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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford

Dreams and Dream-Stories


by Anna Kingsford

Published in New York by Scribner & Welford in !!" #$D$ of Paris% President of the &ermetic Society' Author of (The Perfect Way; or the finding of Christ.( )dited by )dward #aitland

*+or &e so gi,eth unto &is -elo,ed in Slee.$/ Ps$ c00,ii$ 1#arginal 2eading3 2$4$ 5

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford

CONTENTS Page P2)+A6) Part < ? @ ; A 7 ! " C < ? @ ; A 7 ! " <C < << <? <@ D2)A#S 8&) D99#)D 82A:N 8&) W9ND)2+=> SP)68A6>)S 8&) 69=NS)> 9+ P)2+)68:9N 8&) 6:8Y 9+ ->99D 8&) -:2D AND 8&) 6A8 8&) +92)S8 6A8&)D2A> 8&) )N6&AN8)D W9#AN 8&) -AND=)8 9+ 8&) B9DS 8&) D:++:6=>8 PA8& A >:9N :N 8&) WAY A D2)A# 9+ D:S)#-9D:#)N8 8&) P)2+)68 WAY W:8& AN:#A>S 8&) >A-92A892Y =ND)2B29=ND 8&) 9>D Y9=NB #AN 8&) #)8)#PSY6&9S:S 8&) 8&2)) K:NBS 8&) A2#)D B9DD)SS 8&) BA#) 9+ 6A2DS 8&) PAN:6-S82=6K PA6K-&92S) 8&) &A=N8)D :NN AN )AS8)2N AP9>9B=) A &A=N8)D &9=S) :ND))D 8&) SD=A2) :N 8&) &AND D2)A#-4)2S)S 8&29=B& 8&) AB)S < ? @ ; +2AB#)N8 +2AB#)N8 < S:BNS 9+ 8&) 8:#)S W:8& 8&) B9DS 77 !C !C ! ! Page < < << <@ <A ?C ?! ?" @ @ @? @@ @; @" ; ;@ ;A ;" A A? A@ 7C ; " 7

8&) 82)AS=2) :N 8&) >:B&8)D &9=S) <;

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


PA28 :: < ? @ ; A 7 ! D2)A#-S892:)S A 4:>>AB) 9+ S))2S S8))PS:D) -)Y9ND 8&) S=NS)8 A 8=2N 9+ >=6K N9)#:% 923 8&) S:>4)2 2:--9N 8&) >:88>) 9>D #ANES S892Y 8&) N:B&8S&AD) S8 B)92B) 8&) 6&)4A>:)2 !; A @7 A" !< < < <@< <7C

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford PREFACE


[Written in !!A$ Some of the e0.eriences in this ,olume were subseFuent to that date$ 8his .ublication is made in accordance with the authorGs last wishes$ 1)d$5] [Page 7 ] 8&) chronicles which : am about to .resent to the reader are not the result of any conscious effort of the imagination$ 8hey are3 as the title-.age indicates3 records of dreams3 occurring at inter,als during the last ten years3 and transcribed3 .retty nearly in the order of their occurrence3 from my Diary$ Written down as soon as .ossible after awaking from the slumber during which they .resented themsel,es3 these narrati,es3 necessarily unstudied in style and wanting in elegance of diction3 ha,e at least the merit of fresh and ,i,id colour3 for they were committed to .a.er at a moment when the effect and im.ress of each successi,e ,ision were strong and forceful in the mind3 and before the illusion of reality con,eyed by the scenes witnessed and the sounds heard in slee. had had time to .ass away$ : do not know whether these e0.eriences of mine are uniFue$ So far3 : ha,e not yet met with any one in whom the dreaming faculty a..ears to be either so strongly or so strangely de,elo.ed as in myself$ #ost dreams3 e,en when of unusual ,i,idness and lucidity3 betray a want of coherence in their action3 and an incongruity of detail and dramatis persona that stam. [Page ] them as the .roduct of incom.lete and disHointed cerebral function$ -ut the most remarkable features of the e0.eriences : am about to record are the methodical consecuti,eness of their seFuences3 and the intelligent .ur.ose disclosed alike in the e,ents witnessed and in the words heard or read$ Some of these last3 indeed3 resemble3 for .oint and .rofundity3 the a.ologues of )astern scri.tures% and3 on more than one occasion3 the scenery of the dream has accurately .ortrayed characteristics of remote regions3 city3 forest and mountain3 which in this e0istence at least : ha,e ne,er beheld3 nor3 so far as : can remember3 e,en heard described3 and yet3 e,ery feature of these unfamiliar climes has re,ealed itself to my slee.ing ,ision with a s.lendour of colouring and distinctness of outline which made the waking life seem duller and less real by contrast$ : know of no .arallel to this .henomenon unless in the .ages of -ulwer >yttonEs romance entitled I The Pilgrims of the Rhine3 in which is related the story of a Berman student endowed with so mar,ellous a faculty of dreaming3 that for him the normal conditions of slee.ing and waking became re,ersed3 his true life was that which he li,ed in his slumbers3 and his hours of wake-fulness a..eared to him as so many une,entful and inacti,e inter,als of arrest occurring in an e0istence of intense and ,i,id interest which was wholly .assed in the hy.notic state$ Not that to me there is any such in,ersion of natural conditions$ 9n the contrary3 the .riceless insights and illuminations : ha,e acFuired by means of my dreams ha,e gone far to elucidate for me many difficulties and enigmas of life3 and e,en of religion3 which might otherwise ha,e remained dark to me3 and to throw u.on the e,ents and ,icissitudes of a career [Page !] filled with bewildering situations3 a light which3 like sunshine3 has .enetrated to the ,ery causes and s.rings of circumstance3 and has gi,en meaning and fitness to much in my life that would else ha,e a..eared to me incoherent or inconsistent$ : ha,e no theory to offer the reader in e0.lanation of my faculty3 I at least in so far as its .hysiological as.ect is concerned$ 9f course3 ha,ing recei,ed a medical education3 : ha,e s.eculated about the modus operandi of the .henomenon3 but my s.eculations are not of such a character as to entitle them to .resentation in the form e,en of an hy.othesis$ : am tolerably well acFuainted with most of the .ro.ositions regarding unconscious cerebration3 which ha,e been .ut forward by men of science3 but none of these .ro.ositions can3 by any .rocess of reasonable e0.ansion or modification3 be made to fit Page @

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


my case$ &ysteria3 to the multiform and manifold categories of which3 medical e0.erts are wont to refer the maHority of the abnormal e0.eriences encountered by them3 is .lainly inadeFuate to e0.lain or account for mine$ 8he singular coherence and sustained dramatic unity obser,able in these dreams3 as well as the .oetic beauty and tender subtlety of the instructions and suggestions con,eyed in them do not com.ort with the conditions characteristic of ner,ous disease$ #oreo,er3 during the whole .eriod co,ered by these dreams3 : ha,e been busily and almost continuously engrossed with scientific and literary .ursuits demanding accurate Hudgment and com.lete self-.ossession and rectitude of mind$ At the time when many of the most ,i,id and remarkable ,isions occurred3 : was following my course as a student at the Paris +aculty of #edicine3 .re.aring for e0aminations3 daily ,isiting hos.ital wards as dresser3 and attending lectures$ [Page "#] >ater3 when : had taken my degree3 : was engaged in the duties of my .rofession and in writing for the .ress on scientific subHects$ Neither ha,e : e,er taken o.ium3 hashish or other dream-.roducing agent$ A cu. of tea or coffee re.resents the e0tent of my indulgences in this direction$ : mention these details in order to guard against inferences which otherwise might be drawn as to the genesis of my faculty$ With regard to the inter.retation and a..lication of .articular dreams3 : think it best to say nothing$ 8he maHority are ob,iously allegorical3 and although obscure in .arts3 they are in,ariably harmonious3 and tolerably clear in meaning to .ersons acFuainted with the method of Breek and 9riental myth$ : shall not3 therefore3 ,enture on any e0.lanation of my own3 but shall sim.ly record the dreams as they .assed before me3 and the im.ressions left u.on my mind when : awoke$ =nfortunately3 in some instances3 which are not3 therefore3 here transcribed3 my waking memory failed to recall accurately3 or com.letely3 certain discourses heard or written words seen in the course of the ,ision3 which in these cases left but a fragmentary im.ression on the brain and baffled all waking endea,our to recall their missing .assages$ 8hese im.erfect e0.eriences ha,e not3 howe,er3 been numerous% on the contrary3 it is a .er.etual mar,el to me to find with what ease and certainty : can3 as a rule3 on reco,ering ordinary consciousness3 recall the .icture witnessed in my slee.3 and re.roduce the words : ha,e heard s.oken or seen written$ Sometimes se,eral interims of months occur during which none of these e0ce.tional ,isions ,isit me3 but only ordinary dreams3 incongruous and insignificant [Page ""] after their kind$ 9bser,ation3 based on an e0.erience of considerable length3 Hustifies me3 : think3 in saying that climate3 altitude3 and electrical conditions are not without their influence in the .roduction of the cerebral state necessary to the e0ercise of the faculty : ha,e described$ Dry air3 high le,els3 and a cris.3 calm3 e0hilarating atmos.here fa,our its acti,ity% while3 on the other hand3 moisture3 .ro0imity to ri,ers3 cloudy skies3 and a de.ressing3 hea,y climate3 will3 for an indefinite .eriod3 suffice to re.ress it altogether$ :t is not3 therefore3 sur.rising that the greater number of these dreams3 and3 es.ecially3 the most ,i,id3 detailed and idyllic3 ha,e occurred to me while on the continent$ At my own residence on the banks of the Se,ern3 in a humid3 low-lying tract of country3 : ,ery seldom e0.erience such manifestations3 and sometimes3 after a .rolonged soHourn at home3 am tem.ted to fancy that the dreaming gift has left me ne,er to return$ -ut the results of a ,isit to Paris or to SwitJerland always s.eedily reassure me% the necessary magnetic or .sychic tension ne,er fails to reassert itself% and before many weeks ha,e ela.sed my Diary is once more rich with the record of my nightly ,isions$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


Some of these .hantasmagoria ha,e furnished me with the framework3 and e,en details3 of stories which from time to time : ha,e contributed to ,arious magaJines$ A ghost story3 [Steepside] .ublished some years ago in a >ondon magaJine3 and much commented on because of its .eculiarly weird and startling character3 had this origin% so had a fairy tale3 [Beyond the Sunset] which a..eared in a 6hristmas Annual last year3 and which has recently been re-issued in Berman by the editor of a foreign .eriodical$ #any of my more [Page "$] serious contributions to literature ha,e been similarly initiated% and3 more than once3 fragments of .oems3 both in )nglish and other languages3 ha,e been heard or read by me in dreams$ : regret much that : ha,e not yet been able to reco,er any one entire .oem$ #y memory always failed before : could finish writing out the lines3 no matter how luminous and recent the im.ressions made by them on my mind$[8he .oem entitled A Discourse on the Communion of Souls or the Uses of lo e !et"een Creature and Creature# Being a part of the $olden Boo% of &enus which forms one of the a..endices to The Perfect Way would be an e0ce.tion to this rule but that it was necessary for the dream to be re.eated before the whole .oem could be recalled$ 1)d5] &owe,er3 e,en as regards ,erses3 my e0.erience has been far richer and more successful than that of 6oleridge3 the only .roduct of whose faculty in this direction was the .oetical fragment 'u!la 'han3 and there was no scenic dreaming on the occasion3 only the ,erses were thus obtained% and : am not without ho.e that at some future time3 under more fa,ourable conditions than those : now enHoy3 the broken threads may be resumed and these cha.ters of dream ,erse .erfected and made com.lete$ :t may3 .erha.s3 be worthy of remark that by far the larger number of the dreams set down in this ,olume3 occurred towards dawn% sometimes e,en3 after sunrise3 during a second sleep$ A condition of fasting3 united .ossibly3 with some subtle magnetic or other atmos.heric state3 seems therefore to be that most o.en to im.ressions of the kind$ And3 in this connection3 : think it right to add that for the .ast fifteen years : ha,e been an abstainer from flesh-meats% not a &egetarian3 because during the whole of that .eriod : ha,e used such [Page "%] animal .roduce as butter3 cheese3 eggs3 and milk$ 8hat the influence of fasting and of sober fare u.on the .ers.icacity of the slee.ing brain was known to the ancients in times when dreams were far more highly esteemed than they now are3 a..ears e,ident from ,arious .assages in the records of theurgy and mysticism$ Philostratus3 in his (ife of Apollonius Tyaneus3 re.resents the latter as informing King Phraotes that ( the 9neiro.olists3 or :nter.reters of 4isions3 are wont ne,er to inter.ret any ,ision till they ha,e first inFuired the time at which it befell% for3 if it were early3 and of the morning slee.3 they then thought that they might make a good inter.retation thereof 1that is3 that it might be worth the inter.reting53 in that the soul was then fitted for di,ination3 and disincumbered$ -ut if in the first slee.3 or near midnight3 while the soul was as yet clouded and drowned in libations3 they3 being wise3 refused to gi,e any inter.retation$ #oreo,er3 the gods themsel,es are of this o.inion3 and send their oracles only into abstinent minds$ +or the .riests3 taking him who doth so consult3 kee. him one day from meat and three days from wine3 that he may in a clear soul recei,e the oracles$( And again3 lamblichus3 writing to Agathocles3 says' I (8here is nothing unworthy of belief in what you ha,e been told concerning the sacred slee.3 and seeing by means of dreams$ : e0.lain it thus' I 8he soul has a twofold life3 a lower and a higher$ :n slee. the soul is liberated from the constraint of the body3 and enters3 as an emanci.ated being3 on its di,ine life of intelligence$ 8hen3 as the noble faculty which beholds obHects that truly are I the obHects in the world of intelligence I stirs within3 and awakens to its .ower3 who can be astonished that the mind which contains in itself the .rinci.les of [Page "&] all e,ents3 should3 in this its state of liberation3 discern the future in those antecedent .rinci.les which will constitute that future K 8he nobler .art of the mind is thus united by abstraction to higher natures3 and becomes a .artici.ant in the wisdom and foreknowledge of the gods$ $ $ $ 8he night-time of the body is the daytime of the soul$( -ut : ha,e no desire to multi.ly citations3 nor to ,e0 the reader with hy.otheses ina..ro.riate to the Page A

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


design of this little work$ &a,ing3 therefore3 briefly recounted the facts and circumstances of my e0.erience so far as they are known to myself3 : .roceed3 without further commentary3 to unroll my chart of dream-.ictures3 and lea,e them to tell their own tale$ A$ -$ K$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford DREA'S - " - T(E DOO'ED TRA)N
[8his narrati,e was addressed to the friend .articularly referred to in it$ 8he dream occurred near the close of !7A3 and on the e,e3 therefore3 of the 2usso-8urkish war3 and was regarded by us both as ha,ing relation to a national crisis3 of a moral and s.iritual character3 our interest in which was so .rofound as to be destined to dominate all our subseFuent li,es and work 1AuthorGs Note$5] [Page "*] : WAS ,isited last night by a dream of so strange and ,i,id a kind that : feel im.elled to communicate it to you3 not only to relie,e my own mind of the im.ression which the recollection of it causes me3 but also to gi,e you an o..ortunity of finding the meaning3 which : am still far too much shaken and terrified to seek for myself$ :t seemed to me that you and : were two of a ,ast com.any of men and women3 u.on all of whom3 with the e0ce.tion of myself I for : was there ,oluntarily I sentence of death had been .assed$ : was sensible of the knowledge I how obtained : know not I that this terrible doom had been .ronounced by the official agents of some new reign of terror$ 6ertain : was that none of the .arty had really been guilty of any crime deser,ing of death% but that the .enalty had been incurred through [Page "+] their connection with some regime3 .olitical3 social or religious3 which was doomed to utter destruction$ :t became known among us that the sentence was about to be carried out on a colossal scale% but we remained in absolute ignorance as to the .lace and method of the intended e0ecution$ 8hus far my dream ga,e me no intimation of the horrible scene which ne0t burst on me3 I a scene which strained to their utmost tension e,ery sense of sight3 hearing and touch3 in a manner un.recedented in any dream : ha,e .re,iously had$ :t was night3 dark and starless3 and : found myself3 together with the whole com.any of doomed men and women who knew that they were soon to die3 but not how or where3 in a railway train hurrying through the darkness to some unknown destination$ : sat in a carriage Fuite at the rear end of the train3 in a corner seat3 and was leaning out of the o.en window3 .eering into the darkness3 when3 suddenly3 a ,oice3 which seemed to s.eak out of the air3 said to me in a low3 distinct3 intense tone3 the mere recollection of which makes me shudder3 I (8he sentence is being carried out e,en now$ You are all of you lost$ Ahead of the train is a frightful .reci.ice of monstrous height3 and at its base beats a fathomless sea$ 8he railway ends only with the abyss$ 9,er that will the train hurl itself into annihilation$ 8&)2) is N9 9N) 9N 8&) )NB:N) L( At this : s.rang from my seat in horror3 and looked round at the faces of the .ersons in the carriage with me$ No one of them had s.oken3 or had heard those awful words$ 8he lam.light from the dome of the carriage flickered oN the forms about me$ : looked from one to the other3 but saw no sign of alarm gi,en by any of them$ 8hen again the ,oice out of the [Page "7] air s.oke to me3 I (8here is but one way to be sa,ed$ You must lea. out of the train L( :n frantic haste : .ushed o.en the carriage door and ste..ed out on the footboard$ 8he train was going at a terrific .ace3 swaying to and fro as with the .assion of its s.eed% and the mighty wind of its .assage beat my hair about my face and tore at my garments$ Page !

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


=ntil this moment : had not thought of you3 or e,en seemed conscious of your .resence in the train$ &olding tightly on to the rail by the carriage door3 : began to cree. along the footboard towards the engine3 ho.ing to find a chance of dro..ing safely down on the line$ &and o,er hand : .assed along in this way from one carriage to another% and as : did so : saw by the light within each carriage that the .assengers had no idea of the fate u.on which they were being hurried$ At length3 in one of the com.artments3 : saw you$ (6ome outL( : cried% (come outL Sa,e yourselfL :n another minute we shall be dashed to .ieces L( You rose instantly3 wrenched o.en the door3 and stood beside me outside on the footboard$ 8he ra.idity at which we were going was now more fearful than e,er$ 8he train rocked as it fled onwards$ 8he wind shrieked as we were carried through it$ (>ea. down(3 : cried to you% (sa,e yourselfL :t is certain death to stay here$ -efore us is an abyss% and there is no one on the engineL( At this you turned your face full u.on me with a look of intense earnestness3 and said3 (No3 we will not lea. down$ We will sto. the train($ With these words you left me3 and cre.t along the footboard towards the front of the train$ +ull of halfangry an0iety at what seemed to me a Dui0otic act3 : followed$ [Page " ] :n one of the carriages we .assed : saw my mother and eldest brother3 unconscious as the rest$ Presently we reached the last carriage3 and saw by the lurid light of the furnace that the ,oice had s.oken truly3 and that there was no one on the engine$ You continued to mo,e onwards$ (:m.ossibleL :m.ossibleL( : cried% (it cannot be done$ 93 .ray3 come awayL( 8hen you knelt u.on the footboard3 and said3 I (You are right$ :t cannot be done in that way% but we can sa,e the train$ &el. me to get these irons asunder($ 8he engine was connected with the train by two great iron hooks and sta.les$ -y a tremendous effort3 in making which : almost lost my balance3 we unhooked the irons and detached the train% when3 with a mighty lea. as of some mad su.ernatural monster3 the engine s.ed on its way alone3 shooting back as it went a great flaming trail of s.arks3 and was lost in the darkness$ We stood together on the footboard3 watching in silence the gradual slackening of the s.eed$ When at length the train had come to a standstill3 we cried to the .assengers3 (Sa,ed L sa,ed L( and then amid the confusion of o.ening the doors and descending and eager talking3 my dream ended3 lea,ing me shattered and .al.itating with the horror of it$ >9ND9N3 )o . *+,-

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - $ - T(E ,ONDERF-. SPECTAC.ES


[+rom another letter to the friend mentioned in the note a..ended to the Doomed Train. 1AuthorGs Note5]
[Page "!]

: was walking alone on the sea-shore$ 8he day was singularly clear and sunny$ :nland lay the most beautiful landsca.e e,er seen% and far off were ranges of tall hills3 the highest .eaks of which were white with glittering snows$ Along the sands by the sea came towards me a man accoutred as a .ostman$ &e ga,e me a letter$ :t was from you$ :t ran thus' I (: ha,e got hold of the earliest and most .recious book e0tant$ :t was written before the world began$ 8he te0t is easy enough to read% but the notes3 which are ,ery co.ious and numerous3 are in such minute and obscure characters that : cannot make them out$ : want you to get for me the s.ectacles which Swedenborg used to wear% not the smaller .air I those he ga,e to &ans 6hristian Andersen I but the large .air3 and these seem to ha,e got mislaid$ : think they are S.inoJaEs make$ You know he was an o.tical-glass maker by .rofession3 and the best we ha,e e,er had$ See if you can get them for me$( When : looked u. after reading this letter3 : saw the .ostman hastening away across the sands3 and : cried out to him3 ( Sto. L how am : to send the answer K Will you not wait for it K( &e looked round3 sto..ed3 and came back to me$ (: ha,e the answer here3( he said3 ta..ing his letter-bag3 ( and : shall deli,er it immediately$(
[Page $#]

(&ow can you ha,e the answer before : ha,e written itK( : asked$ (You are making a mistake($ (No(3 he said$ (:n the city from which : come3 the re.lies are all written at the office3 and sent out with the letters themsel,es$ Your re.ly is in my bag($ (>et me see it(3 : said$ &e took another letter from his wallet and ga,e it to me$ : o.ened it3 and read3 in my own handwriting3 this answer3 addressed to you'I (8he s.ectacles you want can be bought in >ondon$ -ut you will not be able to use them at once3 for they ha,e not been worn for many years3 and they sadly want cleaning$ 8his you will not be able to do yourself in >ondon3 because it is too dark there to see well3 and because your fingers are not small enough to clean them .ro.erly$ -ring them here to me3 and : will do it for you$( : ga,e this letter back to the .ostman$ &e smiled and nodded at me% and : then .ercei,ed to my astonishment that he wore a camels-hair tunic round his waist$ : had been on the .oint of addressing him I : know not why I as .ermes$ -ut : now saw that he must be Mohn the -a.tist% and in my fright at Page C

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


ha,ing s.oken with so great a saint3 : awoke$[8he dreamer knew nothing of S.inoJa at this time3 and was Fuite unaware that he was an o.tician$ SubseFuent e0.erience made it clear that the s.ectacles in Fuestion were intended to re.resent her own remarkable faculty of intuitional and inter.reti,e .erce.tion 1)d5] >9ND9N3 /an. 0*# *+,,$ [Page $"]

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - % - T(E CO-NSE. OF PERFECT)ON


: dreamed that : was in a large room3 and there were in it se,en .ersons3 all men3 sitting at one long table% and each of them had before him a scroll3 some ha,ing books also% and all were grey-headed and bent with age sa,e one3 and this was a youth of about twenty without hair on his face$ 9ne of the aged men3 who had his finger on a .lace in a book o.en before him3 said' (8his s.irit3 who is of our order3 writes in this book3 I Be ye perfect3 therefore# as your 1ather in hea en is perfect$ &ow shall we understand this word perfection K( And another of the old men3 looking u.3 answered3 ( :t must mean wisdom3 for wisdom is the sum of .erfection$( And another old man said3 (8hat cannot be% for no creature can be wise as Bod is wise$ Where is he among us who could attain to such a state K 8hat which is .art only3 cannot com.rehend the whole$ 8o bid a creature to be wise as Bod is wise would be mockery$( 8hen a fourth old man said' I ( :t must be 8ruth that is intended$ +or truth only is .erfection$ (-ut he who sat ne0t the last s.eaker answered3 (8ruth also is .artial% for where is he among us who shall be able to see as Bod seesK( And the si0th said3 ( :t must surely be Mustice% for this is the whole of righteousness$( And the old man who had s.oken first3 answered him' I (Not so% for Hustice com.rehends ,engeance3 and it is written that ,engeance is the >ordEs alone$( [Page $$] 8hen the young man stood u. with an o.en book in his hand and said' I( : ha,e here another record of one who likewise heard these words$ >et us see whether his rendering of them can hel. us to the knowledge we seek$( And he found a .lace in the book and read aloud' I (-e ye merciful3 e,en as your +ather is merciful$( And all of them closed their books and fi0ed their eyes u.on me$ >9ND9N3 A.ril "3 !77

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - &- T(E C)T/ OF 0.OOD


: dreamed that : was wandering along a narrow street of ,ast length3 u.on either hand of which was an unbroken line of high straight houses3 their walls and doors resembling those of a .rison$ 8he atmos.here was dense and obscure3 and the time seemed that of twilight% in the narrow line of sky ,isible far o,erhead between the two rows of house-roofs3 : could not discern sun3 moon3 or stars3 or colour of any kind$ All was grey3 im.enetrable3 and dim$ =nder foot3 between the .a,ing-stones of the street3 grass was s.ringing$ Nowhere was the least sign of life' the .lace seemed utterly deserted$ : stood alone in the midst of .rofound silence and desolation$ Silence K NoL As : listened3 there came to my ears from all sides3 dully at first and almost im.erce.tibly3 a low cree.ing sound like subdued moaning% a sound that ne,er ceased3 and that was so nati,e to the .lace3 : had at first been unaware of it$ -ut now : clearly gathered in the sound and recognised it as e0.ressi,e of the intensest .hysical suffering$ >ooking [Page $%] steadfastly towards one of the houses from which the most distinct of these sounds issued3 : .ercei,ed a stream of blood slowly ooJing out from beneath the door and trickling down into the street3 staining the tufts of grass red here and there3 as it wound its way towards me$ : glanced u. and saw that the glass in the closed and barred windows of the house was flecked and s.lashed with the same horrible dye$ (Some one has been murdered in this .lace L( : cried3 and flew towards the door$ 8hen3 for the first time3 : .ercei,ed that the door had neither lock nor handle on the outside3 but could be o.ened only from within$ :t had3 indeed3 the form and a..earance of a door3 but in e,ery other res.ect it was solid and im.assable as the walls themsel,es$ :n ,ain : searched for bell or knocker3 or for some means of making entry into the house$ : found only a scroll fastened with nails u.on a crossbeam o,er the door3 and u.on it : read the words' I This is the (a!oratory of a &i isector$ As : read3 the wailing sound redoubled in intensity3 and a noise as of struggling made itself audible within3 as though some new ,ictim had been added to the first$ : beat madly against the door with my hands and shrieked for hel.% but in ,ain$ #y dress was reddened with the blood u.on the door ste.$ :n horror : looked down u.on it3 then turned and fled$ As : .assed along the street3 the sounds around me grew and gathered ,olume3 formulating themsel,es into distinct cries and bursts of frenJied sobbing$ =.on the door of e,ery house some scroll was attached3 similar to that : had already seen$ =.on one was inscribed' I (&ere is a husband murdering his wife'( u.on another' I (&ere is a mother beating her child to death'( u.on a third' (8his is a slaughter-house$(
[Page $&]

),ery door was im.assable% e,ery window was barred$ 8he idea of interference from without was futile$ 4ainly : lifted my ,oice and cried for aid$ 8he street was desolate as a gra,eyard% the only thing that mo,ed about me was the stealthy blood that came cree.ing out from beneath the doors of these awful dwellings$ Wild with horror : fled along the street3 seeking some outlet3 the cries and moans .ursuing me as : ran$ At length the street abru.tly ended in a high dead wall3 the to. of which was not discernible% it seemed3 indeed3 to be limitless in height$ =.on this wall was written in great black letters IThere is no "ay out$ 9,erwhelmed with des.air and anguish3 : fell u.on the stones of the street3 re.eating aloud I There is no "ay out$ &lN89N$ /an *+,, Page ?

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - *- T(E 0)RD AND T(E CAT
[8his dream and the ne0t occurred at a moment when it had almost been decided to rela0 the rule of .ri,acy until then obser,ed in regard to our .sychological e0.eriences3 among other ways3 by submitting them to some of the sa,ants of the Paris 1acult23 I a .roHect of which these dreams at once caused the abandonment$ 8his was not the only occasion on which a dream bore a twofold as.ect3 being a warning or a .rediction3 according to the heed gi,en to it$ 1)D$5] : dreamt that : had a beautiful bird in a cage3 and that the cage was .laced on a table in a room where there was a cat$ : took the bird out of the cage and .ut him on the table$ :nstantly the cat s.rang u.on [Page $*] him and seiJed him in her mouth$ : threw myself u.on her and stro,e to wrest away her .rey3 loading her with re.roaches and bewailing the fate of my beautiful bird$ 8hen suddenly some one said to me3 (You ha,e only yourself to blame for this misfortune$ While the bird remained in his cage he was safe$ Why should you ha,e E taken him out before the eyes of the cat K (

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - +- T(E TREAS-RE )N T(E .)1(TED (O-SE
A second time : dreamt3 and saw a house built in the midst of a forest$ :t was night3 and all the rooms of the house were brilliantly illuminated by lam.s$ -ut the strange thing was that the windows were without shutters3 and reached to the ground$ :n one of the rooms sat an old man counting money and Hewels on a table before him$ : stood in the s.irit beside him3 and .resently heard outside the windows a sound of footste.s and of menEs ,oices talking together in hushed tones$ 8hen a face .eered in at the lighted room3 and : became aware that there were many .ersons assembled without in the darkness3 watching the old man and his treasure$ &e also heard them3 and rose from his seat in alarm3 clutching his gold and gems and endea,ouring to hide them$ ( Who are they K ( : asked him$ &e answered3 his face white with terror% (8hey are robbers and assassins$ 8his forest is their haunt$ 8hey will murder me3 and seiJe my treasure($ (:f this be so(3 said :3 (why did you build your house in the midst of this forest3 and why are there no shutters to the windows K Are you mad3 or [Page $+] a fool3 that you do not know e,ery one can see from without into your lighted rooms K ( &e looked at me with stu.id des.air$ (: ne,er thought of the shutters(3 said he$ As we stood talking3 the robbers outside congregated in great numbers3 and the old man fled from the room with his treasure bags into another a.artment$ -ut this also was brilliantly illuminated within3 and the windows were shutterless$ 8he robbers followed his mo,ements easily3 and so .ursued him from room to room all round the house$ Nowhere had he any shelter$ 8hen came the sound of gouge and mallet and saw3 and : knew the assassins were breaking into the house3 and that before long3 the owner would ha,e met the death his folly had in,ited3 and his treasure would .ass into the hands of the robbers$ PA2:S3 August 0# *+,,$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - 7 - T(E FOREST CAT(EDRA.


