
Thirdly, make sure the people
you engage in sex with are
trustworthy. You want to trust
them in the moment, as well as
after the fact.
But be sure you check to
see if your partners want to
set some ground rules. If you
dont feel comfortable with
something, make sure everyone
knows beforehand. Yelling at
someone for putting it in the
wrong hole can be a mood
killer.
My last words of advice: leave
alcohol and close friends out of
the equation. One word for the
morning after: awkward.
Tarah Bowser studies psychology
and plans to continue studying
sex therapy. She can be reached at
opinion@nevadasagebrush.com.

CAMPUSCHAT
How did you celebrate the Wolf Pack win?

NEVADA PULLS OFF


MIRACLE WIN OVER
BOISE STATE

On Nov. 26,11:06 p.m., joe


wrote:
congrats wolfpack nation!
I am a bronco faithful. If we
were to lose I am glad it was to
you. Nevada has brought a lot
of memories in our battles.

nevadasagebrush.com

Amanda Kesjaral
21, biology major

I was actually
working. But
thankfully, I
work at a sports
bar so I got to
celebrate with
the fans while I
was working.

Catherine Ammon
21, journalism
major

I watched the
game on TV at
the Eldorado.
But then we
went downtown
and celebrated
with all the fans.
The entire city
was excited.

Brian Lopez
22, engineering
major

I made a bet
with my friend
before the first
kick. If we lost, I
shaved my head,
If we won, hed
make me a hat.
And I still have
all of my hair.

Derek Lynn
24, marketing
major

I rushed the
field. It was insane. I ran in to
the center, and it
was like a mosh
pit. So I got out
and celebrated
on the outside of
the circle.

opinion

A8 NOVEMBER 30, 2010

nevadasagebrush.com

POLITICS: THE END OF THE BUSH-ERA TAX CUTS


FROM THE LEFT | TAX CUTS ONLY BENEFIT THE WEALTHIEST AMONG US

irst off, let me clarify


some recent legislation
the right wing continues
to distort. President
Barack Obama and Congress
gave the middle class the
largest
measurable
tax cut in
American
history in
the last
legislative
session.
They also
passed
sweeping
Jacob
health care
Neely
reform,
which the
nonpartisan Congressional Budget
Office says will reduce the
deficit. Now that the Republican Party controls the House of
Representatives on a platform
of reducing the deficit and
cutting spending, it plans to
repeal health care reform and
extend Bush-era tax cuts.
Wait...what?
Yes, Republicans plan on
extending tax cuts for the
wealthy and removing a
substantial amount of incom-

WEB
NOTES
NEVADA PULLS OFF
MIRACLE WIN OVER
BOISE STATE

On Nov. 26, 11:43 p.m., joe


wrote:
congrats wolfpack nation!
I am a bronco faithful. If we
were to lose I am glad it was
to you. Nevada has brought a
lot of memories in our battles.
I have coached little leage
for 20 years and coach Ault
said it best its 11 on 11 and
anything can happen. That
is the mantra I teach my kids.
However We will not forget
this day! Good luck Joe

RAISING FEES WILL


DAMAGE ENROLLMENT
On Nov. 15, 7:33 p.m., Alum
wrote:
It costs more the educate
people in different degrees,
those degrees also have a
higher starting salary; makes
sense to me to charge them
more. For instance, if youre an
English major, it costs hardly
anything to educate you,
mostly just staff salary, and
even then, pretty cheap comparatively. When the English
major leaves college theyll
probably end up working at
Starbucks or going back for
their masters.
Compare that to an Engineering student who has to have
a lab, equipment, computers,
tech, teachers, etc. When
that student leaves college
theyll have multiple job offers with starting salaries
around $60,000 a year off the
bat. (http://blogs.payscale.
com/salary_report_kris_
cowan/2008/07/list-ofbest-co.html)
Seems to make perfect sense
then to charge them more
for their education. Its pretty
clear economics, if youll make
more straight out of college,
you can afford to spend a little
extra getting that degree.

ing revenue that could add an


estimated $700 billion to the
federal budget. They want to
cut a health care program that,
by design, reduces the deficit
over time, according to the
CBO.
This sounds like the opposite
of the platform they ran on.
This would add more to the
deficit than the now-infamous
Troubled Asset Relief Program
legislation. That program used
about $150 billion to prevent a
domino effect of bank failures.
Extending the Bush-era tax
cuts does exactly what the
Republican Party is overstigmatzed for clicking the
undo button and reverting to
old programs rather than trying
fresh, new ideas.
Under the Bush tax system,
the middle class paid more
than they do today, and the
super-wealthy top 1 percent
paid less than they do today.
In a recession, that sounds
like the polar opposite of what
their constituents want. This
is frustrating because their
plan lacks creativity in the
policy-making process. Rather
than trying something new,
or finding a way to reduce

taxes across the board and


name specific programs to cut,
Republicans are taking aim at
extending cuts that make the
rich richer.
Extending the cuts will be
good for small businesses. But
as William Gale writes in the
Washington Post, it would not
affect 98 percent of small businesses. With this in mind, any
logic seems to have evaporated.
As CNN polling has indicated,
the GOPs victory was not a
mandate from the American
people it was a firm rejection of the Democratic Party
pushing too hard.
A slim margin believe
Republicans wont do as bad
as the Democrats, but still
dont expect much. Pushing
this agenda could be a serious
mistake from their party,
especially when these policies
only serve to expand the deficit
rather than reduce it. At least
they wont be able to pass
blame to Nancy Pelosi, Harry
Reid and Obama.
Jacob Neely studies political
science and Spanish. He can
be reached at opinion@nevadasagebrush.com.

FROM THE RIGHT | HARD WORK SHOULD NOT LEAD TO MORE TAXES

ts a classic Robin Hood


story. Our very own Robin
Hood wants to rob from the
rich and give to the poor.
The Bush Tax Cuts will expire
with the new year, meaning, if
Congress
doesnt do
something,
taxes go up.
President
Barack
Obama
wants to
extend
benefits for
the middle
Becca
class, and
Kitchen
let them
expire for
the wealthiest of our population.
He wants to spread the
wealth around. The wealthy can
afford it. Yes, the top 3 percent
of Americans have more money
than we can ever imagine, but
does that mean we have a right
to take it from them?
Take Bill Gates. He built a
company, worked hard and put
in countless hours of labor to
create Microsoft. What did you
do to help him? Did you work
for him? Did you contribute

ideas? My guess is the only


thing you did was complain
how a hard-working man with a
good idea made himself rich.
Sorry to break it to you,
but thats the epitome of the
American Dream. Most of us
will never reach the level of
wealth of some Americans, but
the opportunity to have your
own idea grow and help make
you rich is within reach.
Most of us feel too entitled.
I wager the majority of kids on
this campus feel the wealthiest
3 percent of Americans should
just give the rest of us their
money. I also wager the majority hardly pay any taxes and
probably get a check from the
government after tax season.
I read Ayn Rands Atlas
Shrugged a few years back,
and she had an amazing
description of Robin Hood. He
is known for his antics of taking
money he did not make. Hes
the reason why we think that
if we need something, we have
the right to it because its not
really about what you achieve.
And then I realized something. He didnt make his own
living he lived off of others,
and then took what he didnt

have and gave it away.


I dont want to live in a society where other people work
to support me. The majority
of Americans are middle class
and have a family, a car and
house payments. They might
even have a small business to
pay for. Why should they have
to pay for me, a total stranger,
who has never done anything
to help them?
Experts claim the recession
is over, but its going to take
a while for everything to get
better. Raising taxes of any kind
now would be destructive, even
for the wealthiest 3 percent.
They already pay the majority
of our taxes anyway.
Instead of raising taxes,
we need to curb spending as
citizens and as a government.
I can think of a few areas that
can be trimmed back.
Im sure if our officials really
thought about it, they could
find numerous areas where
they could reduce the spending
of tax payers money too.
Becca Kitchen studies journalism and literature. She can be
reached at opinion@nevadasagebrush.com.

SCAR STORIES

Adrenaline can alter ones perspectives

am not a violent person,


nor am I particularly
tolerant of pain. But a few
weeks ago, I showed both
of these traits when I broke my
arm during an indoor soccer
game. I saw
it bend 180
degrees in
the wrong
direction
before
pulling it
back into
place.
Right
after the
injury, I
Katie
punched
Garner
the guy
who hurt
me in the face (with my good
arm). That night, I learned

how to deal with my body


while under the influence of
adrenaline. I wish I could say I
am secretly a total badass and
my true colors came out that
night. But Im not. And they
didnt.
Everything that happened
after I was slammed into the
wall surrounding the field was
done purely off instinct. I was
swearing, screaming, crying
and waiting for the searing
pain of the new injury to set
in.
But it didnt come. At least,
not until a few minutes later,
when I wasnt expecting it.
When I initially hit the wall,
all I could think of is how
much it should have hurt.
But adrenaline was rushing
through my body, preventing

me from feeling anything


except fear, and apparently
anger.
I felt my arm break. And I
saw my forearm bending in an
unusual direction. But I felt
absolutely no pain.
The adrenaline did not
only alter my physical state,
it altered my emotional state.
Generally, when I feel like
someone has wronged me,
I suck it up and keep it to
myself.
But when adrenaline took
over my body that night, my
mind went with it. I did not
want to just let this one slide.
I was pissed. And who better
to take my anger out on than
the guy who shoved me into a
wall?
And so the hitting, scream-

ing and swearing began.


When the rage and shock
subsided, the pain set in. My
screams of anger turned into
screams of pain and whines
of Are we there yet?! I was
no longer the strong, assertive
person I was while lying on the
soccer field.
I was just myself, writhing in
pain and begging for someone
to help make my arm stop
hurting.
Luckily, I was referred to a
skilled surgeon who took care
of my broken humerus. I never
had to wear a cast, and just a
little more than a week after
my injury, I was no longer
wearing a sling.
Now that I look back on
the experience, I see just how
enlightening it was. I saw

what I am capable of when


my body feels endangered. I
became someone who I didnt
even recognize. I took care of
myself and followed all of my
carnal instincts. Aside from
the broken bone, it was an
amazing feeling.
I am not saying that I am
going to start punching any
person who bothers me.
And Im not going to go to
extensive lengths to prove how
tough I am.
But it is good to know what
my body is capable of. Plus, I
have a great story to explain
the six-inch scar on the back
of my arm.
Katie Garner is an education
major. She can be reached at
opinion@nevadasagebrush.com.

HEALTHY ALTERNATIVES

Easy ways to cure end of the year freak outs

he end of the semester


can really suck. Face
it essays, projects
and catching up on all
the reading you didnt do all
semester before finals week
hits is a
stressful
time.
We all
need a
little bit of
a release,
but this
is hardly
the time of
year to be
killing off
Jay
brain cells
Balagna
en masse.
So reach
back to your high school days
for some wholesome fun
that doesnt need distilling or
fermenting first.
Wait, you forgot what you
used to do in those days?

ROOMMATES | AMY BALAGNA

Maybe theres been a little too


much distilling.
Lucky for you, you have me.
And lucky for me, I grew up
with some friends in a small
town who taught me a couple
games that, although a bit
immature on the surface, can
be a great way to let off some
steam.

FUGITIVE
Who has time to head to
Lombardi nowadays? Even
though the place is open late,
most people probably want to
spend at least some of their
free time with friends, and not
watching Family Guy reruns
on a treadmill. Fortunately for
all of you, this game combines
social time and exercise into
one night.
1) Get as large of a group of
friends as you can and divide
into two teams. One team will
be the Fuzz while the other

one will be the Fugitives.


Within the teams, divide up
into smaller groups of two,
three or four (this ones a safety
thing) and get ready.
2) Decide a place to start
(Mackay Stadium, perhaps?)
and a place to finish (Nye Hall,
maybe?).
3) Team Fuzz stays away
from the starting point for five
minutes, then grabs flashlights
and starts patrolling the area in
between the two places.
4) Team Fugitive waits five
minutes and tries to make it
around their light-wielding
friends to the goal without
being caught. Itll be the most
fun youve had jumping into
bushes and hiding next to trash
cans in a long time.

TWO-FITTY AND UNDER


Now, I know its cold outside. If youre not feeling up
to a night of Fugitive in Renos

frozen wasteland, here is an indoor alternative.


I know youre probably as
strapped for cash as me, but
dont let the name deceive
you. Hours of fun can be had
in public without spending
a penny with one of my
personal favorites, Two-fitty
and Under.
For this game, all you need is
a friend (or two or three) and
a ride to the nearest Wal-Mart,
Target or other big-box style
store. Fellow hippies, fear not
you wont be giving these
giants any of your money.
Actually, youll spend most of
your time making fun of the
weird array of products they
carry.
1) Wander the store finding
items that cost $2.50 or less.
2) When you find an item that
meets the price requirement
and makes you laugh, make
your friend carry it. Leave that

clearance candy behind though


they only have to carry your
item if the group decides its
funnier than what they already
have. So head for the off-brand
cat litter, feminine douches and
oversized condoms because
they will if you dont.
3) Repeat as desired.
The possibilities for these
games are endless. Try it out
and try to make them your
own. Have some fun and think
of ways you can relax that
will leave you ready to make
it into the Knowledge Center
as soon as it opens. If youre
anything like me this semester,
your grade point average
(and maybe your liver?) will
probably thank you for it.
Jay Balagna studies art and
journalism. He can be reached
at jbalagna@nevadasagebrush.com.

classifieds and advertisements

nevadasagebrush.com

For Reno

Services

Answer Key

Got a DUI? - Call Changes


DUI School and Counseling
and let us help you today.
775-250-0080, or
www.changescounseling.net

For Reno

For Rent

2 bedroom house with


washer and dryer, $800
month $400 deposit, dogs
negotiable. 256 Thoma St.
Call Thomas 846-7792
Need a place to live for
spring semester? Room
available for rent in 3
bedroom, 2 bath house
on College Dr. Close to
campus. Master bedroom,
private bath, walk-in closet.
Utilities covered. Rent
negotiable. Ideal for two
friends or a couple! Willing
to rent as soon as possible.
775-560-2048
Walk to UNR.Studios with
shared kitchens.Includes
utilities. Laundry on site.
Parking garages.$395/
month. Perfect for students.
Call Reno Property
Management at 329-7070.

NOVEMBER 30, 2010 A9

For Reno

Help Wanted

For Reno

Help Wanted cont.

MEADOWOOD MALL
Nevada Humanities seeks an
SALES
intern to coordinate and
ASSOCIATE
administer the Young
We are looking for people with
Chautauqua program.
a sincere love for
Workshops begin in
people and strong customer
mid-January and the
service, leadership,
program ends on June
motivation skills, and ability to
30, 2011. Duties include
work in a team
preparing materials for
environment.
and attending bi-weekly
Key Responsibilities:
Offer advice to customers on
workshops, maintaining
products
records, communicating
Utilize specialist product
with participants, and
knowledge
coordinating day and
Use selling techniques to
evening activities during
increase sales
Chautauqua, June 26 30,
Ensure adherence of security
2011. Hours: 4 hours a
procedures to prevent
week at Nevada Humanities
theft from the store
office, and 2 hours every
Key Skills & Experience
other week at workshops,
Strong interpersonal and
communication skills
all on-campus. Skills
Exceptional customer service
required: organizational,
skills and ability to
communication,
deliver sales
interpersonal, and computer.
Flexibiltiy
with regard to
Pay: $10 per hour. Contact
working
Stave Davis or Mary Toleno,
weekends/evenings
Nevada Humanities,
Team oriented approach
784-6587, or
Please forward all resumes to:
srdavis@unr.edu.
david@5050phone.com

WINTER HOURS

5PM - 1AM
12/15 is last day
of Fall 2010 service

CALL: 775-742-6808

arts and entertainment

A10 NOVEMBER 30, 2010

Modern music an affront


to younger generations

he other day I was


in The Nugget with
my 16-year-old sister
who was visiting from
San Jose. While eating Awful
Awfuls, the Green Day single
When
I Come
Around
came on,
prompting
the two
of us to
reminisce
how great
music
Coree J.
was when
Hogan
we were
growing up.
On the other side of the coin
is the music that has been on
the radio throughout the past
decade. When I think of todays
music, the most positive
thought that enters my head is,
Thank God I dont like this.
First and foremost, lets start
with the Billboard Hot 100
charts. Oh, look, its Rihanna,
P!nk and Far East Movement
(yeah, the Like a G6 folks).
Runners-up are Ke$ha and
Nelly.
Much to my misfortune,
I have ridden in cars with
defective CD players forcing
overproduced music with
excessive bass and intellectually-deficient lyrics from

Kanye

CONTINUED FROM PAGE A11

co-produced by legendary WuTang Clan member RZA. West


wastes no time setting the mood
for the album, spitting ferocious
verses as Thats me the first
year that I blow / how do you say
broke in Spanish? Me no hablo.
The albums first single, Power,
underpins the struggle with pride
West addresses throughout the
entire album, with a commentary
on power relations that would
make Michel Foucault tip his hat.
West also refers to his anxieties over the past year, saying

the radio to my ears. I think


the most inspiration Ive ever
drawn from any of these artists
is to never create anything that
bears any sort of resemblance
to that.
In all honesty, the fact that
artists like these sell millions of
records is embarrassing. Not to
you who grabbed Nellys Just a
Dream from the iTunes store,
but rather to me.
It embarrasses me to be
human. These artists are
supposed to be the best in the
country.
But if Americas most
talented musician became
famous by singing shimmy
shimmy cocoa puff in 1999,
while 1965 offered, How
does it feel to be on your own
with no direction home, like
a complete unknown, like a
rolling stone, it certainly says
something about our generation.
As far as our generation is
concerned, we really havent
generated all that much quality
music. Were responsible for
making the Jonas Brothers and
Kanye West millionaires.
Technically, its not our fault
that soulless musicians are
forced on us, the impressionable masses, by record labels
that have an approximately 10
percent success rates. I guess

I could understand why theyd


try so hard to sell their artists.
This 10 percent compensates
for 90 percent of records that
dont break even. Youve seen
used album sections at music
stores. Theyre huge and tend
to be full of no-name artists.
So, I suppose its forgivable
that those purity-ring-wearing
Jonas kids and West are
excessively marketed. The
executives remain rich, the
artists remain to appear rich
and we spent a tenth of our
paycheck on an album thatll
eventually be used as a coaster.
Everyone wins, right?
Not exactly. There are bands
out there that believe that
they have a genuine shot at
greatness and that signing to a
major label means the end of
all their problems. There are
people who buy (not torrent)
albums by the artists on the
Billboard Hot 100 that have
never listened to The Beatles.
There are people who think
Metallica is the only good
heavy band.
Then there are people like
me, who look at contemporary
music and think that is one
ridiculous train wreck and
throw on a Fugazi album.

Got treasures in my mind but


couldnt open up my own vault
/ my childlike creativity, purity
and honesty is being crowded
by these grown thoughts.
Although the star-studded
ensemble on All of the Lights
is an honorable mention, the
zenith of the album is the nineminute epic Runaway. The
track was at the heart of Wests
short film released earlier this
year, as well as his September
VMA performance. Runaway
is by far the most probing look
into the rappers life, and a direct
response to his infamous public
outbursts. The track ends with
West performing a vocal solo over

the tracks haunting melody.


Overall, Wests fifth studio
album serves as a window into
the soul of one of hip-hops
most notorious rappers. My
Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy
challenges notions of normalcy
and popular music by droning
beats and melodies where it
seems uncommon or unnecessary Wests way of asking the
listener to let his music speak
for him. And, once the record
is through, the audience is left
with a product that is as unsettling as it is profound.

Coree J. Hogan can be reached at


chogan@nevadasagebrush.com.

Stephen Ward can be reached at


sward@nevadasagebrush.com.

nevadasagebrush.com

Danger

CONTINUED FROM PAGE A11

Defying checks in one last


time, leaving listeners with a
final message: You know that
big ball of radiation we call the
sun? Well, itll burst you into
flames if you stay in one place
too long that is, if the static
dont get you first. So, remember, even if youre dusted, you
may be gone, but out here in
the desert, your shadow lives
on without you.
Following his final broadcast,
an instrumental Star-Spangled
Banner plays until the station
buzzes into static and transitions into Vampire Money.
The final track is a sort of punk
rock take on a 1960s beach tune
that is an enjoyable and reckless
ode to glam rock that includes
like, 3-2-1, we came to fuck /
Everybody party till the gasman
comes (Yeah, I never thought
Id see the day either), Sparkle
like Bowie in the morning sun /
And get a parking violation on
La Brea till its done and Hair
back, collar up / Jet black, so
cool! / Sing it like the kids that
are mean to you.
All in all, Danger Days is

a tremendous success for the


band. It includes enough rocking dance songs to satisfy your
next party and enough heart to
remind you that the older you

become, the closer the world


grows to complete annihilation.

Fashion

FELTED WOOL CLOCHE


HAT

and sophisticated in no time,


the felted wool will also keep
her head comfortably warm
throughout the coldest of
months. It is the perfect winter
accessory.
Check out Urban Outfitters
(urbanoutfitters.com) for an
array of cloches, especially the
Brixton Portman Felt Cloche
for $38.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE A11

the neck and keeps fur in


moderation. The snood will not
only keep your friend warm
during even the coldest of
days, it will leave her looking
effortlessly stylish.
Check out ASOSs (asos.com)
collection of faux fur snoods,
including the Long Fantasy fur
snood for $35.

24 hours

CONTINUED FROM PAGE A12

area is to charge businesses a


fine for after-hours police calls.
If you stay open past two
oclock and you get a lot of police calls, you get a fine, so you
might find its cheaper to close
at two oclock, he said. We did
the same thing with false alarms.
If you had a lot of false alarms,

WARNER BROTHERS RECORDS

Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys is the fourth
studio album from My Chemical Romance, following the success of
2006 release The Black Parade.

Cloche hats, which are bell


shaped felt hats that were very
popular in the 1920s, have
made a huge comeback this
year. Help your friend help
herself and switch up her
usual boring, plain wool winter
beanie by gifting her with this
vintage, throwback-inspired
hat.
The cloche will not only have
your friend looking polished

were going to charge you for it.


If you have an alarm, you should
know how to work it. If you own
a bar, you should know how to
work a bar.
Chris Favata, a 21-year-old
secondary education major,
said he goes to Pie-Face Pizza
Co. with his friends and likes
seeing downtown businesses
open late for students.
There arent enough places
open late in this town casinos

Casey OLear can be reached at


colear@nevadasagebrush.com.

Enjolie Esteve can be reached at


eesteve@nevadasagebrush.com.

and bars notwithstanding,


he said. Many of us college
students stay up late and would
love to have good dining options
late at night, especially ones
with the kind of atmosphere
they have. I dont really know
how much business Pie-Face is
doing at 3 a.m., but I hope its
working out for them.
Casey OLear can be reached at
colear@nevadasagebrush.com.

TheMixer
nevadasagebrush.com

NOVEMBER 30, 2010

A11

Calendar

ALBUM REVIEW

For a full listing:


nevadasagebrush.com/
calendar

FRIDAY/3

THA DOGG POUND WITH


SPECIAL GUESTS AT THE
KNITTING FACTORY
Tha Dogg Pound, a hip-hop
duo made of Daz Dillinger
and Kurupt, have worked
with acts such as Snoop
Dogg and Dr. Dre. The group
will perform hits off its eightalbum repertoire.
211 N. Virginia St.
Reno
Tickets range from $15-40.

SATURDAY/4

DANE COOK AT RENO


EVENTS CENTER
Comedian and actor Dane
Cook, who has starred in
several films and comedy
specials, will perfom a
standup set filled with new
material. The performance
will begin at 8 p.m.
400 N. Center St.
Reno
Tickets range from $35-65.

SUNDAY/5
WARNER BROTHERS RECORDS

My Chemical Romances Ray Toro, Frank Iero, Gerard Way and Mikey Way assume the personas of the Killjoys, a group of vigilantes in post-apocalyptic California, for the bands
fourth studio album Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys.

Killjoys make some dance-worthy noise


By Casey OLear
Its official: The Black Parade
is dead. Notoriously angsty rock
group My Chemical Romance
released its fourth studio album
last week, Danger Days: The
True Lives of the Fabulous
Killjoys, peeling away the bleak
Black Parade outerlayer to
reveal a hidden world of color,
life and fun.
My Chemical Romance presents itself as a band of Technicolor vigilantes in the intriguing
Danger Days storyline. The
setting is the not-so-distant
future California in the year
2019 in a post-apocalyptic
desert wasteland controlled by
the corporation Better Living
Industries. Prolific comic book
author Grant Morrison portrays
the villain Korse, who controls
the
corporation.
Struggling

against his oppression are the


Killjoys a group of rock n roll
renegades called Party Poison, Jet
Star, Fun Ghoul and Kobra Kid.
The pirate radio DJ Dr. Death
Defying, played by Mindless Self
Indulgence guitarist Steve Righ?,
narrates the album.
It opens with his introduction,
Look Alive, Sunshine, which
leads into the albums first
single, Na Na Na (Na Na Na Na
Na Na Na Na Na). The song is
an excellent start to the album
as it perfectly captures its entire
essence in one fell swoop. The
song is fast, fun and somewhat
unexpected from a band that
introduced its previous album
with the beeping of a hospital
heart rate monitor.
It is clear that My Chemical
Romance has undergone a
significant change (for the better) since the release of its last

album. Band members are now


married with children, and the
record reflects their maturity
and happiness.
On The Kids from Yesterday,
lead singer Gerard Way says,
Now, this could be the last of
all the rides we take, / So hold
on tight and dont look back
When we were young, we used
to say / That you only hear the
music when your heart begins to
break / Now we are the kids from
yesterday.
Though
Danger
Days
maintains the theatrical, shutup-and-let-me-see-your-jazzhands appeal of the bands
previous releases, it is much
more laid back.
While the album features a
few good ballads like Sing
and The Only Hope for Me is
You, its strengths are definitely
the fun, danceable party songs

ALBUM REVIEW

Star reveals twisted fantasy


By Stephen Ward
In fall 2009, Kanye Wests
career looked worse than University of Nevada, Las Vegas on
a football field. People worldwide labeled him with every
malicious word they could cook
up for interrupting Taylor Swift
during the MTV Video Music
Awards, leaving Swift more offkey than her live performance.
The rapper was the center of
attention everywhere from music
blogs to senile talk shows, even
earning a less-than-admirable
nickname from President Barack
Obama. And, under incessant attack from the media, West went
on the premiere of the short-lived
Jay Leno Show and apologized
for the incident. It seemed as if
his career would mirror that of
well, the Jay Leno Show.
More than a year since the
fiasco, West has returned with
My Beautiful Dark Twisted
UNIVERSAL MUSIC GROUP
Fantasy, a record reaffirming Hip-hop star Kanye West recently released his fifth studio album.
his stance in the music industry
while projecting him back into Kid Cudi, Jay-Z and Q-Tip, to
KANYE WEST
the public eye.
name a few wrenching each
MY BEAUTIFUL DARK
The album, clocking in at side of the binary.
about 70 minutes, chronicles
The opening track sets the TWISTED FANTASY
the psyche of an artist caught stage for the story loosely told Release Date:
in a tug-of-war between being throughout the work, with Nov. 22
a pop icon and an abominable rapper Nicki Minaj narrating Genre:
exile. The outcome is as hon- a pseudo-nursery rhyme, fol- Hip-hop
est and abrasive as one might lowed by an explosive beat Grade:
A
expect from the paradox, with
a vast array of hip-hop royalty See KANYE Page A10

it presents, such as Planetary


(GO!) and Bulletproof Heart.
Tracks like Party Poison and
Destroya combine upbeat
rhythms with a phenomenally
defiant attitude that makes
them thoroughly successful
additions to Danger Days. On
Destroya, Way aggressively
sings, You dont believe in God
/ I dont believe in luck / They
dont believe in us / But I believe
were the enemy.
The story of the Killjoys continues throughout the album
with updates from Dr. Death
Defying, who instructs listeners
to Keep your boots tight, keep
your gun close and die with your
mask on if youve got to.
On Save Yourself, Ill Hold
Them Back, Way explains the
fate of the storys heroes and
alludes to its deeper meaning
about life with lines like, Ill

MY CHEMICAL
ROMANCE
DANGER DAYS: THE TRUE
LIVES OF THE FABULOUS
KILLJOYS
Release Date:
Nov. 22
Genre:
Alternative Rock
Grade:
A

tell you all how the story ends


/ Where the good guys die and
the bad guys win. / Who cares! /
It aint about all the friends you
made / But the graffiti they write
on your grave.
Two of the best Danger Days
tracks come near the end of the
album: S/C/A/R/E/C/R/O/W
and Vampire Money. Dr. Death

See DANGER Page A10

Check out fashionable


trends for holiday gifts

he holiday season is
a time for giving and
caring, right? There is
no better way to get
into the holiday spirit and rack
up some good points with
Santa than
by helping
your
friends
update
their plain
winter
styles.
You can
gift them
with some
Enjolie
of the
Esteve
seasons
newest trends. This guide of
affordable fashion gift options
is quick and painless, much
like the fashion intervention
that will ensue once you gift
your friends with these pieces.

STUDDED LEATHER
ALTERNATIVE BOOTS
Unfortunately, we all have
that one friend who loves
schlepping around in disgusting, bulky Ugg boots like its
2004. No matter how many
times you hint to your friend
that her Uggs make her feet
look like a yetis, she will not
give up her horrid footwear unless you show her the fashion
light. Show this friend you

love and care for her and her


fashion well-being by giving
her studded leather alternative
boots a very trendy and
fashionable, yet functional
alternative to Uggs.
Gold studs are back and
bigger than ever this year and
serve as a great way to add edge
and flair to even the drabbest of
winter outfits. In order to avoid
breaking the bank, look for
leather alternative boots.
Forever 21 carries a wide
selection of affordable, studded
leather alternative boots.
Check out the Edgy Biker Boot,
a calf-length boot adorned with
buckles and studs ($30).
Like any intervention, it may
be tough in the beginning, but
your friend will thank you in
the end.

FAUX FUR SNOOD


Faux fur made a huge comeback this season, particularly
in the form of fur vests (I blame
you, Rachel Zoe). While adding
a faux fur vest or coat is a great
way to keep warm during the
freezing Reno winter, those
who rock the trend run the risk
of looking like Chewbacca.
Get your friend a faux fur
snood instead, which is worn
like an infinity scarf around

See FASHION Page A10

THE BLACK CROWES


WITH TRUTH AND
SALVAGE CO. AT THE
KNITTING FACTORY
The Black Crowes, a bluesrock/hard rock band from
Atlanta, has sold more
than 20 million albums
worldwide. The band will
perform several hits from
its eight studio albums.
Truth and Salvage Co., an
Americana band from Los
Angeles, will open the show,
which will begin at 8 p.m.
211 N. Virginia St.
Reno
Tickets range from $47-85.

Upcoming

Releases
TUESDAY/30

THE BLACK EYED PEAS


THE BEGINNING

Genre:
Pop, R&B
Description:
The Beginning marks the
sixth studio album released
by The Black Eyed Peas
and will showcase a more
techno-inspired sound from
the group. B.E.P. worked with
producers Rodney Darkchild
Jerkins, David Guetata and
Free School for the album.

SOULJA BOY TELL EM


THE DEANDRE WAY

Genre:
Hip Hop
Description:
The Deandre Way is the
fourth studio release by
Soulja Boy. Artists such as
Trey Songz and 50 Cent
are featured on the album.
Kanye West, Tha Biziness
and No I.D. are some of the
producers who worked on
the album.

FRIDAY/3

BLACK SWAN

Starring:
Natalie Portman, Mila Kunis
and Winona Ryder
Description:
The film centers on Nina
(Portman) and Lily (Kunis),
two rival ballerinas in a
production of Swan Lake.
The duos rivalry evolves
into a strange friendship and
Nina undergoes a strange
transformation in which she
gets in touch with her dark
side.
Genre: Psychological
Thriller
Rating: R

Arts&Entertainment
A12

NOVEMBER 30, 2010

nevadasagebrush.com

The
Sagebrush
staff picks
the best
late-night
locales in
Reno
BEST PLACE TO EAT
1 The
1.
Th Nugget:
N
t
233 N. Virginia St.
(Open 24 hours)
2. Golden Flower
Vietnamese: 205 W. Fifth St.
(Open until 3 a.m.)
3. Pie-Face Pizza Co.:
239 W. Second St.
(Open until 6 a.m. Fri.-Sat.)