: found myself I accom.anied by a guide3 a young man of 9riental as.ect and habit I .assing through long ,istas of trees which3 as we ad,anced3 continually changed in character$ 8hus we threaded a,enues of )nglish oaks and elms3 the foliage of which ga,e way as we .roceeded to that of warmer and moister climes3 and we saw o,erhead the hanging masses of broad-lea,ed .alms3 and enormous trees whose names : do not know3 s.reading their fingered lea,es o,er us like great green hands in a manner that frightened me$ &ere also : saw [Page $7] huge grasses which rose o,er my shoulders3 and through which : had at times to beat my way as through a sea% and ferns of colossal .ro.ortions% with e,ery .ossible ,ariety and mode of tree-life and e,ery concei,able shade of green3 from the faintest and clearest yellow to the densest blue-green$ 9ne wood in .articular : sto..ed to admire$ :t seemed as though e,ery leaf of its trees were of gold3 so intensely yellow was the tint of the foliage$ :n these forests and thickets were numerous shrines of gods such as the &indus worshi.$ ),ery now and then we came u.on them in o.en s.aces$ 8hey were uncouth and rudely .ainted% but they all were .rofusely adorned with gems3 chiefly turFuoises3 and they all had many arms and hands3 in which they held lotus flowers3 s.rays of .alms3 and coloured berries$ Passing by these strange figures3 we came to a darker .art of our course3 where the character of the trees changed and the air felt colder$ : .ercei,ed that a shadow had fallen on the way% and looking u.wards : found we were .assing beneath a massi,e roof of dark indigo-coloured .ines3 which here and there were .ositi,ely black in their intensity and de.th$ :ntermingled with them were firs3 whose great3 straight stems were co,ered with lichen and mosses of beautiful ,ariety3 and some looking strangely like green ice-crystals$ Presently we came to a little broken-down rude kind of cha.el in the midst of the wood$ :t was built of stone% and masses of stone3 sha.eless and moss-grown3 were lying scattered about on the ground around it$ At a little rough-hewn altar within it stood a 6hristian .riest3 blessing the elements$ 9,erhead3 the great dark s.rays of the larches and cone-laden firs swe.t its roof$ [Page $ ] : sat down to rest on one of the stones3 and looked u.wards a while at the foliage$ 8hen turning my gaJe again towards the earth3 : saw a ,ast circle of stones3 moss-grown like that on which : sat3 and ranged in a circle such as that of Stonehenge$ :t occu.ied an o.en s.ace in the midst of the forest% and the grasses and climbing .lants of the .lace had fastened on the cre,ices of the stones$ 9ne stone3 larger and taller than the rest3 stood at the Hunction of the circle3 in a .lace of honour3 as though it had stood for a symbol of di,inity$ : looked at my guide3 and said3 (&ere3 at least3 is an idol whose semblance belongs to another ty.e than that of the &indus$( &e smiled3 and turning from me to the 6hristian .riest at the altar3 said aloud3 (Priest3 why do your .eo.le recei,e from sacerdotal hands the bread only3 while you yoursel,es recei,e both bread and wineK( And the .riest answered3 (We recei,e no more than they$ Yes3 though under another form3 the .eo.le are .artakers with us of the sacred wine with its .article$ 8he blood is the life of the flesh3 and of it the flesh is formed3 and without it the flesh could not consist$ 8he communion is the same($ 8hen the young man my guide turned again to me and wa,ed his hand towards the stone before me$ And Page A

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


as : looked the stone o.ened from its summit to its base% and : saw that the strata within had the form of a tree' and that e,ery minute crystal of which it was formed3 I .articles so fine that grains of sand would ha,e been coarse in com.arison with them3 I and e,ery atom com.osing its mass3 were stam.ed with this same tree-image3 and bore the sha.e of the ice-crystals3 of the ferns and of the colossal .alm-lea,es : had seen$ And my guide [Page $!] said3 (-efore these stones were3 the 8ree of >ife stood in the midst of the =ni,erse($ And again we .assed on3 lea,ing behind us the cha.el and the circle of stones3 the .ines and the firs' and as we went the foliage around us grew more and more stunted and like that at home$ We tra,elled Fuickly% but now and then3 through breaks and o.enings in the woods3 : saw solitary oaks standing in the midst of green s.aces3 and beneath them kings gi,ing Hudgment to their .eo.les3 and magistrates administering laws$ At last we came to a forest of trees so enormous that they made me tremble3 to look at them$ 8he hugeness of their stems ga,e them an unearthly a..earance% for they rose hundreds of feet from the ground before they burst out far3 far abo,e us3 into colossal masses of ,ast-lea,ed foliage$ : cannot sufficiently con,ey the im.ressions of awe with which the sight of these monster trees ins.ired me$ 8here seemed to me something .itiless and .hantom-like in the se,erity of their enormous bare trunks3 stretching on without break or branch into the distance o,erhead3 and there at length gi,ing birth to a sea of dark wa,ing .lumes3 the rustle of which reached my ears as the sound of tossing wa,es$ Passing beneath these ,ast trees we came to others of smaller growth3 but still of the same ty.e3 I straight-stemmed3 with branching foliage at their summit$ &ere we stood to rest3 and as we .aused : became aware that the trees around me were losing their colour3 and turning by im.erce.tible degrees into stone$ :n nothing was their form or .osition altered% only a cold3 grey hue o,ers.read them3 and the inter,ening s.aces between their stems became filled u.3 as though by a cloud which gradually grew substantial$ Presently : raised my eyes3 [Page %#] and lo L o,erhead were the arches of a ,ast cathedral3 s.anning the sky and hiding it from my sight$ 8he tree stems had become tall columns of grey stone% and their .lumed to.s3 the car,en architra,es and branching s.ines of Bothic scul.ture$ 8he incense rolled in great dense clouds to their outstretching arms3 and3 breaking against them3 hung in floating3 fragrant wreaths about their car,en s.rays$ >ooking downwards to the altar3 : found it co,ered with flowers and .lants and garlands3 in the midst of which stood a great golden crucifi03 and : turned to my guide wishing to Fuestion him3 but he had disa..eared3 and : could not find him$ 8hen a ,ast crowd of worshi..ers surrounded me3 a .riest before the altar raised the .y0 and the .atten in his hands$ 8he .eo.le fell on their knees3 and bent their heads3 as a great field of corn o,er which a strong wind .asses$ : knelt with the rest3 and adored with them in silence$ PA2:S3 /uly *+,,

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - - T(E ENC(ANTED ,O'AN


[9n the night .re,ious to this dream3 #rs Kingsford was awoke by a bright light3 and beheld a hand holding out towards her a glass of foaming ale3 the action being accom.anied by the words3 s.oken with strong em.hasis3 3ou must drin% this$ :t was not her usual be,erage3 but she occasionally yielded to .ressure and took it when at home$ :n conseFuence of the abo,e .rohibition she abstained for that day3 and on the following night recei,ed this ,ision3 in order to fit her for which the .rohibition had a..arently been im.osed$ :t was originally entitled a &ision of the World4s 1all# on the su..osition that it re.resented the loss of the :ntuition3 mystically called the 1all of the Woman# through the sorceries of .riestcraft$ 1)d5] 8he first consciousness which broke my slee. last night was one of floating3 of being carried swiftly by some in,isible force through a ,ast s.ace% then3 of being gently lowered% then of light3 until3 gradually3 : found myself on [Page %"] my feet in a broad noon-day brightness3 and before me an o.en country$ &ills3 hills3 as far as the eye could reach3 I hills with snow on their to.s3 and mists around their gorges$ 8his was the first thing : saw distinctly$ 8hen3 casting my eyes towards the ground3 : .ercei,ed that all about me lay huge masses of grey material which3 at first3 : took for blocks of stone3 ha,ing the form of lions% but as : looked at them more intently3 my sight grew clearer3 and : saw3 to my horror3 that they were really ali,e$ A .anic seiJed me3 and : tried to runaway% but on turning3 : became suddenly aware that the whole country was filled with these awful sha.es% and the faces of those nearest to me were most dreadful3 for their eyes3 and something in the e0.ression3 though not in the form3 of their faces3 were human$ : was absolutely alone in a terrible world .eo.led with lions3 too3 of a monstrous kind$ 2eco,ering myself with an effort3 : resumed my flight3 but3 as : .assed through the midst of this concourse of monsters3 it suddenly struck me that they were .erfectly unconscious of my .resence$ : e,en laid my hands3 in .assing3 on the heads and manes of se,eral3 but they ga,e no sign of seeing me or of knowing that : touched them$ At last : gained the threshold of a great .a,ilion3 not3 a..arently3 built by hands3 but formed by Nature$ 8he walls were solid3 yet they were com.osed of huge trees standing close together3 like columns% and [Page %$] the roof of the .a,ilion was formed by their massi,e foliage3 through which not a ray of outer light .enetrated$ Such light as there was seemed nebulous3 and a..eared to rise out of the ground$ :n the centre of this .a,ilion : stood alone3 ha..y to ha,e got clear away from those terrible beasts and the gaJe of their steadfast eyes$ As : stood there3 : became conscious of the fact that the nebulous light of the .lace was concentrating itself into a focus on the columned wall o..osite to me$ :t grew there3 became intenser3 and then s.read3 re,ealing3 as it s.read3 a series of mo,ing .ictures that a..eared to be scenes actually enacted before me$ +or the figures in the .ictures were li,ing3 and they mo,ed before my eyes3 though : heard neither word nor sound$ And this is what : saw$ +irst there came a writing on the wall of the .a,ilion' IThis is the .istory of our World$ 8hese words3 as : looked at them3 a..eared to sink into the wall as they had risen out of it3 and to yield .lace to the .ictures which then began to come out in succession3 dimly at first3 then strong and clear as actual scenes$ +irst : beheld a beautiful woman3 with the sweetest face and most .erfect form concei,able$ She was dwelling in a ca,e among the hills with her husband3 and he3 too3 was beautiful3 more like an angel than a man$ 8hey seemed .erfectly ha..y together% and their dwelling was like Paradise$ 9n e,ery side was beauty3 sunlight3 and re.ose$ 8his .icture sank into the wall as the writing had done$ And then came out another% the same man and woman dri,ing together in a sleigh drawn by reindeer o,er fields of ice% with all about them glaciers and snow3 and great mountains ,eiled in wreaths of [Page %%] slowly mo,ing mist$ Page !

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


8he sleigh went at a ra.id .ace3 and its occu.ants talked gaily to each other3 so far as : could Hudge by their smiles and the mo,ement of their li.s$ -ut3 what caused me much sur.rise was that they carried between them3 and actually in their hands3 a glowing flame3 the fer,our of which : felt reflected from the .icture u.on my own cheeks$ 8he ice around shone with its brightness$ 8he mists u.on the snow mountains caught its gleam$ Yet3 strong as were its light and heat3 neither the man nor the woman seemed to be burned or daJJled by it$ 8his .icture3 too3 the beauty and brilliancy of which greatly im.ressed me3 sank and disa..eared as the former$ Ne0t3 : saw a terrible looking man clad in an enchanterEs robe3 standing alone u.on an ice-crag$ :n the air abo,e him3 .oised like a dragon-fly3 was an e,il s.irit3 ha,ing a head and face like that of a human being$ 8he rest of it resembled the tail of a comet3 and seemed made of a green fire3 which flickered in and out as though swayed by a wind$ And as : looked3 suddenly3 through an o.ening among the hills3 : saw the sleigh .ass3 carrying the beautiful woman and her husband% and in the same instant the enchanter also saw it3 and his face contracted3 and the e,il s.irit lowered itself and came between me and him$ 8hen this .icture sank and ,anished$ : ne0t beheld the same ca,e in the mountains which : had before seen3 and the beautiful cou.le together in it$ 8hen a shadow darkened the door of the ca,e% and the enchanter was there3 asking admittance% cheerfully they bade3 him enter3 and3 as he came forward with his snake-like eyes fi0ed on the fair woman3 : understood that he wished to ha,e her for his own3 and was e,en then de,ising [Page %&] how to bear her away$ And the s.irit in the air beside him seemed busy suggesting schemes to this end$ 8hen this .icture melted and became confused3 gi,ing .lace for but a brief moment to another3 in which : saw the enchanter carrying the woman away in his arms3 she struggling and lamenting3 her long bright hair streaming behind her$ 8his scene .assed from the wall as though a wind had swe.t o,er it3 and there rose u. in its .lace a .icture3 which im.ressed me with a more ,i,id sense of reality than all the rest$ :t re.resented a market .lace3 in the midst of which was a .ile of faggots and a stake3 such as were used formerly for the burning of heretics and witches$ 8he market .lace3 round which were rows of seats as though for a concourse of s.ectators3 yet a..eared Fuite deserted$ : saw only three li,ing beings .resent3 I the beautiful woman3 the enchanter3 and the e,il s.irit$ Ne,ertheless3 : thought that the seats were really occu.ied by in,isible tenants3 for e,ery now and then there seemed to be a stir in the atmos.here as of a great multitude% and : had3 moreo,er3 a strange sense of facing many witnesses$ 8he enchanter led the woman to the stake3 fastened her there with iron chains3 lit the faggots about her feet and withdrew to a short distance3 where he stood with his arms folded3 looking on as the flames rose about her$ : understood that she had refused his lo,e3 and that in his fury he had denounced her as a sorceress$ 8hen in the fire3 abo,e the .ile3 : saw the e,il s.irit .oising itself like a fly3 and rising and sinking and fluttering in the thick smoke$ While : wondered what this meant3 the flames which had concealed the beautiful woman3 .arted in their midst3 and disclosed a sight so horrible and une0.ected as to thrill me from [Page %*] head to foot3 and curdle my blood$ 6hained to the stake there stood3 not the fair woman : had seen there a moment before3 but a hideous monster3 I a woman still3 but a woman with three heads3 and three bodies linked in one$ )ach of her long arms ended3 not in a hand3 but in a claw like that of a bird of ra.ine$ &er hair resembled the locks of the classic #edusa3 and her faces were ine0.ressibly loathsome$ She seemed3 with all her dreadful heads and limbs3 to writhe in the flames and yet not to be consumed by them$ She gathered them in to herself% her claws caught them and drew them down% her tri.le body a..eared to suck the fire into itself3 as though a blast dro,e it$ 8he sight a..alled me$ : co,ered my face and dared look no more$ Page "

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


When at length : again turned my eyes u.on the wall3 the .icture that had so terrified me was gone3 and instead of it3 : saw the enchanter flying through the world3 .ursued by the e,il s.irit and that dreadful woman$ 8hrough all the world they seemed to go$ 8he scenes changed with mar,ellous ra.idity$ Now the .icture glowed with the wealth and gorgeousness of the torrid Jone% now the ice-fields of the North rose into ,iew% anon a .ine-forest% then a wild sea-shore% but always the same three flying figures% always the horrible three-formed har.y .ursuing the enchanter3 and beside her the e,il s.irit with the dragon-fly wings$ At last this succession of images ceased3 and : beheld a desolate region3 in the midst of which sat the woman with the enchanter beside her3 his head re.osing in her la.$ )ither the sight of her must ha,e become familiar to him and3 so3 less horrible3 or she had subHugated him by some s.ell$ At all e,ents3 they were mated at last3 and their offs.ring lay around them on the stony ground3 [Page %+] or mo,ed to and fro$ 8hese were lions3 I monsters with human faces3 such as : had seen in the beginning of my dream$ 8heir Haws dri..ed blood% they .aced backwards and forwards3 lashing their tails$ 8hen too3 this .icture faded and sank into the wall as the others had done$ And through its melting outlines came out again the words : had first seen' I This is the .istory of our World3 only they seemed to me in some way changed3 but how3 : cannot tell$ 8he horror of the whole thing was too strong u.on me to let me dare look longer at the wall$ And : awoke3 re.eating to myself the Fuestion3 ( &ow could one woman become three K ( &:N89N3 1e!ruary *+,,$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - ! - T(E 0AN2-ET OF T(E 1ODS


: saw in my slee. a great table s.read u.on a beautiful mountain3 the distant .eaks of which were co,ered with snow3 and brilliant with a bright light$ Around the table reclined twel,e .ersons3 si0 male3 si0 female3 some of whom : recognised at once3 the others afterwards$ 8hose whom : recognised at once were Neus3 &era3 Pallas Athena3 Phoebus A.ollo3 and Artemis$ : knew them by the symbols they wore$ 8he table was co,ered with all kinds of fruit3 of great siJe3 including nuts3 almonds3 and oli,es3 with flat cakes of bread3 and cu.s of gold into which3 before drinking3 each di,inity .oured two sorts of liFuid3 one of which was wine3 the other water$ As : was looking on3 standing on a ste. a little below the to. of the flight which led to the table3 : was startled by seeing &era suddenly fi0 her eyes on me and say3 [Page %7] ( What seest thou at the lower end of the table K( And : looked and answered3 (: see two ,acant seats($ 8hen she s.oke again and said3 ( When you are able to eat of our food and to drink of our cu.3 you also shall sit and feast with us$( Scarcely had she uttered these words3 when Athena3 who sat facing me3 added3 (When you are able to eat of our food and to drink of our cu.3 then you shall know as you are known($ And immediately Artemis3 whom : knew by the moon u.on her head3 continued3 ( When you are able to eat of our food and to drink of our cu.3 all things shall become .ure to you3 and ye shall be made ,irgins$( 8hen : said3 (9 :mmortals3 what is your food and your drink3 and how does your banFuet differ from ours3 seeing that we also eat no flesh3 and blood has no .lace in our re.asts K ( 8hen one of the Bods3 whom at the time : did not know3 but ha,e since recognised as &ermes3 rose from the table3 and coming to me .ut into my hands a branch of a fig-tree bearing u.on it ri.e fruit3 and said3 (:f you would be .erfect3 and able to know and to do all things3 Fuit the heresy of Prometheus$ >et fire warm and comfort you e0ternally' it is hea,enEs gift$ -ut do not wrest it from its rightful .ur.ose3 as did that betrayer of your race3 to fill the ,eins of humanity with its contagion3 and to consume your interior being with its breath$ All of you are men of clay3 as was the image which Prometheus made$ Ye are nourished with stolen fire3 and it consumes you$ 9f all the e,il uses of hea,enEs good gifts3 none is so e,il as the internal use of fire$ +or your hot foods and drinks ha,e consumed and dried u. the magnetic .ower of your ner,es3 sealed your senses3 and cut short your li,es$ Now3 you neither see nor hear% [Page % ] for the fire in your organs consumes your senses$ Ye are all blind and deaf3 creatures of clay$ We ha,e sent you a book to read$ Practise its .rece.ts3 and your senses shall be o.ened$( 8hen3 not yet recognising him3 : said3 (8ell me your name3 >ord$( At this he laughed and answered3 (: ha,e been about you from the beginning$ : am the white cloud on the noon-day sky($ (Do you3 then(3 : asked3 (desire the whole world to abandon the use of fire in .re.aring food and drink K ( :nstead of answering my Fuestion3 he said3 (We show you the e0cellent way$ 8wo .laces only are ,acant at our table$ We ha,e told you all that can be shown you on the le,el on which yo= stand$ -ut our .erfect gifts3 the fruits of the 8ree of >ife3 are beyond your reach now$ We cannot gi,e them to you until you are .urified and ha,e come u. higher$ 8he conditions are B9DES% the will is with you$( 8hese last words seemed to be re.eated from the sky o,erhead3 and again from beneath my feet$ And at the instant : fell3 as if shot down like a meteor from a ,ast height% and with the swiftness and shock of the Page <

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


fall : awoke$ &:N89N3 Se.t$ !77$ [8he book referred to was a ,olume entitled 1ruit and Bread3 which had been sent anonymously on the .re,ious morning$ 8he fig-tree3 which both with the &ebrews and the Breeks was the ty.e of intuitional .erce.tion3 was a s.ecial symbol of &ermes3 called by the &ebrews 2a.hael$ 8he .lural used by the seer included myself as the .artner of her literary and other studies$ 8he term ,irgin in its mystical sense signifies a soul .ure from admi0ture of matter$ )ditor] [Page %!]

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - "# - T(E D)FF)C-.T PAT(


&a,ing fallen aslee. last night while in a state of great .er.le0ity about the care and education of my daughter3 : dreamt as follows$ : was walking with the child along the border of a high cliff3 at the foot of which was the sea$ 8he .ath was e0ceedingly narrow3 and on the inner side was flanked by a line of rocks and stones$ 8he outer side was so close to the edge of the cliff that she was com.elled to walk either before or behind me3 or else on the stones$ And3 as it was unsafe to let go her hand3 it was on the stones that she had to walk3 much to her distress$ : was in male attire3 and carried a staff in my hand$ She wore skirts and had no staff% and e,ery moment she stumbled or her dress caught and was torn by some Hutting crag or bramble$ :n this way our .rogress was being continually interru.ted and rendered almost im.ossible3 when suddenly we came u.on a shar. decli,ity leading to a stee. .ath which wound down the side of the .reci.ice to the beach below$ >ooking down3 : saw on the shore beneath the cliff a collection of fishermenEs huts3 and grou.s of men and women on the shingle3 mending nets3 hauling u. boats3 and sorting fish of ,arious kinds$ :n the midst of the little ,illage stood a great crucifi0 of lead3 so cast in a mould as to allow me from the ele,ated .osition : occu.ied behind it3 to see that though in front it looked solid3 it was in reality hollow$ As : was noting this3 a ,oice of some one close at hand suddenly addressed me% and on turning my head : found [Page &#] standing before me a man in the garb of a fisherman3 who e,idently had Hust scaled the stee. .ath leading from the beach$ &e stretched out his hand to take the child3 saying he had come to fetch her3 for that in the .ath : was following there was room only for one$ (>et her come to us(3 he added% (she will do ,ery well as a fishermanEs daughter($ -eing reluctant to .art with her3 and not .ercei,ing then the significance of his garb and ,ocation3 : obHected that the calling was a dirty and unsa,oury one3 and would soil her hands and dress$ Whereu.on the man became se,ere3 and seemed to insist with a kind of authority u.on my acce.tance of his .ro.osition$ 8he child3 too3 was taken with him3 and was moreo,er an0ious to lea,e the rough and dangerous .ath% and she accordingly went to him of her own will and3 .lacing her hand in his3 left me without any sign of regret3 and : went on my way alone$ 8hen lifting my eyes to see whither my .ath led3 : beheld it winding along the edge of the cliff to an a..arently endless distance3 until3 as : gaJed steadily on the e0treme limit of my ,iew3 : saw the grey mist from the sea here and there break and roll u. into great masses of slow-drifting cloud3 in the inter,als of which : caught the white gleam of sunlit snow$ And these inter,als continually closed u. to o.en again in fresh .laces higher u.3 disclosing .eak u.on .eak of a range of mountains of enormous altitude$[Always the symbol of high mystical insight and s.iritual attainment OP/ -iblically called the .ill of the (ord and 5ount of $od 1)d5] -y a curious coincidence3 the ,ery morning after this dream3 a friend3 who knew of my .er.le0ity3 called to [Page &"] recommend a school in a certain con,ent as one suitable for my child$ 8here were3 howe,er3 insu.erable obHections to the scheme$ PA2:S3 )o . 0# *+,,

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - "" - A .)ON )N T(E ,A/


9wing to the many and great difficulties thrown in my way3 : had been seriously considering the ad,isability of withdrawing3 if only for a time3 from my course of medical studies3 when : recei,ed the following dream3 which determined me to .erse,ere' OP/ : found myself on the same narrow3 rugged3 and .reci.itous .ath described in my last dream3 and confronted by a lion$ Afraid to .ass him : turned and fled$ 9n this the beast ga,e chase3 when finding esca.e by flight ho.eless3 : turned and boldly faced him$ Whereu.on the lion at once sto..ed and slunk to the side of the .ath3 and suffered me to .ass unmolested3 though : was so close to him that : could not a,oid touching him with my garments in .assing$ [8he .rognostic was fully Hustified by the e,ent$ 1)d5] Paris3 No, ;3 *+,,

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - "$ - A DREA' OF D)SE'0OD)'ENT


: dreamt that : was dead3 and wanted to take form and a..ear to 63 in order to con,erse with him$ And it was suggested by those about me OP/ s.irits like myself3 : su..ose OP/ that : might materialiJe myself through [Page &$] the medium of some man whom they indicated to me$ 6oming to the .lace where he was3 : was directed to throw myself out forward towards him by an intense concentration of will% which : accordingly tried to do3 but without success3 though the effort : made was enormous$ : can only com.are it to the attem.t made by a .erson unable to swim3 to fling himself off a .latform into dee. water$ Do all : would3 : could not gather myself u. for it% and although encouraged and stimulated3 and assured : had only to let myself go3 my attem.ts were ineffectual$ ),en when : had sufficiently collected and .re.ared myself in one .art of my system3 the other .art failed me$ At length it was suggested to me that : should find it easier if : first took on me the form of the medium$ 8his : at length succeeded in doing3 and3 to my annoyance3 so com.letely that : materialiJed myself into the sha.e not only of his features3 but of his clothing also$ 8he effort reFuisite for this e0hausted me to the utmost3 so that : was unable to kee. u. the a..arition for more than a few minutes3 when : had no choice but to yield to the strain and let myself go again3 only in the o..osite way$ So : went out3 and mounted like a sudden flame3 and saw myself for a moment like a thin streak of white mist rising in the air% while the comfort and relief : e0.erienced by regaining my light s.irit-condition3 were indescribable$ :t was because : had3 for want of skill3 de-materialiJed myself without sufficient deliberation3 that : had thus ra.idly mounted in the air$ After an inter,al : dreamt that3 wishing to see what A would do in case : a..eared to him after my death3 : went to him as a s.irit and called him by his name$ =.on hearing my ,oice he rose and went to the window [Page &%] and looked out uneasily$ 9n my going close to him and s.eaking in his ear3 he was much disturbed3 and ran his hand through his hair and rubbed his head in a .uJJled and by no means .leased manner$ At the third attem.t to attract his attention he rushed to the door and3 calling for a glass3 .oured out some wine3 which he drank$ 9n seeing this3 and finding him inaccessible3 : desisted3 thinking it must often ha..en to the de.arted to be distressed by the inability or unwillingness of those they lo,e to recei,e and recogniJe them$ Paris /an *+,+

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - "% - T(E PERFECT ,A/ ,)T( AN)'A.S
: saw in my slee. a cart-horse who3 coming to me3 con,ersed with me in what seemed a .erfectly sim.le and natural manner3 for it caused me no sur.rise that he should s.eak$ And this is what he said' OP/ Kindness to animals of the gentler orders is the ,ery foundation of ci,iliJation$ +or it is the cruelty and harshness of men towards the animals under their .rotection which is the cause of the .resent low standard of humanity itself$ -rutal usage creates brutes% and the ranks of mankind are constantly recruited from s.irits already hardened and de.ra,ed by a long course of ill-treatment$ Nothing de,elo.s the s.irit as much as sym.athy$ Nothing culti,ates3 refines3 and aids it in its .rogress towards .erfection so much as kind and gentle treatment$ 9n the contrary3 the brutal usage and want of sym.athy with which we meet at the hands of men3 [Page &&] stunt our de,elo.ment and re,erse all the currents of our nature$ We grow coarse with coarseness3 ,ile with re,iling3 and brutal with the brutality of those who surround us$ And when we .ass out of this stage we enter on the ne0t de.ra,ed and hardened3 and with the bent of our dis.ositions such that we are ready by our nature to do in our turn that which has been done to us$ 8he greater number of us3 indeed know no other or better way$ +or the s.irit learns by e0.erience and imitation3 and inclines necessarily to do those things which it has been in the habit of seeing done$ &umanity will ne,er become .erfected until this doctrine is understood and recei,ed and made the rule of conduct$/ Paris3 9ctober <!3 !7"

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - "& - T(E .A0ORATOR/ -NDER1RO-ND


: dreamed that : found myself underground in a ,ault artificially lighted$ 8ables were ranged along the walls of the ,ault3 and u.on these tables were bound down the li,ing bodies of half-dissected and mutilated animals$ Scientific e0.erts were busy at work on their ,ictims with scal.el3 hot iron and force.s$ -ut3 as : looked at the creatures lying bound before them3 they no longer a..eared to be mere rabbits3 or hounds3 for in each : saw a human sha.e3 the sha.e of a man3 with limbs and lineaments resembling those of their torturers3 hidden within the outward form$ And when they led into the .lace an old worn-out horse3 cri..led with age and long [Page &*] toil in the ser,ice of man3 and bound him down3 and lacerated his flesh with their kni,es3 : saw the human form within him stir and writhe as though it were an unborn babe mo,ing in its motherGs womb$ And : cried aloud OP/ *WretchesL you are tormenting an unborn manL/ -ut they heard not3 nor could they see what : saw$ 8hen they brought in a white rabbit3 and thrust its eyes through with heated irons$ And as : gaJed3 the rabbit seemed to me like a tiny infant3 with human face3 and hands which stretched themsel,es towards me in a..eal3 and li.s which sought to cry for hel. in human accents$ And : could bear no more3 but broke forth into a bitter rain of tears3 e0claiming - *9 blindL blind/ not to see that you torture a child3 the youngest of your own flesh and bloodL/ And with that : woke3 sobbing ,ehemently$ Paris3 1e!ruary 6# *++7

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - "* - T(E O.D /O-N1 'AN
: dreamed that : was in 2ome with 6$3 and a friend of his called on us there3 and asked lea,e to introduce to us a young man3 a student of art3 whose history and condition were singular$ 8hey came together in the e,ening$ :n the room where we sat was a kind of tele.honic tube3 through which3 at inter,als3 a ,oice s.oke to me$ When the young man entered3 these words were s.oken in my ear through the tube' OP/ You ha,e made a good many diagnoses lately of [Page &+] cases of .hysical disease% here is a curious and interesting ty.e of s.iritual .athology3 the like of which is rarely met with$ Duestion this young man$/ Accordingly : did so3 and drew from him that about a year ago he had been seriously ill of 2oman fe,er% but as he hesitated3 and seemed unwilling to s.eak on the subHect3 : Fuestioned the friend$ +rom him : learnt that the young man had formerly been a ,ery .roficient .u.il in one of the best-known studios in 2ome3 but that a year ago he had suffered from a most terrible attack of malaria3 in conseFuence of his remaining in 2ome to work after others had found it necessary to go into the country3 and that the malady had so affected the ner,ous system that since his reco,ery he had been wholly unlike his former self$ &is great a.titude for artistic work3 from which so much had been e0.ected3 seemed to ha,e entirely left him% he was no longer master of his .encil% his former faculty and .romise of e0cellence had ,anished$ 8he .hysician who had attended him during his illness affirmed that all this was readily accounted for by the assum.tion that the malaria had affected the cerebral centers3 and in .articular3 the ner,e-cells of the memory% that such conseFuences of se,ere continuous fe,er were by no means uncommon3 and might last for an indefinite .eriod$ #eanwhile the young man was now3 by slow and .ainful a..lication3 doing his utmost to reco,er his lost .ower and skill$ Naturally the subHect was distasteful to him3 and he shrank from discussing it$ &ere the ,oice again s.oke to me through the tube3 telling me to obser,e the young man3 and es.ecially his face$ 9n this : scanned his countenance with attention3 and remarked that it wore a singularly old look3 OP/ the look of a man ad,anced in years and [Page &7] e0.erience$ -ut that : surmised to be a not unusual effect of se,ere fe,er$ &ow old do you su..ose the .atient to beK/ asked the interrogati,e ,oice$ About twenty years old3 : su..ose/ said :$ &e is a year old3/ reHoined the ,oice$ A yearL &ow can that beK/ :f you will not allow that he is only a year old3 then you must admit that he is si0ty-fi,e3 for he is certainly either one or the other$/ 8his enigma so .er.le0ed me3 that : begged my in,isible informant for the solution of the difficulty3 which was at once ,ouchsafed in the following terms' OP/ Page <!