BEST PLACE TO SHOP


1 Walmart
1.
W l
t Supercenter:
S
t
5260 W. Seventh St.
(Open 24 hours)
2. WinCo Foods:
2855 Northtowne Ln.
(Open 24 hours)
3. Save Mart:
195 W. Plumb Ln.
(Open 24 hours)

BEST PLACE TO DRINK


1 Lincoln
1.
Li
l Lounge:
L
306 E. Fourth St.
(Open until 3 a.m. Sat.)
2. St. James Infirmary:
445 California Ave.
(Open until close)
3. 5 Star Saloon:
132 West St.
(Open 24 hours)

BEST PLACE TO PLAY


1 Eldorado:
1.
Eld d
345 N. Virginia St.
(Open 24 hours)
2. Circus Circus Hotel and
Casino:
500 N. Sierra St.
(Open 24 hours)
3. Grand Sierra Resort:
2500 E. Second St.
(Open 24 hours)

TONY CONTINI /NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

In Reno, many businesses,


restaurants and bars open
their doors to customers all
hours of the day. Drawbacks
to a 24-hour business include
complaints from nearby
residents and extensive
expenses for paying staff and
electrical bills during additional
hours. However, most of these
businesses find it worthwhile.

Reno hotspots thrive at night


By Casey OLear
Nightly at 8 p.m., shops and restaurants around
the nation close their doors. Citizens retreat into
their homes, regretting not taking the chance to
pick up groceries or order a pizza before businesses closed for the night. But not in Reno.
With a downtown area full of casinos, clubs
and bars open late, Reno has gained a reputation
for being a 24-hour city.
While 24-hour businesses face problems such
as complaints from neighbors and high costs of
remaining open when fewer customers come in,
many agree that the ends justify the means.
If they find it worthwhile, theyll do it, said Elliott Parker, chair of the economics department
at the University of Nevada, Reno. Bars tend to
find it worthwhile.
Bars are not the only businesses open 24 hours
a day many other restaurants and shops stay
open late to cater to customers of all ages. One
such business is the Gold N Silver Inn, a popular
place for students to eat after a wild night out on
the town, as it is always open.

Were busy 24 hours, said Renate Harding,


Gold N Silver manager. Were not as busy at 12
as we are at noon, but were still really doing good
business. Lots of people come here at night,
mainly young people from the university who
are studying all night.
Pie-Face Pizza Co. has already gained lots of
attention for marketing itself as a new late-night
restaurant and hangout for young people, though
it is a relatively new business to downtown Reno.
The restaurant is open as late as 6 a.m. during the
weekends.
Pie-Face co-owner Trevor Leppek said that
the restaurant gets a lot of business from people
in the service industry who get off work late at
night.
The staff from the Freight House district
usually comes over here all together after their
shifts are over, he said. Business is really steady
on the weekends. We usually have a line going
toward the door.
Renos notoriety as a 24-hour hotspot stems in
part from the fact that businesses in the United
States are typically open later than businesses in

other countries, Parker said. Many shops close at


about 9 p.m., and bars in many states stay open
past midnight, which is not the case in other
countries.
Its because of government restrictions, he
said. We tend to not regulate as much. Most
states enforce a 2 a.m. closing time for bars, but
we dont do that.
While some businesses thrive at night, others
have to cut back hours because of a suffering
economy, Parker said.
Businesses are having to cut corners, he
said. Its expensive to stay open 24 hours. Even
if you have a smaller staff, you still have to pay
the lighting bill and you have to have a staff even
if there are no customers. Its not uncommon for
businesses to shut down or close earlier during a
severe recession.
Another problematic aspect of a 24-hour town
is the excitement downtown that continues all
night, much to the chagrin of many local residents.
Reno City Councilman Dave Aiazzi said that
he is glad Reno is seen as a 24-hour city, despite

problems that are associated with the downtown


areas unconventional hours.
There are plenty of places that are open
downtown that get no complaints, and there are
some that get the majority of the complaints, he
said. I dont think its the 24-hour nature, per say,
that causes the complaints but the type of activity that the business puts up with.
Aiazzi said the city council encourages businesses to stay open later and does not wish to
make them close early.
A lot of people are out there trying to say that
the citys trying to shut them down, and thats
absolutely not the truth, he said. Id love for
everyone to stay open and stay open 24 hours.
Theyve got to regulate their own behavior. All
the taxpayers in Reno shouldnt be putting out
security in the form of a police department for
one or two businesses downtown.
Aiazzi said that one of the Reno City
Councils main plans to curb noise and other
complaints from residents in the downtown

See 24 HOURS Page A10

Sports

Womens
Basketball
Preview

A look into how the womens


basketball team, which has
six seniors on its roster, is
faring this season.
Read the preview next issue.
nevadasagebrush.com

SECTION B

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2010

The greatest victory this


university has ever had.
Chris Ault

Nevada quarterback Colin Kaepernick threw for 259 yards and rushed for 45 yards against Boise State on Friday. He also had one rushing and passing touchdown.

Victory brings
major changes
for fans, players
By Lukas Eggen
Despite it being after 1:30 a.m.
local time in St. Louis, 19-yearold University of Nevada, Reno
marketing major Brad Rootz
was wide awake. The now-No.
14 Wolf Pack was on the cusp
of defeating then-No. 4 Boise
State, and he wasnt about to
hold in his emotion.
Rootz, a die-hard Wolf Pack
fan, teared up after Nevadas
loss to Hawaii earlier this season.
This was a chance for redemption.
After freshman kicker Anthony Martinez gave Nevada
the win, the rest of Rootz family, who were asleep, knew what
had happened.
We just went nuts, said
Rootz, who went home for
Thanksgiving. I was screaming
at the top of my lungs and we
woke everyone up.
Nevadas
victory
sent
shockwaves across the college
football world, shaking up bowl
projections and the outlook for
the Bowl Championship Series
bowl games.
For the Wolf Pack, the win
affected everyone from the
athletes to the fans.

THE SENIORS
For quarterback Colin Kaepernick, it was fitting that his final
home game with Nevada was a
victory against the seemingly-

unbeatable Broncos.
It was at Boise State in 2007
that Kaepernick made his first
start for the Wolf Pack, introducing himself to the college
football world and posting
420 total yards and five touchdowns.
Yet it was in a losing effort.
Each year since, the Wolf Pack
has come up short against the
Broncos, losing by two, seven
and nine points.
In what was one of the biggest
stages of his career last Friday,
Kaepernick threw for 259 yards
and rushed for 45 yards, scoring one passing and rushing
touchdown.
I started my career against
Boise, so its good to end it this
way, the senior said.
Along with a senior class that
includes running back Vai Taua,
defensive end Dontay Moch
and tight end Virgil Green,
going winless against Boise
State would have marred the
class legacy. Instead, the win
cemented it as one of the best
in program history.
This win puts a stamp on
this program that says this
team is ready to play football
with any team in the country,
Kaepernick said.
Ault was happy to see his
senior class go out with a bang.
What a great thrill for those
seniors, Ault said.

See EFFECTS Page B4

CASEY DURKIN /NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Matthews emerges
as Packs top target
By Lukas Eggen

TONY CONTINI/NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

A Nevada fan cheers during the Wolf Packs 34-31 overtime victory
against the Broncos.

EMERSON MARCUS/NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Nevada wide receiver Rishard Matthews had 10 catches for 172 yards
and one touchdown Friday.

The Wolf Pack has no shortage


of stars on offense. Quarterback
Colin Kaepernick, running
back Vai Taua and head coach
Chris Ault have been grabbing
headlines for the Pistol Offense
and for breaking numerous
program and NCAA records.
Yet, in a team built around
its ground game, it was a wide
receiver who emerged as the
hero.
Junior wideout Rishard Matthews did it all for Nevada on
Friday, rushing for a 44-yard
touchdown and recording a
team-high 10 catches for 171
yards and one touchdown,
including the game-tying catch
with 13 seconds remaining in
regulation.
I just thought, Were still
in this game, Matthews said
about his mentality after being
down 24-7. We never gave up
and just wanted to give ourselves an opportunity to win
the game.
Matthews, the Wolf Packs
leading receiver, emerged as
the breakout player of the game
and continued his successful
season.
Before coming to Nevada this
year, Matthews attended Bakersfield College in California.
Heading into the season, he
was expected to give the Wolf
Pack a dangerous threat with its
passing game.
However, Matthews got off to
a slow start to the season, grabbing 16 catches for 407 yards
and one touchdown through
the first eight games as he

learned the offense.


Since then, Matthews has
emerged as one of the Wolf
Packs greatest offensive threats.
During the last four games, hes
caught 32 passes for 381 yards
and three touchdowns.
He showed glimpses of his
ability against Idaho on Nov. 6,
where he had seven receptions
for 151 yards and two touchdowns.
Hes an amazing player,
quarterback Colin Kaepernick
said. Physically, hes just a
specimen. Hes really getting
comfortable in our offense now
and were beginning to be able
to utilize him the way we should
be able to.
Despite getting off to a slow
start, Matthews has emerged
late into the season.
Like Ive said all along, we
expect big things and we need
him to realize how good he can
be and I think you saw that
(against Boise State), Nevada
head coach Chris Ault said. I
expect him to just take off.
Since wide receiver Chris
Wellington went down with
an injury Oct. 2, Matthews has
stepped up as the teams top
pass catcher.
He leads the team in receptions (48), yards (788) and is
second on the team in receiving
touchdowns (4).
Although its Nevadas run
game that gets most of the
attention, Matthews is giving
fans a reason to notice the Wolf
Packs passing game.
Lukas Eggen can be reached at
leggen@nevadasagebrush.com.

Nevadas upset over Boise State perfect way to send off team
After Nevada upset no,
shocked Boise State on Friday
night, I didnt
celebrate.
I didnt rush
the field and
go bananas.
I didnt
leave Mackay
Stadium that
night with a
hoarse voice,
sore from
screaming my
Juan
brains out for
Lpez
four hours.
But I wanted to.

The Wolf Packs 34-31


hysteria-causing victory over
the then-No. 4 Broncos made
me proud and almost brought
tears to my eyes, even as I
worked with the ESPN crew on
the game.
It was difficult to look at
the way Nevada won, look at
the way the players fought
through the adversity, look at
the pandemonium that ensued
after Anthony Martinezs 34yard kick and not get an inkling
to break down.
The win, which I will
forever remember as The

Kick, meant many things.

THE CULMINATION OF A
STORYBOOK CAREER
Colin Kaepernick is the best
athlete in school history, hands
down. And not for his blindsiding statistics which include 56
career rushing touchdowns
(third-all time for a Division I
quarterback) and three seasons
with more than 2,000 passing
yards and more than 1,000
passing yards (first player in
NCAA history).
Those stats pale in comparison to being able to say he was a

part of the team that conquered


Boise State.
Kaepernick showed the
resiliency he built during his
career at Nevada. He showed
that hard work, dedication
and will can topple any
mountain.
He tied up the loose ends to
his incomparable legacy with
this unforgettable win.
This capped Kaeps career as
one of the best players in NCAA
football history.
And to think, the Wolf Pack
was the only team who offered
him a scholarship.

WINNING ONE FOR THE


OLD BALL COACH
Since Chris Ault took over as
head coach in 2004, the biggest
criticism hes received is that he
couldnt win a big game.
Since 04 and before this
season, his record against BCS
teams and Boise State was a
miserable 1-15 (the only win
came in 2006 against Northwestern).
After starting 0-3 last season,
many (including myself) called
for Ault to be fired because
of his ineptness against big
schools.

But this year has been


different. Like the senior class,
hes been able to get over humps
and reach places hes never
been before and thats saying
something for an active Hall of
Fame coach.
Even after beating then-No.
24 California earlier this season,
Ault wasnt given the credit he
deserved.
Theres no denying Aults work
now.
Dont question for one second
that beating Boise State wasnt

See VICTORY Page B4

Inside Scoop
B2

NOVEMBER 30, 2010

nevadasagebrush.com

AROUND THE WAC

ON TAP
FOOTBALL

at Louisiana Tech noon Saturday

THE SKINNY: Nevada hopes


to avoid a letdown after
defeating Boise State 34-31
on Friday. The Wolf Pack
travels to face the Bulldogs,
who need a victory to become
bowl eligible. For Nevada, a
win means the team earns
a share of the Western
Athletic Conference title with
Hawaii and Boise State (if the
Broncos win its final game of
the regular season). Though
Louisiana Tech is 0-3 against
WAC teams with winning
records, the Wolf Pack could
overlook the Bulldogs on
Friday.

MENS BASKETBALL

at South Dakota State 5 p.m.


Tuesday
vs. UNLV 8 p.m. Saturday

THE SKINNY: Nevada looks


to break its four-game losing
streak against South Dakota
State tonight. The game also
extends the Wolf Packs
stretch away from Lawlor to
six. But the teams second
home game of the season is
against UNLV. The Rebels
are off to a good start and if
Nevada is to stand a chance,
freshman guard Deonte
Burton must continue his
strong offensive play and
forward Dario Hunt will need
to be at his best defensively.
Otherwise, the Wolf Pack
could drop another game to
its southern rivals.

WOMENS BASKETBALL

vs. Arizona 7 p.m. Thursday


at Washington State 1 p.m. Sunday

THE SKINNY: The Wolf Pack


took the Nugget Classic,
thanks in large part to forward
Shavon Moore, who was
named the Most Valuable
Player in the tournament. The
team faces two more stiff
tests against Pac-10 teams
Arizona and Washington
State. The games will provide
two more chances to see
exactly where Nevada stands
on a national scale.

WHOS HOT
SHAVON MOORE
WOMENS BASKETBALL
The forward scored 26 points
against North Carolina State
and 16 against San Diego
State as the Wolf Pack took
first at the Nugget Classic last
weekend.

WHOS NOT
DEONTE BURTON
MENS BASKETBALL
The freshman guard has been
one of the pleasant surprises
of the season, but Burton shot
1-of-7 from the field and had
two turnovers against Boston
University. With a game
against UNLV this Saturday,
Nevada needs Burton to shake
his bad game off and return to
the form he showed early in
the season.

CASEY DURKIN/NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Nevada defeated No. 24 California, Berkeley


and No. 4 Boise State. If it beats Louisiana Tech
on Saturday, it claims a share of the Western
Athletic Conference title.

WEEKLY TOP 5

Games of the year

TONY CONTINI/NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Boise State gave up 239 rush yards to Nevada in the second half and overtime of the teams 34-31 loss to Nevada.

Boise fans shouldnt place


blame solely on Brotzman

issing out on a Bowl


Championship Series
bowl is tough.
Having it replaced
by something called the Kraft Fight
Hunger Bowl or the Humanitarian
Bowl at home is even tougher.
Boise State experienced a week
usually reserved
for Chicago Cubs
fans or Charlie
Brown kicking a
football.
Hang your
heads, Boise fans.
Nevada fans
have been there
Emerson
before, and they
Marcus
sympathize with
you.
But dont take your anger out on
Kyle Brotzman.
Dozens of Facebook pages have
emerged about the scapegoat of
Blue Friday. Facebook followers
can like I Hate Kyle Brotzman,
Kyle Brotzman is the new Ray
Finkle or Kyle Brotzman sucks.
The latter already has 1,130 fans.
ESPN reported that the Ada
County Sheriffs Department in
Boise got a reports about callers
leaving obnoxious, harassing
telephone messages with a woman
thought to be related to Brotzman.

Boise State fans should be frustrated with the anomalous


kicking performance from kicker Kyle Brotzman, but they
shouldnt make him the next Steve Bartman...
Brotzman missed two field goals
in Fridays 34-31 loss to Nevada. He
missed a 26-yarder as regulation
ended and a 29-yarder in overtime.
Boise State fans should be
frustrated with the anomalous
kicking performance from Brotzman, but they shouldnt make
him the next Steve Bartman (2003
National League Championship
Series Chicago Cubs fan who
robbed Moises Alou from a sure out
in left field).
As a placekicker, Brotzman was
as close to a sure thing as it gets in
the Western Athletic Conference.
The Bronco senior was a semifinalist for the Lou Groza award,
which is given to the best collegiate
kicker.
He has kicked extra points and
field goals in two Bowl Championship Series wins. He was 12-of-13
from 40 yards or less this season,
but in the most crucial moment
of the most crucial game of the
season, something happened.
Its hard to get into Brotzmans
head right now.
However, its also hard to think of

sports figures that buckled under


the pressure more.
Bill Buckner and Mitch Williams
immediately come to mind. But
now Brotzman is on that list.
But Brotzman didnt surrender 24
points in the second half. Brotzman
didnt give up 239 rush yards in
the second half and overtime. It
wasnt Brotzmans fault that Nevada
held the ball for 21 minutes, 54
seconds compared to Boise States
8 minutes, 7 seconds in the second
half. Its easy to make him the
scapegoat, but it isnt his fault the
Broncos lost.
Many Boise State fans have
reacted with pro-Brotzman
Facebook pages and other comforting sentiments for the 22-year-old
man who is probably going through
one of the darkest moments of his
life. Boise fans dont have to love
the guy, but they should leave the
kid alone. Every one should.
What he went through was bad
enough.
Emerson Marcus can be reached at
emarcus@nevadasagebrush.com.

BOISE STATE

CALIFORNIA

It was a game fans had been


waiting for since 1998. Nevadas
victory over then-No. 4 Boise
State meant the Wolf Pack
ended the Broncos Bowl Championship
Series hopes, put the team in line for a conference title and shot Nevada into the spotlight.
Beside Boise State, California,
Berkeley was Nevadas other big
game this season. The then-No.
24 Golden Bears proved to be
less of a challenge than expected as the Wolf
Pack went on to a 52-31 victory. The play of
the game came from Marlon Johnson, when
he jumped a route and intercepted a pass for
a touchdown that gave Nevada a 31-21 lead.

FRESNO STATE

Nevada needed this win on the


road against a solid Fresno State
team. After a sluggish start, the
Wolf Pack clawed back into the
game and took a one point lead
after a 24-yard touchdown run by Vai Taua.
Nevada had to win in order to have a shot for
a share of the WAC title with Boise State.

LOSS TO HAWAII

Quarterback Colin Kaepernick


turned the ball over three times,
including a fumble in the end
zone resulting in a touchback for
the Warriors, yet Nevada still had a chance
to beat Hawaii in the fourth quarter. A fourth
turnover put the nail in the coffin, ending the
Wolf Packs hopes for an undefeated season.

UNLV

No matter what the record of


each team is, the UNLV game
is always very important for
Nevada. This season the Wolf
Pack looked to keep the cannon
for the sixth straight season but had to do it in
the Rebels stadium. The Rebels kept it close
midway through the second quarter, but Nevada won 44-26.

sports

nevadasagebrush.com

NOVEMBER 30, 2010 B3

WOMENS BASKETBALL

Nevada passes early season tests


By Jake Ward
After suffering its first loss of
the season to the University of
Nevada, Las Vegas on Nov. 21,
the Wolf Pack came home to
host John Ascuagas Nugget
Classic Championship where it
defeated North Carolina State
and San Diego State to win the
tournament.
The seniors wanted to win,
and I would go so far as to say
this was one of their (season)
goals, Wolf Pack head coach
Jane Albright said. The field was
strong and its hard to play back
to back and grind out wins.
Despite already playing games
against NC State, San Diego State,
Pepperdine and UNLV, Nevadas
schedule doesnt lighten up with
two games against Pac-10 teams
on the horizon.
We have a great opportunity
at home against Arizona and
then we play at Washington
State, but Im ecstatic to be 5-1
with our schedule thus far,
Albright said.
The Wolf Pack beat San Diego
State 63-61 Saturday to clinch
the championship. Albright
said this was a way to test her
team and see how they would
respond.
The tournament win came after its first loss of the season last
week. Albright was pleased with
the way her team rebounded.
We got better this week in
one week than we have the last
five weeks, she said.
During the weekend triumph,
senior guards Nicole Williams
and Johnna Ward continued to
split starts and playing time.
Albright said she hasnt made up
her mind as to who will become
the regular starter.
Were very pleased so far, Albright said. Theyre both doing
great and we wouldnt have won
without either.

Gaming
grows
big on
campus
By Cory Thomas

TONY CONTINI /NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Nevada forward Shavon Moore scored 42 points and grabbed 21 rebounds during the John Ascuagas Nugget Classic Championship last
Friday and Saturday.
The team has also been receiving strong play from senior
guard Tahnee Robinson. While
she was upset with how she shot
for the tournament (10-for-36
and 3-for-18 from three-point
land), her shooting percentage
for the year is still .440 and she is
the teams top scorer at 23 points
per game.
Ive been working out a lot,
but tonight and last night was
not great, Robinson said.
Though Robinson struggled
during the two games, Albright

said shes seen great improvement from her senior.


She worked all summer, long
hours, and she has confidence,
Albright said. Though she wont
shoot 60 percent every night like
she expects to, shes shooting
the ball great.
With Robinson struggling from
the field, forward Shavon Moore
stepped up for the Wolf Pack.
She was named tournament
Most Valuable Player and posted
42 points and 21 rebounds in the
two games.

Moore was also named the


Western Athletic Conference
Womens Basketball Player of
the Week.
We run a lot, and we get a lot
of fast break points thanks to the
guards, and a lot of opportunities, Albright said.
Nevada hosts Arizona 7 p.m.
Thursday before traveling to
play Washington State 1 p.m.
Sunday.
Jake Ward can be reached at
sports@nevadasagebrush.com.

BASKETBALL STATS
S
Senior
i forward
f
d Shavon
Sh
Moore averaged 21 points
and 12 rebounds during the
John AscuagasNugget Classic Championship.
Senior guard Tahnee Robinson went 10-for-36 from
the field in the tournament.
Nevada is 5-1 on the season and faces Arizona Thursday and Washington State
Friday.

PHOTO BY ERIC CASTILLO /NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Former Nevada dance team coach Nicole Scott (top middle) left to coach the Reno Bighorns dance team after the Wolf Pack dance team combined with the cheer team this year.
Scott was offered a position to help coach Nevadas cheer team but decided to turn it down.

Former dance team coach takes over Bighorns


By Eric Castillo
Nicole Scott, the former
Nevada dance team head coach
brought national attention to
the Nevada Athletic Department
when her team took third at the
2006 USA College Nationals.
It was the most amazing experience of my life, being ranked
third nationally and being on the
field at Notre Dame, said Scott,
who coached the team for six
years. Im very sad thats over.
The Nevada athletics department informed the dance team
two weeks before the 2010
spring semester tryouts that
their squad would combine
with the cheerleading team.
Nevada
cheerleading
head
coach Kimberley Anastassatos

incorporated dance within the


pom section of the cheer team,
but Scott said that the dance
team was truly cut last semester because of the budget crisis.
Many dancers are bound to the
skill sets of cheerleading.
(The Nevada dance team)
didnt combine, Scott said. Its
a pom and stunt team a lot
different than what we did with
the dance girls.
Former dance team member
and current cheerleader Charlee
Kooser is one of eight former
dancers that made the cheer
team this semester. She said
some of her dancing technique
is being ignored.
Its a cheer team and I know
what comes with that, but I was
really sad to see the dance team

go, Kooser said. I dont get to


dance as much, but with only
one team, there are a lot more
benefits for us girls.
The Nevada cheerleaders have
access to a tanning membership at Pacific Sun, free Kardio
Kickboxing classes at Freestyle
Martial Arts Academy and opportunities for travel. According
to Kooser, these are all benefits
the dance team did not receive.
Despite the benefits, Nevada
is the only nationally-ranked
football school without both a
dance team and cheer team.
Its a little embarrassing when
youre the only top-25 ranked
school without a dance team,
Scott said.
Nevada offered Scott a position to coach with five other

assistants to the team, but she


turned down the offer and now
enjoys a larger salary coaching
the NBA Development League
Reno Bighorns Dance Team.
I didnt want to be one of six
assistant coaches, and I dont
cheer, Scott said, I dance. I
ran the dance program with one
volunteer. (I) never see how you
would need six.
Former dancer Sami Busey decided not to join the cheer team.
I didnt try out for the cheer
team because its just not my
thing, Busey said. Ive been
dancing my whole life and want
to continue.
Busey now spends 20 to 30
hours per week working on
her dancing technique for the
Bighorns, and said she is happy

DANCE TEAM INFO


Th
The N
Nevada
d Athl
Athletics
ti
Department combined the
dance and cheer teams this
year because of budget cuts.
Nevada is the only top-25
school in football without a
dance and cheer team.
to be reunited with her former
Nevada coach.
Nicole (Scott) is a very positive
role model for all her students,
she is my biggest mentor, Busey
said. I really know what shes
looking for and what she expects
out of her girls.
Eric Castillo can be reached at
sports@nevadasagebrush.com.

While playing Call of Duty:


Modern Warfare, University
of Nevada, Reno engineering
major Nick Sellers becomes
emotionally attached to the
main character.
You are playing as a Marine
and a nuke goes off, Sellers,
21, said. You are like, Oh, shit,
he is dead, but he survives
and that is intense. You just fall
in love with it.
Sellers owns 75 video games,
two gaming consoles and a
gaming computer.
Hes had his thumbs turn
purple a few times from playing Super Smash Brothers
Brawl too long. He is, as some
call, a gamer.
Sellers said gaming is an
electronic sport and, like regular sports, it takes practice,
skill and thought.
The adrenaline makes me
shake after a good match,
Sellers said. You can really
feel it in those tough situations
and it can be hard to calm
down.
Recently released game
Call of Duty: Black Ops sold
5.6 million copies the day it
was released, according to
Activision, its publisher.
Because of the games
popularity, Wesley Nilsson,
the special events programmer at UNR for the Associated
Students of the University of
Nevada, hosted a tournament
for the game Nov. 19, and the
turnout was surprising.
This was a good outcome
for the event, Nilsson said. I
was expecting maybe 20 teams
to sign up and we have well
over 40, so more than double
what I expected.
Eric Cummings, an 18-yearold accounting major, signed
up to play in the tournament
and played in several others.
He said he becomes nervous
in tournaments because its
like a traditional sport, with
a crowd of people watching,
and he doesnt want to look
bad.
Its very intense and sometimes the people watching behind you makes you nervous,
but you just have to get over
it and just focus on the game
and believe you are the only
one there, Cummings said.
Nilsson, 19, said he planned
the event because he knew
this game would be popular.
I based it in November
because the new Black Ops
game was coming out a week
before, he said.
The popularity of gaming on
campus prompted a new club
this year: the UNR Computer
Gaming Club. It meets Thursday nights in a room in the
@One for Fragfest, an event
where people play all kinds of
video games.
Sellers, the treasurer of
the club, said between 20-25
people show up each week to
play.
(Gaming) is a very good
stress reliever, Sellers said. If
you are angry, you can just go
(in a game) and go on a rampage and just mow everything
down if you want to.
Cory Thomas can be reached at
cthomas@nevadasagebrush.com.

GAMING AT NEVADA
M
More than
th 100 people
l
showed played in the Call
of Duty: Black Ops tournament at the Joe Nov. 19.
The UNR Computing and
Gaming club is new this
year.
The club meets on Thursdays in a room in the @One
to play all kinds of video
games.

SPORTS BRIEFS
FOOTBALL
BOISE STATE FALLS TO 11
IN POLLS
The Broncos saw its dream of
a national championship game
crumble after losing Friday to
Nevada 34-31 in overtime. Boise
State dropped from No. 4 to No.
11 in the Bowl Championship
Series standings.
Had the Broncos won, it
would have likely jumped Texas
Christian University to claim the

No. 3 spot and if not a national


championship game, it would
have at least received a trip to
the Rose Bowl.
Now Boise State will likely
play in a non-BCS bowl game
this season.
With the win, Nevada moved up
two spots from No. 19 to No. 17.

TCU LEAVING MOUNTAIN


WEST FOR BIG EAST
The Horned Frogs are jumping conferences in the 2012-13

season. It will move from the


Mountain West conference to the
Big East.
One reason for the jump is because the Big East is an automatic
qualifying conference. It means
the winner of the conference
receives a BCS bowl bid. The
Mountain West is not an automatic qualifying conference.
This move comes after Boise
State announced it would leave
the Western Athletic Conference
for the MWC next season. Ne-

vada and Fresno State will join


the MWC in 2012-13. Hawaii
will also join the MWC that year
in just football.

VOLLEYBALL
UTAH STATE EARNS A
NCAA TOURNAMENT SEED
The Aggies defeated No. 3
Hawaii 3-0 in the WAC championship game Wednesday,
earning an automatic spot in
the National Collegiate Athletic

Association tournament. It will


face the University of California,
Berkeley on Friday.
Utah States Shay Sorensen
and Liz McArthur led the way,
combining for 25 kills. Sorenson
recorded an attack percentage
of better than .650. McArthur
tallied seven digs.
Hawaii ended its season with
a 28-2 record and 16-0 in conference play. With that record, it also
made the tournament and will
play Portland State on Thursday.

WOMENS BASKETBALL
SHAVON MOORE
HONORED
Senior forward Shavon Moore
earned WAC player of the week
after Nevada won the John
Ascuaga Nugget Classic.
Moore received the Most
Valuable Player award for the
tournament by averaging 21
points and10.5 rebounds.
This is the first time she has received the WAC player of the week.

agate

B4 NOVEMBER 30, 2010

Effects

CONTINUED FROM PAGE B1

AULT
Last September, many called
for head coach Chris Ault to be
fired. Despite coaching the Wolf
Pack for 26 seasons, fans were
growing impatient. Ault needed
a signature victory a big win
that would silence his critics.
The Broncos, ranked No. 4 in
the BCS standings, were a team
Nevada hadnt beaten since
1998. Boise State was Aults
signature victory.
It is the greatest victory this
university has ever had, said
Ault, who has received much
national attention for his pistol
offense this season. I can tell
you that.
For Ault, the win could mean
a lot more. He has received
attention from national sports
writers, some of which, including Eric Sorenson of CBS Sports,
have called for Ault to win Coach
of the Year.

FANS
Nevadas victory also resulted
in more national exposure for
the program than ever before.
It definitely makes me proud
that I go to Nevada, Rootz said.
I went around wearing my Nevada sweatshirt and everyones
like Oh cool, congratulations.
Players said they can feel the
energy and have seen the city
fully get behind the team.
You can feel it in the city,
Kaepernick said. Theres a lot

Victory

CONTINUED FROM PAGE B1

carved in the players mind


since day one and that winning
the Western Athletic Conference championship wasnt goal
No. 1 from the get-go.
And dont doubt that it was
Ault who put those thoughts in
their heads.

THE MONETARY LOSSES


Boise States loss will likely
deny the Broncos a third trip to
a BCS bowl game in five years.
The loss also cost WAC
schools a lot of money.
Last season, when Boise
State played Texas Christian
University in the Fiesta Bowl
(one of the five BCS bowl
games), the Broncos received
about $3.2 million.
Since this season, Boise State
will probably play in a regular
bowl game, the school will
receive about a $400,000 bowl
stipend.
The Wolf Pack, and every
other WAC school, received
$434,000 from Boise State
playing in the Fiesta Bowl last
season.
That money wont be coming
in this year.

nevadasagebrush.com

BY THE NUMBERS

Inside look at Nevadas victory again Boise State

is the number of third down


conversions Boise State had
in the second half.

10

is the number of catches


receiver Rishard Matthews
caught against the Broncos.

8:07

is the time Boise State held


the ball in the second half.
Nevada held the ball for 21
minutes and 53 seconds.
of excitement going around and
thats a great feeling.
Ault said Nevadas game
against Boise State was an event
that brought the city together.
The thing that really excites
me is it gave our community
something to hang on to and
something we can brag about,
Ault said. Because times are
tough, I think there is an obligation to bring our community
some good things.
The game even turned nonfootball fans into supporters,
even if it was for just a day.
Carissa Gutierrez, a 22-year-

With a move to the Mountain


West Conference coming in
two years and Nevada in a
budget downfall, the school
could use all the money it can
get.
Plus, since the Broncos wont
be in a BCS bowl, theyll now
likely receive the top WAC
bowl.
That means the Wolf Pack
will get the second-best WAC
bowl.
The economic result of
the game was a potential
loss of about $450,000 and a
less-attractive bowl game for
Nevada.
But the morning after the
win, Nevada Chief Financial
Officer John Nunn e-mailed a
summary and said:
After last night, I think
the non-monetary gains
experienced by our studentathletes, coaching staff, athletic
department, institution, and
the community far exceed any
monetary loss we might incur.
Well said, Mr. Nunn.
Because, like many of us, Ive
never been more proud to be
a University of Nevada, Reno
student.
Juan Lpez can be reached at
jlopez@nevadasagebrush.com.

TONY CONTINI /NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

After Nevadas game against Boise State, Nevada head coach Chris Ault earned acclaim from several national sports writers.
old business administration
major, didnt watch too much
football before this season.
For her, the Wolf Packs game
against Boise State was a mustsee.
Its the most important game
in a while, Gutierrez said. The
game put us on the map and
made us more recognized and
hopefully made more people
want to attend.