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


&ere is the history of your .atient$ 8he youth who was the .roficient and gifted student3 who astonished his masters3 and ga,e such brilliant indications of future greatness3 is dead$ 8he malaria killed him$ -ut he had a father3 who3 while ali,e3 had lo,ed his son as the a..le of his eye3 and whose whole being and desire centered in the boy$ 8his father died some si0 years ago3 about the age of si0ty$ After his death his de,otion to the youth continued3 and as a spirit3 he followed him e,erywhere3 ne,er Fuitting his side$ So entirely was he absorbed in the lad and in his career3 that he made no ad,ance in his own s.iritual life3 nor3 indeed was he fully aware of the fact that he had himself Fuitted the earthly .lane$ +or there are souls which3 ha,ing been obtuse and dull in their a..rehension of s.iritual things during their e0istence in the flesh3 and ha,ing neither ho.es not aims beyond the body3 are ,ery slow to realiJe the fact of their dissolution3 and remain3 therefore3 chained to the earth by earthly affections and interests3 haunting the .laces or .ersons they ha,e most affected$ [Page & ] -ut the young artist was not of this order$ :dealist and genius3 he was already highly s.iritualiJed and ,italiJed e,en u.on earth3 and when death rent the bond between him and his body3 he .assed at once from the atmos.here of carnal things into a loftier s.here$ -ut at the moment of his death3 the .hantom father was watching beside the sonGs sick-bed3 and filled with agony at beholding the wreck of all the brilliant ho.es he had cherished for the boy3 thought only of .reser,ing the .hysical life of that dear body3 since the death of the outward form was still for him the death of all he had lo,ed$ &e would cling to it3 .reser,e it3 re-animate it at any cost$ 8he s.irit had Fuitted it% it lay before him a cor.se$ What3 then did the father doK With a su.reme effort of desire3 ineffectual indeed to recall the de.arted ghost3 but .otent in its reaction u.on himself3 he .roHected his own ,itality into his sonGs dead body3 re-animated it with his own soul3 and thus effected the resuscitation for which he had so ardently longed$ So the body you now behold is3 indeed3 the sonGs body3 the soul which animates it is that of the father$ And it is a year since this e,ent occurred$ Such is the real solution of the .roblem3 whose natural effects the .hysician attributes to the result of disease$ 8he s.irit which now tenants this young manGs form had no knowledge of art when he was so strangely reborn into the world3 beyond the mere rudiments of drawing which he had learned while watching his son at work during the .re,ious si0 years$ What3 therefore seems to the .hysician to be a .ainful reco,ery of .re,ious a.titude3 is3 in fact the im.erfect endea,our of a no,ice entering a new and unsuitable career$ +or the father the e0.erience is by no means an un.rofitable one$ &e would certainly sooner or later3 ha,e [Page &!] resumed e0istence u.on earth in the flesh3 and it is as well that his return should be under the actual circumstances$ 8he study of art u.on which he has thus entered is likely to .ro,e to him an e0cellent means of s.iritual education$ -y means of it his soul may ascend as it has ne,er yet done% while the habits of the body he now .ossesses3 trained as it is to refined and gentle modes of life3 may do much to accom.lish the .urgation and redem.tion of its new tenant3 :t is far better for the father that this strange e,ent should ha,e occurred3 than that he should ha,e remained an earth-bound .hantom3 unable to realiJe his own .osition3 or to rise abo,e the affection which chained him to merely worldly things$/ PA2:S3 1e!ruary 6*# *++7

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - "+ - T(E 'ETE'PS/C(OS)S


: was ,isited last night in my sleet by one whom : .resently recogniJed as the famous Ade.t and #ystic of the first century of our era3 A.ollonius of 8yana3 called the Pagan Christ$ &e was clad in a grey linen robe with a hood3 like that of a monk3 and had a smooth3 beardless face3 and seemed to be between forty and fifty years of age$ &e made himself known to me by asking if : had heard of his lion$ [8his was a tame ca.ti,e lion3 in whom A.ollonius is said to ha,e recogniJed the soul of the )gy.tian King Amasis3 who had li,ed ;CC years .re,iously$ 8he lion burst into tears at the recognition3 and showed much misery$ 1AuthorGs Note$5 ] &e commenced by s.eaking of #etem.sychosis3 concerning which he informed [Page *#] me as follows' OP/ *8here are two streams or currents3 and u.ward and a downward one3 by which souls are continually .assing and re.assing as on a ladder$ 8he carni,orous animals are souls undergoing .enance by being im.risoned for a time in such forms on account of their misdeeds$ &a,e you not heard the story of my lionK/ : said yes3 but that : did not understand it4 because : thought it im.ossible for a human soul to suffer the degradation of returning into the body of a lower creature after once attaining humanity$ At this he laughed out3 and said that the real degradation was not in the .enance but in the sin$ *:t is not by the .enance3 but by incurring the need of the .enance3 that the soul is degraded$ 8he man who sullies his humanity by cruelty or lust3 is already degraded thereby below humanity% and the form which his soul assumes afterwards assumes is the mere natural conseFuence of that degradation$ &e may again reco,er humanity3 but only by means of .assing through another form than that of the carni,ora$ When you were told [8he reference is to an instruction recei,ed by her four years .re,iously3 but in slee.3 and not from A.ollonius3 though from a source no less transcendental$ 1)d$5] that certain creatures were redeemable or not redeemable3 the meaning was this' 8hey who are redeemable may3 on lea,ing their .resent form3 return directly into humanity$ 8heir .enance accom.lished in that form3 and in it3 therefore3 they are redeemed$ -ut they who are not redeemable3 are they whose sin has been too dee. or too ingrained to suffer them to return until they ha,e .assed through other lower forms$ 8hey are not redeemable therein3 but will be on ascending again$ 9thers3 altogether ,ile and .ast redem.tion3 sink continually lower and lower down the stream3 until [Page *"] at length they burn out$ 8hey shall neither be redeemed in the form they now occu.y3 nor in any other$/ PA2:S3 #ay 3 !!C

QQQ [ 2emembering3 on being told this dream3 that 8liphas (e i in his .aute 5agie3 had described an inter,iew with the .hantom of A.ollonius3 which he had e,oked3 : referred to the book3 and found that he also saw him with a smooth-sha,en face3 but wearing a shroud 1linceul5 1)d$5]

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - "7 - T(E T(REE K)N1S


8he time was drawing towards dawn in a wild and desolate region$ And : stood with my genius at the foot of a mountain the summit of which was hidden in mist$ At a few .aces from me stood three .ersons3 clad in s.lendid robes and wearing crowns on their heads$ )ach .ersonage carried a casket and a key' the three caskets differed from one another3 but the keys were all alike$ And my genius said to me3 *8hese are the three kings of the )ast3 and they Hourney hither o,er the ri,er that is dried u.3 to go u. into the mountain of Sion and rebuild the 8em.le of the >ord Bod$/ 8hen : looked more closely at the three royalties3 and : saw that the one who stood nearest to me on the left hand was a man3 and color of his skin was dark like that of an :ndian$ And the second was in form like a woman3 and her com.le0ion was fair' and the third had the wings of an Angel3 and carried a staff of gold$ And : heard them say one to another3 *-rother3 what hast thou in thy casketK/ And the first answered3 and the King who bore the as.ect of a woman3 answered3 ( : am the car.$ *: am the Stonelayer3 [Page *$] and : carry the im.lements of my craft% also a bundle of myrrh for thee and for me$/: am the 6ar.enter3 and : bear the instruments of my craft% also a bo0 of frankincense for thee and for me$/ And the Angel-king answered3 *: am the #easurer3 and : carry the secrets of the li,ing Bod3 and the rod of gold to measure your work withal$/ 8hen the first said3 *8herefore let us go u. into the hill of the >ord and build the walls of Merusalem$ And they turned to ascend the mountain$ -ut they had not taken the first ste. when the king3 whose name was Stonelayer3 said to him who was called the 6ar.enter3 *Bi,e me first the im.lements of thy craft3 and the .lan of thy building3 that : may know after what sort thou buildest3 and may fashion thereto my masonry$/ And the other asked him3 *What buildest thou3 brotherK/ And he answered3 *: build the 9uter 6ourt3/ 8hen the 6ar.enter unlocked his casket and ga,e him a scroll written o,er in sil,er3 and a crystal rule3 and a car.enterGs .lane and a saw$ And the other took them and .ut them into his casket$ 8hen the 6ar.enter said to the Stonelayer3 *-rother3 gi,e me also the .lan of thy building3 and the tools of thy craft$ +or : build the :nner Place3 and must needs fit my designing to thy foundation$/ -ut the other answered3 *Nay3 my brother3 for : ha,e .romised the laborers$ -uild thou alone$ :t is enough that : know thy secrets% ask not mine of me$/ And the 6ar.enter answered3 *&ow then shall the 8em.le of the >ord be builtK Are we not of three Ages3 and is the tem.le yet .erfectedK/ 8hen the Angel s.oke3 and said to the Stonelayer3 *+ear not3 brother' freely hast thou recei,ed% freely gi,e$ +or e0ce.t thine elder brother had been first a Stonelayer3 he [Page *%] could not now be a 6ar.enter$ Art thou not of Solomon3 and he of 6hristK 8herefore he hath already handled thy tools3 and is of thy craft$ And : also3 the #easurer3 : know the work of both$ -ut now is that time when the end cometh3 and that which hath been s.oken in the ear in closets3 the same shall be .roclaimed on the houseto.s$/ 8hen the first king unlocked his casket3 and ga,e to the 6ar.enter a scroll written in red3 and a com.ass and a trowel$ -ut the 6ar.enter answered him' *:t is enough$ : ha,e seen3 and : remember$ +or this is the writing King Solomon ga,e into my hands when : also was a Stonelayer3 and when thou wert of the com.any of them that labor$ +or : also am thy -rother3 and that thou knowest : know also$/ 8hen the third king4 the Angel3 s.oke again and said3 *Now is the knowledge .erfected and the bond fulfilled$ +or neither can the Stonelayer build alone3 nor the 6ar.enter construct a.art$ 8herefore3 until this day3 is the 8em.le of the >ord unbuilt$ -ut now is the time come3 and Salem shall ha,e her habitation on the &ill of the >ord$/ And there came down a mist from the mountain3 and out of the mist a star$ And my Benius said3 *8hou shalt yet see more on this wise$/ -ut : saw then only the mist3 which filled the ,alley3 and moistened my hair and my dress% and so : awoke$ >9ND9N3 April 07# *++6 Page ?

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


[ +or the full com.rehension of the abo,e dream3 it is necessary to be .rofoundly ,ersed at once in the esoteric signification of the Scri.tures and in the mysteries of +reemasonry$ :t was the dreamerGs great regret that she neither knew3 nor could know3 the latter3 women being e0cluded from initiation$ 1)d$5] [Page
*&]

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - " - T(E AR'ED 1ODDESS


: dreamed that : sat reading in my study3 with books lying about all round me$ Suddenly a ,oice mar,ellously clear and sil,ery3 called me by name$ Starting u. and turning3 : saw behind me a long ,ista of white marble columns3 Breek in architecture3 flanking on either side a gallery of white marble$ At the end of this gallery stood a sha.e of e0ceeding brilliancy3 the sha.e of a woman abo,e mortal height3 clad from head to foot in shining mail armor$ :n her right hand was a s.ear3 on her left arm a shield$ &er brow was hidden by a helmet3 and the as.ect of her face was stern3 se,ere e,en3 : thought3 : a..roached her3 and as : went3 my body was lifted u. from the earth3 and : was aware of that strange sensation of floating abo,e the surface of the ground3 which is so common with me in slee. that at times : can scarce .ersuade myself after waking that it has not been a real e0.erience$ When : alighted at the end of the long gallery before the armed woman3 she said to me' 8ake off the nightdress thou wearest$/ : looked at my attire and was about to answer OP/ *8his is not a nightdress3/ when she added3 as though .ercei,ing my thought' OP/ 8he womanGs garb is a nightdress% it is a garment made to slee. in$ 8he manGs garb is the dress for the day$ >ook eastwardL/ : raised my eyes and3 behind the mail-clad sha.e3 : saw the draw breaking3 blood-red3 and with great clouds like [Page **] .illars of smoke rolling u. on either side of the .lace where the sun was about to rise$ -ut as yet the sun was not ,isible$ And as : looked3 she cried aloud3 and her ,oice rang through the air like the clash of steel' OP/ >istenL/ And she struck her s.ear on the marble .a,ement$ At the same moment there came from afar off3 a confused sound of battle$ 6ries3 and human ,oices in conflict3 and the stir as of a ,ast multitude3 the distant clang of arms and a noise of the gallo.ing of many horses rushing furiously o,er the ground$ And then3 sudden silence$ Again she smote the .a,ement3 and again the sounds arose3 nearer now3 and more tumultuous$ 9nce more they ceased3 and a third time she struck the marble with her s.ear$ 8hen the noises arose all about and around the ,ery s.ot where we stood3 and the clang of the arms was so close that it shook and thrilled the ,ery columns beside me$ And the neighing and snorting of horses3 and the thud of their .onderous hoofs flying o,er the earth made3 as it were3 a wind in my ears3 so that it seemed as though a furious battle were raging all around us$ -ut : could see nothing$ 9nly the sounds increased3 and became so ,iolent that they awoke me3 and e,en after waking : still seemed to catch the commotion of them in the air$ [8his dream was shortly followed by #rs KingsfordGs anti-,i,isection Page ??

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


e0.edition to SwitJerland3 the fierce conflict of which am.ly fulfilled any .redicti,e significance it may ha,e had$] [Page *+] PA2:S3 1e!ruary *9# *++0

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - "! - T(E 1A'E OF CARDS


: dreamed : was .laying at cards with three .ersons3 the two o..osed to me being a man and a woman with hoods .ulled o,er their heads3 and cloaks co,ering their .ersons$ : did not .articularly obser,e them$ #y .artner was an old man without hood or cloak3 and there was about him this .eculiarity3 that he did not from one minute to another a..ear to remain the same$ Sometimes he looked like a ,ery young man3 the features not a..earing to change in order to .roduce this effect3 but an as.ect of youth and e,en of mirth coming into the face as though the features were lighted from within$ -ehind me stood a .ersonage whom : could not see3 for his hand and arm only a..eared3 handing me a .ack of cards$ So far as : discerned3 it was a manGs figure3 habited in black$ Shortly after the dream began3 my .artner addressed me3 saying3 Do you .lay by luck or by skillK/ : answered/ *: .lay by luck chiefly% : donGt know how to .lay by skill$ -ut : ha,e generally been lucky$( :n fact : had already3 lying by me3 se,eral tric%s : had taken$ &e answered me' OP/ 8o .lay by luck is to trust to "ithout% to .lay by skill is to trust to "ithin$ :n this game3 Within goes further than Without$/ What are trum.sK/ : asked$ Diamonds are trum.s3/ he answered$ : looked at the cards in my hand and said to him' OP/ *: ha,e more clubs than anything else$/ [Page *7] At this he laughed3 and seemed all at once Fuite a youth$ *6lubs are strong cards3 after all3/ he said$ *DonGt des.ise the black suits$ : ha,e known some of the best games e,er .layed won by .layers holding more clubs than you ha,e$/ : e0amined the cards and found something ,ery odd about them$ 8here were four suits3 diamonds3 hearts3 clubs3 and s.ades$ -ut the .icture cards in my hand seemed different altogether from any : had e,er seen before$ 9ne was Fueen of 6lubs3 and her face altered as : looked at it$ +irst it was dark3 OP/ almost dusky3 OP/ with the im.erial crown on the head% then it seemed Fuite fair3 the crown changing to a smaller one of )nglish as.ect3 and the dress also transforming itself$ 8here was a Fueen of &earts3 too3 in an antiFue .easantGs gown3 with brown hair3 and .resently this melted into a suit of armor which shone as if reflecting fire-light in its burnished scales$ 8he other cards seemed ali,e likewise3 e,en the ordinary ones3 Hust like the court-cards$ 8here seemed to be .ictures mo,ing inside the emblems on their faces$ 8he clubs in my hand ran into higher figures than the s.ades% these came ne0t in number3 and diamonds ne0t$ : had no .icture-cards of diamonds3 but : had the Ace$ And this was so bright : could not look at it$ )0ce.t the two Fueens of 6lubs and &earts : think : had no .icture-cards in my hand3 and ,ery few red Page ?;

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


cards of any kind$ 8here were high figures in the s.ades$ :t was the .ersonage behind my chair who dealt the cards always$ : said to my .artner' OP/ *:t is difficult to .lay at all3 whether by luck or by skill3 for : get such a bad hand dealt me each time$ 8hat is your fault3/ he said$ *Play your best with what you ha,e3 and ne0t time you will get better cards$/[Page * ] *&ow can that beK : asked$ -ecause after each game3 the tric%s you take are added to the bottom of the .ack which the dealer holds3 and you get the honors you ha,e taken u. from the table$ Play well and take all you can$ -ut you must .ut more head into it$ You trust too much to fortune$ DonGt blame the dealer% he canGt see$/ : shall lose this game3/ : said .resently3 for the two .ersons .laying against us seemed to be taking u. all the cards Fuickly3 and the lead ne,er came to my turn$ :t is because you donGt count your .oints before .utting down a card3/ my .artner said$ *:f they .lay high numbers3 you must .lay higher$/ -ut they ha,e all the trum.s3/ : said$ No3/ he answered3 *you ha,e the highest trum. of all in your own hand$ :t is the first and the last$ You may take e,ery card they ha,e with that3 for it is the chief of the whole series$ -ut you ha,e s.ades too3 and high ones$/ 1&e seemed to %no" what : had$5 Diamonds are better than s.ades3/ : answered$ *And nearly all my cards are black ones$ -esides3 : canGt count3 it wants so much thinking$ 6anGt you come o,er here and .lay for meK/ &e shook his head3 and : thought that again he laughed$ *No3/ he re.lied3 *that is against the law of the game$ You must .lay for yourself$ 8hink it out$/ &e uttered these words ,ery em.hatically and with so strange an intonation that they dissi.ated the rest of the dream3 and : remember no more of it$ [Page *!] A86&A#3 Dec ,# *++0

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - $# - T(E PAN)C-STR-CK PACK-(ORSE


9ut of a ,eil of .al.itating mist there arose before me in my slee. the image of a colossal and .reci.itous cliff3 standing sheer u. against a sky of cloud and sea-mist3 the to.s of the granite .eaks being merged and hidden in the ,a.or$ At the foot of the .reci.ice beat a wild sea3 tossing and flecked with foam% and out of the flying s.ray rose shar. s.linters of granite3 standing like s.earheads about the base of the sold rock$ As : looked3 something stirred far off in the distance3 like a fly crawling o,er the smooth crag$ +i0ing my gaJe u.on it : became aware that there was at a great height abo,e the sea3 midway between sky and water3 a narrow un.rotected foot.ath winding u. and down irregularly along the side of the mighty cliff% OP/ a slender3 slo.ing .ath3 horrible to look at3 like a ro.e or a thread stretched midair3 hanging between hea,en and the hungry foam$ 9ne by one3 came towards me along this awful .ath a .rocession of horses3 drawing tall narrow carts filled with bales of merchandise$ 8he horses mo,ed along the edge of the crag as though they clung to it3 their bodies aslant towards the wall of granite on their right3 their legs mo,ing with the .recision of creatures feeling and gras.ing e,ery ste.$ >ike deer they mo,ed3 OP/ not like horses3 OP/ and as they ad,anced3 the carts they drew swayed behind them3 and : thought e,ery Holt would hurl them o,er the .reci.ice$ +ascinated : watched3 OP/ : could not choose but watch$ At length came a grey horse3 not drawing a cart3 but carrying something on his back3 OP/ on a .ack-saddle a..arently$ >ike the rest he [Page +#] came on stealthily3 sniffing e,ery inch of the terrible way3 until3 Hust at the worst and giddiest .oint he .aused3 hesitated3 and seemed about to turn$ : saw him back himself into a crouching attitude against the wall of rock behind him3 lowering his haunches3 and rearing his head in a strange manner$ 8he idea flashed on me that he would certainly turn3 and then OP/ what could ha..enK #ore horses were ad,ancing3 and two beasts could not .ossibly .ass each other on that narrow ledgeL -ut : was totally un.re.ared for the ghastly thing that actually did ha..en$ 8he miserable horse had been seiJed with the awful mountain-madness that sometimes o,ertakes men on stu.endous heights3 OP/ the madness of suicide$ With a frightful scream3 that sounded .artly like a cry of su.reme des.eration3 .artly like one of furious and frenJied Hoy3 the horse reared himself to his full height on the horrible ledge3 shook his head wildly3 and lea.ed with a frantic s.ring into the air3 sheer o,er the .reci.ice3 and into the foam beneath$ &is eyes glared as he shot into the ,oid3 a great dark li,ing mass against the white mist$ Was he s.eared on those terrible shafts or rock below3 or was his life dashed out in horrible crimson s.lashes against the cliff-sideK 9r did he sink into the reeling swirl of the foaming waters3 and die more mercifully in their steel-dark de.thsK : could not see$ : saw only the flying form dart through the mist like an arrow from a bow$ : head only the a..alling cry3 like nothing earthly e,er heard before% and : woke in a .anic3 with hands tightly clas.ed3 and my body dam. with moisture$ :t was but a dream OP/ this awful .icture% it was gone as an image from a mirror3 and : was awake and gaJing only u.on blank darkness$ [Page +"] A86&A#3 Sept *9# *++:

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - $" - T(E (A-NTED )NN


: seemed in my ,ision to be on a long and wearisome Hourney3 and to ha,e arri,ed at an :nn3 in which : was offered shelter and rest$ 8he a.artment gi,en me consisted of a bedroom and .arlor3 communicating3 and furnished in an antiFue manner3 e,erything in the rooms a..earing to be wormeaten3 dusty and out of date$ 8he walls were bare and dingy% there was not a .icture or an ornament in the a.artment$ An e0tremely dim light .re,ailed in the scene% indeed3 : do not clearly remember3 whether3 with the e0ce.tion of the fire and a night-lam.3 the rooms were illumined at all$ : seated myself in a chair by the hearth% it was late3 and : thought only of rest$ -ut3 .resently3 : became aware of strange things going on about me$ 9n a table in a corner lay some .a.ers and a .encil$ With a feeling of indescribable horror : saw this .encil assume an erect .osition and begin of itself to write on the .a.er3 .recisely as though an in,isible hand held and guided it$ At the same time3 small detonations sounded in different .arts of the room% tiny bright s.arks a..eared3 burst3 and immediately e0.ired in smoke$ 8he .encil ha,ing ceased to write3 laid itself gently down3 and taking the .a.er in my hand : found on it a Fuantity of writing which at first a..eared to me to be in ci.her3 but : .resently .ercei,ed that the words com.osing as it were written backwards3 from right to left3 e0actly as one sees writing reflected on a looking glass$ What was written made a [Page +$] considerable im.ression on me at the time3 but : cannot now recall it3 : know3 howe,er3 that the dominant feeling : e0.erienced was one of horror$ : called the owners of the inn and related to them what had taken .lace$ 8hey recei,ed my statement with .erfect eFuanimity3 and told me that in their house this was the normal state of things3 of which3 in fact3 they were e0tremely .roud' and they ended by congratulating me as a ,isitor much fa,ored by the in,isible agencies of the .lace$ We call them our >ights3/ they said$ :t is true3/ : obser,ed3 *that : saw lights in the air about the room3 but they went out instantaneously3 and left only smoke behind them$ And why do they write backwardsK Who are 8heyK/ As : asked this Fuestion3 the .encil on the table rose again3 and wrote thus on the .a.er' OP/ ksatonoD/ Again horror seiJed on me3 and the air becoming full of smoke : found it im.ossible to breathe$ *>et me outL/ : cried3 *: am stifled here3 OP/ the air is full of smokeL/ ;utside3 the .eo.le of the house answered3 *you will lose your way% it is Fuite dark3 and we ha,e no other rooms to let$ And3 besides3 it is the same in all the other a.artments of the inn$/ -ut the .lace is hauntedL/ : cried% and : .ushed .ast them3 and burst out of the house$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


-efore the doorway stood a tall ,eiled figure3 like translucent sil,er$ A sense of re,erence o,ercame me$ 8he night was balmy3 and bright almost as day with res.lendent starlight$ 8he stars seemed to lean out of hea,en% they looked down on me like li,ing eyes3 full of [Page +%] a strange immeasurable sym.athy$ : crossed the threshold3 and stood in the o.en .lain3 breathing with ra.ture and relief the .ure warm air of that delicious night$ &ow restful3 calm3 and glorious was the dark landsca.e3 outlined in .ur.le against the luminous sky L And what a consciousness of ,astness and immensity abo,e and around me L ( Where am : K ( : cried$ 8he sil,er figure stood beside me3 and lifted its ,eil$ :t was Pallas Athena$ <=nder the Stars of the )ast(3 she answered me3 ( the true eternal >ights of the World$( After : was awake3 a te0t in the Bos.els was ,i,idly brought to my mind' I (There "as no room for them in the =nn$( What is this :nn3 : wondered3 all the rooms of which are haunted3 and in which the 6hrist cannot be born K And this o.en country under the eastern night3 I is it not the same in which they were ( abiding3( to whom that -irth was first angelically announced K A86&A#3 No,$ ;3 !!;$ QQQ [ 8he solution of the enigma was recei,ed subseFuently in an instruction3 also im.arted in slee.3 in which it was said3 ( :f 9ccultism were all3 and held the key of hea,en3 there would be no need of 6hrist$(1)D$5]

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - $$ - AN EASTERN APO.O1-E3


8he following was read by me during slee.3 in an old book .rinted in archaic ty.e$ As with many other things similarly read by me3 : do not know whether it is to be found in any book' I [Page +&] (After -uddha had been ten years in retirement3 certain sages sent their disci.les to him3 asking him3 I What dost thou claim to be3 Bautama KE ( -uddha answered them3 E : claim to be nothing$E ( 8en years afterwards they sent again to him3 asking the same Fuestion3 and again -uddha answered' I E : claim to be nothing$E (8hen after yet another ten years had .assed3 they sent a third time3 asking3 E What dost thou claim to be3 Bautama KE (And -uddha re.lied3 E : claim to be the utterance of the most high Bod$E ( 8hen they said to him' E &ow is this3 that hitherto thou hast .roclaimed thyself to be nothing3 and now thou declarest thyself to be the ,ery utterance of Bod KE ( -uddha answered' E )ither : am nothing3 or : am the ,ery utterance of Bod3 for between these two all is silence$E( A86&A#3 5arch 9# *++9.

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - $% - A (A-NTED (O-SE )NDEED


: dreamt that during a tour on the 6ontinent with my friend 6$ we stayed in a town wherein there was an ancient house of horrible re.utation3 concerning which we recei,ed the following account$ At the to. of the house was a suite of rooms3 from which no one who entered at night e,er again emerged$ No cor.se was e,er found% but it was said by some that the ,ictims were absorbed bodily by the walls% by others that there [Page +*] were in the rooms a number of .ictures in frames3 one frame3 howe,er3 containing a blank can,as3 which had the dreadful .ower3 first3 of fascinating the beholder3 and ne0t of drawing him towards it3 so that he was com.elled to a..roach and gaJe at it$ 8hen3 by the same hideous enchantment3 he was forced to touch it3 and the touch was fatal$ +or the can,as seiJed him as a de,ilfish seiJes its .rey3 and sucked him in3 so that he .erished without lea,ing a trace of himself3 or of the manner of his death$ 8he legend said further that if any .erson could succeed in .assing a night in these rooms and in resisting their deadly influence3 the s.ell would for e,er be broken3 and no one would thenceforth be sacrificed$ &earing all this3 and being somewhat of the knight-errant order3 6$ and : determined to face the danger3 and3 if .ossible3 deli,er the town from the enchantment$ We were assured that the attem.t would be ,ain3 for that it had already been many times made3 and the De,ils of the .lace were always trium.hant$ 8hey had the .ower3 we were told3 of hallucinating the senses of their ,ictims% we should be subHected to some illusion3 and be fatally decei,ed$ Ne,ertheless3 we were resol,ed to try what we could do3 and in order to acFuaint oursel,es with the scene of the ordeal3 we ,isited the .lace in the daytime$ :t was a gloomylooking building3 consisting of se,eral ,ast rooms3 filled with lumber of old furniture3 worm-eaten and decaying% scaffoldings3 which seemed to ha,e been erected for the sake of making re.airs and then left% the windows were curtainless3 the floors bare3 and rats ran hither and thither among the rubbish accumulated in the corners$ Nothing could .ossibly look more desolate and gruesome$ We saw no .ictures% but as we [Page ++] did not e0.lore e,ery .art of the rooms3 they may ha,e been there without our seeing them$ We were further informed by the .eo.le of the town that in order to ,isit the rooms at night it was necessary to wear a s.ecial costume3 and that without it we should ha,e no chance whate,er of issuing from them ali,e$ 8his costume was of black and white3 and each of us was to carry a black sta,e$ So we .ut on this attire3 I which somewhat resembled the garb of an ecclesiastical order3 I and when the a..ointed time came3 re.aired to the haunted house3 where3 after toiling u. the great staircase in the darkness3 we reached the door of the haunted a.artments to find it closed$ -ut light was .lainly ,isible beneath it3 and within was the sound of ,oices$ 8his greatly sur.rised us% but after a short conference we knocked$ 8he door was .resently o.ened by a ser,ant3 dressed as a modern indoor footman usually is3 who ci,illy asked us to walk in$ 9n entering we found the .lace altogether different from what we e0.ected to find3 and had found on our daylight ,isit$ :t was brightly lighted3 had decorated walls3 .retty ornaments3 car.ets3 and e,ery kind of modern garnishment3 and3 in short3 bore all the a..earance of an ordinary well-a..ointed .ri,ate flat$ While we stood in the corridor3 astonished3 a gentleman in e,ening dress ad,anced towards us from one of the rece.tion rooms$ As he looked interrogati,ely at us3 we thought it best to e0.lain the intrusion3 adding that we .resumed we had either entered the wrong house3 or sto..ed at the wrong a.artment$ &e laughed .leasantly at our tale3 and said3 (: donEt know anything about haunted rooms3 and3 in fact3 Page @

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


donEt belie,e in anything of the kind$ As for these rooms3 they ha,e for a long time been let for two or three nights [Page +7] e,ery week to our Society for the .ur.ose of social reunion$ We are members of a musical and literary association3 and are in the habit of holding con,ersaJiones in these rooms on certain e,enings3 during which we entertain oursel,es with dancing3 singing3 charades3 and literary gossi.$ 8he rooms are s.acious and lofty3 and e0actly ada.ted to our reFuirements$ As you are here3 : may say3 in the name of the rest of the members3 that we shall be ha..y if you will Hoin us$( At this : glanced at our dresses in some confusion3 which being obser,ed by the gentleman3 he hastened to say' ( You need be under no an0iety about your a..earance3 for this is a costume night3 and the greater number of our guests are in tra,esty$( As he s.oke he threw o.en the door of a large drawing-room and in,ited us in$ 9n entering we found a com.any of men and women3 well-dressed3 some in ordinary e,ening attire and some costumed$ 8he room was brilliantly lighted and beautifully furnished and decorated$ At one end was a grand .iano3 round which se,eral .ersons were grou.ed% others were seated on ottomans taking tea or coffee% and others strolled about3 talking$ 9ur host3 who a..eared to be master of the ceremonies3 introduced us to se,eral .ersons3 and we soon became dee.ly interested in a con,ersation on literary subHects$ So the e,ening wore on .leasantly3 but : ne,er ceased to wonder how we could ha,e mistaken the house or the staircase after the .recaution we had taken of ,isiting it in the daytime in order to a,oid the .ossibility of error$ Presently3 being tired of con,ersation3 : wandered away from the grou. with which 6$ was still engaged3 to look at the beautiful decorations of the great salon3 the walls of which were co,ered with artistic designs in [Page + ] fresco$ -etween each cou.le of .anels3 the whole length of the salon3 was a beautiful .ainting3 re.resenting a landsca.e or a sea-.iece$ : .assed from one to the other3 admiring each3 till : had reached the e0treme end3 and was far away from the rest of the com.any3 where the lights were not so many or so bright as in the centre$ 8he last fresco in the series then caught my attention$ At first it a..eared to me to be unfinished% and then : obser,ed that there was u.on its background no .icture at all3 but only a background of merging tints which seemed to change3 and to be now sky3 now sea3 now green grass$ 8his em.ty .icture had3 moreo,er3 an odd metallic colouring which fascinated me% and saying to myself ( :s there really any .ainting on it K ( : mechanically .ut out my hand and touched it$ 9n this : was instantly seiJed by a frightful sensation3 a shock that ran from the ti.s of my fingers to my brain3 and stee.ed my whole being$ Simultaneously : was aware of an o,erwhelming sense of sucking and dragging3 which3 from my hand and arm3 and3 as it were3 through them3 seemed to .ossess and en,elo. my whole .erson$ +ace3 hair3 eyes3 bosom3 limbs3 e,ery .ortion of my body was locked in an awful embrace which3 like the ,orte0 of a whirl.ool3 drew me irresistibly towards the .icture$ : felt the hideous im.ulse clinging o,er me and sucking me forwards into the wall$ : stro,e in ,ain to resist it$ #y efforts were more futile than the flutter of gossamer wings$ And then there rushed u.on my mind the consciousness that all we had been told about the haunted rooms was true% that a strong delusion had been cast o,er us% that all this brilliant throng of modern ladies and gentlemen were fiends masFuerading3 .re.ared beforehand for our coming% that all the beauty and s.lendour of our surroundings were mere glamour% and [Page +!] that in reality the rooms were those we had seen in the daytime3 filled with lumber and rot and ,ermin$ As : realised all this3 and was thrilled with the certainty of it3 a sudden access of strength came to me3 and : was im.elled3 as a last des.erate effort3 to turn my back on the awful fresco3 and at least to sa,e my face from coming into contact with it and being glued to its surface$ With a shriek of anguish : wrenched myself round and fell .rostrate on the ground3 face downwards3 with my back to the wall3 feeling as though the flesh had been torn from my hand and arm$ Whether : was sa,ed or not : knew not$ #y whole being was o,er.owered by the realisation of the dece.tion to which : had succumbed$ : had looked for something so different3 I darkness3 ,acant3 deserted rooms3 and .erha.s a tall3 white3 em.ty can,as in a frame3 against which : should ha,e been on my guard$ Who could ha,e antici.ated or sus.ected this cheerful welcome3 these entertaining literati3 Page @<

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


these innocent-looking frescoes K Who could ha,e foreseen so deadly a horror in such a guiseK Was : doomedK Should :3 too3 be sucked in and absorbed3 and .erha.s 6$ after me3 knowing nothing of my fateK : had no ,oice% : could not warn him% all my force seemed to ha,e been s.ent on the single shriek : had uttered as : turned my back on the wall$ : lay .rone u.on the floor3 and knew that : had swooned$ And thus3 on seeking me3 6$ would doubtless ha,e found me3 lying insensible among the rubbish3 with the rooms restored to the condition in which we had seen them by day3 my success in withdrawing myself ha,ing dissol,ed the s.ell and destroyed the enchantment$ -ut as it was3 : awoke from my swoon only to find that : had been dreaming$ [Page 7#]

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - $& - T(E S2-ARE )N T(E (AND
8he foregoing dream was almost immediately succeeded by another3 in which : dreamt that : was concerned in a ,ery .rominent way in a .olitical struggle in +rance for liberty and the .eo.leEs rights$ #y .art in this struggle was3 indeed3 the leading one3 but my friend 6$ had been drawn into it at my instance3 and was im.licated in a secondary manner only$ 8he go,ernment sought our arrest3 and3 for a time3 we e,aded all attem.ts to take us3 but at last we were sur.rised and dri,en under escort in a .ri,ate carriage to a military station3 where we were to be detained for e0amination$ With us was arrested a man .o.ularly known as 1ou3 a .oor weakling whom : much .itied$ When we arri,ed at the station which was our destination3 1ou ga,e some trouble to the officials$ : think he fainted3 but at all e,ents his con,eyance from the carriage to the caserne needed the conHoined efforts of our escort3 and some commotion was caused by his a..earance among the crowd assembled to see us$ 6learly the crowd was sym.athetic with us and hostile to the military$ : .articularly noticed one woman who .ressed forward as 1ou was being carried into the station3 and who loudly called on all .resent to note his feeble condition and the barbarity of arresting a witless creature such as he$ At that moment 6$ laid his hand on my arm and whis.ered' (Now is our time% the guards are all occu.ied with 1ou% we are left alone for a minute% let us Hum. out of the carriage and run L( As he said this [Page 7"] he o.ened the carriage door on the side o..osite to the caserne and alighted in the street$ : instantly followed3 and the .eo.le fa,ouring us3 we .ressed through them and fled at the to. of our s.eed down the road$ As we ran : es.ied a .athway winding u. a hill-side away from the town3 and cried3 ( >et us go u. there% let us get away from the streetL( 6$ answered3 (No3 no% they would see us there immediately at that height3 the .ath is too cons.icuous$ 9ur best safety is to lose oursel,es in the town$ We may throw them off our track by winding in and out of the streets$( Must then a little child3 .laying in the road3 got in our way3 and nearly threw us down as we ran$ We had to .ause a moment to reco,er oursel,es$ ( 8hat child may ha,e cost us our li,es3( whis.ered 6$3 breathlessly$ A second afterwards we reached the bottom of the street which branched off right and left$ : hesitated a moment% then we both turned to the right$ As we did so I in the twinkling of an eye I we found oursel,es in the midst of a grou. of soldiers coming round the corner$ : ran straight into the arms of one of them3 who the same instant knew me and seiJed me by throat and waist with a gri. of iron$ 8his was a horrible momentL 8he iron gras. was sudden and solid as the gri. of a ,ice% the manEs arm held my waist like a bar of steel$ ( : arrest you L( he cried3 and the soldiers immediately closed round us$ At once : realised the ho.elessness of the situation3 I the utter futility of resistance$ ( &ous n4a e> pas !esoin de me tenir ainsi3( : said to the officer% (?4irai tran@uillement$( &e loosened his hold and we were then marched off to another military station3 in a different .art of the town from that whence we had esca.ed$ 8he man who had arrested me was a sergeant or some officer [Page 7$] in .etty command$ &e took me alone with him into the guardroom3 and .laced before me on a wooden table some .a.ers which he told me to fill in and sign$ 8hen he sat down o..osite to me and : looked through the .a.ers$ 8hey were forms3 with blanks left for descri.tions s.ecifying the name3 occu.ation3 age3 address and so forth of arrested .ersons$ : signed these3 and .ushing them across the table to the man3 asked him what was to be done with us$ (You will be shot(3 he re.lied3 Fuickly and decisi,ely$ (-oth of us K ( : asked$ (-oth(3 he re.lied$ ( -ut(3 said :3 (my com.anion has done nothing to deser,e death$ &e was drawn into this struggle entirely by me$ 6onsider3 too3 his ad,anced age$ &is hair is white% he stoo.s3 and3 had it not been for the difficulty with which he mo,es his limbs3 both of us would .robably be at this moment in a .lace of safety$ What can you gain by shooting an old man such as he K ( 8he officer was silent$ &e neither fa,oured nor discouraged me by his manner$ While : sat awaiting his re.ly3 : glanced at the hand with which : had Hust signed the .a.ers3 and a sudden idea flashed into my mind$ (At least(3 : said3 (grant me one reFuest$ :f my com.anion must die3 let me die first$( Now : made this reFuest for the following reason$ :n my right hand3 the line of life broke abru.tly halfway in its length3 indicating a sudden and ,iolent death$ -ut the .oint at which it broke was terminated by a .erfectly marked s@uare3 Page @@

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


e0traordinarily clear-cut and distinct$ Such a sFuare3 occurring at the end of a broken line means rescue3 sal ation$ : had long been aware of this strange figuration in my hand3 and had often wondered what it .resaged$ -ut now3 as once more : looked at it3 it came u.on me with sudden con,iction that in some way : was [Page 7%] destined to be deli,ered from death at the last moment3 and : thought that if this be so it would be horrible should 6$ ha,e been killed first$ :f ) were to be sa,ed$ : should certainly sa,e him also3 for my .ardon would in,ol,e the .ardon of both3 or my rescue the rescue of both$ 8herefore it was im.ortant to .ro,ide for his safety until after my fate was decided$ 8he officer seemed to take this last reFuest into more serious consideration than the first$ &e said shortly' ( : may be able to manage that for you3( and then at once rose and took u. the .a.ers : had signed$ ( When are we to be shot K ( : asked him$ (8omorrow morning(3 he re.lied3 as .rom.tly as before$ 8hen he went out3 turning the key of the guard-room u.on me$ 8he dawn of the ne0t day broke darkly$ :t was a terribly stormy day% great black lurid thunderclouds lay .iled along the horiJon3 and came u. slowly and awfully against the wind$ : looked u.on them with terror% they seemed so near the earth3 and so like li,ing3 watching things$ 8hey hung out of the sky3 e0tending long ghostly arms downwards3 and their gloom and density seemed su.ernatural$ 8he soldiers took us out3 our hands bound behind us3 into a Fuadrangle at the back of their barracks$ 8he scene is shar.ly im.ressed on my mind$ A .alisade of two sides of a sFuare3 made of wooden .lanks3 ran round the Fuadrangle$ -ehind this .alisade3 and .ressed u. close against it3 was a mob of men and women I the .eo.le of the town I come to see the e0ecution$ -ut their faces were sym.athetic% an unmistakable look of mingled grief and rage3 not unmi0ed with des.eration I for they were a down-trodden folk I shone in the hundreds of eyes turned towards us$ [Page 7&] : was the only woman among the condemned$ 6$ was there3 and .oor 1ou3 looking bewildered3 and one or two other .risoners$ 9n the third and fourth sides of the Fuadrangle was a high wall3 and in a certain .lace was a niche .artly enclosing the trunk of a tree3 cut off at the to.$ An iron ring was dri,en into the trunk midway3 e,idently for the .ur.ose of securing condemned .ersons for e0ecution$ : guessed it would be used for that now$ :n the centre of the sFuare .iece of ground stood a file of soldiers3 armed with carbines3 and an officer with a drawn sabre$ 8he .alisade was guarded by a row of soldiers somewhat s.arsely distributed3 certainly not more than a doJen in all$ A 6atholic .riest in a black cassock walked beside me3 and as we were conducted into the enclosure3 he turned to me and offered religious consolation$ : declined his ministrations3 but asked him an0iously if he knew which of us was to die first$ 3ou he re.lied% (the officer in charge of you said you wished it3 and he has been able to accede to your reFuest$( ),en then : felt a singular Hoy at hearing this3 though : had no longer any e0.ectation of release$ Death was3 : thought3 far too near at hand for that$ Must then a soldier a..roached us3 and led me3 bareheaded3 to the tree trunk3 where he .laced me with my back against it3 and made fast my hands behind me with a ro.e to the iron ring$ No bandage was .ut o,er my eyes$ : stood thus3 facing the file of soldiers in the middle of the Fuadrangle3 and noticed that the officer with the drawn sabre .laced himself at the e0tremity of the line3 com.osed of si0 men$ :n that su.reme moment : also noticed that their uniform was bright with steel accoutrements$ 8heir helmets were of steel3 and their carbines3 as they raised them and .ointed them at me3 [Page 7*] ready cocked3 glittered in a fitful gleam of sunlight with the same burnished metal$ 8here was an instantEs stillness and hush while the men took aim% then : saw the officer raise his bared sabre as the signal to fire$ :t flashed in the air% then3 with a suddenness im.ossible to con,ey3 the whole Fuadrangle blaJed with an awful light3 I a light so ,i,id3 so intense3 so blinding3 so indescribable that e,erything was blotted out and de,oured by it$ :t crossed my brain with instantaneous con,iction that this amaJing glare was the .hysical effect of being shot3 and that the bullets had .ierced my brain or heart3 and caused this frightful sense of all.er,ading flame$ 4aguely : remembered ha,ing read or ha,ing been told that such was the result .roduced on the ner,ous system of a ,ictim to death from firearms$ ( :t is o,er(3 : said3 ( that was the bullets($ -ut .resently there forced itself on my daJed senses a sound I a confusion of sounds I Page @;

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


darkness succeeding the white flash I then steadying itself into gloomy daylight% a tumult% a hea. of stricken3 tumbled men lying stone-still before me% a fearful horror u.on e,ery li,ing face% and then $$$ it all burst on me with distinct con,iction$ 8he storm which had been gathering all the morning had culminated in its blackest and most electric .oint immediately o,erhead$ 8he file of soldiers a..ointed to shoot us stood e0actly under it$ S.arkling with bright steel on head and breast and carbines3 they stood shoulder to shoulder3 a com.lete lightning conductor3 and at the end of the chain they formed3 their officer3 at the critical moment3 raised his shining3 naked blade towards the sky$ :nstantaneously hea,en o.ened3 and the lightning fell3 attracted by the burnished steel$ +rom blade to carbine3 from helmet to breast.late it ran3 smiting e,ery man dead as he stood$ [Page 7+] 8hey fell like a row of nine.ins3 blackened in face and hand in an instant3 I in the twinkling of an eye$ Dead$ 8he electric flame licked the life out of se,en men in that second% not one mo,ed a muscle or a finger again$ 8hen followed a wild scene$ 8he crowd3 stu.efied for a minute by the thunderbolt and the horror of the de,astation it had wrought3 .resently reco,ered sense3 and with a mighty shout hurled itself against the .alisade3 burst it3 lea.t o,er it and swarmed into the Fuadrangle3 easily o,er.owering the unner,ed guards$ : was surrounded% eager hands unbound mine% arms were thrown about me% the .eo.le roared3 and we.t3 and trium.hed3 and fell about me on their knees .raising &ea,en$ : think rain fell3 my face was wet with dro.s3 and my hair3 I but : knew no more3 for : swooned and lay unconscious in the arms of the crowd$ #y rescue had indeed come3 and from the ,ery &ea,ensL 29#)3 April *6# *++,.

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford DREA'-5ERSES T(RO-1( T(E A1ES


WAK)3 thou that slee.estL Soul3 awake L 8hy light is come3 arise and shine L +or darkness melts3 and dawn di,ine Doth from the holy 9rient break% Swift-darting down the shadowy ways And misty dee.s of unborn 8ime3 BodEs >ight3 BodEs Day3 whose .erfect .rime :s as the light of se,en days$ Wake3 .ro.het-soul3 the time draws near3 The $od "ho %no"s within thee stirs And s.eaks3 for &is thou art3 and &ers Who bears the mystic shield and s.ear$ 8he hidden secrets of their shrine Where thou3 initiate3 didst adore3 8heir Fuickening finger shall restore And make its glories newly thine$ A touch di,ine shall thrill thy brain3 8hy soul shall lea. to life3 and lo L What she has known3 again shall know% What she has seen3 shall see again% 8he ancient Past through which she came3I A cloud across a sunset sky3I A cactus flower of scarlet dye3I A bird with throat and wings of flame%I [Page 7 A red wild roe3 whose mountain bed Nor e,er hound or hunter knew3 Whose flying foot.rint dashed the dew
]

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


:n nameless forests3 long since dead$ And e,er thus in ceaseless roll 8he wheels of Destiny and 8ime 8hrough changing form and age and clime -ear onward the undying Soul' 8ill now a Sense3 confused and dim3 Dawns in a sha.e of nobler mould3 >ess beast3 scarce human% uncontrolled3 With free fierce life in e,ery limb% A sa,age youth3 in .ainted gear3 +oot fleeter than the summer wind% Scant s.eech for scanty needs designed3 6ontent with sweetheart3 s.oil and s.ear' And3 .assing thence3 with burning breath3 A fiery Soul that knows no fear3 8he armRd hosts of 9din hear &er ,oice amid the ranks of death% 8here3 where the sounds of war are shrill3 And clarion shrieks3 and battle roars3 9nce more set free3 she lea.s and soars A Soul of flame3 as.iring still L 8ill last3 in fairer sha.e she stands Where lotos-scented waters glide3 A 8heban Priestess3 dusky-eyed3 -arefooted on the golden sands% [Page 7!] 9r3 .rostrate3 in the 8em.le-halls3 When S.irits wake3 and mortals slee.3 She hears what mighty 4oices swee.

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


>ike winds along the columned walls$ A Princess then beneath the .alms Which wa,e oEer AfricEs burning .lains3 8he blood of Afric in thy ,eins3 A golden circlet on thine arms$ -y sacred BangesE sultry tide3 With dreamy gaJe and clas.Rd hands 8hou walkst a Seeress in the lands Where holy -uddha li,ed and died$ Anon3 a sea-bleached mountain ca,e #akes shelter for thee3 gra,e and wan3 8hou solemn3 solitary #an3 Who3 nightly3 by the star-lit wa,e :n,okest with illumined eyes 8he steadfast >ords who rule and wait -eyond the hea,ens and 8ime and fate$ =ntil the .erfect Dawn shall rise3 And oracles3 through ages dumb3 Shall wake3 and holy forms shall shine 9n mountain .eaks in light di,ine3 When mortals bid BodEs kingdom come L So turns the wheel of thy SkeenT soul% +rom birth to birth her ruling stars3 Swift #ercury and fiery #ars3 :n e,er changing orbits rollL PA2:S3 5ay *++7$ [Page
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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford FRA1'ENT "


A Harring note3 a chord amiss I 8he musicEs sweeter after3 >ike wrangling ended with a kiss3 9r tears3 with sil,er laughter$ 8he high gods ha,e no Hoys like these3 So sweet in human story% No tem.est rends their tranFuil seas -eyond the sunset glory$ 8he whirling wheels of 8ime and +ate

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford FRA1'ENT $


[8hese are not .ro.erly dream-,erses3 ha,ing been suddenly .resented to the waking ,ision one day in Paris while gaJing at the bright sky$ 1)d5] : thank 8hee3 >ord3 who hast through de,ious ways >ed me to know 8hy Praise3 And to this Wildernesse &ast brought me out3 8hine :srael to blesse$ :f should faint with 8hirst3 or weary3 sink3 8o these my Soule is Drink3 8o these the #aHick 2od :s >ife3 and mine is hid with 6hrist in Bod$ [Page
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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford S)1NS OF T(E T)'ES


)yes of the dawning in hea,en K S.arks from the o.ening of hell K Bleams from the altar-lam.s se,en K 6an you tell K :s it the glare of a fire K :s it the breaking of day K -irth-lights3 or funeral .yreK Who shall say K A.ril "3 !!A$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford ,)T( T(E 1ODS


Sweet lengths of shore with sea between3 Sweet gleams of tender blue and green3 Sweet wind caressi,e and unseen3 Soft breathing from the dee.% What Hoy ha,e : in all sweet things% &ow clear and bright my s.irit sings% 2ising aloft on mystic wings% While sense and body slee.$ :n some such dream of grace and light3 #y soul shall .ass into the sight 9f the dear Bods who in the height 9f inward being dwell% [Page And Hoyful at &er .erfect feet Whom most of all : long to greet3 #y soul shall lie in meadow sweet All white with as.hodel$ August 0*# *++, [Pages
% - *] $]

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford PART )) DREA'-STOR)ES - " - A 5)..A1E OF SEERS A C(R)ST'AS STOR/
A DAY or two before 6hristmas3 a few years since3 : found myself com.elled by business to lea,e )ngland for the 6ontinent$ : am an American3 Hunior .artner in a >ondon mercantile house ha,ing a large Swiss connection% and a transaction I needless to s.ecify here I reFuired immediate and .ersonal su.er,ision abroad3 at a season of the year when : would gladly ha,e ke.t festi,al in >ondon with my friends$ -ut my Hourney was destined to bring me an ad,enture of a ,ery remarkable character3 which made me full amends for the loss of 6hristmas cheer at home$ : crossed the 6hannel at night from Do,er to 6alais$ 8he .assage was bleak and snowy3 and the .assengers were ,ery few$ 9n board the steamboat : remarked one tra,eller whose a..earance and manner struck me as altogether unusual and interesting3 and : deemed it by no means a disagreeable circumstance that3 on arri,ing at 6alais3 this man entered the com.artment of the railway carriage in which : had already seated myself$ So far as the dim light .ermitted me a glim.se of the [Page +] strangerEs face3 : Hudged him to be about fifty years of age$ 8he features were delicate and refined in ty.e3 the eyes dark and dee.-sunken3 but full of intelligence and thought3 and the whole as.ect of the man denoted good birth3 a nature gi,en to study and meditation3 and a life of much sorrowful e0.erience$ 8wo other tra,ellers occu.ied our carriage until Amiens was reached$ 8hey then left us3 and the interesting stranger and : remained alone together$ ( A bitter night(3 : said to him3 as : drew u. the window3 ( and the worst of it is yet to come L 8he early hours of dawn are always the coldest($ ( : su..ose so3( he answered in a gra,e ,oice$ 8he ,oice im.ressed me as strongly as the face% it was subdued and restrained3 the ,oice of a man undergoing great mental suffering$ ( You will find Paris bleak at this season of the year(3 : continued3 longing to make him talk$ ( :t was colder there last winter than in >ondon$( ( : do not stay in Paris3( he re.lied3 ( sa,e to breakfast$(

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


(:ndeed% that is my case$ : am going on to -Ule$( ( And : also(3 he said3 ( and further yet($ 8hen he turned his face to the window3 and would say no more$ #y s.eculations regarding him multi.led with his taciturnity$ : felt con,inced that he was a man with a romance3 and a desire to know its nature became strong in me$ We breakfasted a.art at Paris3 but : watched him into his com.artment for -Ule3 and s.rang in after him$ During the first .art of our Hourney we sle.t% but3 as we neared the Swiss frontier3 a s.irit of wakefulness took hold of us3 and fitful sentences were e0changed$ #y com.anion3 it a..eared3 intended to [Page 7] rest but a single day at -Ule$ &e was bound for far-away Al.ine regions3 ordinarily ,isited by tourists during the summer months only3 and3 one would think3 im.assable at this season of the year$ ( And you go alone K ( : asked him$ ( You will ha,e no com.anions to Hoin youK( ( : shall ha,e guides(3 he answered3 and rela.sed into meditati,e silence$ Presently : ,entured another Fuestion' (You go on business3 .erha.s I not on .leasure K ( &e turned his melancholy eyes on mine$ (Do : look as if : were tra,elling for .leasureEs sake K ( he asked gently$ : felt rebuked3 and hastened to a.ologise$ ( Pardon me% : ought not to ha,e said that$ -ut you interest me greatly3 and : wish3 if .ossible3 to be of ser,ice to you$ :f you are going into Al.ine districts on business and alone3 at this time of the year I ( 8here : hesitated and .aused$ &ow could : tell him that he interested me so much as to make me long to know the romance which3 : felt con,inced3 attached to his e0.edition K Perha.s he .ercei,ed what was in my mind3 for he Fuestioned me in his turn$ ( And you I ha,e you business in -Ule K ( ( Yes3 and in other .laces$ #y accent may ha,e told you my nationality$ : tra,el in the interests of the American firm3 +letcher -ros$3 2oy3 & 6o$3 whose >ondon house3 no doubt3 you know$ -ut : need remain only twenty-four hours in -Ule$ Afterwards : go to -erne3 then to Bene,a$ : must3 howe,er3 wait for letters from )ngland after doing my business at -Ule3 and : shall ha,e some days free$( [Page ] (&ow manyK(

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


( +rom the < st to the <Ath$( &e was silent for a minute3 meditating$ 8hen he took from his tra,elling-bag a porteAfeullle3 and from the porteAfeuille a ,isiting-card3 which he handed to me$ ( 8hat is my name3( he said briefly$ : took the hint3 and returned the com.liment in kind$ 9n his card : read' #2 6&A2>)S D)N:S S8 A=-YN3 Bros,enor SFuare3 >ondon$ St AubynEs 6ourt3 Shrewsbury$ And mine bore the legend' #2 +2ANK 29Y3 #erchantsE 6lub3 W$ 6$ (Now that we are no longer unknown to each other3( said :3 ( may : ask3 without committing an indiscretion3 if : can use the free time at my dis.osal in your interests K ( (You are ,ery good3 #r 2oy$ :t is the characteristic of your nation to be kind-hearted and readily interested in strangers$( Was this sarcasticK : wondered$ Perha.s% but he said it Fuite courteously$ ( : am a solitary and unfortunate man$ -efore : acce.t your kindness3 will you .ermit me to tell you the nature of the Hourney : am makingK :t is a strange one$( &e s.oke huskily3 and with e,ident effort$ : assented eagerly$ 8he following3 recounted in broken sentences3 and with many abru.t .auses3 is the story to which : listened' #r St Aubyn was a widower$ &is only child3 a boy twel,e years of age3 had been for a year .ast afflicted with loss of s.eech and hearing3 the result of a se,ere [Page !] ty.hoid fe,er3 from which he barely esca.ed with life$ >ast summer3 his father3 following medical ad,ice3 brought him to SwitJerland3 in the ho.e that Al.ine air3 change of scene3 e0ercise3 and the .leasure of the tri.3 would restore him to his normal condition$ 9ne day father and son3 led by a guide3 were ascending a mountain .athway3 not ordinarily regarded as dangerous3 when the boy3 ste..ing aside to ,iew the snowy ranges abo,e and around3 sli..ed on a treacherous fragment of half-detached rock3 and went sliding into the ra,ine beneath$ 8he height of the fall was by no means great3 and the le,el ground on which the boy would necessarily alight was o,ergrown with soft herbage and long grass3 so that neither the father nor the Page ;A