WHATS NEXT
Beating Boise State may seem
like a storybook ending for Nevadas season, but the Wolf Pack
still has work to do.
Nevada travels to play Louisiana Tech in a game that may be
less glamorous on the surface,
but holds much significance.
A Nevada victory means the
Wolf Pack would earn a share of
the conference title, the teams

first since 2005. A loss, and Nevada could drop to third.


We havent won a championship, Ault said. And the players
have to understand that. Beating
Boise is a great thrill, but that
wont matter. You have to find
a way to beat La. Tech and they
have a lot to play for.
The Wolf Packs victory over the
Broncos also affected Nevadas,
and the rest of the bowl-eligible

WAC teams, bowl outlook.


ESPN.com predicted the Wolf
Pack to play in the Kraft Fight
Hunger Bowl game prior to Friday. Now it predicts Nevada for
the Humanitarian Bowl. Nevada
could also go to the New Mexico
Bowl, the other open bowl game
with WAC affiliation.
Lukas Eggen can be reached at
leggen@nevadasagebrush.com.

RESULTS

Womens basketball Football


FRIDAY, NOV. 26

SATURDAY, NOV. 27
Team
San Diego State
Nevada

1
33
39

Team
Boise State
Nevada

2
28
24

T
61
63

FTM-A
1-4
0-0
1-2
3-6
0-0
0-0
0-0
1-2
0-0
0-0
0-0

REB
8
1
5
7
4
0
1
2
0
2
5

AST
3
4
7
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

MIN
25
28
34
33
29
14
12
8
1
16
0

PTS
5
5
9
19
11
7
2
3
0
0
0

San Diego State


Bradley, J
Davis, C
Griffin, S
Johnson, P
Clements, C
Sweat, M
Clark, G
Chambers, C
Nahinu, M
Tutt, K
TEAM

FGM-A
2-3
2-9
4-10
8-13
5-10
3-3
1-3
1-2
0-0
0-0
0-0

TOTALS

26-53

6-14

35

15

200

61

Nevada
Robinson, T
Ward, J
Johnson, A
Moore, S
Williams, K
Cherry, M
Williams, N
Jones, H
Kevorken, K
Hammond, M
Smith, A
TEAM

FGM-A
5-19
4-9
1-2
6-12
4-10
0-0
0-3
0-0
0-1
0-3
1-3
0-0

FTM-A
9-11
0-0
2-2
4-6
1-1
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
2-2
0-0

REB
6
1
2
9
9
0
5
0
2
3
2
2

AST
2
0
4
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0

MIN
34
25
33
35
29
2
13
7
5
11
6
0

PTS
20
10
4
16
9
0
0
0
0
0
4
0

TOTALS

21-62

18-22

41

200

63

Mens basketball
1
24
32

2
33
34

T
57
66

Rushing

Moore, K

FTM-A
0-1
3-6
2-2
3-5
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
2-2
0-0
1-2
0-0

REB
6
10
4
4
3
0
5
1
8
0
2
3

AST
1
0
2
0
2
0
0
1
0
0
2
0

MIN
21
27
21
26
27
3
16
13
19
13
14
0

PTS
5
11
4
6
14
0
4
2
4
0
7
0

TOTALS

21-57

11-18

46

200

57

Boston University
OBrien, J
Hazel, P
Partin, D
Irving, D.J.
Holland, J
Griffin, M
Terry, M
Morris, D
Robinson, T
TEAM

FGM-A
6-9
3-6
0-6
3-7
9-23
1-4
0-0
0-1
0-0
0-0

FTM-A
0-0
0-1
0-0
5-6
7-11
0-0
1-2
1-2
0-0
0-0

REB
5
4
1
3
4
1
2
7
2
3

AST
1
1
2
2
1
1
0
0
1
0

MIN
29
23
30
23
35
21
10
18
11
0

PTS
15
6
0
13
28
2
1
1
0
0

TOTALS

22-56

14-22

32

No.
32
21
1

Yds
131
45
44

TD
1
1
1

Yds
259

TD
1

Nevada
Rushing

TD
2
0
0

Att-Cmp-Int
20-31-0

Yds
348

TD
2

No.
6
5
3
2

Yds
129
65
78
32

TD
0
0
0
0

Matthews, R
Ball, M
Taua, V
Green, V

No.
10
4
2
1

Yds
172
37
24
14

TD
1
0
0
0

Tackles
13
13
9
7
7

Sacks
0
1
0
0
0

Int
0
0
0
0
1

Coulson, R
Miller, D
Williams, D
Grimes, K
Johnson, J.M.

Tackles
10
8
8
6
6

Sacks
0.5
1
0
0
2

Int
0
0
0
0
0

No.

Yds

Long

132

45

Young, T
Pettis, A
Martin, D
Avery, J

Defense

Kickoff Returns

200

66

Team
Utah State
Nevada

Utah State

Statistic
139
29
52
15
70%
67%
9
20

G1
25
17

G2
25
20

G3
14
25

Fowles, C
Astle, K
Sorensen, S
McArthur, L
Durrant, S
White, J
Bodily, L
Hargrove, K
Morrill, C

K
4
5
9
16
4
14
0
0
0

SA
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
0

Dig
10
0
2
8
1
6
9
4
28

BA
2
1
2
0
6
5
0
0
0

Totals

52

68

16

2010 WESTERN
ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
STATISTICAL LEADERS
Category
Name
Assists
Dani Mafua
Digs
Blocks
Kills

School
SJSU
NMSU
Utah State
NMSU
Fresno State
SJSU
Utah State
Nevada

T
31
34

Yds
152
4
-11

Receiving

Johnson, J
Venable, W
Tevis, A
Percy, J.C.
Iloka, G

OT
0
3

No.
24
4
2

Martin, D
Jeremy Avery
Moore, K

Passing

Q4
7
17

Taua, V
Kaepernick, C
Mathews, R

Passing

Att-Cmp-Int
Kaepernick, C 19-35-1

Receiving

No.

Yds

Long

Ball, M

70

30

G4
25
15

MONDAY, NOV. 22

FGM-A
2-4
4-10
1-5
1-7
6-12
0-0
2-6
1-2
1-4
0-0
3-7
0-0

Category
Name
Points
Adrian Oliver
Assists
Hernst Laroche
Rebounds
Brady Jardine
Steals
Hernst Laroche
Field goal percentage Greg Smith
Three point percentage Justin Graham
Blocks
Brady Jardine
Offensive rebounds
Dario Hunt

Q3
0
7

Volleyball

Nevada
Panzer, K
Hunt, D
Burris, J
Burton, D
Story, M
Nyeko, P
Evans, J
Baldwin, I
Elliot, D
Finn, J
Conner, D
TEAM

2010 WAC STATISTICAL LEADERS

Q2
21
7

Boise State

Young, T

TUESDAY, NOV. 23
Team
Nevada
Boston University

Q1
3
0

School Statistic
UH
11.21
/set
Lori Hunsucker
La Tech 5.03
/set
Brittany Hewitt
UH
1.67
/set
Kayleigh Giddens NMSU 4.8
/ set

WAC TOURNAMENT
SCORES FROM NOV. 22-24
Utah State (W) vs. New Mexico State
at Las Vegas, Nev

3-2

Hawaii (W) vs. Idaho


at Las Vegas, Nev

3-0

Hawaii (L) vs. Utah State


at Las Vegas, Nev

3-0

Nevada
Garvey, E
Batista, J
Anxo, G
Harrington, K
Baldwin, L
Santiago, T
Chang, K
Heinen, B
Link, N
Ji, E
Yates, B

T
3
1

K
14
6
1
9
12
0
0
0
0
6
0

SA
0
0
0
1
2
0
1
0
0
0
0

Dig
2
0
1
23
3
8
2
11
17
6
0

BA
3
4
1
2
2
2
0
0
0
0
1

48

73

15

2010 WAC STANDINGS

Team
Conference Standings Overall
Hawaii
16-0
28-2
New Mexico state 12-4
18-13
Utah State
9-7
24-8
Boise State
8-8
21-12
Idaho
8-8
14-15
Fresno State
7-9
13-15
Nevada
7-9
13-17
San Jose State
3-13
8-22
Louisiana Tech
2-14
13-20

2010 NEVADA
STATISTICAL LEADERS
Category
Assists
Digs

Name
Tatiana Santiago
Nicole Link

Blocks

Lindsay Baldwin

Kills

Kylie Harrington

Statistic
10.38
/set
3.98
/set
.92
/set
3..35
/set

sports

nevadasagebrush.com

NOVEMBER 30, 2010 B5

Fazekas returns to Nevada


By Eric Castillo
Former Nevada basketball
teammates Nick Fazekas and Mo
Charlo combined for 135 points
to help the Reno Bighorns open
the season with four consecutive
victories.
Fazekas, Nevadas all-time
scoring leader with 2,464 points,
was teammates with Charlo
from 2005-06. Fazekas was part
of the team that earned a seed
into the NCAA Tournaments
Sweet 16 in 2004.
Selected as the No. 1 overall
pick in the 2010 National Basketball Association Development
League Draft, Fazekas returns
to Reno and is getting back in
touch with friends and fans.
It feels good to get a warm
welcome from all the fans,
getting a lot of applause and
seeing old faces has been great,
Fazekas said.

Receiving plenty of media


coverage around town, Fazekas
presence has been felt both in
the community and around the
Nevada campus.
I went out to the Montana
game as a proud supporter of
Nevada, said Fazekas of the
Nov. 13 basketball game he attended between the Wolf Pack
and the Grizzlies. I went and
spoke with (Nevada head) coach
(David) Carter and watched a
few practices as well.
Fazekas said Carter will experience some growing pains
with his young team, but expects
the team to raise their play once
Western Athletic Conference
season begins.
With a bunch of young guys
(on the team), I think it will be a
big turnaround from last season
with guys trying to figure out
their role, Fazekas said. Theyll
know how hard to work come

WAC play in January and February because then you cant make
mistakes.
Fazekas had already played
one season for Nevada when
Charlo joined the Wolf Pack in
2005, but now the roles have
reversed. Fazekas enters his first
NBA Developmental League
season with the Bighorns while
Charlo has played three years in
D-League, including last season
with the Reno Bighorns.
Charlo started all 50 games last
season and helped the Bighorns
reach the playoffs for the first
time in their two-year history.
Reno is like a second home to
me and fans have been behind
me all the way, Charlo said. Its
been great to have the opportunity to play in the same town as
I did in college. I love my Reno
family.
Although Charlo hasnt attended a Wolf Pack game this

season, he says he plans to. He


also thinks the young squad will
win more games than expected
this season and win even more
in the future.
Now playing with the Bighorns, Fazekas and Charlo are,
once again playing a big part for
a Reno team.
Through four games, Charlo
has 69 points, shooting 62 percent from the field (25-for-40),
54 percent from beyond the
arc (6-for-11) and grabbed 27
rebounds.
Fazekas has 66 points, shooting 54 percent in the field
(16-for-25) and has snatched
39 rebounds. Combined, the
players have accounted for 39
percent of the teams rebounds
(66 of 168) and 35 percent of
team steals (15 of 43).
PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN BYRNE/NEVADA ATHLETICS DEPARTMENT

Eric Castillo can be reached at


sports@nevadasagebrush.com.

Former Nevada forward Nick Fazekas is the Wolf Packs all-time


scoring leader with 2,464 points.

Gameday
B6

THIS WEEKS GAME


at Louisiana Tech

Saturday
TIME: Noon
nevadasagebrush.com

NOVEMBER 30, 2010

SEPT. 2

SEPT. 11

SEPT. 17

SEPT. 25

OCT. 2

OCT. 9

OCT. 16

OCT. 30

NOV. 6

NOV. 13

NOV. 20

NOV. 26

E. Washington
W 49-24

CSU
W 51-6

California
W 52-31

at BYU
W 27-13

UNLV
W 44-26

San Jose State


W 35-13

at Hawaii
L 27-21

Utah State
W 56-42

at Idaho
W 63-17

at Fresno State
W 35-34

NMSU
W 52-6

Boise State
W 34-31 (OT)

AP TOP 25
1. Oregon (36)
2. Auburn (23)
3. TCU (1)
4. Wisconsin
5. Stanford
6. Ohio State
7. Michigan State
8. Arkansas
9. Boise State
10. Oklahoma
11. LSU
12. Virginia Tech
13. Nebraska
14. Nevada
15. Missouri
16. Oklahoma State
17. Alabama
18. South Carolina
19. Texas A&M
20. Florida State
21. Utah
22. Mississippi State
23. West Virginia
24. Northern Illinois
25. Hawaii

11-0
12-0
12-0
11-1
11-1
11-1
11-1
10-2
10-1
10-2
10-2
10-2
10-2
11-1
10-2
10-2
9-3
9-3
9-3
9-3
10-2
8-4
8-3
10-2
9-3

Pack looks to earn


share of WAC title
Louisiana Tech needs victory to become bowl eligible, hopes to
ruin Nevadas shot at first conference championship since 2005

*National ranking in parentheses

Nevada

Category

La. Tech

301.42 (4)

Rushing

177.00 (36)

235.50 (47)

Passing

221.73 (60)

153.44 (16)

Pass Efficiency

117.25 (93)

536.92 (3)

Total

368.73 (47)

Scoring

27.64 (57)

OFFENSE

43.25 (6)

DEFENSE
126.33 (26)

Rushing

154.82 (66)

258.08 (108)

Passing

302.09 (117)

123.59(50)

Pass Efficiency

141.38 (99)

384.42 (71)

Total

456.91 (114)

22.50 (39)

Scoring

30.27 (85)

SP
SPECIAL TEAMS/MISC.
By Lukas Eggen

OTHERS RECEIVING VOTES


Arizona 34, Maryland 29, Tulsa
28, Connecticut 16, Navy 14, UCF
12, San Diego State 5, Air Force 2,
North Carolina State 2

A week after
aft
fter
er clinching a victory agai
against Boise State,
Nevada has one last roadblock standing
standin between a share
off the
Western
title Louisiana
th Weste
te
ern Athletic
Ath
A
t letic Conference titl
Tech.
overall and need a victory
Tech
Te
ch.. The Bulldogs
Bull
Bu
lldogs
ll
gs stand at 5-6 overal
against
Wolf
Pack
become
agains
i st the
th
he Wo
W
lff P
Pa
ack to becom
ac
me bowl eligible. With a loss,
the
miss
shot
postseason
the team
team
m will
wil
illl m
isss a sho
ot at pos
sts
tsea
e son play.

BCS STANDINGS

RUNNING
R
RU
NNIN
NN
NIN
ING
G WILD
WILD
WI
D

1. Auburn
2. Oregon
3. TCU
4. Stanford
5. Wisconsin
6. Ohio State
7. Arkansas
8. Michigan State
9. Oklahoma
10. LSU
11. Boise State
12. Missouri
13. Nebraska
14. Oklahoma State
15. Virginia Tech
16. Alabama
17. Nevada
18. Texas A&M
19. South Carolina
20. Utah
21. Florida State
22. Mississippi State
23. Arizona
24. West Virginia
25. Northern Illinois

TALE OF THE TAPE

Louisiana
Lo
Loui
ou sian
na Te
T
Tech
ch h
has
hasnt
asn
as
ntt fa
n
fared
arre
ed we
ed
well
ell a
aga
against
ga
WAC teams with
winn
winn
wi
ning re
ecord
cord
ds.
s. All
All ffou
ou
ur off tthe
h ttea
he
eam
mss conference victories
m
winning
records.
four
teams
have
ha ccome
ome
om
e ag
agai
against
aiins
nst
st th
the
he co
cconferences
conf
onfferren
ence
ces
ce
ss b
bottom
o
four teams
(San
( an
(S
n JJose
osse St
Stat
State,
ate,
at
e, N
e,
New
ew M
ew
Mex
Mexico
exxic
i o St
Stat
State,
ate,
at
e, IIdaho
da and Utah State).
da
The
will
running
back
Th Bulldogs
Bulldo
Bu
lldo
ll
dogs
g w
gs
ill lo
ill
il
llook
ook tto
o ru
unn
nnin
ing
in
g ba
b
a Lennon Creer
to build
bui
uild
ui
ld on
on th
the
e ga
game
m he
e ha
h
had
d ag
agai
against
ains
ai
n t Sa
ns
S
San Jose State on
Saturday.
Creer
gained
252 yards and scored
Satu
Sa
turd
rd
day
y. Cr
Cree
e r ga
ee
g
in
ned a ccareer-high
a ee
ar
eerr-hi
rhigh
hi
gh
g
h2
three touchdowns.
had
receiving
yards. Against
touchd
hdowns. He also
allso h
ad
d 25 rec
ece
e
New
rushing yards and one
Ne Mexico
Mexi
Me
x co State, Creer had 107 rush
touchdown.
touc
to
u hd
uc
down.
more than 100 yards
For the season, Creer is averaging m
per game and has 10 rushing touchdo
touchdowns. Nevadas
defense allowed Boise State running b
back Doug Martin to
gain 152 rushing yards on Saturday, bu
but held him to less
than
second
half.
than 50
50 yards
yard
ya
rdss in tthe
he ssec
econ
ond
d ha
half
lf..
The Bulldogs will also look to w
wide receiver Phillip
Livas.
Though he has started just fiv
ve games this
season, Livas is a dangerous return
man and one
re
that could give Nevadas speci
special teams unit a lot
of trouble. He had his eighth career return for a
touchdown against San Jose State, scoring on an
88-yard
88-yar
yard
d punt return,
ret
etu
urn, tying him
h with five other
players
play
pl
ayer
erss fo
forr th
the
e NC
NCAA
AA rrecord.
ecor
ec
or
Against
special
teams
unit that has
Ag
gai
ains
nstt a sp
ns
spec
ecia
ec
iall te
ia
team
amss u
am
struggled
given
strugg
ggled an
and
d gi
give
ven
n up b
big
ig returns this year,
Livas could spark the Bulld
Bulldogs and turn
momentum.
moment
ntum
um.