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


guide at first concei,ed any serious a..rehensions for the safety of the boyEs life or limbs$ &e might be bruised3 .erha.s e,en a few cuts or a s.rained wrist might disable him for a few days3 but they feared nothing worse than these$ As Fuickly as the sli..ery ground would .ermit3 they descended the winding .ath leading to the meadow3 but when they reached it3 the boy was nowhere to be seen$ &ours .assed in ,ain and an0ious Fuest% no track3 no sound3 no clue assisted the seekers3 and the shouts of the guide3 if they reached3 as doubtless they did3 the s.ot where the lost boy lay3 fell on ears as dull and deadened as those of a cor.se$ Nor could the boy3 if cri..led by his fall3 and unable to show himself3 gi,e e,idence of his whereabouts by so much as a single cry$ -oth tongue and ears were sealed by infirmity3 and any low sound such as that he might ha,e been able to utter would ha,e been rendered inaudible by the torrent rushing through the ra,ine hard by$ At nightfall the search was sus.ended3 to be renewed before daybreak with fresh assistance from the [Page !#] nearest ,illage$ Some of the new-comers s.oke of a ca,e on the slo.e of the meadow3 into which the boy might ha,e cre.t$ 8his was easily reached$ :t was a..arently of but small e0tent% a few goats re.osed in it3 but no trace of the child was disco,erable$ After some days s.ent in futile endea,our3 all ho.e was abandoned$ 8he father returned to )ngland to mourn his lost boy3 and another disaster was added to the annual list of casualties in the Al.s$ So far the story was sad enough3 but hardly romantic$ : clas.ed the hand of the narrator3 and assured him warmly of my sym.athy3 adding3 with as little a..earance of curiosity as : could command' I (And your obHect in coming back is only3 then3 to I to I be near the scene of your great trouble K ( (No3 #r 2oy% that is not the moti,e of my Hourney$ : do not belie,e either that my boyEs cor.se lies concealed among the grasses of the .lateau3 or that it was swe.t away3 as has been suggested3 by the mountain cataract$ Neither hy.othesis seems to me tenable$ 8he bed of the stream was followed and searched for miles% and though3 when he fell3 he was carrying o,er his shoulder a flask and a thick furlined cloak3 I for we e0.ected cold on the heights3 and went .ro,ided against it3 I not a fragment of anything belonging to him was found$ &ad he fallen into the torrent3 it is im.ossible his clothing should not ha,e become detached from the body and caught by the innumerable rocks in the shallow .arts of the stream$ -ut that is not all$ : ha,e another reason for the belief : cherish$( &e leaned forward3 and added in firmer and slower tones' ( : am con,inced that my boy still li,es3 for I V ha e seen him< ( You ha,e seen him L( : cried$ [Page !"] (Yes% again and again I in dreams$ And always in the same way3 and with the same look$ &e stands before me3 beckoning to me3 and making signs that : should come and hel. him$ Not once or twice only3 but many times3 night after night : ha,e seen the same thingL( Poor fatherL Poor desolate manL Not the first dri,en distraught by grief% not the first deluded by the shadows of lo,e and longing L ( You think : am decei,ed by hallucinations3( he said3 watching my face$ ( :t is you who are misled by the scientific idiots of the day3 the wiseacres who teach us to belie,e3 whene,er soul s.eaks to soul3 that the highest and holiest communion attainable by man is the .roduct of .hysical diseaseL +orgi,e me the Page ;7

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


energy of my words% but had you lo,ed and lost your belo,ed I wife and child I as : ha,e done3 you would com.rehend the contem.t and anger with which : regard those modern teachers whose cold and ghastly doctrines gi,e the lie3 not only to all human ho.es and as.irations towards the higher life3 but also to the .ossibility of that ,ery .rogress from lower to nobler forms which is the basis of their own .hiloso.hy3 and to the conce.tion of which the idea of the soul and of lo,e are essential L ),olution .resu..oses .ossible .erfecting3 and the conscious ada.tation of means to ends in order to attain it$ And both the ideal itself and the endea,our to reach it are incom.rehensible without desire3 which is lo,e3 and whose seat is in the interior self3 the li,ing soul I the maker of the outward form L ( &e was roused from his melancholy now3 and s.oke connectedly and with enthusiasm$ : was about to reassure him in regard to my own .hiloso.hical con,ictions3 [Page !$] the soundness of which he seemed to Fuestion3 when his ,oice sank again3 and he added earnestly' I ( : tell you : ha,e seen my boy3 and that : know he li,es3 I not in any far-off s.here beyond the gra,e3 but here on earth3 among li,ing men L 8wice since his loss : ha,e returned from )ngland to seek him3 in obedience to the ,ision3 but in ,ain3 and : ha,e gone back home to dream the same dream$ -ut I only last week I : heard a wonderful story$ :t was told me by a friend who is a great tra,eller3 and who has but Hust returned from a lengthened tour in the south$ : met him at my club3 !y accident3 as unthinking .ersons say$ &e told me that there e0ists3 buried away out of common sight and knowledge3 in the bosom of the Swiss Al.s3 a little ,illage whose inhabitants .ossess3 in ,arying degrees3 a mar,ellous and .riceless faculty$ Almost all the dwellers in this ,illage are mutually related3 either bearing the same ancestral name3 or being branches from one original stock$ 8he founder of this community was a blind man3 who3 by some une0.lained good fortune3 acFuired or became endowed with the .sychic faculty called second sight3 or clair,oyance$ 8his faculty3 it a..ears3 is now the hereditary .ro.erty of the whole ,illage3 more de,elo.ed in the blind manEs immediate heirs than in his remoter relati,es% but3 strange to say3 it is a faculty which3 for a reason connected with the history of its acFuirement3 they enHoy only once a year3 and that is on 6hristmas ),e$ : know well3( continued #r St Aubyn3 (all you ha,e it in your mind to say$ Doubtless3 you would hint to me that the narrator of the tale was amusing himself with my credulity% or that these Al.ine ,illagers3 if they e0ist3 are not clair,oyants3 but charlatans trading on the [Page !%] folly of the curious3 or e,en that the whole story is a chimera of my own dreaming brain$ : am willing that3 if it .lease you3 you should acce.t any of these hy.otheses$ As for me3 in my sorrow and des.air3 : am resol,ed to lea,e no means untried to reco,er my boy% and it ha..ens that the ,illage in Fuestion is not far from the scene of the disaster which de.ri,ed me of him$ A strange ho.e I a confidence e,en I grows in my heart as : a..roach the end of my Hourney$ : belie,e : am about to ,erify the truth of my friendEs story3 and that3 through the wonderful faculty .ossessed by these Al.ine .easants3 the .romise of my ,isions will be realiJed$( &is ,oice broke again3 he ceased s.eaking3 and turned his face away from me$ : was greatly mo,ed3 and an0ious to im.ress him with a belief in the sincerity of my sym.athy3 and in my readiness to acce.t the truth of the tale he had re.eated$ (Do not think(3 : said with some warmth3 ( that : am dis.osed to make light of what you tell me3 strange though it sounds$ 9ut in the West3 where : come from3 : heard3 when a boy3 many a story at least as curious as yours$ :n our wild country3 odd things chance at times3 and Fueer circumstances3 they say3 ha..en in out of the way tracks in forest and .rairie% I aye3 and there are strange creatures that haunt the bush3 some tell3 in .laces where no human foot is wont to tread$ So that nothing of this sort comes Page ;!

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


u.on me with an air of newness3 at leastL : maynEt Fuite trust it3 as you do3 but : am no scoffer$ >ook3 now3 #r St Aubyn3 : ha,e a .ro.osal to make$ You are alone3 and .ur.ose undertaking a bitter and3 it may be3 a .erilous Hourney in mountain ground at this season$ What say you to [Page !&] taking me along with you K #ay be3 : shall .ro,e of some use% and at any rate3 your ad,enture and your story interest me greatly L( : was Fuite tremulous with a..rehension lest he should refuse my reFuest3 but he did not$ &e looked earnestly and e,en fi0edly at me for a minute3 then silently held out his hand and gras.ed mine with energy$ :t was a sealed com.act$ After that we considered oursel,es comrades3 and continued our Hourney together$ 9ur dayEs rest at -Ule being o,er3 and the business which concerned me there transacted3 we followed the route indicated by #r St Aubyn3 and on the e,ening of the <<nd of December arri,ed at a little hill station3 where we found a guide who .romised to conduct us the ne0t morning to the ,illage we sought$ Sunrise found us on our way3 and a tram. of se,eral weary hours3 with occasional breaks for rest and refreshment3 brought us at last to the desired s.ot$ :t was a Fuaint3 .icturesFue little hamlet3 embosomed in a mountain recess3 a sheltered oasis in the midst of a wind-swe.t3 snow-co,ered region$ 8he usual Swiss trade of wood-car,ing a..eared to be the .rinci.al occu.ation of the community$ 8he single narrow street was thronged with goats3 whose Hingling many-toned bells made an incessant and agreeable sym.hony$ =nder the .roHecting roofs of the log-built chUlets bundles of dried herbs swung in the frosty air% stacks of fir-wood3 handy for use3 were .iled about the doorways3 and here and there we noticed a huge dog of the St -ernard breed3 with solemn face3 and massi,e .aws that left tracks like a lionEs in the fresh-fallen snow$ A rosy afternoon-radiance glorified the surrounding mountains and warmed the as.ect of the little ,illage as we entered it$ :t was not [Page !*] more than three oEclock3 yet already the sun drew near the hill-to.s3 and in a short s.ace he would sink behind them and lea,e the ,alleys immersed in twilight$ :nn or hostelry .ro.er there was none in this out of the world recess3 but the .easants were right willing to entertain us3 and the owner of the largest chBlet in the .lace s.eedily made ready the necessary board and lodging$ Su..er I of goatEs milk cheese3 coarse bread3 honey3 and drink .ur.orting to be coffee I being concluded3 the ,illagers began to dro. in by twos and threes to ha,e a look at us% and .resently3 at the in,itation of our host3 we all drew our stools around the .ine-wood fire3 and .artook of a strange be,erage ser,ed hot with sugar and toast3 tasting not unlike elderberry wine$ #eanwhile my )nglish friend3 more con,ersant than myself with the curiously mingled +rench and Berman patois of the district3 .lunged into the narration of his trouble3 and ended with a frank and .athetic a..eal to those .resent3 that if there were any truth in the tale he had heard regarding the annual clair,oyance of the ,illagers3 they would consent to use their .owers in his ser,ice$ Probably they had ne,er been so a..ealed to before$ When my friend had finished s.eaking3 silence3 broken only by a few half-audible whis.ers3 fell on the grou.$ : began to fear that3 after all3 he had been either misinformed or misunderstood3 and was .re.aring to hel. him out with an e0.lanation to the best of my ability3 when a man sitting in the chimney-corner rose and said that3 if we .leased3 he would fetch the grandsons of the original seer3 who would gi,e us the fullest information .ossible on the subHect of our inFuiry$ 8his announcement was encouraging3 and we assented with Hoy$ &e left the chBlet3 and shortly afterwards returned with two [Page !*] stalwart and intelligent-looking men of about thirty and thirtyfi,e res.ecti,ely3 accom.anied by a cou.le of St -ernards3 the most magnificent dogs : had e,er seen$ : Page ;"

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


was reassured instantly3 for the faces of these two .easants were certainly not those of rogues or fools$ 8hey ad,anced to the centre of the assembly3 now numbering some twenty .ersons3 men and women3 and were duly introduced to us by our host as 8heodor and Augustin 2aoul$ A wooden bench by the hearth was accorded them3 the great dogs couched at their feet3 .i.es were lit here and there among the circle% and the scene3 embellished by the ruddy glow of the flaming .ine-logs3 the unfamiliar costume of the .easantry3 the Fuaint furniture of the chalet-kitchen in which we sat3 and enhanced by the strange circumstances of our Hourney and the yet stranger story now recounted by the two 2aouls3 became to my mind e,ery moment more romantic and unworld-like$ -ut the intent and strained e0.ression of St AubynEs features as he bent eagerly forward3 hanging as if for life or death on the words which the brothers .oured forth3 reminded me that3 in one res.ect at least3 the s.ectacle before me .resented a .ainful reality3 and that for this desolate and lonely man e,ery word of the 6hristmas tale told that e,ening was .regnant with im.ort of the dee.est and most serious kind$ &ere3 in )nglish guise3 is the legend of the Al.ine seer3 recounted with much gesticulation and rugged dramatic force by his grandsons3 the younger occasionally inter.olating details which the elder forgot3 confirming the data3 and echoing with a sonorous interHection the e0clamations of the listeners$ Augustin +ranJ 2aoul3 the grandfather of the men who addressed us3 originally differed in no res.ect3 sa,e that [Page !7] of blindness3 from ordinary .eo.le$ 9ne 6hristmas ),e3 as the day drew towards twilight3 and a dri,ing storm of froJen snow raged o,er the mountains3 he3 his dog &ans3 and his mule were fighting their way home u. the .ass in the teeth of the tem.est$ At a turn of the road they came on a .riest carrying the 4iaticum to a dying man who inhabited a solitary hut in the ,alley below$ 8he .riest was on foot3 almost s.ent with fatigue3 and bewildered by the blinding snow which obscured the .athway and grew e,ery moment more im.enetrable and harder to face$ 8he whirling flakes circled and danced before his sight3 the winding .ath was well-nigh obliterated3 his brain grew diJJy and his feet unsteady3 and he felt that without assistance he should ne,er reach his destination in safety$ -lind 2aoul3 though himself tired3 and longing for shelter3 listened with sym.athy to the .riestEs com.laint3 and answered3 (+ather3 you know well : am hardly a .ious son of the 6hurch% but if the .enitent dying down yonder needs s.iritual consolation from her3 &ea,en forbid that : should not do my utmost to hel. you to him L Sightless though : am3 : know my way o,er these crags as no other man knows it3 and the snow-storm which bewilders your eyes so much cannot daJe mine$ 6ome3 mount my mule3 &ans will go with us3 and we three will take you to your HourneyEs end safe and sound$( ( Son(3 answered the .riest3 (Bod will reward you for this act of charity$ 8he .enitent to whom : go bears an e,il re.utation as a sorcerer3 and we all know his name well enough in these .arts$ &e may ha,e some crime on his conscience which he desires to confess before death$ -ut for your timely hel. : should not be able to fight my way through this [Page ! ] tem.est to his door3 and he would certainly .erish unshri,en$/ 8he fury of the storm increased as darkness came on$ Dense clouds of snow obscured the whole landsca.e3 and rendered sky and mountain alike indistinguishable$ 8error seiJed the .riest% but for the blind man3 to whose sight day and night were indifferent3 these horrors had no great danger$ &e and his dumb friends .lodded Fuietly and slowly on in the accustomed .ath3 and at length3 close u.on midnight3 the ,alley was safely reached3 and the .riest ushered into the .resence of his .enitent$ What the dying sorcererEs confession was the blind man ne,er knew% but after it was o,er3 and the Sacred &ost had .assed his li.s3 2aoul was summoned to his bedside3 where a strange and solemn ,oice greeted him by name and thanked him for the ser,ice he had rendered$ Page AC

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


(+riend(3 said the dying man3 (you will ne,er know how great a debt : owe you$ -ut before : .ass out of the world3 : would fain do somewhat towards re.ayment$ Sorcerer though : am by re.ute3 : cannot gi,e you that which3 were it .ossible3 : would gi,e with all my heart3 the blessing of .hysical sight$ -ut may Bod hear the last earthly .rayer of a dying .enitent3 and grant you a better gift and a rarer one than e,en that of the sight of your outward eyes3 by o.ening those of your s.irit L And may the faculty of that interior ,ision be continued to you and yours so long as ye use it in deeds of mercy and human kindness such as this L( 8he s.eaker laid his hand a moment on the blind manEs forehead3 and his li.s mo,ed silently awhile3 though 2aoul saw it not$ 8he .riest and he remained to the last with the .enitent% and when the grey 6hristmas [Page !!] morning broke o,er the whitened .lain they left the little hut in which the cor.se lay3 to a..rise the dwellers in the ,alley hamlet of the death of the wiJard3 and to arrange for his burial$ And e,er since that 6hristmas ),e3 said the two 2aouls3 their grandfather found himself when the sacred time came round again3 year after year3 .ossessed of a new and e0traordinary .ower3 that of seeing with the inward senses of the s.irit whate,er he desired to see3 and this as .lainly and distinctly3 miles distant3 as at his own threshold$ 8he .ower of interior ,ision came u.on him in slee. or in trance3 .recisely as with the .ro.hets and sybils of old3 and in this condition3 sometimes momentary only3 whole scenes were flashed before him3 the faces of friends leagues away became ,isible3 and he seemed to touch their hands$ At these times nothing was hidden from him% it was necessary only that he should desire fer,ently to see any .articular .erson or .lace3 and that the intent of the wish should be innocent3 and he became straightway clair,oyant$ 8o the blind man3 de.ri,ed in early childhood of .hysical sight3 this miraculous .ower was an inestimable consolation3 and 6hristmas ),e became to him a festi,al of illumination whose annual reminiscences and antici.ations brightened the whole round of the year$ And when at length he died3 the faculty remained a family heritage3 of which all his descendants .artook in some degree3 his two grandsons3 as his nearest kin3 .ossessing the gift in its com.letest de,elo.ment$ And I most strange of all I the two hounds which lay couched before us by the hearth3 a..eared to enHoy a share of the sorcererEs benison L 8hese dogs3 +ritJ and -runo3 directly descended from &ans3 had often dis.layed strong e,idence of lucidity3 and under its influence they had been known to [Page "##] act with acumen and sagacity wholly beyond the reach of ordinary dogs$ 8heir immediate sire3 BlWck3 was the .ro.erty of a community of monks li,ing fourteen miles distant in the Arblen ,alley% and though the 2aouls were not aware that he had yet distinguished himself by any remarkable e0.loit of a clair,oyant character3 he was commonly credited with a goodly share of the family gift$ (And the mule K ( : asked thoughtlessly$ (8he mule3 monsieur(3 re.lied the younger 2aoul3 with a smile3 (has been dead many long years$ Naturally he left no .osterity$( 8hus ended the tale3 and for a brief s.ace all remained silent3 while many glances stole furti,ely towards St Aubyn$ &e sat motionless3 with bowed head and folded arms3 absorbed in thought$ 9ne by one the members of the grou. around us rose3 knocked the ashes from their .i.es3 and with a few brief words Fuitted the chBlet$ :n a few minutes there remained only our host3 the two 2aouls3 with their dogs3 my friend3 and myself$ 8hen St Aubyn found his ,oice$ &e too rose3 and in slow tremulous tones3 addressing 8heodor3 asked3 I Page A

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


(You will ha,e e,erything .re.ared for an e0.edition tomorrow3 in case I you should ha,e anything to tell usK/ (All shall be in readiness3 monsieur$ Pierre 1the host5 will wake you by sunrise3 for with the dawn of 6hristmas ),e our lucid faculty returns to us3 and if we should ha,e good news to gi,e3 the start ought to be made early$ We may ha,e far to go3 and the days are short$/ &e whistled to the great hounds3 wished us good-night3 [Page "#"] and the two brothers left the house together3 followed by +ritJ and -runo$ Pierre lighted a lantern3 and mounting a ladder in the corner of the room3 in,ited us to accom.any him$ We clambered u. this .rimiti,e staircase with some difficulty3 and .resently found oursel,es in a bedchamber not less Fuaint and .icturesFue than the kitchen below$ 9ur beds were both .re.ared in this room3 round the walls of which were .iled goatEs-milk cheeses3 dried herbs3 sacks of meal3 and other winter .ro,ender$ 9utside it was a star-lit night3 clear3 calm3 and frosty3 with brilliant .romise for the coming day$ >ong after : was in the land of dreams3 : fancy St Aubyn lay awake3 following with restless eyes the stars in their courses3 and wondering whether from some far-off3 unknown s.ot his lost boy might not be watching them also$ Dawn3 grey and misty3 enwra..ed the little ,illage when : was startled from my slee. by a noisy chorus of ,oices and a busy hurrying of footste.s$ A moment later some one3 hea,ily booted3 ascended the ladder leading to our bedroom3 and a .onderous knock resounded on our door$ St Aubyn s.rang from his bed3 lifted the latch3 and admitted the younger 2aoul3 whose beaming eyes and e0cited manner betrayed3 before he s.oke3 the good tidings in store$ (We ha,e seen him L( he cried3 throwing u. his hands trium.hantly abo,e his head$ ( -oth of us ha,e seen your son3 monsieur L Not half an hour ago3 Hust as the dawn broke3 we saw him in a ,ision3 ali,e and well in a mountain ca,e3 se.arated from the ,alley by a broad torrent$ An Angel of the good >ord has ministered to him' it is a miracleL 6ourage3 he will be restored to you$ Dress Fuickly3 and come down to breakfast$ ),erything is ready for the e0.edition3 and there is no time to loseL ( 8hese broken eHaculations were interru.ted by the ,oice of the elder brother3 calling from the foot of the ladder' (#ake haste3 messieurs3 if you .lease$ 8he ,alley we ha,e seen in our dream is fully twel,e miles away3 and to reach it we shall ha,e to cut our way through the snow$ :t is bad at this time of the year3 and the .asses may be blocked L 6ome3 Augustin L( ),erything was now hurry and commotion$ All the ,illage was astir% the e0citement became intense$ +rom Page A<

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


the window we saw men running eagerly towards our chBlet with .icka0es3 ro.es3 hatchets3 and other necessary adHuncts of Al.ine ad,enture$ 8he two great hounds3 with others of their breed3 were bounding Hoyfully about in the snow3 and showing3 : thought3 by their intelligent glances and im.atient beha,iour3 that they already understood the nature of the intended dayEs work$ At sunrise we sat down to a hearty meal3 and amid the clamor of ,oices and rattling of .latters3 the elder 2aoul unfolded to us his .lans for reaching the ,alley3 which both he and his brother had recogniJed as the higher le,el of the Arblen3 se,eral thousand feet abo,e our .resent altitude3 and in mid-winter a .erilous .lace to ,isit$ (8he s.ot is com.letely shut off from the ,alley by the cataract(3 said he3 (and last year a landsli. blocked u. the only route to it from the mountains$ &ow the child got there is a mystery L( ( We must cut our way o,er the 8hurgau Pass(3 cried Augustin$ (8hat is Hust my idea$ Duick now3 if you ha,e [Page "#%] finished eating3 call Beorges and Albert3 and take the ro.es with you L ( 9ur little .arty was s.eedily eFui..ed3 and amid the lusty cheers of the men and the sym.athetic murmurs of the women3 we .assed swiftly through the little snow-car.eted street and struck into the mountain .ath$ We were si0 in number3 St Aubyn and myself3 the two 2aouls3 and a cou.le of ,illagers carrying the reFuisite im.lements of mountaineering3 while the two dogs3 +ritJ and -runo3 trotted on before us$ At the outset there was some rough ground to tra,erse3 and considerable work to be done with ro.es and tools3 for the sli..ery edges of the highland .ath afforded scarce any foothold3 and in some .arts the difficulties a..eared well-nigh insurmountable$ -ut e,ery fresh obstacle o,ercome added a new Jest to our resolution3 and3 cheered by the reiterated cry of the two seers3 (6ourage3 messieurs L A anCDonsL 8he worst will soon be .assed L( we .ushed forward with right good will3 and at length found oursel,es on a broad rocky .lateau$ All this time the two hounds had taken the lead3 .ioneering us with amaJing skill round .reci.itous corners3 and s.ringing from crag to crag o,er the icy ra,ines with a daring and .recision which curdled my blood to witness$ :t was a relief to see them finally descend the narrow .ass in safety3 and halt beside us .anting and e0ultant$ All around lay glittering reaches of untrodden snow3 blinding to look at3 scintillant as diamond dust$ We sat down to rest on some scattered boulders3 and gaJed with wonder at the magnificent ,istas of glowing .eaks towering abo,e us3 and the luminous e0.anse of .ur.le gorge and ,alley3 with the white3 roaring torrents [Page "#&] below3 o,er which wreaths of foam-like filmy mist ho,ered and floated continually$ As : sat3 lost in admiration3 St Aubyn touched my arm3 and silently .ointed to 8heodor 2aoul$ &e had risen3 and now stood at the edge of the .lateau o,erhanging the lowland landsca.e3 his head raised3 his Page A?

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


eyes wide-o.ened3 his whole a..earance indicati,e of magnetic trance$ While we looked he turned slowly towards us3 mo,ed his hands to and fro with a gesture of uncertainty3 as though feeling his way in the dark3 and s.oke with a slow dreamy utterance' (: see the lad sitting in the entrance of the ca,ern3 looking out across the ,alley3 as though e0.ecting some one$ &e is .allid and thin3 and wears a dark-coloured mantle I a large mantle I lined with sable fur$( St Aubyn s.rang from his seat$ True L he e0claimed$ ( :t is the mantle he was carrying on his arm when he sli..ed o,er the .ass L 93 thank Bod for that% it may ha,e sa,ed his lifeL( (8he .lace in which : see your boy(3 continued the mountaineer3 (is fully three miles distant from the .lateau on which we now stand$ -ut : do not know how to reach it$ : cannot discern the track$ : am at faultL ( &e mo,ed his hands im.atiently to and fro3 and cried in tones which manifested the disa..ointment he felt' (: can see no moreL the ,ision .asses from me$ : can disco,er nothing but confused sha.es merged in e,er-increasing darkness L( We gathered round him in some dismay3 and St Aubyn urged the younger 2aoul to attem.t an elucidation of the difficulty$ -ut he too failed$ 8he scene in the ca,e a..eared to him with .erfect distinctness% but when he stro,e to trace the .ath which should conduct [Page "#*] us to it3 .rofound darkness obliterated the ,ision$ (:t must be underground3( he said3 using the gro.ing action we had already obser,ed on 8heodorEs .art$ ( :t is im.ossible to distinguish anything3 sa,e a few ,ague outlines of rock$ Now there is not a glimmer of light% all is .rofound gloom L( Suddenly3 as we stood discussing the situation3 one ad,ising this3 another that3 a shar. bark from one of the hounds startled us all3 and immediately arrested our consultation$ :t was +ritJ who had thus interru.ted the debate$ &e was running e0citedly to and fro3 sniffing about the edge of the .lateau3 and e,ery now and then turning himself with an abru.t Herk3 as if seeking something which eluded him$ Presently -runo Hoined in this mysterious Fuest3 and the ne0t moment3 to our admiration and amaJement3 both dogs simultaneously lifted their heads3 their eyes illumined with intelligence and delight3 and uttered a .rolonged and Hoyous cry that re,erberated chorus-like from the mountain wall behind us$ (8hey know L 8hey see L 8hey ha,e the clue L ( cried the .easants3 as the two hounds lea.t from the .lateau down the stee. decli,ity leading to the ,alley3 scattering the snow-drifts of the cre,ices .ell-mell in their headlong career$ :n frantic haste we resumed our loads3 and hurried after our flying guides with what s.eed we could$ When the dogs had reached the ne0t le,el3 they .aused and waited3 standing with u.lifted heads and dri..ing tongues while we clambered down the gorge to Hoin them$ Again they took the lead% but this time the way was more intricate3 and their .rogress slower$ Single-file we followed them along a narrow winding track of [Page "#+] broken ground3 o,er which e,ery moment a tiny torrent foamed and tumbled% and as we descended the air became less keen3 the snow rarer3 and a few .atches of gentian and hardy .lants a..eared on the craggy sides of the mountain$ Page A@

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


Suddenly a great agitation seiJed St Aubyn$ (>ook L lookL( he cried3 clutching me by the arm% ( here3 where we stand3 is the ,ery s.ot from which my boy fellL And below yonder is the ,alley L( ),en as he uttered the words3 the dogs halted and came towards us3 looking wistfully into St AubynEs face3 as though they fain would s.eak to him$ We stood still3 and looked down into the green ,alley3 green e,en in mid-winter3 where a score of goats were browsing in the sunshine$ &ere my friend would ha,e descended3 but the 2aouls bade him trust the leadershi. of the dogs$ ( +ollow them3 monsieur(3 said 8heodor3 im.ressi,ely% ( they can see3 and you cannot$ :t is the good Bod that conducts them$ Doubtless they ha,e brought us to this s.ot to show you they know it3 and to ins.ire you with confidence in their skill and guidance$ SeeL they are ad,ancingL 9n L do not let us remain behindL 8hus urged3 we hastened after our canine guides3 who3 im.elled by the mysterious influence of their strange faculty3 were again .ressing forward$ 8his time the track ascended$ Soon we lost sight of the ,alley3 and an hourEs u.ward scrambling o,er loose rocks and shar. crags brought us to a chasm3 the two edges of which were se.arated by a .reci.itous gulf some twenty feet across$ 8his chasm was .robably about eight or nine hundred feet dee.3 and its sides were straight and sheer as those of a well$ 9ur ladders were in reFuisition3 [Page "#7] now3 and with the aid of these and the ro.es3 all the members of our .arty3 human and canine3 were safely landed on the o..osite brink of the abyss$ We had co,ered about two miles of difficult ground beyond the chasm3 when once more3 on the brow of a .roHecting eminence3 the hounds halted for the last time3 and drew near St Aubyn3 gaJing u. at him with eloFuent e0ulting eyes3 as though they would ha,e said3 ( .e "hom you see% is here E < :t was a wild and desolate s.ot3 strewn with tem.est-torn branches3 a s.ot hidden from the sun by dense masses of .ine foliage3 and backed by shar. .eaks of granite$ St Aubyn looked around him3 trembling with emotion$ (Shout(3 cried one of the .easants% ( shout3 the boy may hear you L ( (Alas(3 answered the father3 (he cannot hear% you forget that my child is deaf and dumb L( At that instant3 8heodor3 who for a brief while had stood a.art3 abstracted and silent3 a..roached St Aubyn and gras.ed his hand$ (ShoutL( re.eated he3 with the earnestness of a command% ( call your boy by his name L ( St Aubyn looked at him with astonishment% then in a clear .iercing ,oice obeyed$