12-0
11-0
12-0
11-1
11-1
11-1
10-2
11-1
10-2
10-2
10-1
10-2
10-2
10-2
10-2
9-3
11-1
9-3
9-3
10-2
9-3
8-4
7-4
8-3
10-3

THIS WEEKS GAME

DOUBLE
DOUB
DO
UBLE
LE T
TROUBLE
ROUB
RO
UBLE
L

Nevada at Louisiana Tech

When: Saturday, noon


Where: Joe Aillet Stadium
(30,600, FieldTurf)

TV: N/A
Season records: Louisiana

Tech (5-6 overall, 4-3


WAC), Nevada (11-1 overall,
6-1 WAC)

All-time series record:


Nevada leads 6-4

The coaches: Head coach


Sonny Dykes is 5-6 in his
first year at Louisiana Tech.
Nevada hall of fame head
coach Chris Ault is in his
26th season as Nevadas
coach and has a 217-97-1
record.

KEY MATCHUP

B lld
Bulldogs
secondary
d
vs.
Rishard Matthews

37.96 (33)

Net Punting

36.35 (62)

8.50 (56)

Punt Returns

13.33 (14)

22.80 (40)

Kickoff Returns

23.18 (33)

.50 (26)

Turnover Margin

-.45 (89)

2010 LEADERS
LEA

Player

Lennon Cree
Creer

Rushing

102.9

Taulib Ikharo

Receiving

40.5

Jay Dudley

Tackles

7.54

Matt Broha

Tackles for loss

1.18

Nevada
Category Avg./Game

Player
Vai Taua

Rushing

124.7

R. Matthews

Receiving

65.7

J.M. Johnson

Tackles

6.67

Dontay Moc
Moch Tackles for loss

1.67

2010 WAC STANDINGS

Standings Conference

Overall

Hawaii

7-1

9-3

Nevada

6-1

11-1

Boise State

6-1

10-1

Fresno State

5-3

7-4

Louisiana Tech
Te

4-3

5-6

Idaho

2-5

5-7

The Bulldogs defense feature


features two of the top
line
li
neme
m n in the WAC. Defensive
Defe
De
fens
nsiv
ive
e ttackle Mason Hitt
linemen
and
d defensive
defe
fens
nsiv
ive
e en
end
d Ma
Matt
tt B
Broha
roha
ro
ha g
gi
give
i Louisiana Tech a
one-two punch that will be key if the team hopes to
have any success stopping the Wo
Wolf Pack offense.
13.5 tackles for loss,
Hitt and Broha have 10.5 and 13
respectively, to lead the team.
In addition, they have combined for 12 sacks and three
forced
forc
fo
rced
ed fumbles.
fum
fumbl
bles. Though Louisiana Tech
Tec gives up 456.9
yards of total offense
in the WAC),
off
ffense per
per game
g
gam
ame
e (second-worst
(sec
(s
econ
on
if Hitt and Broha continue their strong play, the game
could result in more of a defensive ba
battle than many
expect.
Achilles heel.
The secondary has been the Bulldogs
Bulld
The team
conference-worst 302 passing yards
te
eam gives up a conference-wo
per game and has allowed 27 passing touchdowns.
t
for the
Butt the
th secondary also has created turnovers
t
Bulldogs.
Chad Boyd is the
Bullldo
dogs
gs. Sophomore
Soph
So
phom
o ore defensive
de
efe
fens
n iv
ive ba
back
c C
top
As a
top
to
p dog,
g leading
leadi
d ng the
h team with four interceptions.
in
team,
t am
te
am, Louisiana
Loui
Lo
uisi
sian
ana
a Tech
Tech has
has picked
p
pic
icke
cked off
offf 12
2 passes, tied for the
third-highest total in the WAC.
WAC
AC.
If Louisiana Tech can turn some
som
o e of tthose big passes into
interceptions, the Bulldogs will be able
abl to stick around
and challenge Nevada.

Utah State

2-5

4-7

New Mexico State 1-7

2-10

Lukas Eggen can be reached at leggen@nevadasagebrush.com.

San Jose State


Sta

0-7

1-11

LOUISIANA TECHS SCHEDULE


LOUISIAN

Date
D
t

O
Opponentt

Sept. 4

Grambling State

W 20-6

Sept. 11

at Texas A&M

L 48-16

Sept. 18

Navy

L 37-23

Sept. 25

Southern Miss

L 13-12

Oct. 2

at Hawaii

L 41-21

Oct. 9

Utah State

W 24-6

Oct. 16

Idaho

W 48-35

Oct. 26

at Boise State

L 49-20

Ti
Time

Nov. 6

Fresno State

L 40-34

Nov. 13

a New Mexico State


at

W 41-20

Nov. 27

at San Jose State

W 45-38.

Dec. 4

Receiver Rishard Matthews


had a breakout game against
Boise State, grabbing 10
catches for 172 yards and one
touchdown. Louisiana Techs
secondary gives up more
than 300 yards per game
and must find a way to limit
Matthews.

Louisiana Tech
Category Avg./Game

Nevada

Noon

TONY CONTINI/ NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Safety Doyle Miller

MAKING THE CALL

STAFF PICKS

DIFFERENCE MAKER LENNON CREER

OPTIMIST SAYS: Nevadas win


against Boise State showed the teams
potential. Against Louisiana Tech,
the Wolf Pack offense overwhelms
the Bulldogs as quarterback Colin
Kaepernick has a huge day in the air,
throwing for more than 300 yards. The
defense continues the momentum
it had in the second half against the
Broncos and shuts down Louisiana Tech.

PESSIMIST SAYS: After defeating Boise


State, the Wolf Pack suffers a letdown in
the first half against the Bulldogs. Louisiana Tech gets an early lead and forces
several turnovers as Kaepernick throws
multiple interceptions. Nevada recovers
in the second half and mounts a rally,
but Louisiana Techs lead is too big and
the team does just enough to hang on
for the upset.

OUTCOME: Nevada wins 45-0

OUTCOME: Louisiana Tech wins 38-34

Louisiana Tech running back Lennon Creer has been one of thee few
bright spots for Louisiana Techs offense. Creer averages more than
his season.
100 rushing yards per game and has 10 rushing touchdowns this
nd scored
Against San Jose State, Creer had a career-high of 252 yards and
three touchdowns. Creer may have to have a similar type gamee to keep
verages just
the Bulldogs in the game against the Wolf Pack, as the team averages
o get into
221 pass yards per game. Louisiana Tech lacks the firepower to
a shootout with Nevada and Creer will be key in the Bulldogs ability to
control the clock and keep the Wolf Pack offense off the field. After facing Boise State running back Doug Martin, Nevadas defensivee line faces
another difficult test.

PHOTO COURTESY OF LA. TECH


ATHLETICS SERVICES

Season preview:
The Wolf Pack
looks to establish
its own identity

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2010

2010 MENS BASKETBALL PREVIEW

C2-C4
Le about this
Learn
seasons key
players

Online: interactive roster


oster
and game coverage:
ge:
nevadasagebrush.com
com

C5
Meet the team
and see its
schedule

C6
See how Nevada
matches up
around the WAC

This is my team. Nevada head coach David Carter

A NEW ERA

TONY CONTINI /NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Nevada head coach David Carter recruited all but two of the players on this years roster. Carter, who is in his second year as head coach for the Wolf Pack, is looking to repeat the success of past teams.

Carter set to make his own mark


By Juan Lpez
While championship banners from teams
of former Nevada head coaches Trent Johnson
and Mark Fox hang high in the Lawlor Events
Center rafters, few reminders of the most successful coaches in Wolf Pack history remain.
When current head coach David Carter took
the reins of the team two years ago, many of
the teams prominent players were athletes
that Fox recruited.
Not this season.
For the first time since 2003, no player on the
team has experience in a NCAA Tournament.
Of the 2010-11 Nevada mens basketball team,
Carter recruited all but two players forwards
Dario Hunt and Devonte Elliott.
This is my team, Carter said, as he motioned at his players scattered on the basketball
court.
While the team is finally his, Carter will have
to almost start from scratch when it comes to

getting his players on-court experience.


Of the 16 players on the team, only one is
a senior (walk-on Adam Carp), while 10 are
freshmen and sophomores. Only six have
played for the Wolf Pack before this season.
The Wolf Pack also lost five of its top six
scorers from last season. The teams newness is
showing early in the season.
Nevada is just 1-4 and has lost three secondhalf leads so far. The players struggles have
much to do with their lack of chemistry. The
Wolf Pack is averaging 14.4 turnovers per game.
One player who has stepped up his game
and been a consistent force is Hunt, who averaged just 5.1 points his first two seasons with
the Wolf Pack. This year, he leads the team with
14.6 points per game. He acknowledged the
changing of the guard.
Roles are going to change, Hunt said. We lost
a lot of good players, a lot of experienced players.
Im going to have to come out and be a leader
and pick up some of the slack offensively.

Carter said since Hunt is his most battletested player, he will look to the junior forward
as an on-court leader during the beginning of
the season. This will be a big change for Hunt
who, in his first two years, was soft-spoken.
On the court, (Hunts) got to become a little
more vocal, Carter said. Hes been kind of quiet,
but this year hes coming out of his shell so we
need him to be a more vocal leader for us.
So far, Hunt is stepping up to the plate and is
being more vocal with the team.
Dario does a great job as a leader. Id say he
is our best leader, senior center Illiwa Baldwin
said. Hes a quiet guy, pretty good on the court
and really sets the tone. Great for our young
guys.
Another player Carter is looking for leadership is freshman point guard Deonte Burton.
Burton leads the team in assists this year
with 4.6 per game and has shown flashes of
scoring prowess.
He scored 17 points in the teams first game

against Montana on Nov. 13.


Despite being the fourth-youngest player on
the team, Burton said his experience as a high
school point guard has prepared him well for
the situation he is about to step into.
I was a leader in my high school, the
19-year-old from Los Angeles said. I know
theyre different levels, but I know I can carry
it onto this level. The guys, theyre already
respecting me.
Carter knows this season will have its ups
and downs they all do. But the biggest key
for his young players is to be able to rebound
after difficult times, he said.
Its hard to win every game, he said. Not many
teams can do that. Bouncing back from losses and
making sure you dont lose two or three (games)
back-to-back will be the biggest thing especially
with a group of young guys like this.
Juan Lpez can be reached at jlopez@nevadasagebrush.com.

BY THE NUMBERS

A look into how Nevadas basketball team has fared in the past and how this years team compares.

is the number of seasons in


a row the Wolf Pack won at
least 20 games.

is the number of starters


Nevada returned from last
year (Dario Hunt).

is the number of players


who had played for Nevada
prior to this season.

is the number of losses


Nevada has this season.
The Wolf Pack is 1-4 on the
year.

2010 mens basketball preview

C2 NOVEMBER 30, 2010

nevadasagebrush.com

Taking the lead


The biggest thing we lack is experience. Im going to have to come out and be a leader because Ive been through things other guys havent.
forward Dario Hunt

CASEY DURKIN /NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Junior forward Dario Hunt is the only returning starter from last season and is the most experienced player on Nevadas roster. Hunt leads the team in both rebounds and points per game this season.

Hunt will be called on to play a much bigger role for Nevada this season
By Juan Lpez
As a child, Dario Hunt read books
that broadened his imagination and
let his mind wander aimlessly.
The son of parents in the Air Force,
he moved seven times before settling
in Colorado Springs, Colo., during
high school. Hunt has lived in Turkey,
Japan and all over the United States.
The moves didnt allow him to get too
comfortable in one place, so he found
solace in his books.
Quietly, he became immersed
in English authors Brian Jacques
Redwall series imaginative
novels about animals taking human
characteristics.
His quietness has carried on with
him, even as a 21-year-old forward on
the Nevada mens basketball team.
During his first two years with the
Wolf Pack, Hunt was a role player,
asked to play and not preach.
But now hes breaking away from

that mold.
As a junior, he is the most-experienced athlete (73 career starts) on a
16-player team that is made up of 10
freshmen and sophomores.
The transition from the shadows to
the forefront will be trying for Hunt,
who is 60 blocks away from breaking
Nevadas all-time record of 192.
The biggest thing we lack is experience, Hunt said. Im going to have
to come out and be a leader because
Ive been through things other guys
havent.
His father says hes ready.
(Becoming a leader) is something
(Dario) and I discussed before he
went back to Reno this summer, said
his father Randall Hunt, who served
22 years in the Air Force. He has the
characteristics and capabilities as well
as anyone does to have be a leader.
Hes not easy to get to know because he doesnt let people in very
easily so people make the mistake of

saying hes introverted, but hes just


really well thought-out. When he talks,
people listen because he chooses his
words carefully. Hes very exact.
Hunts precision carries over to
his performance on the court. He
leads the team in scoring (14.6) and
rebounding (8.0) and has made
tremendous strides in his offensive
attack.
His teammates are also noticing his
new leadership role.
Hes so patient, freshman forward
Devonte Elliot said. And me, as a
young guy, I like to run and go fast.
Darios relaxed. He tries to tell me to
be patient and I think that is a good
thing.
Wolf Pack head coach David Carter
agrees that Hunt leads by example.
He does a great job off the court
in going to class, the second-year
coach said. On the court, hes got to
become a little more vocal. Hes been
kind of quiet, but this year hes com-

ing out of his shell so we need him to


be a more vocal leader for us.
The demand placed on Hunt will be
much greater this season than in the
past.
Hell be counted on to take the
reigns of a program that has won at
least 21 games per season in the past
seven years and made the postseason
in the last eight.
But Randall Hunt said his son is up
for the task.
Hes been waiting for (the coaches)
to challenge him, Randall Hunt said
of his son, who earned All-Western
Athletic Conference Defensive team
honors last season. He understood
the role he was in these last two years
and fulfilled it. Hes always expected
more of himself, so now its time to
show everyone hes ready to be a
leader.
Juan Lpez can be reached at jlopez@
nevadasagebrush.com.

BY THE NUMBERS

A look at how junior forward Dario


Hunt has fared this season.

14.6

is the number of points per game


Hunt is averaging to lead the Wolf
Pack.

8.0

is the number of rebounds per game


Hunt is averaging.

29.6

is the number of minutes per game


Hunt has played.

SEASON OUTLOOK

Pack in for learning experience

n 1999, the Nevada mens


basketball team started 1-6.
That year, the Wolf Pack
put up a horrid 9-20 record
and went 6-10 in the Big West
Conference.
The nine-win
season marked
just the third
time in the last
37 seasons the
school failed
to win more
than 10 games.
Fast forward
to 2010 and
Juan
the team is 1-4
Lpez
and facing a
similar start.
With nine of the 10 players
on the team who average more
than 10 minutes per game
being first-year players, head
coach David Carter has a tall
task ahead of him surviving
the growing pains of having
a young team while trying to
continue the rich tradition of
Nevada basketball.

The biggest issue with the


team is something that cant
be worked on in practice or
through watching film experience. In the four games the
Wolf Pack has lost this season,
it has held second-half leads in
three of them. But the team has
failed to close out.
This season, during the
last five minutes of each half,
Nevada has been outscored
97-67. The team is faltering
where it counts most in the
clutch. The problem is, these
young players see adversity and
dont know how to respond yet.
Whats adding to the teams
futility is the scoring droughts it
experiences. Through the teams
last four games, it has gone
through nine scoring droughts
of more than three minutes.
When a young team has to fight
through periods like this, the
effects are devastating.
Not seeing the ball go
through the hoop has snowball
effects because then players

start to hang their heads and


sometimes it leads to them
slacking on the defensive end,
or not boxing out properly, or
not fighting through screens
the little things that can be the
deciding factor in a close game.
Despite the early season
troubles, Carter doesnt seem
worried. I dont think he should
be, either.
Expectations for this season
werent high. What can you
expect after your team loses
two of its best players in school
history in Armon Johnson and
Luke Babbitt? Realistically, this
season is a warmup for the next.
Expect the Wolf Pack to take
the rest of its 25 regular-season
games this year to gain experience rather than wins.
But fans can be hopeful. The
team has loads of talent.
Point guard Deonte Burton
is learning slowly but count
on him providing some big
highlights this season.
Forward Dario Hunt leads

the team in scoring (14.6)


and rebounding (8.0) and has
progressed since last season.
Guard Malik Story has one of
the sweetest shooting strokes in
the conference.
But there is also bound to be
tons of Are you kidding me?
moments this season when
watching the team.
With the youngest team in
the WAC, eight more out-ofconference games left and fans
patience running short, Nevada
shouldnt be worried about
trying to hit the 20-win plateau
for the eighth-straight season.
It shouldnt be worried about
making a postseason appearance for the ninth-straight.
Consider this season a learning experience because theres
a good chance fans will see a
similar season to that of 99.
Yep, that same one where
Nevada failed to pick up 10 Ws.
TONY CONTINI /NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Juan Lpez can be reached at


jlopez@nevadasagebrush.com.

Freshman guard Deonte Burton is one of 10 freshmen or sophmores


on the Wolf Packs roster this season.

2010 mens basketball preview

nevadasagebrush.com

NOVEMBER 30, 2010 C3

It was the coaches. They brought such a family atmosphere and I could tell they werent the kind of people who just wanted to
get my son to sign the dotted line then stop talking to me. Derek Burton, Deonte Burtons father

Family
atmosphere
draws Burton
By Emerson Marcus
The University of California, Los Angeles coach Ben Howland couldnt believe it.
St. Johns coach Steve Lavin asked, Why Nevada?
But Derek Burton knew why his son, Deonte, turned down
some of the best basketball programs in the nation to play at
Nevada.
It was the coaches, Burton said of his sons decision. They
brought such a family atmosphere and I could tell they werent
the kind of people who just wanted to get my son to sign the
dotted line then stop talking to me.
The highly touted Los Angeles recruit chose Nevada in April.
Fast forward seven months, and Burton is Nevadas starting
point guard as a freshman. His talent is already showing, as
showcased by his debut against the University of Montana
Nov. 13, where he scored 17 points on 3-of-4 shooting from
beyond the arc. Yet, he is still learning the position.
Such responsibility carries a heavy burden. Burton must fill
the shoes of Portland Trail Blazers guard Armon Johnson and
Cleveland Cavaliers guard Ramon Sessions Burtons immediate predecessors. But Burton fits the traditional mold of
a Nevada point guard because of his experience as an athletic
scorer and ball distributor from the position.
He is the kind of player who can score and make everyone
around him better, said head coach David Carter, who also
played point guard at the collegiate level.
Burton, who was a Wooden Award recipient at Compton
Centennial High School in California, experienced a sheltered
life before college, his father said.
Hes kind of naive, his father said. He once had his phone
stolen from him in Compton and I told him, Yes, Deonte.
Those kinds of people do exist. But hes learning on his own
now in college, and I know he is in good hands with (Nevada
assistant coach) Keith (Brown) and coach (Carter).
Brown initially made contact with Burton at a tournament
last year. Brown visited Southern California to observe players
at the Trevor Ariza Westchester Tip-Off Classic. But Burton
wasnt the main focus for Brown. The 6-foot-1, 185-pound
guard missed his entire junior season because of injury and
was only pursued by Long Beach State.
That changed after the December tournament. Burton averaged more than 30 points per game and won the tournaments
Most Outstanding Player award.
Thats when people started taking notice, his father said.
UCLA, the University of Cincinnati, St. Johns and Marquette
took aim at Burton. But Nevada remained a dark horse that
Deonte and his father didnt want to rule out.
(Carter) and my dad really had a good relationship from the
beginning, Deonte said. Coach did a good job looking my dad
in the eye and letting him know sports come second to school.
Burton made his decision to come to Nevada in April, a few
weeks after Johnson left for the NBA. His father said Johnsons
decision to leave did not affect Burtons decision to come to
Nevada. Burtons father texted his son two weeks ago and
asked if he felt he had made the right decision.
He told me, Yes, sir, he said. Deonte just loves life right
now. He is working hard at school and I couldnt be more
proud of him.
Burton, who admitted that school is coming easier than
Carters intricate offensive game plan, said he always places
school before basketball. His father pushed that philosophy.
Deonte is not leaving after his freshman or sophomore
year you can quote me on that, he said. He is not going
anywhere until after his junior season. He is staying at Nevada
until he physically and mentally matures a little more. But I
can tell you he is in the right hands with those coaches. That is
something I am definitely comfortable in saying.
Emerson Marcus can be reached at emarcus@nevadasagebrush.com.

TONY CONTINI /NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Nevada guard Deonte Burton is averaging 9.0 points and 4.6 assists per game for the Wolf Pack this season.

BY THE NUMBERS

Despite being a freshman, Deonte Burton is proving to be one of the leaders in the early part of the season.

23

is the number of assists


Deonte Burton has this
season to lead the team.

17

is the number of points


Burton scored against
Montana on Nov. 13.

29.2

is the number of minutes


Burton is averaging, the
second-highest on the team.

is the number of steals


Burton has this season. The
mark leads the team.

Jordan and Jordan ready to help replace lost starters


Theres definitely a lot of competition for minutes. Everyones
playing hard, so that helps us. Im hoping I can play a pretty big
role this season. guard Jordan Finn

By Lukas Eggen
Replacing a star is never easy.
Replacing two can be daunting. But replacing four starters
means a team could have a long
road ahead of it.
As the Nevada mens basketball team features a very different look in terms of personnel,
guards Jordan Burris and Jordan
Finn are looking to make their
marks early in the season.
The two will help fill the void
left by former Nevada backcourt
players Joey Shaw, Brandon
Fields and Armon Johnson
three players responsible for
40.6 of Nevadas 79.5 points per
game last season.
We expect both (Burris and
Finn) to come up and help the
team, head coach David Carter
said.

JORDAN FINN

TONY CONTINI /NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Nevada guards Jordan Finn and Jordan Burris hope to play significant roles in the Wolf Packs rotation.

Finn attended the Air Force


Academy Preparatory school for
six months before deciding to
transfer to Nevada this summer.
It just wasnt for me, Finn
said. The lifestyle got kind of
old. Doing the same thing every
day got repetitive.
With former Nevada players
Luke Babbitt and Johnson still
fresh in fans minds, Finn said

it was important for the team to


not worry about the pressure of
coming after them.
Its going to be in the back
of our minds a little bit, Finn
said. But were ready to make a
name for ourselves and not play
in Luke and Armons shadows.
Nevada was the first school
to pursue Finn, and he took a
liking to the coaching staff and
the university. Carter said that
Finn will fit in perfectly to their
system and his versatility at the
guard position makes him a
useful asset going forward.
Finn is a combo guard,
Carter said. He can play the
one and two and thats not the
easiest thing to do.
Though he has seen limited
action in games so far this season averaging 13.6 minutes,
2.2 points and 1.2 rebounds
per game Finn is looking to
expand his role.
Theres definitely a lot of competition for minutes, Finn said.
Everyones playing hard, so that
helps us. Im hoping I can play a
pretty big role this season.

JORDAN BURRIS
In high school (Bakersfield,
Calif.), Burris set school records
for points, assists, steals, blocks
and rebounds.

Jordan is a talented young


player who can score a lot,
Carter said. Hes going to be
huge for us and we look forward
to seeing what he can do.
Five games into the season,
Burris is starting to show his
potential, earning his first start
against George Washington
University on Nov. 22.
For Burris, the college game
is presenting challenges unlike
any other he had to face when
he was playing high school.
The biggest thing for me is
how well the other team knows
you, Burris said. They know
everything that I want to do or
everything we want to do as a
team.
Still, Burris is showing signs
that he is growing comfortable
within the system and is averaging 6.2 points per game this
season. Burris scored 15 points
in the teams 76-75 loss to the
University of Pacific and is getting Carters attention.
Hes come out and played really, really aggressively, Carter
said. Hes got a good feel on the
offensive end. We need to see
that aggressiveness coming off
the bench.
Lukas Eggen can be reached at
leggen@nevadasagebrush.com.

2010 mens basketball preview

C4 NOVEMBER 30, 2010

nevadasagebrush.com

My goal will be to keep my body together, slide into a leadership role and try to establish a good atmosphere for the young guys on the team.
center Illiwa Baldwin

Senior center Illiwa Baldwin spent four months playing basketball for an Australian team. The NCAA-ruled Baldwin has one year of eligibility remaining with the Wolf Pack.

TONY CONTINI /NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Aussie aims to slide into a leadership role


By Emerson Marcus
Illiwamanu is Nevada big-man Illiwa Baldwins full first name it means fast-flying bird
over the ocean.
If you ask Baldwin about his journey, you
might think that only a fast-flying bird could
have made it this far.
Its surreal, said the 24-year-old senior,
born in Papa New Guinea, who learned to play
basketball in Australia.
For Baldwin, theres always been a hurdle
something he had to fight through to continue
his journey.
Baldwin kept fighting after his grandfather,
who he has a tattoo of on his right arm, died
after he left Australia to play basketball in the
United States.
He kept fighting after he broke his foot and
gained 60 pounds later that year.
He kept fighting after he transferred Pratt
Community College and woke up one morning with a golf-ball sized tumor on his right
ankle.
And hell keep fighting even after the NCAA
denied him an extra year of eligibility earlier
this month because of a four-month stint with
the Australian team.
Its sort of been overwhelming, Baldwin
said of his experience.

Baldwin will play a limited role off the bench


for Nevada in his only season, but it will be his
veteran leadership that will be valued the most,
Nevada mens basketball head coach David
Carter said.
He should be a good role model for our freshmen, Carter said. Hell be important for the
team. He should be able to step back and shoot.
Hell be big on the boards and as a defender
down low. Hes also a good interior passer.
Baldwin, nicknamed grandpa by his teammates, is looking to slide into a leadership
role for Nevada.
Devonte Elliot admits Baldwin gives his
teammates without cars a ride to Wal-mart for
groceries. Baldwin is also gaining a reputation
as the teams funny-man.
Hes a cool cat, Nevada forward Olek Czyz
said. Hes a funny dude.
Baldwins humor comes from his hurdles.
Its better to maintain a positive attitude
than getting down about it, he said.
Baldwin didnt start playing basketball until
he moved to Brisbane, Australia, when he was
11 years old.
He made noise as a solid Aussie talent, who
maintains dual citizenship from both southern
Hemisphere nations.
He played his first year at Howard University
in Texas in 2007.

BY THE NUMBERS

Breaking down senior center Illiwa Baldwins impact for Nevada this season.

14.2

is the number of minutes


per game that Illiwa Baldwin
is averaging through five
games this season.

10.7

is the number of rebounds


Baldwin averaged during
his second season at Pratt
Community College.

After his first year, Baldwin broke his foot.


The 6-foot-11, 260-pound forward said this
was one of the most depressing times of his
career.
He had just lost his grandfather and broke
his foot in his first season in the United States.
Baldwin gained 60 pounds, ballooning to more
than 300.
I looked like an offensive lineman, he said.
After transferring to Pratt Community College in 2008, Baldwin built confidence, lost
the extra weight and appeared ready to have a
breakout season. Once there, he encountered
yet another set back.
While visiting his girlfriend in San Francisco,
Baldwin woke up one morning and noticed a
golf-ball sized tumor on his right ankle.

is the number of years of


eligibility the NCAA ruled
Baldwin has left to play for
the Wolf Pack.

Doctors removed the benign tumor and


Baldwin was forced to miss more playing time
while he recovered.
After he was fully healed, Baldwin averaged
13.3 points and 10.7 rebounds in his second
season at Pratt.
Arizona State, South Carolina and Pacific
showed interest, but Baldwin chose Nevada
because of the system, the location and the
players, he said.
My goal will be to keep my body together,
slide into a leadership role and try to establish
a good atmosphere for the young guys on the
team, Baldwin said.
Emerson Marcus can be reached at emarcus@
nevadasagebrush.com.

Transfer prepares for homecoming


By Lukas Eggen
When junior forward Olek
Czyz makes his debut for the
Wolf Pack in December, it will
be a homecoming for the Reno
High School graduate. It just
took longer than expected.
Czyz was a star for the Huskies, averaging 20 points and 10
rebounds per game as a senior.
He helped Reno High to a 77-17
record and two state championships during his career.
Highly recruited out of high
school, Czyz originally went to
Duke, something that sounds
like a dream to many high
school players.
But for Czyz, the dream
became more of a battle to
maintain motivation. Czyz
saw limited action for the Blue
Devils and the competitive fire
in him was diminishing.
At first when I was recruited,
I wanted to develop, that was
my main goal, said Czyz, who
transferred to Nevada after
two years with the Blue Devils.
Once I got to Duke and went
through a year-and-a-half, I
started to want different things. I
didnt play as much and I wasnt
as competitive, and not having

that feeling just didnt feel right.


I changed my views on things. I
wanted to play and thought going to Nevada, I could definitely
do that.
Czyz left for Nevada for a shot
at more playing time, but there
was also another factor that
came into play family.
Czyzs older sister, Anita, is a
business major at the University
of Nevada, Reno and the two
had conversations about what
life was like at the school.
Weve been talking about it a
lot, Czyz said. Since Ive been
back, Ive gotten to hang out
with her a lot more. I hadnt seen
her in a while before this year.
Because of NCAA transfer
rules, Czyz must sit out until
later December. Though he is
missing the teams first handful
of games, he is expecting to fight
for playing time as soon as he
can.
Im just really excited, Czyz
said. Its a different atmosphere
and Im just eager to get out
there and help this team.
In a team finding its shape,
Czyz could play a major role in
the frontcourt rotation. Though
Czyz is listed as a forward, his
athleticism allows him to play

all over the court and he could


take on multiple roles.
Olek is kind of a wild card,
head coach David Carter said.
He can play two or three different positions.
As Nevada continues to search
for a set rotation, Czyz may not
see a set, defined role, but his
impact will be felt nonetheless.
His role will be to do whatever it takes for the team to
be successful, Carter said.
Whether its scoring, rebounding or whatever we need him to
do and I think hes capable of
doing that.
And though he has still yet
to step onto the court for the
Wolf Pack, sophomore forward
Marko Cukic said the teams
expectations are huge for Czyz.
Its clear that Nevada will be
banking on Czyz to live up to
the potential he showed in high
school, Cukic said.
Oleks going to be a big part
of the offense, Cukic said. He
can shoot and he can do just
about everything. Were going to
need him and Im sure hell have
a big role.
Lukas Eggen can be reached at
leggen@nevadasagebrush.com.

BY THE NUMBERS

A look at junior Olek Czyzs


career so far.

20

is the number of points per


game Czyz averaged at Reno
High School.

is the number of games


Czyz played at Duke during
the 2009-10 season.

58.3

is the percentage Czyz shot


from the field during the
2009-10 season.

is the number of seasons


Czyz spent at Duke before
transferring.

TONY CONTINI /NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Junior forward Olek Czyz spent two seasons at Duke before transferring.