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(CharlieL( he cried% (Charlie# my !oy E "here are you K ( We stood around him in dread silence and e0.ectancy3 a grou. for a .icture$ St Aubyn in the midst3 with white Fui,ering face and clas.ed hands3 the two 2aouls on either side3 listening intently3 the dogs motionless and eager3 their ears erect3 their hair bristling round their stretched throats$ You might ha,e heard a .in dro. on [Page "# ] the rock at our feet3 as we stood and waited after that cry$ A minute .assed thus3 and then there was heard from below3 at a great de.th3 a faint uncertain sound$ 9ne word only I uttered in the ,oice of a child3 tremulous3 and intensely earnest' ( 1ather L ( St Aubyn fell on his knees$ (#y Bod L my Bod L( he cried3 sobbing% (it is my boy L &e is ali,e3 and can hear and s.eak L( With fe,erish haste we descended the crag3 and s.eedily found oursel,es on a green sward3 sheltered on three sides by high walls of cliff3 and bounded on the fourth3 southward3 by a rushing stream some thirty feet from shore to shore$ -eyond the stream was a wide e0.anse of .asture stretching down into the Arblen ,alley$ Again St Aubyn shouted3 and again the child-like cry re.lied3 guiding us to a narrow gorge or fissure in the cliff almost hidden under e0uberant foliage$ 8his .assage brought us to a turfy knoll3 u.on which o.ened a dee. recess in the mountain rock% a .icturesFue ca,ern3 car.eted with moss3 and showing3 from some ancient3 half obliterated car,ings which here and there adorned its walls3 that :t had once ser,ed as a cry.t or cha.el3 .ossibly in some time of ecclesiastical .ersecution$ At the mouth of this ca,e3 with startled eyes and .allid .arted li.s3 stood a fair-haired lad3 wra..ed in the mantle described by the elder 2aoul$ 9ne instant only he stood there% the ne0t he darted forward3 and fell with wee.ing and inarticulate cries into his fatherEs embrace$ We .aused3 and waited aloof in silence3 res.ecting the su.reme Hoy and emotion of a greeting so sacred as this$ 8he dogs only3 bursting into the ca,e3 lea.t and [Page "#!] gambolled about3 ,enting their satisfaction in sonorous barks and turbulent demonstrations of delight$ -ut for them3 as they seemed well to know3 this mar,ellous disco,ery would ha,e ne,er been achie,ed3 and the drama which now ended with so great ha..iness3 might ha,e terminated in a life-long tragedy$ 8herefore we were not sur.rised to see St Aubyn3 after the first trans.ort of the meeting3 turn to the dogs3 and clas.ing each huge rough head in turn3 kiss it fer,ently and with grateful tears$ :t was their only guerdon for that dayEs .riceless ser,ice' the dumb beasts that lo,e us do not work for gold L And now came the history of the three long months which had ela.sed since the occurrence of the disaster which se.arated my friend from his little son$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


Seated on the soft moss of the ca,ern floor3 St Aubyn in the midst and the boy beside him3 we listened to the seFuel of the strange tale recounted the .receding e,ening by 8heodor and Augustin 2aoul$ And first we learnt that until the moment when his fatherEs shout broke u.on his ear that day3 6harlie St Aubyn had remained as insensible to sound and as mute of ,oice as he was when his accident befell him$ ),en now that the .owers of hearing and of s.eech were restored3 he articulated uncertainly and with great difficulty3 lea,ing many words unfinished3 and hel.ing out his .hrases with gesticulations and signs3 his father suggesting and assisting as the narrati,e .roceeded$ Was it the strong lo,e in St AubynEs cry that broke through the s.ell of disease and thrilled his childEs dulled ner,es into life K was it the shock of an emotion coming une0.ected and intense after all those dreary weeks of futile watchfulness K or was the miracle an effect of the same Di,ine grace which3 by [Page ""#] means of a mysterious gift3 had enabled us to track and to find this obscure and unknown s.ot K :t matters little% the s.irit of man is master of all things3 and the miracles of lo,e are myriad-fold$ +or3 where lo,e abounds and is .ure3 the s.irit of man is as the S.irit of Bod$ >ittle St Aubyn had been sa,ed from death3 and sustained during the .ast three months by a creature dumb like himself' I a large dog e0actly resembling +ritJ and -runo$ 8his dog3 he ga,e us to understand3 came from o er the torrent3 indicating with a gesture the Arblen 4alley% and3 from the beginning of his troubles3 had been to him like a human friend$ 8he fall from the hill-side had not seriously inHured3 but only bruised and tem.orarily lamed the lad3 and after lying for a minute or two a little stunned and giddy3 he rose and with some difficulty made his way across the meadow slo.e on which he found himself3 e0.ecting to meet his father descending the .ath$ -ut he miscalculated its direction3 and s.eedily disco,ered he had lost his way$ After waiting a long time in great sus.ense3 and seeing no one but a few goatherds at a distance3 whose attention he failed to attract3 the .ain of a twisted ankle3 increased by continual mo,ement3 com.elled him to seek a nightEs shelter in the ca,e subseFuently ,isited by his father at the suggestion of the .easants who assisted in the search$ 8hese .easants were not aware that the ca,e was but the mouth of a ,ast and wandering labyrinth tunnelled3 .artly by nature and .artly by art3 through the rocky heart of the mountain$ A little before sunrise3 on the morning after his accident3 the boy3 e0amining with minute curiosity the .icturesFue grotto in which he had .assed the night3 disco,ered in its darkest corner a [Page """] moss-co,ered stone behind which had accumulated a great Fuantity of weeds3 i,y3 and loose rubbish$ -oy-like3 he fell to clearing away these im.edimenta and e0ca,ating the stone3 until3 after some industrious labour thus e0.ended3 he dismantled behind and a little abo,e it a narrow .assage3 into which he cre.t3 .artly to satisfy his lo,e of eFploring3 .artly in the ho.e that it might afford him an egress in the direction of the ,illage$ 8he a.erture thus e0.osed had not3 in fact3 esca.ed the eye of St Aubyn3 when about an hour afterwards the search for the lost boy was renewed$ -ut one of his guides3 after a brief ins.ection3 declared the recess into which it o.ened em.ty3 and the .arty3 satisfied with his re.ort3 left the s.ot3 little thinking that all their labour had been lost by a too hasty e0amination$ +or3 in fact3 this narrow and a..arently limited .assage gradually widened in its darkest .art3 and3 as little St Aubyn found3 became by degrees a tolerably roomy corridor3 in which he could Hust manage to walk u.right3 and into which light from the outer world .enetrated dimly through artificial fissures hollowed out at inter,als in the rocky wall$ Delighted at this disco,ery3 but chilled by the ,ault-like coldness of the .lace3 the lad hastened back to fetch the fur mantle he had left in the ca,e3 threw it o,er his shoulders3 and returned to continue his e0.loration$ 8he ca,ern gallery beguiled him with e,er-new wonders at e,ery ste.$ &ere rose a subterranean s.ring3 there a rudely car,ed gurgoyle grinned from the granite roof% curious and intricate windings enticed his eager ste.s3 while all the time the death-like and horrible silence which might ha,e deterred an ordinary child from further ad,ance3 failed of its effect u.on ears unable to distinguish between the li,ing sounds of the Page A7

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


outer world and the stillness of a se.ulchre$[Page ""$] 8hus he gro.ed and wandered3 until he became aware that the gloom of the corridor had gradually dee.ened3 and that the tiny o.enings in the rock were now far less freFuent than at the outset$ ),en to his eyes3 by this time accustomed to obscurity3 the darkness grew .ortentous3 and at e,ery ste. he stumbled against some unseen .roHection3 or bruised his hands in ,ain efforts to disco,er a returning .ath$ 8oo late he began to a..rehend that he was nearly lost in the heart of the mountain$ )ither the windings of the labyrinth were ho.elessly confusing3 or some dCG!ris3 dislodged by the unaccustomed concussion of footste.s3 had fallen from the roof and choked the .assage behind him$ 8he account which the boy ga,e of his ad,enture3 and of his ,ain and longcontinued efforts to retrace his way3 made the latter hy.othesis a..ear to us the more acce.table3 the noise occasioned by such a fall ha,ing of course .assed unheeded by him$ :n the end3 thoroughly baffled and e0hausted3 the lad determined to work on through the 6immerian darkness in the ho.e of disco,ering a second terminus on the further side of the mountain$ 8his at length he did$ A faint star-like outlet finally .resented itself to his delighted eyes% he gro.ed .ainfully towards it% gradually it widened and brightened3 till at length he emerged from the subterranean gulf which had so long im.risoned him into the mountain ca,e wherein he had e,er since remained$ &ow long it had taken him to accom.lish this .assage he could not guess3 but from the sunEs .osition it seemed to be about noon when he again beheld day$ &e sat down3 daJJled and fatigued3 on the mossy floor of the grotto3 and watched the mountain torrent eddying and swee.ing furiously .ast in the gorge beneath his retreat$ After [Page ""%] a while he sle.t3 and awoke towards e,ening faint with hunger and bitterly regretting the affliction which .re,ented him from attracting hel.$ Suddenly3 to his great amaJe3 a huge tawny head a..eared abo,e the rocky edge of the .lateau3 and in another moment a St -ernard hound clambered u. the stee. bank and ran towards the ca,e$ &e was dri..ing wet3 and carried3 stra..ed across his broad back3 a double panier3 the contents of which .ro,ed on ins.ection to consist of three flasks of goatEs milk3 and some half-doJen rye loa,es .acked in a tin bo0$ 8he friendly e0.ression and intelligent demeanour of his ,isitor in,ited little St AubynEs confidence and reanimated his sinking heart$ Delighted at such e,idence of human .ro0imity3 and eager for food3 he drank of the goatEs milk and ate .art of the bread3 afterwards em.tying his .ockets of the few sous he .ossessed and enclosing them with the remaining loa,es in the tin case3 ho.ing that the sight of the coins would inform the dogEs owners of the incident$ 8he creature went as he came3 .lunging into the dee.est and least boisterous .art of the torrent3 which he crossed by swimming3 regained the o..osite shore3 and soon disa..eared from ,iew$ -ut ne0t day3 at about the same hour3 the dog rea..eared alone3 again bringing milk and bread3 of which again the lad .artook3 this time3 howe,er3 ha,ing no sous to de.osit in the basket$ And when3 as on the .re,ious day3 his new friend rose to de.art3 6harlie St Aubyn left the ca,e with him3 clambered down the bank with difficulty3 and essayed to cross the torrent ford$ -ut the de.th and ra.idity of the current dismayed him3 and with sinking heart the child returned to his abode$ ),ery day the same thing ha..ened3 and at length the strange [Page ""&] life became familiar to him3 the trees3 the birds3 and the flowers became his friends3 and the great hound a mysterious .rotector whom he regarded with re,erent affection and trusted with entire confidence$ At night he dreamed of home3 and constantly ,isited his father in ,isions3 saying always the same words3 ( 1ather# = am ali e and "ell.< (And now(3 whis.ered the child3 nestling closer in St AubynEs embrace3 ( the wonderful thing is that today3 Page A!

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


for the first and only time since : ha,e been in this ca,e3 my dog has not come to me L :t looks3 does it not3 as if in some strange and fairy-like way he really knew what was ha..ening3 and had known it all along from the ,ery beginningL 9 father L can he be I do you think I can he be an Angel in disguiseK And3 to be sure3 : .atted him3 and thought he was only a dog L( As the boy3 an awed e0.ression in his lifted blue eyes3 ga,e utterance to this naX,e idea3 : glanced at St AubynEs face3 and saw that3 though his li.s smiled3 his eyes were gra,e and full of grateful wonder$ &e turned towards the .easants grou.ed around us3 and in their own language recited to them the childEs story$ 8hey listened intently3 from time to time e0changing among themsel,es intelligent glances and muttering interHections e0.ressi,e of astonishment$ When the last word of the tale was s.oken3 the elder 2aoul3 who stood at the entrance of the ca,e3 gaJing out o,er the sunlit ,alley of the Arblen3 remo,ed his hat with a re,erent gesture and crossed himself$ (Bod forgi,e us miserable sinners(3 he said humbly3 (and .ardon us our human .rideL 8he Angel of the >ord whom Augustin and : beheld in our ,ision3 ministering to the lad3 is no other than the dog BlWck who [Page ""*] li,es at the monastery out yonder L And while we men are lucid only once a year3 he has the seeing gift all the year round3 and the good Bod showed him the lad in this ca,e3 when we3 forsooth3 should ha,e looked for him in ,ain$ : know that e,ery day BlWck is sent from the monastery laden with food and drink to a .oor widow li,ing u. yonder o,er the ra,ine$ She is infirm and bedridden3 and her little grand-daughter takes care of her$ Doubtless the .oor soul took the sous in the basket to be the gift of the brothers3 and3 as her .ortion is not always the same from day to day3 but de.ends on what they can s.are from the store set a.art for almsgi,ing3 she would not notice the diminished cakes and milk3 sa,e .erha.s to grumble a little at the increase of the beggars who tres.assed thus on her .ension$( 8here was silence among us for a moment3 then St AubynEs boy s.oke$ (+ather(3 he asked3 tremulously3 (shall : not see that good BlYZck again and tell the monks how he sa,ed me3 and how +ritJ and -runo brought you here K( ( Yes3 my child(3 answered St Aubyn3 rising3 and drawing the boyEs hand into his own3 (we will go and find BlYZck3 who knows3 no doubt3 all that has .assed today3 and is waiting for us at the monastery$( ( We must ford the torrent3( said Augustin% ( the bridge was carried off by last yearEs a,alanche3 but with si0 of us and the dogs it will be easy work$( 8wilight was falling% and already the stars of 6hristmas ),e climbed the frosty hea,ens and a..eared abo,e the snowy far-off .eaks$ +illed with gratitude and wonder at all the strange e,ents of the day we betook oursel,es to the ford3 and by the hel. of ro.es and stocks our whole .arty landed [Page ""+] safely on the ,alley side$ Another halfPage A"

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


hour brought us into the warm glow of the monkEs refectory fire3 where3 while su..er was .re.ared3 the worthy brothers listened to a tale at least as mar,ellous as any legend in their ecclesiastical re.ertory$ : fancy they must ha,e felt a .ang of regret that holy #other 6hurch would find it im.ossible to bestow u.on BlWck and his two noble sons the dignity of canoniJation$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - $ - STEEPS)DE A 1(OST STOR/


8&) strange things : am going to tell you3 dear reader3 did not occur3 as such things generally do3 to my great-uncle3 or to my second cousin3 or e,en to my grandfather3 but to myself$ :t ha..ened that a few years ago : recei,ed an in,itation from an old schoolfellow to s.end 6hristmas week with him in his country house on the borders of North Wales3 and3 as : was then a ha..y bachelor3 and had not seen my friend for a considerable time3 : acce.ted the in,itation3 and turned my back u.on >ondon on the a..ointed day with a light heart and antici.ations of the .leasantest descri.tion$ >ea,ing my 6ity haunts by a morning train3 : was landed early in the afternoon at the nearest station to my friendEs house3 although in this case nearest was indeed3 as it .ro,ed3 by no means near$ When : reached the inn where : had fondly e0.ected to find ( flys3 omnibuses3 and other ,ehicles obtainable on the shortest notice3( : was met by the landlady of the establishment3 [Page ""7] who3 with an a.ologetic curtsey and a de.recating smile3 informed me that she was e0tremely sorry to say her last con,eyance had Hust started with a .arty3 and would not return until late at night$ : looked at my watch% it was nearing four$ Se,en miles3 and : had a large tra,elling-bag to carry$ (:s it a good road from here to -----K( : asked the landlady$ (9h yes3 sir% ,ery fair$( (Well(3 : said3 (: think :Ell walk it$ 8he railway Hourney has rather numbed my feet3 and a shar. walk will certainly im.ro,e their tem.erature$( So : courageously lifted my bag and set out on the Hourney to my friendEs house$ Ah3 how little : guessed what was destined to befall me before : reached that desired ha,enL : had gone3 : su..ose3 about two miles when : descried behind me a ,ast mass of dark3 surging cloud dri,ing u. ra.idly with the wind$ : was in o.en country3 and there was e,idently going to be a ,ery hea,y snowstorm$ Presently it began$ At first : made u. my mind not to heed it% but in about twenty minutes after the commencement of the fall the snow became so thick and so blinding3 that it was absolutely im.ossible for me to find my way along a road which was utterly new to me$ #oreo,er3 with the cloud came the twilight3 and a most disagreeably keen wind$ 8he tra,elling-bag became unbearably hea,y$ : shifted it from one hand to the other% : hung it o,er my shoulder% : .ut it under my arm% : carried it in all sorts of ways3 but none afforded me any .ermanent relief$ 8o add to my misfortune3 : strongly sus.ected that : had mistaken my way3 for by this time the snow was so dee. that the foot.ath was altogether obliterated$ :n this .redicament : [Page "" ] looked out wistfully across the whitened landsca.e for signs of an inn or habitation of some descri.tion where : might put up for the night3 and by good fortune 1or was it bad K5 : at last es.ied through the gathering gloom a solitary and not ,ery distant light twinkling from a lodge at the entrance of a .ri,ate road$ : fought my way through the snow as Fuickly as .ossible3 and3 .resenting myself at the gate of the little cottage3 rang the bell com.lacently3 and flattered myself that : had at length disco,ered a resting.lace$ An old man with grey hair answered my summons$ &im : acFuainted with my misfortune3 and to him : .referred my reFuest that : might be allowed a nightEs shelter in the lodge3 or at least the tem.orary Page 7

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


.ri,ilege of drying myself and mes ha!illements at his fireside$ 8he old fellow admitted me cheerfully enough% but he seemed more than doubtful as to the .ossibility of my .assing the night beneath his roof$ (Ye see3 sir(3 he said3 (weE,e only one small room I me and the missis% and : donEt well see how weEre to manage about you$ All the same3 sir3 : wouldnEt ad,ise ye to go on tonight3 for if yeEre bound for #r ------Es3 yeE,e come a deal out of your way3 and the stormEs getting worse and worse e,ery minute$ We shall ha,e a nasty night of it3 sir3 and itEll be a deal too stiff for tra,elling on foot$( &ere the wife3 a hos.itable-looking old woman3 inter.osed$ (Willum3 donEt ye think as the gentleman might be .ut to slee. in the room u. at the &ouse3 where Beorge sle.t last time he was here to see us K &is bedEs there still3 ye know$ :tEs a ,ery good room3 sir3( she argued3 addressing me% ( and : can gi,e ye a .air of blankets in no time$([Page ""!] (-ut( said :3 (the master of the house doesnEt know me$ : am a stranger here altogether$( (>orL bless ye3 sir L( answered my host3 ( there ainEt nobody in the .lace$ 8he house has been to let these ten years at least to my knowledge% for :E,e been here eight3 and the house and the lodge had both been em.ty no one knows how long when : come3 : rents this cottage of #r &oughton3 out yonder$( (9h well(3 : reHoined3 (if that is the case3 and there is nobodyEs lea,e sa,e yours to ask3 :Em willing enough to slee. at the house3 and thank you too for your kindness$( So it was arranged that : should .ass the coming night within the walls of the em.ty mansion% and3 until it was time to retire thither3 : amused and edified myself by a friendly chat with the old man and his s.ouse3 both of whom were ,astly communicati,e$ At ten oEclock : and my host adHourned to the house3 which stood at a ,ery short distance from the lodge$ : carried my bag3 and my com.anion bore the blankets already referred to3 a candle3 and some firewood and matches$ 8he chamber to which he conducted me was comfortable enough3 but by no means .rofusely furnished$ :t contained a small truckle bedstead3 two chairs3 and a washstand3 but no attem.t at .ictures or ornaments of any descri.tion$ ),idently it was an im.rom.tu bedroom$ #y entertainer in a few minutes kindled a cheerful fire u.on the old-fashioned stone hearth$ 8hen3 after arranging my bed and .lacing my candle on the mantel.iece3 he wished me a res.ectful good-night and withdrew$ When he was gone : dragged one of the chairs towards the fire.lace3 and sat down to enHoy the .leasant flicker of the blaJe$ : ruminated u.on the occurrences of the [Page "$#] day3 and the .ossible history of the old house3 whose sole occu.ant : had thus strangely become$ Now3 : am of an inFuisiti,e turn of mind3 and .erha.s less a.t than most men to be troubled with that uncomfortable sensation which those .eo.le who are its ,ictims describe as ner,ousness3 and those who are not3 as cowardice$ Another in my .lace might ha,e shrunk from doing what : .resently resol,ed to do3 and that was to e0.lore3 before going to rest3 at least some .art of this em.ty old house$ Accordingly3 : took u. my candle and walked out into the .assage3 lea,ing the door of my room widely o.en3 so that the fire-light streamed full into the entrance of the dark gallery3 and ser,ed to guide me on my way along it$ When : had thus .rogressed for some twenty yards3 : was brought to a standstill by encountering a large red baiJe door3 Page 7<

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


which e,idently shut off the wing in which my room was situated from the rest of the mansion3 and com.letely closed all egress from the corridor where : then stood$ : .aused a moment or two in uncertainty3 for the door was locked% but .resently my glance fell on an old rusty key hanging from a nail3 likewise rusty3 in a niche of the wall$ : abstracted this key from its resting-.lace3 destroying as : did so the residences of a doJen s.iders3 which3 to Hudge from a..earances3 seemed to ha,e thri,ed e0cellently in the atmos.here of desolation which surrounded them$ :t was some time before : could get the clumsy old lock to act .ro.erly3 or summon sufficient strength to turn the key% but at length .erse,erance met with its .ro,erbial reward3 and the door mo,ed slowly and noisily on its hinges$ Still bearing my candle3 : went on my way into a second corridor3 which was literally car.eted with dust3 the accumulation .robably of the ten years to which my host had referred$[Page "$"] All round was gloomy and silent as a se.ulchre3 sa,e that e,ery now and then the loosened boards creaked beneath my tread3 or some little misanthro.ical animal3 startled from his hermitage by the unwonted sound of my ste.s3 hurried across the .assage3 making as he went a tiny trail in the thick furry dust$ Se,eral galleries branched off from the mainway like tributary streams3 but : .referred to steer my course down the central corridor3 which finally conducted me to a large antiFue-looking a.artment with car,ed wainscot and curious old .aintings on the .anelled walls$ : .ut the candle u.on a table which stood in the centre of the room3 and standing beside it3 took a general sur,ey$ 8here was an old mouldylooking bookcase in one corner of the chamber3 with some old mouldy books .acked closely together on a few of its shel,es$ 8his .iece of furniture was hollowed out3 crescent-wise3 at the base3 and .artially concealed a car,ed oaken door3 which had e,idently in former times been the means of communication with an adHoining a.artment$ Prom.ted by curiosity3 : took down and o.ened a few of the nearest books on the shel,es before me$ 8hey .ro,ed to be some of the ,ery earliest ,olumes of the Spectator3 I books of considerable interest to me3 I and in ten minutes : was Fuite absorbed in an article by one of our most noted masters of literature$ : drew one of the Fueer high-backed chairs scattered about the room3 towards the table3 and sat down to enHoy a feast of reason and a flo" of soul$ As : turned the mildewed .age3 something suddenly fell with a dull flop u.on the .a.er$ =t "as a drop of !lood L : stared at it with a strange sensation of mingled horror and astonishment$ 6ould it ha,e been u.on the .age !efore : turned it K No% it was wet and bright3 [Page "$$] and .resented the une,en3 broken disc which dro.s of liFuid always .ossess when they fall from a considerable height$ -esides : had heard and seen it fall$ : .ut the book down on the table and looked u.ward at the ceiling$ 8here was nothing ,isible there sa,e the grey dirt of years$ : looked closely at the hideous blotch3 and saw it ra.idly soaking and widening its way into the .a.er3 already softened with age$ As3 of course3 after this incident : was not inclined to continue my studies of Addison and Steele3 : shut the ,olume and re.laced it on the shel,es$ 8urning back towards the table to take u. my candle3 my eyes rested u.on a full-length .ortrait immediately facing the bookcase$ :t was that of a young and handsome woman with glossy black hair coiled round her head3 but3 : thought3 with something re.ulsi,e in the .roud3 stony face and shadowed eyes$ : raised the light abo,e my head to get a better ,iew of the .ainting$ As : did this3 it seemed to me that the countenance of the figure changed3 or rather that a 8hing came between me and it$ :t was a momentary distortion3 as though a gust of wind had .assed across the .ortrait and disturbed the outline of the features% the how and the why : know not but the face changed% nor shall : e,er forget the sudden horror of the look it assumed$ :t was like that face of .hantom ghastliness that we see sometimes in the delirium of fe,er3 I the face that meets us and turns u.on us in the maJes of nightmare3 with a look that wakes us in the darkness3 and dri,es the cold sweat out u.on our forehead while we lie still and hold our breath for fear$ #an as : was3 : shuddered con,ulsi,ely from head to foot3 and fi0ed my eyes earnestly on the terrible .ortrait$ :n a minute it was a mere .icture again I an inanimate [Page "$%] colored can,as I wearing no e0.ression u.on its .ainted features sa,e that which the artist had gi,en to it nearly a century ago$ : thought then that the strange a..earance : had witnessed was .robably the effect of the fitful Page 7?

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


candle-light3 or an illusion of my own ,ision% but now : belie,e otherwise$ Seeing nothing further unusual in the .icture3 : turned my back u.on it3 and made a few ste.s towards the door3 intending to Fuit this mysterious chamber of horrors3 when a third and more hideous .henomenon ri,eted me to the s.ot where : stood% for3 as : looked towards the oaken door in the corner3 : became aware of something slowly filtering from beneath it3 and cree.ing towards me$ 9 hea,en L : had not long to look to know what that something was' I it was blood3 I red3 thick3 stealthy L 9n it came3 winding its way in a frightful stream into the room3 soddening the rich car.et3 and lying .resently in a black .ool at my feet$ :t had trickled in from the adHoining chamber3 that chamber the entrance to which was closed by the bookcase$ 8here were some great ,olumes on the ground before the door3 I ,olumes which : had noticed when : entered the room3 on account of the thick dust with which they were surrounded$ 8hey were lying now in a .ool of stagnant blood$ :t would be utterly im.ossible for me to attem.t to describe my sensations at that minute$ : was not ca.able of feeling any distinct emotion$ #y brain seemed o..ressed3 : could scarcely breathe I scarcely mo,e$ : watched the dreadful stream ooJing drowsily through the cre,ices of the mouldy3 rotting woodwork I bulging out in great beads like raindro.s on the sides of the door I trickling noiselessly down the knots of the car,ed oak$ Still : stood and watched it3 and it cre.t on slowly3 slowly3 like a li,ing thing3 [Page "$&] and growing as it came3 to my ,ery feet$ : cannot say how long : might ha,e stood there3 fascinated by it3 had not something suddenly occurred to startle me into my senses again% for full u.on the back of my right hand fell3 with a sullen3 hea,y sound3 a second dro. of blood$ :t stung and burnt my flesh like molten lead3 and the shar.3 sudden .ain it ga,e me shot u. my arm and shoulder3 and seemed in an instant to mount into my brain and .er,ade my whole being$ : turned and fled from the terrible .lace with a shrill cry that rang through the em.ty corridors and ghostly rooms like nothing human$ : did not recognise it for my own ,oice3 so strange it was3 I so totally unlike its accustomed sound% and now3 when : recall it3 : am dis.osed to think it was surely not the cry of li,ing mortal3 but of that unknown 8hing that .assed before the .ortrait3 and that stood beside me e,en then in the lonely room$ 6ertain : am that the echoes of that cry had in them something ine0.ressibly fiendish3 and through the deathly gloom of the mansion they came back3 re,erberated and re.eated from a hundred in,isible corners and galleries$ Now3 : had to .ass3 on my return3 a long3 broad window that lighted the .rinci.al staircase$ 8his window had neither shutters nor blind3 and was com.osed of those small sFuare .anes that were in ,ogue a century ago$ As : went by it3 : threw a hasty3 a..alled glance behind me3 and distinctly saw3 e,en through the blurred and dirty glass3 the figures of two women3 one .ursuing the other o,er the thick white snow outside$ :n the ra.id ,iew : had of them3 : obser,ed only that the first carried something in her hand that looked like a .istol3 and her long black hair streamed behind her3 showing darkly against the dead whiteness of the landsca.e$ 8he arms of her .ursuer [Page "$*] were outstretched3 as though she were calling to her com.anion to sto.% but .erfect as was the silence of the night3 and close as the figures seemed to be3 : heard no sound of a ,oice$ Ne0t : came to a second and smaller window which had been once boarded u.3 but with la.se of time the .lank had loosened and .artly fallen3 and here : .aused a moment to look out$ :t still snowed slightly3 but there was a clear moon3 sufficient to throw a ghastly light u.on the outside obHects nearest to me$ With the slee,e of my coat : rubbed away the dust and cobwebs which o,erhung the glass3 and .eered out$ 8he two women were still hurrying onward3 but the distance between them was considerably lessened$ And now for the first time a .eculiarity about them struck me$ :t was this3 that the figures were not substantial% they flickered and wa,ed .recisely like flames3 as they ran$ As : gaJed at them the foremost turned her head to look at the woman behind her3 and as she did so3 stumbled3 fell3 and disa..eared$ She seemed to ha,e suddenly dro..ed down a .reci.ice3 so Fuickly and so com.letely she ,anished$ 8he other figure sto..ed3 wrung its hands wildly3 and .resently turned and fled in the direction of the .ark-gates3 and was soon lost in the obscurity of the distance$ 8he sights : had Hust witnessed in the .anelled chamber had not been of a nature to ins.ire courage in any one3 and : must candidly confess that my knees actually shook and my teeth rattled as : left the window and darted u. the solitary .assage to the baiJe door at the to. of it$ Would : had ne,er unlocked that door L Would that the key had been lost3 or that : had ne,er set foot in Page 7@