I changed my views on things. I wanted to play and


thought going to Nevada, I could definitely do that.
forward Olek Czyz

2010 mens basketball preview

nevadasagebrush.com

NOVEMBER 30, 2010 C5

Meet the Nevada Mens Basketball Team

FILE PHOTO /NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

PATRICK NYEKO, #1

JERRY EVANS, #2

ILLIWA BALDWIN, #3

DEVONTE ELLIOTT, #4

Position: Guard
Height: 68
Weight: 188 pounds
Year: Redshirt Freshman
Age: 19
Major: Human Development
and Family Studies
Hometown: Lawndale, Calif.

Position: Center
Height: 611
Weight: 260 pounds
Year: Senior
Age: 24
Major: General Studies
Hometown: Brisbane, Australia

Bio: Sophomore guard Partrick Nyeko did


not see much playing time his freshman
year last season. He averaged less than five
minutes per game and less than a point per
game. This year he will be called upon to
make a bigger contribution to the team.

Bio: Because of his height and athleticism,


redshirt freshman guard Jerry Evans will see
significant playing time. Evans earned the
Most Valuable Player of the Bay League and
was the captain of his high school team his
senior year.

Bio: Because forward newcomer Illiwa


Baldwin played one year in an Australian
league he is considered a senior at Nevada.
Last season he played for Pratt, Kansas
Community College, where he averaged 13.3
points and more than 10 rebounds per game.

Bio: Freshman forward Devonte Elliot


averaged 12.5 points, 11.9 rebounds and
more than four blocks per game his senior
year at Paramount High School. He is
expected to be a big contributor to the team
this year.

KEITH FUETSCH, #12

ADAM CARP, #13

MARKO CUKIC, #14

JORDAN FINN, #15

Position: Guard
Height: 66
Weight: 180 pounds
Year: Sophomore
Age: 21
Major: Speech Communication
Hometown: London

Position: Forward
Height: 67
Weight: 215 pounds
Year: Senior
Age: 21
Major: Graduate student for
Educational Leadership
Hometown: Clayton, Calif.

Position: Guard
Height: 60
Weight: 170 pounds
Year: Sophomore
Age: 20
Major: Business
Hometown: Reno

Position: Forward
Height: 610
Weight: 220 pounds
Year: Freshman
Age: 19
Major: Undecided
Hometown: Los Angeles

Position: Guard
Height: 64
Weight: 190 pounds
Year: Freshman
Age: 20
Major: Business

Position: Forward
Height: 69
Weight: 250 pounds
Year: Sophomore
Age: 24
Major: General Studies
Hometown: Belgrade, Serbia

Hometown: Rancho Cucamonga,


Calif.

Bio: Sophomore guard Keith Fuetsch is


a Reno local and walked on last season.
He saw very limited time last season for
the Wolf Pack. His playing time will likely
increase, but it is probable that he will
continue to play a limited role for Nevada.

Bio: Last season, Adam Carp averaged less


than three minutes per game and has never
seen much playing time for the Wolf Pack.
His minutes could increase this year and
he will be called on to help keep this young
team focused and motivated.

Bio: Despite playing behind Dario Hunt and


Luke Babbitt last season, sophomore forward
Marko Cukic saw significant playing time and
showed good offensive ability. He shot better
than 60 percent from the field and almost 71
percent from the free throw line.

Bio: Freshman Jordan Finn attended the


Air Force Academy Preparatory School last
year. In his senior year of high school, he
played for Etiwanda High School where he
averaged 12 points and 4.7 rebounds per
game.

JORDAN BURRIS, #20

DERRELL CONNER, #21

DEONTE BURTON, #24

OLEK CZYZ, #31

Position: Guard
Height: 67
Weight: 205 pounds
Year: Freshman
Age: 18
Major: Undecided
Hometown: Bakersfield, Calif.

Position: Guard
Height: 60
Weight: 165 pounds
Year: Junior
Age: 20
Major: General Studies
Hometown: Chicago

Position: Forward
Height: 67
Weight: 240 pounds
Year: Junior
Age: 20
Major: Speech Communication
Hometown: Gdynia, Poland

Position: Guard
Height: 61
Weight: 185 pounds
Year: Freshman
Age: 19
Major: Undecided
Hometown: Los Angeles

Bio: Freshman guard Jordan Burris scored


a school record 52 points in a game in high
school. He also set the Stockdale High
School (Bakersfield, Calif.) career records
in points, assists, rebounds, steals and
blocks.

Bio: Junior point guard Derrell Conner


transferred to Nevada this season and will
be the Wolf Packs backup point guard to
Deonte Burton. Last season with Kankakee
Community College, Conner averaged 12.3
points and about 5 assists per game.

Bio: Much of the teams success will fall on


freshman point guard Deonte Burton. He
is considered the Wolf Packs best recruit.
He won the John Wooden Player of the
Year award in his senior year at Compton
Centennial High School.

Bio: Reno High School graduate Olek


Czyz comes to Nevada as a junior after
transferring from Duke University where he
played last season. Czyz is eligible to play in
December. He is a versatile player that will
see time as a guard and forward.

KEVIN PANZER, #33

MALIK STORY, #34

KEITH OLSON, #43

DARIO HUNT, #44

Position: Forward
Height: 69
Weight: 205 pounds
Year: Freshman
Age: 18
Major: Psychology
Hometown: Mission Viejo, Calif.
Bio: A great rebounder in high school,
freshman forward Kevin Panzer will look to
keep his rebounding success going in college.
He set school records at Capistrano Valley
High School with the most rebounds in a
single season and the most career rebounds.

Position: Forward
Height: 610
Weight: 270 pounds
Year: Junior
Age: 24
Major: Human Development
and Family Services
Hometown: Gardnerville

Position: Forward
Height: 68
Weight: 230 pounds
Year: Junior
Age: 21
Major: International Business

Bio: Injuries have plagued junior forward Keith


Olsons collegiate career. During his first year
on Northern Arizona Universitys basketball
team, he struggled to get on the court because
of an injury. Last season with Nevada, he
missed five games because of a knee injury.

Bio: Junior forward Dario Hunt is the only


returning starter from last season. Hunt
needs 60 blocks to break Nevadas all-time
record of 192. He is assigned with leading
this young Wolf Pack team through its
growing pains.

Position: Guard
Height: 65
Weight: 225 pounds
Year: Redshirt Sophomore
Age: 20
Major: General Studies
Hometown: Pasadena, Calif.
Bio: Sophomore Malik Story has a sweet
shooting stroke and is a sharpshooter from
beyond the arc. He sat out last season after
transferring from Indiana. In 2008-09, Story
averaged 5.9 points and 2.2 rebounds per
game. He has three years of eligibility left.

Hometown: Colorado Springs,


Colo.

STATS
Player
Dario Hunt, #44
Malik Story, #34
Deonte Burton, #24
Jordan Burris, #20
Kevin Panzer, #33
Illiwa Baldwin, #3
Derrell Conner, #21
Devonte Elliot, #4
Jerry Evans, #2
Jordan Finn #15
Adam Carp, #13
Marko Cukic, #14
Keith Feutsch, #12
Patrick Nyeko, #1
Team Totals

GP
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
2
3
1
4
5

GS
5
5
5
2
2
0
0
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
-

MPG
29.6
27.8
29.2
19.0
17.8
14.2
10.0
14.8
17.2
13.6
2.5
3.7
2.0
3.5
-

FGA
58
49
49
25
30
14
18
13
20
8
2
2
3
2
283

FGM
29
19
12
11
10
10
8
6
7
2
1
2
0
0
117

FG%
.500
.388
.245
.440
.500
.714
.444
.462
.350
.250
.500
1.00
.000
.000
.413

3pt FGA
0
23
20
13
12
0
5
0
7
3
0
0
2
0
85

3pt FGM
0
13
4
5
5
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
30

3pt FG%
.000
.565
.200
.385
.417
.000
.400
.000
.143
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
.353

Reb.
8
3.8
2.2
3.4
2.4
2.2
.6
5.6
3.8
1.2
0
0
0
1
37.6

Ast.
3
7
23
9
5
2
10
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
62

TO
12
10
11
8
2
4
6
6
5
6
0
0
0
1
72

Blk
4
0
2
0
4
2
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
15

Stl
2
3
7
1
1
0
4
3
1
3
0
0
0
0
25

PPG
14.6
11.2
9.0
6.2
5.0
4.4
4.0
3.2
3.2
2.2
1.5
1.3
0
0
64.4

JOHN CALLAHAN /NEVADA SAGEBRUSH

Junior forward Dario Hunt leads the team in scoring so far this season.

SEASON SCHEDULE
Tuesday, Nov. 30 at 5 p.m.
at South Dakota State

Monday, Dec. 20 at 7:30 p.m.


Portland State

Saturday, Jan. 8 at 1 p.m.


Utah State*

Thursday, Jan. 27 at 7:30 p.m.


Fresno State*

Saturday, Feb. 19 at TBA


ESPNU BracketBusters

WAC Tournament
at Las Vegas:

Saturday, Dec. 4 at 8 p.m.


UNLV

Wednesday, Dec. 22 at 6 p.m.


at Washington

Wednesday, Jan. 12 at 8 p.m.


at Idaho*

Wednesday, Feb. 2 at 8 p.m.


at Utah State*

Thursday, Feb. 24 at 7:30 p.m.


Idaho*

Wednesday, March 9
Quarterfinals*

Monday, Dec. 6 at 5 p.m.


at Houston

Monday, Dec. 27 at 7 p.m.


at Portland

Saturday, Jan. 15 at 6:05 p.m.


at Boise State*

Saturday, Feb. 5 at 7:30 p.m.


San Jose State*

Saturday, Feb. 26 at 7:30 p.m.


Boise State*

Friday, March 11
Semifinals*

Saturday, Dec. 11 at 5 p.m.


San Francisco State

Friday, Dec. 31 at 5:05 p.m.


Hawaii*

Thursday, Jan. 20 at 7:30 p.m.


New Mexico State*

Saturday, Feb. 12 at 7 p.m.


at San Jose State*

Thursday, March 3 at 6 p.m.


at Louisiana Tech*

Saturday, March 12
Championship*

Friday, Dec. 17 at 6 p.m.


Arizona State

Monday, Jan. 3 at 8 p.m.


at Fresno State *

Saturday, Jan. 22 at 7:30 p.m.


Louisiana Tech*

Monday, Feb. 14 at 9 p.m.


at Hawaii*

Monday, March 5 at 6 p.m.


at New Mexico State*

* denotes WAC play

2010 mens basketball preview

C6 NOVEMBER 30, 2010

nevadasagebrush.com

2010 WAC PREVIEW

PHOTO COURTESY OF SAN JOSE STATE ATHLETICS DEPARTMENT

San Jose State guard Adrian Oliver led the Spartans in scoring last season with 22.5 points per game. San Jose State finished 14-17 overall and 6-10 in Western Athletic Conference play.

A team-by-team look at Nevadas conference foes

*listed by last seasons WAC record

UTAH STATE

NEW MEXICO STATE

2009-10 record: 27-8 overall, 14-2 WAC


Postseason appearance:2010 NCAA Tournament, first round
Series vs. Nevada: Utah State leads 29-13
Last meeting: Feb. 6, Utah State 76-65
Meetings this year: Jan. 8, Feb. 2
Player to watch: Tai Wesley, forward

TEAM OUTLOOK:

The WAC coaches favor Utah State to win the regular-season conference title for the thirdstraight season. Utah State is without last seasons point guard Jared Quayle. He posted team
highs in assists, steals and was second in points as Utah State posted a 27-8 record. The team
made the NCAA Tournament but lost in the first round. The Aggies will look to senior forward
Tai Wesley, who led the team in points, rebounds and blocks last season, to be the center point.

2009-10 record: 22-12 overall, 11-5 WAC


Postseason appearance:2010 NCAA Tournament, first round
Series vs. Nevada: New Mexico State leads 17-14
Last meeting: March 12, New Mexico State 80-79
Meetings this year: Jan. 20, Feb. 13
Player to watch: Troy Gillenwater, forward

TEAM OUTLOOK:

New Mexico State is picked to finish second in the conference after it won the WAC
Tournament last season. The Aggies lost in the first round of the NCAA tournament. The
teams top two scorers from last season, Jonathan Gibson and Jahmar Young, are gone so New
Mexico State must find other scorers. The team returns its leaders in assists and rebounds but
junior forward Troy Gillenwater must emerge as a scoring threat for the Aggies.

LOUISIANA TECH

FRESNO STATE
2009-10 record: 15-18 overall, 7-9 WAC
Postseason appearance: None
Series vs. Nevada: Nevada leads 45-36
Last meeting: Jan. 23, Fresno State 87-77
Meetings this year: Jan. 3, Jan. 27
Player to watch: Steven Shipp, guard

2009-10 record: 24-11 overall, 9-7 WAC


Postseason appearance: 2010 CollegeInsider.com Tournament
Series vs. Nevada: Nevada leads 15-5
Last meeting: March 6, Nevada 79-68
Meetings this year: Jan. 22, March 3
Player to watch: Olu Ashaolu, forward

TEAM OUTLOOK:

Louisiana Tech is coming off a 24-11 season and a third-place finish in the WAC. This could
be a rebuilding year for the Bulldogs since its top two scorers from last year, Kyle Gibson and
Magnum Rolle, are gone. Rolle also led the team in rebounds. Junior forward Olu Ashaolu and
senior point guard DeAndre Brown will be called on to take charge. Ashaolu was second in rebounding and Brown led the team in assists last season, but both must become better scorers
for Louisiana Tech to be successful.

TEAM OUTLOOK:

Last season, the Bulldogs struggled, finishing fifth in the conference and posting a 15-18
record. The team lost its leader from last season in Paul George, who led the team in points,
rebounds and steals. It also lost Sylvester Seay, the teams second-leading scorer and rebounder. Junior point guard Steven Shepp must become the team leader and sophomore
Greg Smith needs to continue to improve if Fresno State wants to finish in the top half of the
conference this season.

IDAHO

SAN JOSE STATE

2009-10 record: 15-16 overall, 6-10 WAC


Postseason appearance:None
Series vs. Nevada: Nevada leads 35-23
Last meeting: March 11, Nevada 87-71
Meetings this year: Jan. 12, Feb. 24
Player to watch: Kyle Barone, center

2009-10 record: 14-17 overall, 6-10 WAC


Postseason appearance: None
Series vs. Nevada: San Jose State leads 47-46
Last meeting: Feb. 25, Nevada 83-79
Meetings this year: Feb. 5, Feb. 12
Player to watch: Adrian Oliver, guard

TEAM OUTLOOK:

TEAM OUTLOOK:

The Vandals will have a new look this year after losing their top three scorers from last
season. Idaho finished sixth in the conference and 15-16 overall last season. To be successful,
sophomore center Kyle Barone must be dominant inside for Idaho to open up offensively.
Senior guards Shawn Henderson and Jeff Ledbetter both averaged less than five points per
game last season, so both must become offensive leaders for the Vandals to stay competitive.

While the Spartans finished last season in a disappointing seventh place, the team is one of the
only in the conference that returns its top scorer. Senior guard Adrian Oliver averaged more
than 22 points per game last season and is the teams leader this year. San Jose States biggest
loss was center Chris Oakes, who led the team in rebounds. Still, with its star player back, the
Spartans should finish better in the conference.

BOISE STATE

HAWAII
2009-10 record:10-20 overall, 3-13 WAC
Postseason appearance: None
Series vs. Nevada: Nevada leads 17-10
Last meeting: Feb. 27, Hawaii 74-63
Meetings this year: Dec. 31, Feb. 14
Player to watch: Hiram Thompson, guard

2009-10 record: 15-17 overall, 5-11 WAC


Postseason appearance: None
Series vs. Nevada: Nevada leads 37-20
Last meeting: Feb. 13, Nevada 88-80
Meetings this year: Jan. 15, Feb. 26
Player to watch: LaShard Anderson, guard

TEAM OUTLOOK:

Last season, Boise State was only as good as its forward, Ike Okoye. Okoye led the team in points,
rebounds, blocks and field goal attempts. With Okoye as the Broncos key player, the team went
15-17 and finished second-to-last in the WAC conference. Okoye is now gone (graduation),
so the team must find a balanced attack to get out of the basement of the WAC. Senior guard
LaShard Anderson led the team in minutes played and must step up and lead the Broncos.

TEAM OUTLOOK:

Hawaii finished dead last in the WAC last season with a conference record of 3-13, and this
year, it only returns one of its top six scorers from last season. This is a young Warriors team
and these players will try to erase the memories of last seasons 10-20 record. A key player
from last season, senior point guard Hiram Thompson will be looked to provide leadership and
find these young players open shots.