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


this abominable houseL &astily : refastened the door3 hung u. the rusty key in its niche3 and rushed into my own room3 where : dro..ed into a chair with a [Page "$+] deadly faintness cree.ing o,er me$ : looked at my hand3 where the clot of blood had fallen$ :t seemed to ha,e burnt its way into my flesh3 for it no longer a..eared on the surface3 but3 where it had been was a round3 .ur.le mark3 with an outer ring3 like the scar of a burn$ 8hat scar is on my hand now3 and : su..ose will be there all my life$ : looked at my watch3 which : had left behind on the mantel.iece$ :t was fi,e minutes .ast twel,e$ Should : go to bedK : stirred the sinking fire into a blaJe3 and looked an0iously at my candle$ Neither fire nor candles3 : .ercei,ed3 would last much longer$ -efore long both would be e0.ended3 and : should be in darkness$ :n darkness3 and alone in that house$ 8he bare idea of a night .assed in such solitude was terrible to me$ : tried to laugh at my fears3 and re.roached myself with weakness and cowardice$ : re,erted to the stereoty.ed method of consolation under circumstances of this descri.tion3 and stro,e to .ersuade myself that3 being guiltless3 : had no cause to fear the .owers of e,il$ -ut in ,ain$ 8rembling from head to foot3 : raked together the smoldering embers in the sto,e for the last time3 wra..ed my railway rug around me I for : dared not undress I and threw myself on the bed3 where : lay slee.less until the dawn$ -ut oh3 what : endured all those weary hours no human creature can imagine$ : watched the last s.arks of the fire die out3 one by one3 and heard the ashes slide and dro. slowly u.on the hearth$ : watched the flame of the candle flare u. and sink again a doJen times3 and then at last e0.ire3 lea,ing me in utter darkness and silence$ : fancied3 e,er and anon3 that : could distinguish the sound of .hantom feet coming down the corridor towards my room3 and that the mysterious Presence : had encountered in the [Page "$7] .aneled chamber stood at my bedside looking at me3 or that a stealthy hand touched mine$ : felt the sweat u.on my forehead3 but : dared not mo,e to wi.e it away$ : thought of .eo.le whose hair had turned white through terror in a few brief hours3 and wondered what colour mine would be in the morning$ And when at last I at last I the first grey glimmer of that morning .eered through the window-blind3 : hailed its a..earance with much the same emotions as3 no doubt3 a tra,eller fainting with thirst in a desert would e0.erience u.on descrying a watery oasis in the midst of the burning sands$ >ong before the sun arose3 : lea.t from my couch3 and ha,ing made a hasty toilette3 : sallied out into the bleak3 frosty air$ :t re,i,ed me at once3 and brought new courage into my heart$ >ooking at the whitened e0.anse of lawn where last night : had seen the two women running3 : could detect no sign of footmarks in the snow$ 8he whole lawn .resented an unbroken surface of s.arkling crystals$ : walked down the dri,e to the lodge$ 8he old man3 e,idently an early bird3 was in the act of unbarring his door as : a..eared$ (&alloa3 sir3 youEre u. betimesL( he e0claimed$ (Will ye Hust ste. in now and take somethinE K #y ole womanEs agoinE to get out the breakfast$ Sle.t well last night3 sir K ( he continued3 as : entered the little .arlour% (the bed is rayther hard3 : know% but3 ye see3 it does well enow for my son Beorge when heEs u. here3 which isna often$ Ye look tired like3 this morning% didna get much rest .Era.s K Ah L now then3 -ess3 giE us another .late here3 ole gal$( : ate my breakfast in com.arati,e silence3 wondering to myself whether it would be well to say anything to my host of my recent e0.eriences3 since he had clearly [Page "$ ] no sus.icions on the subHect% and3 anon3 wishing : had com.orted myself in that terrible house with as little curiosity as the son $eorge3 who no doubt was content to stay where he was .ut at night3 and was not gi,en to nocturnal e0cursions in em.ty mansions$ (&a,e you any idea(3 said :3 at last3 (whether thereEs any story connected with that .lace where : sle.t last night K : only ask(3 added :3 with a feeble grin3 like the ghost of a smile that had been able-bodied once3 (because :Em fond of hearing stories3 and because3 as you know3 there generally is a legend3 or Page 7;

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


something of that sort3 related about old family mansions($ (Well3 sir(3 answered the old man slowly3 ( : ne,er heard nothinE but then3 you see3 : ne,er asked no Fuestions$ We came here eight years agone3 and then no one round remembered a tenant at the big house$ :tEs been em.ty somewhere nigh twenty years3 : should say3 I to my own knowledge more than ten3 I and whatEs more3 nobody knows e0actly who it belongs to' and thereEs been lawsuits about it and all manner oE things3 but nothinE e,er came of them$( (Did no one e,er tell you anything about its history(3 : asked3 (or were you ne,er asked any Fuestions about it until now K ( (Not .articularly as : remember(3 re.lied he musingly$ 8hen3 after a momentEs .ause3 he added more briskly3 ( Ay3 ay3 though3 now : come to think of it3 there was a man u. here moreEn fi,e months back3 a +renchman3 who came on .ur.ose to see it and ask me one or two Fuestions3 but : onEy Hest told him nothinE as :E,e told you$ &e was a .o.ish .riest3 and seemed to take a sight of interest in the .lace somehow$ : think if you want to know about it3 sir3 youEd better go and see him% heEs [Page "$!] staying down here in the ,illage3 about a mile and a half off3 at the 6rown :nn$( (And a Fueer old fellow he is(3 broke in my hostEs wife3 who was clearing away the breakfast% (no one knows where he comes from3 Ece.t as heEs a +renchman$ : see him about often3 .rowlinE along with his stick and his snuff-bo03 always alone3 and sometimes he nods at me and says Egood-morningE as : go by$( :n conseFuence of this information : resol,ed to make my way immediately to the old .riestEs dwelling3 and ha,ing acFuainted myself with the direction in which the house lay3 : took lea,e of my host3 shouldered my bag once more3 and set out en route$ 8he air was clear and shar.3 and the cris. snow crackled .leasantly under my &essian boots as : strode along the country lanes$ All traces of cloud had totally disa..eared from the sky3 the sun looked cheerfully down on me3 and my morningEs walk thoroughly refreshed and in,igorated me$ :n due time : arri,ed at the inn which had been named to me as the abode of the 2e,$ #$ Pierre3 I a .retty homely little nest3 with an antiFue gable and .ortico$ Addressing myself to the elderly woman who answered my summons at the house-door3 : inFuired if : could see #$ Pierre3 and3 in re.ly3 recei,ed a ci,il in,itation to (ste. inside and wait($ #y sus.ense did not last long3 for #$ Pierre made his a..earance ,ery .rom.tly$ &e was a tall3 thin indi,idual with a friedlooking com.le0ion3 keen sunken eyes3 and s.arse hair streaked with grey$ &e entered the room with a courteous bow and inFuiring look$ 2ising from the chair in which : had rested myself by the fire3 : ad,anced towards him and addressed him by name in my sua,est tones$ &e inclined his head and looked at me more inFuiringly than before$ ( : [Page "%#] ha,e taken the liberty to reFuest an inter,iew with you this morning(3 continued :3 ( because : ha,e been told that you may .robably be able to gi,e me some information of which : am in search3 with regard to an old mansion in this .art of the county3 called Steepside3 and in which : s.ent last night$( Scarcely had : uttered these last words when the e0.ression of the old .riestEs face changed from one of Page 7A

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


courteous indifference to earnest interest$ (Do : understand you rightly3 monsieur K( he said$ ( You say you sle.t last night in Stee.side mansion K ( (: did not say : slept there3( : reHoined3 with an em.hasis% (: said : .assed the night there$( (-ien(3 said he dryly3 (: com.rehend$ And you were not .leased with your nightEs lodging$ 8hat is so3 is it not3 monsieur3 I is it not K ( he re.eated3 eying my face curiously3 as though he were seeking to read the e0.ression of my thoughts there$ (You may be sure(3 said :3 (that if something ,ery .eculiar had not occurred to me in that house3 : should not thus ha,e troubled a gentleman to whom : am3 unha..ily3 a stranger$( &e bowed slightly and then stood silent3 contem.lating me3 and3 as : think3 considering whether or not he should afford me the information : desired$ Presently3 his scrutiny ha,ing a..arently .ro,ed satisfactory3 he withdrew his eyes from my face3 and seated himself beside me$ ( #onsieur(3 said he3 (before : begin to answer your inFuiry3 : will ask you to tell me what you saw last night at Stee.side$( &e drew from his .ocket a small3 old-fashioned snuffbo0 and refreshed his little yellow nose with a .inch of [Page "%"] ra..ee3 after which ceremonial he leaned back at his ease3 resting his chin in his hand and regarding me fi0edly during the whole of my strange recital$ When : had finished s.eaking he sat silent a few minutes3 and then resumed3 in his Fueer broken manner' (What : am going to tell you : would not tell to any man who had not done what you ha,e done3 and seen what you saw last night$ #on DieuL it is strange you should ha,e been at that house last night of all nights in the year3 the <<nd of DecemberL/ &e seemed to make this reflection rather to himself than to me3 and .resently continued3 taking a small key from a .ocket in his ,est as he s.oke' (Do you understand +rench well3 monsieur K ( ()0cellently well(3 returned : with alacrity% (a great .art of my business corres.ondence is conducted in +rench3 and : s.eak and hear it e,ery day of my life$( &e smiled .leasantly in re.ly3 rose from his seat3 and3 unlocking with the key he held a small drawer in a chest that stood beside the chimney-.iece3 took out of it a roll of manuscri.t and a cigar$ Page 77

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<5onsieur( 3 said he3 offering me the latter3 (let me recommend this3 if you care to smoke so early in the day$ : always .refer ra..ee3 but you3 doubtless3 ha,e younger tastes$( &a,ing thus .ro,ided for my comfort3 the old .riest reseated himself3 unfolded the manuscri.t3 and3 without further a.ology3 read the following story in the +rench language' I 8owards the latter .art of the last century Stee.side became the .ro.erty of a certain Sir Mulian >orrington$ &is family consisted only of his wife3 >ady Sarah3 and [Page "%$] their daughter Mulia3 a girl remarkable alike for her beauty and her e0.ectations$ +or a long time Sir Mulian had retained in his establishment an old +rench maitre dEh[tel and his wife3 who both died in the baronetEs ser,ice3 lea,ing one child3 4irginie3 whom >ady Sarah3 out of regard for the fidelity of her .arents3 engaged to educate and .rotect$ :n due time this or.han3 brought u. in the household of Sir Mulian3 became the chosen com.anion of his heiress% and when the family took u. their residence at Stee.side3 4irginie Biraud3 who had been associated in MuliaEs studies and recreations from early childhood3 was installed there as maid and confidant to the ho.e of the house$ Not long after the settlement at Stee.side3 Sir Mulian3 in the summary fashion of those days with regard to matrimonial affairs3 announced his intention of bestowing his daughter u.on a certain Welsh sFuire of old ancestry and broad acres$ Sir Mulian was a .ractical man3 thoroughly inca.able of regarding wedlock in any other light than as a mere union of wealth and .ro.erty3 the owners of which Hoined hands and li,ed together$ 8his was the way in which he had married3 and it was the way in which he intended his daughter to marry% lo,e and .assion were meaningless3 if not ,ulgar words in his ears3 and he concei,ed it im.ossible they should be otherwise to his only child$ As for >ady Sarah3 she was an unsym.athetic creature3 whose thoughts ran only on the ambition of seeing Mulia married to some gentleman of high .osition3 and heading a fine establishment with social success and distinction$ So it was not until all things relati,e to the contract had been duly arranged between these amiable .arents [Page "%%] and their intended son-in-law3 that the bride elect was informed of the fortune in store for her$ -ut all the time that the lawyers had been .re.aring the marriage settlements3 a young .enniless gentleman named Phili. -rian had been finding out for himself the way to MuliaEs heart3 and these two had .ledged their faith to each other only a few days before Sir Mulian and >ady >orrington formally announced their .lans to their daughter$ :n conseFuence of her engagement with Phili.3 Mulia recei,ed their intelligence with indignation3 and .rotested that no .ower on earth should force her to act falsely to the young man whose .romised wife she had become$ 8he e0.ression of this determination was recei,ed by both .arents with high dis.leasure$ Sir Mulian indulged in a few angry oaths3 and >ady Sarah in a little select satire% Phili. -rian was3 of course3 forbidden the house3 all letters and messages between the lo,ers were interdicted3 and Mulia was commanded to com.ort herself like a dutiful and obedient heiress$ Page 7!

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


Now 4irginie Biraud was the friend as well as the attendant of Sir MulianEs daughter3 and it was 4irginie therefore who3 after the occurrence of this outbreak3 was des.atched to Phili. with a note of warning from his mistress$ Naturally the lo,er returned an answer by the same means3 and from that hour 4irginie continued to act as agent between the two3 carrying letters to and fro3 gi,ing counsel and arranging meetings$ #eanwhile the bridal day was fi0ed by the .arent >orringtons3 and elaborate .re.arations were made for a wedding festi,al which should be the wonderment and admiration of the county$ 8he breakfast room was decorated with la,ish s.lendour3 the richest a..arel bes.oken for the bride3 and all the wealthy and titled relati,es of both contracting [Page "%&] families were in,ited to the .ageant$ Nor were Phili. and Mulia idle$ :t was arranged between them that3 at ele,en oEclock on the night of the day .receding the intended wedding3 the young man should .resent himself beneath MuliaEs window3 4irginie being on the watch and in readiness to accom.any the flight of the lo,ers$ All three3 under co,er of the darkness3 should then steal down the a,enue of the coach-dri,e and make their e0it by the shrubbery gate3 the key of which 4irginie already had in kee.ing$ 8he a..ointed e,ening came3 I the <<nd of December$ Snow lay dee. u.on the ground3 and more threatened to fall before dawn3 but Phili. had engaged to .ro,ide horses eFual to any emergency of weather3 and the darkness of the night lent fa,our to the enter.rise$ 4irginieEs beha,iour all that day had somehow seemed unaccountable to her mistress$ 8he maidEs face was .allid and wore a strange e0.ression of an0iety and a..rehension$ She winced and trembled when MuliaEs glance rested u.on her3 and her hands Fui,ered ,iolently while she hel.ed the latter to adHust her hood and mantle as the hour of assignation a..roached$ )ndea,ouring3 howe,er3 to .ersuade herself that this strange conduct arose from a feeling of e0citement or ner,ousness natural under the circumstances3 Mulia used a hundred kind words and tender gestures to reassure and su..ort her com.anion$ -ut the more she consoled or admonished3 the more agitated 4irginie became3 and matters stood in this condition when ele,en oEclock arri,ed$ Mulia waited at her chamber window3 which was not abo,e three feet from the ground without3 her hood and mantle donned3 listening eagerly for the sound of her lo,erEs ,oice% and the +rench girl leant behind her [Page "%*] against the closed door3 ner,ously tearing to fragments a .iece of .a.er she had taken from her .ocket a minute ago$ 8hese torn atoms she flung u.on the hearth3 where a bright fire was blaJing3 not obser,ing that3 meanwhile3 Mulia had o.ened the window-casement$ A gust of wind darting into the room from outside caught u. a fragment of the yet unconsumed .a.er and whirled it back from the flames to MuliaEs feet$ She glanced at it indifferently3 but the sight of some characters on it suddenly attracting her3 she stoo.ed and .icked it u.$ :t bore her name written o,er and o,er se,eral times3 first in rather laboured imitation of her own handwriting3 then more successfully3 and3 lastly3 in so .erfect a manner that e,en Mulia herself was almost decei,ed into belie,ing it her genuine signature$ 8hen followed se,eral >Es and MEs3 as though the co.yist had not considered those initials satisfactory counter.arts of the original$ Mulia wondered3 but did not doubt% and as she tossed the fragment from her hand3 4irginie turned and .ercei,ed the action$ :nstantly a dee. flush of crimson o,ers.read the maidEs face% she darted suddenly forward3 and uttered an e0clamation of alarm$ &er cry was immediately succeeded by the shar. noise of a .istol re.ort beneath the window3 and a hea,y3 muffled sound3 as of the fall of a body u.on the snowco,ered earth$ Mulia looked out in fear and sur.rise$ 8he lea.ing firelight from within the room streamed through the window3 and3 in the heart of its ,i,id brightness3 re,ealed the figure of a man lying motionless u.on the whitened ground3 his face buried in the scattered snow3 and his outstretched hand gras.ing a .istol$ Page 7"

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


Mulia lea.ed through the o.en casement with a wild shriek3 and flung herself on her knees beside him$
[Page "%+]

(PhilL PhilL( she said$ ( what ha,e you done K what has ha..ened K S.eak to meL( -ut the only res.onse was a faint3 low moan$ Phili. -rian had shot himselfL :n an agony of grief and horror Mulia lifted his head u.on her arm3 and .ressed her hand to his heart$ 8he mo,ement recalled him to life for a few moments% he o.ened his eyes3 looked at her3 and uttered a few broken words$ She stoo.ed and listened eagerly$ The letter L he gas.ed% ( the letter you sent me L 9 Mulia3 you ha,e broken my heartL &ow could you be false to me3 and : lo,ing you I trusting you I so wholly L -ut at least : shall not li,e to see you wed the man you ha,e chosen% : came here tonight to die3 since without you life would be intolerable$ See what you ha,e doneL( Des.erate and silent3 she wound her arms around him3 and .ressed her li.s to his$ A con,ulsi,e shudder seiJed him% his eyes rolled back3 and with a sigh he resigned himself to the death he had courted so madly$ Death in the .assion of a last kiss L Mulia sat still3 the cor.se of her lo,er su..orted on her arm3 and her hand clas.ed in his3 tearless and frigid as though she had been turned into stone by some fearful s.ell$ &alf hidden in the bosom of his ,est was a letter3 the broken seal of which bore her own monogram$ She .lucked it out of its resting.lace3 and read it hastily by the flicker of the firelight$ :t was in >ady SarahEs handwriting3 and ran thus' I (#Y D)A2 #2 -2:AN3 I Although3 when last we .arted3 it was with the usual understanding that tonight we should meet again% yet subseFuent reflection3 and [Page "%7] the .ositi,e inHunctions of my .arents3 ha,e obliged me to decide otherwise$ You are to know3 therefore3 that3 in obedience to the wishes of my father and mother3 : ha,e .romised to become the wife of the gentleman they ha,e chosen for me$ All corres.ondence between us must therefore wholly cease3 nor must you longer suffer yourself to entertain a thought of me$ :t is hardly necessary to add that : shall not e0.ect to see you this e,ening% your own sense of honour will3 : am .ersuaded3 be sufficient to restrain you from kee.ing an a..ointment against my wishes$ :n concluding3 : beg you will not attem.t to obtain any further e0.lanation of my conduct% but rest assured that it is the unalterable resol,e of cool and earnest deliberation$ ( +or the last time : subscribe myself/$ M=>:A >922:NB89N$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


( Postscript$ I :n order to sa,e you any doubt of my entire concurrence in my motherEs wishes3 : sign and address this with my own hand3 and 4irginie3 who undertakes to deli,er it3 will add her .ersonal testimony to the truth of these statements3 since she has witnessed the writing of the letter3 and knows how fully my consent has been gi,en to all its e0.ressions$( ( With my own hand L ( Yes3 surely% both signature and address were .erfect facsimiles of MuliaEs writing L What wonder that Phili. had been decei,ed into belie,ing her false K 8wice she read the letter from beginning to end% then she laid her lo,erEs cor.se gently down on the snow3 and stood u. erect and silent3 her face more ghastly and death-like than the face of the dead beside her$ :n a moment the whole shameful scheme had flashed [Page "% ] u.on her mind% I 4irginieEs treachery and cle,er fraud% its connection with the torn fragment of .a.er which Mulia had seen only a few minutes before% the deliberate falsehood of which >ady Sarah had been guilty% the bribery3 by means of which she had .robably corru.ted 4irginieEs fidelity% the cruel disa..ointment and suffering of her lo,er% all these things .ressed themsel,es u.on her reeling brain3 and ga,e birth to the suggestions of madness$ Stoo.ing down3 she .ut her lithe hand u.on the belt of the dead man$ 8here was3 as she e0.ected3 a second .istol in it3 the fellow of that with which he had shot himself$ :t was loaded$ Mulia drew it out3 wra..ed her mantle round it3 and climbed noiselessly into her chamber through the still o.en window$ 6rossing the room3 she .assed out into the corridor beyond3 and went like a shadow3 swift and silent of foot3 to the door of her fatherEs study3 I an a.artment communicating3 by means of an oaken door3 with the .anelled chamber$ 4irginie3 from a dark recess in the wall of the house3 had heard and noted all that .assed in the garden$ She saw Mulia o.en and read the letter% she caught the e0.ression of her face as she stoo.ed for the .istol3 and a..rehending something of what might follow3 she cre.t through the window after her mistress and .ursued her u. the dark .assages$ &ere3 crouching again into a recess in the gallery outside the .anelled room3 she waited in terror for the ne0t scene of the tragedy$ Mulia flung o.en the door of the study where her father sat writing at his table3 and3 standing on the threshold in the full glare of the lam.light which illumined the a.artment3 raised the .istol3 cocked and aimed it$ Sir Mulian had barely time to lea. from his [Page "%!] chair with a cry when she fired3 and the ne0t instant he fell3 struck by the bullet on the left tem.le3 and e0.ired at his daughterEs feet$ At the re.ort of the .istol and the sound of his fall3 >ady Sarah Fuitted her dressing-room and ran in disordered attire into the study3 where she beheld her husband lying dead and bloody u.on the floor3 and Mulia standing at the entrance of the .anelled chamber3 with the light of madness and murder in her eyes$ Not long she stood there3 howe,er3 for3 seeing >ady Sarah enter3 the distracted girl threw down the em.ty wea.on3 and flinging herself u.on her mother3 gras.ed her throat with all the might of her frenJied being$ =. and down the room they wrestled together3 two des.erate women3 one bent u.on murder3 the other battling for her life3 and neither uttered cry or groan3 so terribly earnest was the struggle$ At length >ady SarahEs strength ga,e way% she fell under her assailantEs weight3 her face black with suffocation3 and her eyes .rotruding from their swelling sockets$ Mulia redoubled her gri.$ She knelt u.on >ady SarahEs breast3 and held her down with the force and resolution of a fiend3 though the blood burst from the ears of her ,ictim and filmed her staring eyes% nor did the .itiless fingers rela0 until the murderess knew her ,engeance was com.lete$ 8hen she lea.t to her feet3 seiJed Phili.Es .istol from the floor3 and3 with a wild3 .ealing shriek3 Page !

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


fled forth along the gallery3 down the staircase3 and out into the .ark3 I out into the wind3 and the dri,ing snow3 and the cold3 her uncoiled hair streaming in dishe,elled masses down her shoulders3 and her dress of trailing satin daubed with stains of blood$ -ehind her ran 4irginie3 well-nigh maddened herself with horror3 ,ainly endea,ouring to catch or to sto. the unha..y fugiti,e$ -ut Hust as the [Page "&#] latter reached the brink of a high .reci.ice at the boundary of the terraced lawn3 from which the mansion took its name of Steepside she turned to look at her .ursuer3 missed her footing3 and fell headlong o,er the low stone co.ing that bordered the slo.e into the snow-drift at the bottom of the chasm$ 4irginie ran to the s.ot and looked o,er$ 8he steep was e0ceedingly high and sudden% not a trace of Mulia could be seen in the darkness below$ Doubtless the miserable heiress of the >orringtons had found a gra,e in the bed of soft3 dee. snow which surrounded its base$ 8hen3 stricken through heart and brain with the curse of madness which had already sent her mistress red-handed to death3 4irginie Biraud fled across the lawn I through the .ark-gates I out u.on the bleak common beyond3 and was gone$ 8he old .riest laid aside the manuscri.t and took a fresh .inch of ra..ee from the sil,er snuff-bo0$ (#onsieur(3 said he3 with a .olite inclination of his grey head3 (: ha,e had the honour to read you the history you wished to hear($ (And : thank you most heartily for your kindness(3 returned :$ (-ut may :3 without danger of seeming too inFuisiti,e3 ask you one Fuestion moreK( Seeing assent in his face3 and a smile that antici.ated my inFuiry wrinkling the corners of his mouth3 : continued boldly3 ( Will you tell me3 then3 #$ Pierre3 by what means you became .ossessed of this manuscri.t3 and who wrote it K ( (:t is a natural Fuestion3 monsieur(3 he answered after a short .ause3 (and : ha,e no good reason for withholding [Page "&"] the re.ly3 since e,ery one who was .ersonally concerned in the tragedy has long been dead$ You must know3 then3 that in my younger days : was cur2 to a little .arish of about two hundred souls in the .ro,ince of -erry$ #any years ago there came to this ,illage a strange old woman of whom nobody in the .lace had the least knowledge$ She took and rented a small ho,el on the borders of a wood about two miles from our church3 and3 e0ce.t on market days3 when she came to the ,illage for her weekly .ro,isions3 none of my .arishioners e,er held any intercourse with her$ She was e,idently insane3 and although she did harm to nobody3 yet she often caused considerable alarm and wonderment by her eccentric beha,iour$ :t is3 as you must know3 often the case in intermittent mania that its ,ictims are insane u.on some .articular subHect3 some .oint u.on which their frenJy always betrays itself3 I e,en when3 with regard to other matters3 they conduct themsel,es like ordinary .eo.le$ Now this old womanEs weakness manifested itself in a wild and continual desire to co.y e,ery written document she saw$ :f3 on her market-day ,isits to the ,illage3 any written notice u.on the church-doors chanced to catch her eye as she .assed3 she would immediately .ause3 draw out .encil and .a.er from her .ocket3 and stand muttering to herself until she had closely transcribed the whole of the .lacard3 when she would Page !<

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


Fuietly return the co.y to her .ocket and go on her way$ (8hinking it my duty3 as .astor of the ,illage3 to make myself acFuainted with this .oor creature3 who had thus become one of my flock3 : went occasionally to ,isit her3 in the ho.e that : might .ossibly disco,er the cause of her strange disorder 1which : sus.ected had its origin in some calamity of her earlier days53 and so Fualify myself [Page "&$] to afford her the ad,ice and comfort she might need$ During the first two or three ,isits : .aid her : could elicit nothing$ She sat still as a statue3 and watched me sullenly while : s.oke to her of the mysteries and consolations of our faith3 e0horting her ,ainly to make confession and obtain that .eace of heart and mind which the sacrament of .enance could alone bestow$ Well3 it chanced that on the occasion of one of these ,isits : took with me3 besides my .rayer-book3 a small sheet of .a.er3 on which : had written a few .assages of Scri.ture3 such as : conHectured to be most suited to her soulEs necessity$ : found her3 as usual3 moody and reser,ed3 until : drew from my missal the sheet of transcribed te0ts and .ut it into her hand$ :n an instant her manner changed$ 8he madness gleamed in her eyes3 and she began searching ner,ously for a .encil$ E: can do itLE she cried$ E#y writing was always like hers3 for we learnt together when we were children$ &e will ne,er know : wrote it% we shall du.e him easily$ Already : ha,e .ractised her signature many times I soon : shall be able to make it e0actly like her own hand$ And : shall tell her3 my lady3 that he would ha,e decei,ed her3 that : o,erheard him lo,emaking to another girl I that : disco,ered his falsehood I his baseness I and that he fled in his shame from the county$ Yes3 yes3 we will du.e them both$E (:n this fashion she chattered and muttered fe,erishly for some minutes3 till : grew alarmed3 and taking her by the shoulders3 tried to shake back the senses into her distracted brain$ E What ails you3 foolish old woman KE cried : E : am not miladi% : am your .arish .astor$ Say your Pater Noster3 or your A,e3 and dri,e Satan away$E (: am not sure whether my words or the remo,al of [Page "&%] the unlucky manuscri.t recalled her wandering wits$ At any rate3 she s.eedily reco,ered3 and3 after doing my best to soothe and calm her by leading her to s.eak on other to.ics3 : Fuitted the cottage reassured$ (Not long after this e.isode a neighbour called at my house one morning3 and told me that3 ha,ing missed the old woman from the weekly market3 and knowing how regular she had always been in her attendance3 he had gone to her dwelling and found her lying sick and desiring to see me$ 9f course : immediately .re.ared to com.ly with her reFuest3 .ro,iding myself in case : should find her an0ious for absolution and the ,iaticum$ Directly : entered her hut3 she beckoned me to the bedside3 and said in a low3 hurried ,oice' I ( E+ather3 : wish to confess to you at once3 for : know : am going to die$E (Percei,ing that3 for the .resent at least3 she was .erfectly sane3 : willingly com.lied with her reFuest3 and heard her slowly and .ainfully unburden her miserable soul$ (#onsieur3 if the story with which 4irginie Biraud intrusted me had been told only in her sacramental confession3 : should not ha,e been able to re.eat it to you$ -ut3 when the final words of .eace had been Page !?

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


s.oken3 she took a .acket of .a.ers from beneath her .illow and .laced it in my hands$ E &ere3 father3E she said3 E is the substance of my history$ When : am dead3 you are free to make what use of it you .lease$ :t may warn some3 .erha.s3 from yielding to the great tem.tation which o,ercame me$E ( E 8he tem.tation of a bribe K ( said :3 inFuiringly$ She turned her failing sight towards my face and shook her head feebly$ [Page "&&] ( ENo bribe3 father3( she answered$ E Do you belie,e : would ha,e done what : did for mere coinK ( (: ga,e no re.ly3 for her words were enigmatical to me3 and : was loath to harass with my curiosity a soul so near its de.arture as hers$ So : leaned back in my chair and sat silent3 in the ho.e that3 being wearied with her religious e0ercises3 she might be able to slee. a little$ -ut3 no doubt3 my last Fuestion3 working in her disordered mind3 awoke again the madness that had only slumbered for a time$ Suddenly she raised herself on her .illow3 .ressed her withered hands to her head3 and cried out wildly' I ( E #oney L I money to me3 who would ha,e sold my own soul for one day of his lo,eL AhL : could ha,e flung it back in their facesL I fools that they were to belie,e : cared for gold L Phili. L Phili. L you were mad to think of the heiress as a wife% it had been better for you had you cared to look on me I on me who lo,ed you so L 8hen : should ne,er ha,e ruined you I ne,er betrayed you to >ady SarahL -ut : could not forgi,e the hard words you ga,e me% : could not forgi,e your lo,e3 for Mulia L Shall : e,er go to .aradise I to .aradise where the saints are K Will they let me in there K I will they suffer my soul among them K 9r shall : ne,er lea,e .urgatory3 but burn3 and burn3 and burn there always uncleansed K +or3 oh L if all the .ast should come back to me a thousand years hence3 : should do the same thing again3 Phil -rian3 for lo,e of you LE (She started from the bed in her delirium% there came a rattling sound in her throat I a sudden choking cry I and in a moment her breast and .illow and Fuilt were deluged with a crimson stream L :n her .aro0ysm she had burst a blood-,essel$ : s.rang forward to catch [Page "&*] her as she fell .rone u.on the brick floor% raised her in my arms3 and gaJed at her distorted features$ 8here was no breath from the reddened li.s$ 4irginie Biraud was a cor.se$ ( 8hus in her madness was told the secret of her life and her crime% a secret she would not confess e,en to me in her sane moments$ :t was no greed of gold3 but des.ised and ,indicti,e lo,e that lay behind all the horrors she had related$ +rom my soul : .itied the .oor dead wretch3 for : dimly com.rehended what a hell her e0istence on earth had been$ (8he written account of the Stee.side tragedy with which she had intrusted me furnished3 in somewhat briefer language3 the story : ha,e Hust read to you3 and many of its more im.ortant details ha,e subseFuently been ,erified by me on a..lication to other sources3 so that in that .a.er you ha,e the testimony of an eyewitness to the facts3 as well as the su..ort of legal e,idence$ (Some forty years after 4irginieEs death3 monsieur3 family reasons obliged me to seek tem.orary release Page !@

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


from duty and come to )ngland% and3 finding that circumstances would kee. me in the country for some time3 : came here and went to see that house$ -ut the tenant at the lodge could only tell me that Stee.side was em.ty then3 and had been em.ty for years .ast% and : ha,e disco,ered that3 since that horrible <<nd of December3 it ne,er had an occu.ant$ Sir Mulian3 to whom it belonged by .urchase3 left no immediate heirs3 and his relati,es sFuabbled between themsel,es o,er the .ro.erty3 till one by one the dis.uting .arties died off3 and now there is no one enter.rising enough to resuscitate the lawsuit$( 2ising to take my lea,e of the genial old man3 it [Page "&+] occurred to me as e0tremely .robable that he might ha,e been led to form some o.inion worth hearing with regard to the nature of the strange a..earances at Stee.side3 and : ,entured accordingly to make the inFuiry$ (:f my ,iews on the subHect ha,e any ,alue or interest for you(3 said he3 (you are ,ery welcome to know them$ As a .riest of the 6atholic 6hurch3 : cannot acce.t the .o.ular notions about ghostly ,isitations$ Such e0.eriences as yours in that ill-fated mansion are e0.licable to me only on the following hy.othesis$ 8here is a Power greater than the .owers of e,il% a Will to which e,en demons must submit$ :t is not inconsistent with 6hristian doctrine to su..ose that3 in cases of such terrible crimes as that we ha,e been discussing3 the e,il s.irits who .rom.ted these crimes may3 for a .eriod more or less lengthy3 be forced to haunt the scene of their machinations3 and re-enact there3 in .hantom show3 the horrors they once caused in reality$ Naturally I or .erha.s(3 said he3 breaking off with a little smile3 ( : ought rather to say su.er-naturally I these demons3 in order to manifest themsel,es3 would be forced to resume some sha.e that would identify them with the crime they had suggested% and3 in such a case3 what more likely than that they should ado.t the s.ectral forms of their human ,ictims I murdered and murderer3 or otherwise I according to the nature of the wickedness .er.etrated K 8his is but an amateur o.inion3 monsieur% : offer it as an indi,idual3 not as a .riest s.eaking on the .art of the 6hurch$ -ut it may ser,e to account for a real difficulty3 and may be held without im.iety$ 9f one thing at least we may rest assured as 6hristian men% that the souls of the dead3 whether of saints or sinners3 are in BodEs safe kee.ing3 and walk the earth no more$( [Page "&7] 8hen : shook hands with #$ Pierre3 and we .arted$ And after that3 reader3 : went to my friendEs house3 and s.ent my 6hristmas week right merrily$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - % - 0E/OND T(E S-NSET A FA)R/ TA.E FOR T(E T)'ES
9nce u.on a time there was a Princess$ Now3 this Princess dwelt in a far-off and beautiful world beyond the sunset3 and she had immortal youth and an ancestry of glorious name$ 4ery rich3 too3 she was3 and the .alace in which she li,ed was made all of marble and alabaster and things .recious and wonderful$ -ut that which was most wonderful about her was her e0ceeding beauty3 I a beauty not like that one sees in the world this side of the sunset$ +or the beauty of the Princess was the bright-shining of a lo,ely s.irit% her body was but the ,eil of her soul that shone through all her .erfect form as the radiance of the sun shines through clear water$ : cannot tell you how beautiful this Princess was3 nor can : describe the colour of her hair and her eyes3 or the as.ect of her face$ #any men ha,e seen her and tried to gi,e an account of her% but though : ha,e read se,eral of these accounts3 they differ so greatly from one another that : should find it hard indeed to re.roduce her .icture from the records of it which her lo,ers ha,e left$ +or all these men who ha,e written about the Princess [Page "& ] lo,ed her% none3 indeed3 could hel. it who e,er looked on her face$ And to some she has seemed fair as the dawn3 and to others dark as night% some ha,e found her gay and Hoyous as Allegro3 and others sad and silent and sweet as Penseroso$ -ut to e,ery lo,er she has seemed the essence and core of all beauty% the .urest3 noblest3 highest3 and most regal being that he has found it .ossible to concei,e$ : am not going to tell you about all the lo,ers of the Princess3 for that would take many ,olumes to rehearse3 but only about three of them3 because these three were ty.ical .ersonages3 and had ,ery remarkable histories$ >ike all the lo,ers of the Princess3 these three men were tra,ellers3 coming from a distant country to the land beyond the sunset on .ur.ose to see the beautiful lady of whom their fathers and grandfathers had told them% the lady who ne,er could outli,e youth because she belonged to the race of the e,erlasting Bods who ruled the earth in the old far-off &ellenic times$ : do not know how long these three men stayed in the country of the Princess% but they stayed Fuite long enough to be ,ery3 ,ery much in lo,e with her3 and when at last they had to come away I for no man who is not dead can remain long beyond the sunset I she ga,e to each of them a beautiful little bird3 a tiny li,ing bird with a ,oice of sweetest music3 that had been trained and tuned to song by Phoebus A.ollo himself$ And : could no more describe to you the sweetness of that song than : could describe the beauty of the Princess$ 8hen she told the tra,ellers to be of bra,e heart and of ,aliant ho.e3 because there lay before them an ordeal demanding all their .rowess3 and after that the .ros.ect of a great reward$ ( Now3( she said3 ( that you ha,e [Page "&!] learned to lo,e me3 and to desire to ha,e your dwelling here with me3 you must go forth to .ro,e your knighthood$ : am not inaccessible3 but no man must think to win me for his lady unless he first Hustify his fealty by noble ser,ice$ 8he world to which you now go is a world of mirage and of .hantasms3 which a..ear real only to those who ha,e ne,er reached and seen this realm of mine on the hea,enward side of the sun$ You will ha,e to .ass through ways beset by monstrous s.ectres3 o,er wastes where rage ferocious hydras3 chimaeras3 and strange dragons breathing flame$ You must Hourney .ast beautiful shadowy islets of the summer sea3 in whose fertile bays the cunning sirens sing% you must Page !A

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


bra,e the mountain robber3 the goblins of the wilderness3 and the ogre whose Hoy is to de,our li,ing men$ -ut fear nothing3 for all these are but .hantoms% nor do you need any sword or s.ear to slay them3 but only a loyal mind and an unswer,ing .ur.ose$ >et not your ,ision be decei,ed3 nor your heart beguiled% return to me unscathed through all these many snares3 and doubt not the worth and greatness of the guerdon : shall gi,e$ Nor think you go unaided$ With each of you : send a guide and monitor% heed well his ,oice and follow where he leads$(

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Now3 when the three tra,ellers had recei,ed their .resents3 and had looked their last u.on the shining face of the donor3 they went out of the .alace and through the golden gate of the wonderful city in which she dwelt3 and so3 once again3 they came into the land which lies this side of the sun$ 8hen their ordeal began% but3 indeed3 they saw no [Page "*#] sirens or dragons or gorgons3 but only .eo.le like themsel,es going and coming along the highways$ Some of these .eo.le sauntered3 some ran3 some walked3 alone and .ensi,ely3 others congregated in grou.s together and talked or laughed or shouted noisy songs$ =nder the .leasant trees on the greensward were .a,ilions3 beautifully adorned% the sound of music issued from many of them3 fair women danced there under the new blossoming trees3 tossing flowers into the air3 and feasts were s.read3 wine flowed3 and Hewels glittered$ And the music and the dancing women .leased the ear and eye of one of the three tra,ellers3 so that he turned aside from his com.anions to listen and to look$ 8hen .resently a grou. of youths and girls drew near and s.oke to him$ ( :t is our festi,al3( they said% ( we are worshi..ers of Dueen -eauty% come and feast with us$ 8he moon of #ay is rising% we shall dance all night in her beautiful soft beams$( -ut he said3 (: ha,e Hust returned from a country the beauty of which far sur.asses that of anything one can see here3 and where there is a Princess so lo,ely and so stately that the greatest Dueen of all your world is not fit to be her tiring maid$( 8hen they said3 ( Where is that country of which you s.eak3 and who is this wonderful Princess K ( ( :t is the land beyond the sunset3( he answered3 ( but the name of the Princess no man knows until she herself tells it him$ And she will tell it only to the man whom she lo,es$( At that they laughed and made mirth among themsel,es$ (Your land is the land of dreams(3 they said% (we ha,e heard all about it$ Nothing there is real3 and as for your Princess she is a mere shadow3 a ,ision of your own creation3 and no substantial being at all$ 8he only real and true beauty is the beauty we see and touch [Page "*"] and hear% the beauty which sense re,eals to us3 and which is .resent with us today$( 8hen he answered3 (: do not blame you at all3 for you ha,e ne,er seen my Princess$ -ut : ha,e seen her3 and heard her s.eak3 and some day : ho.e to return to her$ And when : came away she warned me that in this country : should be beset by all manner of strange and monstrous s.ectres3 har.ies3 and sirens3 eaters of men3 whom : must bra,ely meet and o,ercome$ : .ray you tell me in what .art of your land these dangers lie3 that : may be on my guard against them$( 8hereat they laughed the more3 and answered him3 (9h3 foolish tra,eller3 your head is certainly full of dreams L 8here are no such things as sirens% all that is an old Breek fable3 a fairy tale with no meaning e0ce.t for old Breeks and modern babies L You will ne,er meet with any sirens or har.ies3 nor will you e,er see again the Princess of whom you talk3 unless3 indeed3 in your dreams$ :t is this country that is the only real one3 there is nothing at all beyond the sunset$( Page !7

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


Now all this time the little bird which the Princess had gi,en to him was singing Fuite loudly under the folds of the tra,elerGs cloak$ And he took it out and showed it to the youths who s.oke with him3 and said3 *8his bird was gi,en me by the Princess whom you declare to be a myth$ &ow could a myth gi,e me this li,ing birdK/ 8hey answered3 *You are surely a madman as well as a dreamer$ Doubtless the bird flew into your chamber while you sle.t3 and your dreaming fancy took ad,antage of the incident to frame this tale about the Princess and her gift$ :t is often so in dreams$ 8he consciousness .ercei,es things as it were through a cloud3 and wea,es fictions out of realities$/ [Page "*$] 8hen he began to doubt3 but still he held his ground3 and said3 *Yet hear how sweetly it singsL No wild3 untaught bird of earth could sing like that/$ Whereat they were ,astly merry3 and one cried3 *Why3 it is Fuite a common t"eetAt"eetL$ :t is no more than the chir. of a ,ulgar3 e,eryday thrush or linnetL/ And another3 *Were : you3 : would wring the birdGs neck% it must be a terrible nuisance if it always makes such a noiseL/ And a third3 *>et it fly3 we cannot hear oursel,es s.eaking for its screamingL/ 8hen the tra,eler began to feel ashamed of his bird$ *All that : say3/ he thought3 *a..ears to them foolish3 e,en the PrincessGs gift is3 in they eyes3 a common chir.ing chaffinch$ What if indeed : ha,e been dreaming% what if this3 after all3 should be the real world3 and the other a mere fantasyK/ 8he bird sang3 *AwayL awayL or you will ne,er see the Princess moreL 8he real world lied beyond the gates of the sunsetL/ -ut when the tra,eler asked the youths what the bird sang3 they answered that they had only heard T"eetAt"eet3/ and ChirpAchirp. 8hen he was really angry3 but not with them3 as you would .erha.s ha,e thought$ No3 he was angry with the bird3 and ashamed of it and of himself$ And he threw it from him into the air3 and cla..ed his hands to dri,e it away% and all the youths and girls that stood around him cla..ed theirs too$ ShAshsh3 they cried3 *be off3 you are a good-for-nothing hedge-finch3 and may be thankful your neck has not been wrung to .unish you for making such a noiseL/ So the bird flew away3 away beyond the sunset3 and : think it went back to the Princess and told her all that had ha..ened$ And the tra,eler went3 and danced and [Page "*%] sang and feasted to his heartGs content with the worshi.ers of Dueen -eauty3 not knowing that he really had fallen among the sirens after allL

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#eanwhile the two other tra,elers had gone on their way3 for neither of them cared about .leasure% one was a gra,e looking man who walked with his eyes on the ground3 looking curiously at e,ery rock and shrub he .assed by the wayside3 and often .ausing to e0amine more closely a strange herb3 or to .ick to .ieces a flower% the other had a calm3 sweet face3 and he walked erect3 his eyes lifted towards the great mountains that lay far away before them$ -y-and-by there came along the road towards the two tra,elers a com.any of men carrying banners3 on which were inscribed as mottoes - Knowledge is +reedomL$ Science knows no law but the law of ProgressL >iberty3 )Fuality3 +raternityL =tility is 4irtue. and a great many other fine .hrases$ #ost of the .ersons who marched first in this .rocession wore s.ectacles3 and some were clad in academical Page !!

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


costumes$ 8he greater number had gone .ast3 when the gra,e-looking tra,eler I he who had interested himself so much in the stones and foliage by the wayside I courteously sto..ed one of the com.any and asked him what the .rocession meant$ *We are worshi.ers of Science3/ answered the man whom he addressed% *today we hold solemn rites in honor of our deity$ #any orations will be made by her high .riests3 and a great number of ,ictims slain3 I lambs3 and horses3 and do,es3 and hinds3 and all manner of animals$ 8hey will be .ut to death with uns.eakable [Page "*&] torments3 racked3 and maimed3 and burned3 and hewn asunder3 all for the glory and gain of Science$ And we shall shout with enthusiasm as the blood flows o,er he altars3 and the smoke ascends in her .raise$ -ut all this is horrible/3said the gra,e man3 with a gesture of a,oidance% *it sounds to me like a descri.tion of the orgies of sa,ages3 or of the .astimes of madmen% it is unworthy of intelligent and sane men$/ *9n the contrary3/ returned his informant3 *it is Hust because we are intelligent and sane that we take delight in it$ +or it is by means of these sacrifices that our deity ,ouchsafes her oracles$ :n the mangled cor.ses and entrails of these ,ictims our augurs find the knowledges we seek/$ *And what knowledges are theyK/ asked the tra,eler $ *8he knowledge of NatureGs secrets/3 cried the ,otary of Science with kindling eye3 *the knowledge of life and death% the magic of the art of healing disease% the solution of the riddle of the uni,erseL All this we learn3 all this we .ercei,e3 in the dying throes of our ,ictims$ Does not this sufficeK I is not the end great enough to Hustify the meansK/ 8hen3 when the second of the tra,elers heard these words I he whose face had been lifted as he walked I he drew nearer and answered' I No% it is greater to be Hust than to be learned$ No man should wish to be healed at the cost of anotherGs torment$/ At which the stranger frowned3 and retorted im.atiently3 *You forget3 methinks3 that they whom we seek to heal are men3 and they who are tormented merely beasts$ -y these means we enrich and endow humanity/$ *Nay3 : forgot not/3 he answered gently3 *buy he who would be so healed is man no longer$ -y that wish and act he becomes lower than any beast$ Nor can humanity [Page "**] be enriched by that which beggars it of all its wealth$/ *+ine s.eeches3 forsoothL/ cried the worshi.er of Science% *you are a moralist3 : find3 and doubtless a ,ery ignorant .ersonL All this old-fashioned talk of yours belongs to a .ast age$ We ha,e cast aside su.erstition3 we ha,e swe.t away the old faiths$ 9ur only guide is 2eason3 our only goal is KnowledgeL/ *AlasL/ returned the other3 *it is not the higher but the lower 2eason which leads you3 and the Knowledge you co,et is not that of realities3 but of mere seemings$ You do not know the real world$ You are the du.es of a Phantasm which you take for Substance$/ With that he .assed on3 and the man of Science was left in the com.any of the tra,eler who had first accosted him$ *What .erson is thatK/ asked the former3 looking after the retreating figure of him who had Hust s.oken$ *&e is a .oet/3 returned the gra,e-faced tra,eler% *we ha,e both of us been beyond the sunset to see the lo,ely Princess who rules that wonderful country3 and we left it together on a Hourney to this world of yours$/ -eyond the sunset L re.eated the other incredulously$ *8hat is the land of shadows% when the world was younger they used to say the old Bods li,ed there/$ *#aybe they li,e there still3/ said the tra,eler3 *for the Princess is of their kith and lineage/$ *A .retty fable3 indeed/3 res.onded the scientific ,otary$ *-ut we know now that all that kind of thing is sheer nonsense3 and worse3 for it is the basis of the effete old-world sentiment which forms the most formidable obstacle to Progress3 and which Science e,en yet finds it hard to o,erthrow$ -ut what is that strange singing : hear beneath your cloakK/ :t was the bird which the tra,eler had recei,ed from [Page "*+] the Princess$ &e drew it forth3 but did not say whose gift it was nor whence it came3 because of the contem.t with which his com.anion had Page !"

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


s.oken of the mystic country and its 2ulers$ Already he began to wa,er in his loyalty towards the Princess3 and to desire greatly the knowledges of which the stranger told him$ +or this tra,eler3 though he cared nothing for .leasure3 or for the beauty of sensuous things3 was greatly taken by the wish to be wise% only he did not rightly know in what wisdom consists$ &e thought it lay in the acFuirement of facts3 whereas really it is the .ower by which facts are transcended$ 8hat is a foreign bird/3 obser,ed the scientific man3 e0amining it carefully through his s.ectacles3 *and Fuite a curiosity$ : do not remember ha,ing e,er seen one like it$ 8he note3 too3 is .eculiar$ :n some of its tones it reminds me of a nightingale$ No doubt it is the descendant of a de,elo.ed s.ecies of a nightingale3 carefully selected and artificially bred from one generation to another$ Wonderful modifications of s.ecies may be obtained in this manner3 as e0.eriments with fancy breeds of .igeons ha,e am.ly .ro,ed$ Permit me to e0amine the bill more closely$ Yes3 yes I a nightingale certainly I and yet I indeed3 : ought not to decide in haste$ : should greatly like to ha,e the o.inion of Professor )ffaress on the subHect$ -ut what noise is that yonderK/ +or Hust then a terrible hubbub arose among a crowd of .eo.le congregated under the .ortico of a large and magnificent building a little way from the .lace where the scientific man and the intellectual tra,eler stood con,ersing$ 8his building3 the facade of which was adorned all o,er with !asAreliefs of >iberty and Progress3 and modern elderly gentlemen in doctorsG gowns and [Page "*7] laurel wreaths3 with rolls of .a.er and microsco.es3 was3 in fact3 a great Scientific :nstitution3 and into it the .rocession of learned .ersonages whom the tra,elers had met on their way had entered3 followed by a great multitude of admirers and enthusiasts$ :n this edifice the solemn rites which the ,otary of Science had described were to be held3 and a ,ast congregation filled its halls$ All at once3 Hust as the sacrifices were about to begin3 a solitary man arose in the midst of the hushed assembly3 and .rotested3 as once of old3 by the banks of the far-away Banges3 SiddUrtha -uddha had .rotested against the bloody offerings of the .riests of :ndra$ And much after the same manner as -uddha had s.oken this man s.oke3 of the high duty of manhood3 of the s.lendor of Hustice3 of the certainty of retribution3 and of the true meaning of Progress and +reedom3 the noblest reaches of which are s.iritual3 transcending all the baser and meaner utilities of the .hysical nature$ And when the high .riests of Science3 not like the .riests of :ndra in older times3 answered the .ro.het disdainfully and without shame3 that they knew nothing of any s.iritual utilities3 because they belie,ed in e,olution and held man to be only a de,elo.ed a.e3 with no more soul than his ancestor3 the stranger res.onded that he too was an ),olutionist3 but that he understood the doctrine Fuite differently from them3 and more after the fashion of the old teachers3 I Pythagoras3 Plato3 &ermes and -uddha$ And that the li,ing and incorru.tible S.irit of Bod was in all things3 whether a.e or man3 whether beast or human3 ay3 and in the ,ery flowers and grass of the field3 and in e,ery element of all that is ignorantly thought to be dead and inert matter$ So that the soul of man3 he said3 is one of the soul that is in all Nature3[Page "* ] only that when man is truly human3 in him alone the soul becomes selfknowing and self-concentrated3 the mirror of &ea,en3 and the focus of the Di,ine >ight$ And he declared3 moreo,er3 that the s.iritual e,olution of which he s.oke was not so much .romoted by intellectual knowledge as by moral goodness% and that it was .ossible to be a ,ery learned a.e indeed3 but in no wise to deser,e the name of man% and that inasmuch as any .erson was dis.osed to sacrifice the higher to the lower reason3 and to rank intellectual abo,e s.iritual attainment3 insomuch that .erson was still an a.e and had not de,elo.ed humanity$ Now3 the stranger who was bra,e enough to say all this was no other than the tra,eler .oet3 and all the time he was s.eaking3 the bird which the Princess had gi,en him lay hid in his bosom and sang to him3 Page "C

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


clear and sweet3 CourageE courageL these are the ogres and the dragons% fight the good fight% to be of bold heartL/ Nor was he astonished or dismayed when the assembly arose with tumult and hooting3 and ,iolently thrust him out of the Scientific :nstitution into the street$ And that was the noise which the other tra,eler and his com.anion had heard$ -ut when the greater .art of the mob had returned into the building there was left with the .oet a little grou. of men and women whose hearts had been stirred by his .rotest$ And they said to him3 *You ha,e s.oken well3 sir3 and ha,e done a noble thing$ We are citiJens of this .lace3 and we will de,ote oursel,es to gi,ing effect to your words$ Doubt not that we shall succeed3 though it may be long first3 for indeed we will work with a will$/ 8hen the .oet was glad3 because he had not s.oken in ,ain3 and he bade them good s.eed3 and went on his [Page "*!] way3 but the scientific man3 who was with the other tra,eler3 heard these last words3 and became ,ery angry$ (6ertainly(3 he said3 *this foolish and ignorant .erson who has Hust been turned out of the assembly must ha,e insulted our great leadersL What .resum.tionL what insolenceL No one knows what mischief he may not ha,e done by his silly talkL :t is de.lorableL -ut see3 here comes Professor )ffaress3 the ,ery man : most wished to see$ Professor3 let me .resent this gentleman$ &e is the owner of a rare and remarkable bird3 on which we want your o.inion$ 8he Professor was a ,ery great .ersonage3 and his coat was co,ered all o,er with decorations and bits of colored ribbon3 like those on a kitGs tail$ Perha.s3 like a kitGs tail3 they weighed and steadied him3 and ke.t him from mounting too high into the clouds$ 8he Professor looked at the bird through his s.ectacles3 and nodded his head sagaciously$ *: ha,e seen this s.ecies before3/ he said3 *though not often$ :t belongs to a ,ery ancient family indeed3 and : scarcely thought that any s.ecimen of it remained in the .resent day$ Duite a museum bird% and in e0cellent .lumage too$ Sir3 : congratulate you$/ You do not3 then consider3 Professor/3 said the tra,eler3 *that this bird has about it anything transcendental - that it is - in fact - not altogether - .ardon me the e0.ression - a terrestrial birdK/ +or he was afraid to say the truth3 that the bird really came from beyond the sunset$ 8he decorated .ersonage was much amused$ &e laughed .leasantly and answered in bland tones3 *9h dear3 no% : recogniJe Fuite well the s.ecies to which it belongs$ An ancient s.ecies3 as : ha,e said3 and one indeed that Science has done her utmost to e0tir.ate3 [Page "+#] .ur.osely in .art3 because it is .ro,ed to be a great de,astator of the cro.s3 and thus directly inHurious to the interests of mankind3 and .artly by accident3 for it has a most remarkable song-note3 and scientific men ha,e destroyed all the s.ecimens they ha,e been able to .rocure3 in the ho.e of disco,ering the mechanism by which the ,ocal tones are .roduced$ -ut3 .ardon me3 are you a stranger in this city3 sirK/ : am/3 res.onded the tra,eler3 *and .ermit me to assure you that : take a li,ely interest in the scientific and intellectual .ursuits with which in this .lace3 : .ercei,e3 you are largely occu.ied$/ We ha,e a -rotherhood of >earning here3 sir/3 returned the Professor% *we are all Progressionists$ : trust you will remain with us and take .art in our assemblies$/ -ut3 as he said that3 the fairy bird suddenly lifted u. his song and warned the tra,eler3 crying in the language of the country beyond the sunset3 *-ewareL bewareL 8his is an ogre3 he will kill you3 and mi0 your bones with his breadL -e warned in time3 and fly% fly3 if you cannot fightL/ Page "

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


Dear me/3 said the Professor3 *what a ery remarkable noteL : am con,inced that the structure and dis.osition of this birdGs ,ocal organs must be uniFue$ S.eaking for my scientific brethren3 as well as for myself3 : may say that we should hold oursel,es singularly indebted to you if you would .ermit us the o..ortunity of adding so rare a s.ecimen to our national collection$ :t would be an acFuisition3 sir3 : assure you3 for which we would show oursel,es .rofoundly grateful$ :ndeed3 : am sure that the Society to which : ha,e the honor to belong would readily admit to its +ellowshi. the donor of a treasure so inestimable$/ As he s.oke3 he fi0ed [Page "+"] his eyes on the tra,eler3 and bowed with much ceremony and condescension$ And the tra,eler thought what a fine thing it would be to become a Professor3 and be able to wear a great many bits of colored ribbon3 and to be immensely learned3 and know all the faces of the uni,erse$ And3 after all3 what was a little singing bird3 and a fairy Princess3 in whose ,ery e0istence the scientific gentlemen did not in the least belie,e3 and who was3 .erha.s3 really the shadow of a dreamK So he bowed in return3 and said he was greatly honored% and Professor )ffaces took the bird and twisted its neck gra,ely3 and .ut the little cor.se into his .ocket$ And so the di,ine and beautiful song of the fairy minstrel was Fuenched3 and instead of it : su..ose the tra,eler got a great deal of learning and many fine decorations on his coat$ -ut the s.irit of the slain bird fled from that inhos.itable city3 and went back to the Princess and told her what had befallen$

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As for the .oet3 he went on his way alone into the o.en country3 and saw the .easants in the fields3 rea.ing and gleaning and gathering fruit and corn3 for it was har,est time$ And he .assed through many hamlets and ,illages3 and sometimes he rested a night or two at an inn% and on Sundays he heard the .arish .arson say .rayers and .reach in some Fuaint little Norman or Sa0on church$ And at last he came to a brand-new town3 where all the houses were )arly )nglish3 and all the .eo.le dressed like ancient Breeks3 and all the manners 2enaissance3 or3 [Page "+$] .erha.s3 Bothic$ 8he .oet thought they were Bothic3 and .robably was right$ :n this town the talk was mostly about Art3 and many fine things were said in regard to s"eetness and light$ ),erybody claimed to be an artist of some kind3 whether .ainter3 musician3 no,elist3 dramatist3 ,erse-maker3 reciter3 singer3 or what not$ -ut although they seemed so greatly de,oted to the Braces and the #uses3 it was but the images of the Parnassian Bods that they worshi.ed$ +or in the .urlieus of this fine town3 horrible cruelties and abuses were committed3 yet none of the so-called .oets lifted a cry of reform$ ),ery morning3 early3 before daybreak3 there came through the streets long and sad .rocessions and meek-eyed o0en and bleating lambs3 harried by brutal dro,ers3 with shouts and blows3 I terrible .rocessions of innocent creatures going to die under the .olea0e and the knife in order to .ro,ide the pleasures of the ta!le for dainty ,otaries of s"eetness and light$ -efore the fair faint dawn made rosy the eastern sky o,er the houses3 you might ha,e heard on e,ery side the hea,y thud of the .olea0e striking down the .atient heifer on her knees3 I the heifer whose eyes are like the eyes of &erR3 say the old Breek songbooks3 that were read and Fuoted all day in this town of 6ulture and Art$ And a little later3 going down the by-ways of the town3 you might ha,e seen the gutters running with fresh blood3 and ha,e met carts laden with gory hides3 and buckets filled with brains and blood3 going to the Page "<

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


factories and tan-yards$ Young lads s.ent all their days in the slaughter-houses3 dealing ,iolent deaths3 witnessing tragedies of carnage3 hearing incessant .lainti,e cries3 walking about on clogs among .ools of clotting or [Page "+%] steamy blood3 and breathing the fumes of it$ And scarce a mile away from the scene of all these loathsome and degrading sights3 sounds3 and odors3 you might ha,e found fastidious and courtly gentlemen3 and ladies all belaced and beHewelled3 sentimentaliJing o,er their aspic de foie gras# or their cotelettes H la ?ardiniIre.J or some other eu.hemism for the dead flesh which could not3 without .ardonable breach of good breeding3 be called by its .lain true name in their .resence$ And when the .oet reminded them of this truth3 and s.oke to them of the demoraliJation to which3 by their habits3 they daily subHected many of their fellow-men% when he drew for them gra.hic .ictures of the slaughter-yard3 and of all the scenes of suffering and tyranny that led u. to it and ensued from it3 they cla..ed their hands to their ears3 and cried out that he was a shockingly coarse .erson3 and Fuite too horribly indelicate for refined society$ -ecause3 indeed3 they cared only about a surface and outside refinement3 and not a whit for that which is inward and .rofound$ +or beauty of !eing they had neither desire nor .ower of re,erence% all their enthusiasm was s.ent o,er forms and words and a..earances of beauty$ :n them the senses were Fuickened3 but not the heart3 nor the reason$ 8herefore the s.irit of the 2eformer was not in them3 but the s.irit of the Dilettante only$ And the .oet was grie,ed and angry with them3 because e,ery true .oet is a 2eformer% and he went forth and s.oke aloud in their .ublic .laces and rebuked the dwellers in that town$ -ut e0ce.t a few curiosity hunters and some idle folks who wanted higher wages and less work3 and thought he might hel. them to get what they wished for3 nobody listened to him$ -ut they went in crowds to see a conHurer3 and to hear a man who [Page "+&] lectured on blue china3 and another who made them a long oration about intricate and obscure te0ts in a certain old dramatic book$ And : think that in those days3 if it had not been for the sweet and gracious song of the fairy bird which he carried about always in his bosom3 the .oet would ha,e become ,ery heart-sick and des.onding indeed$ : do not Fuite know what it was that the bird sang3 but it was something about the certainty of the ad,ent of wisdom3 and of the coming of the .erfect day% and the burden of the song was ho.e for all the nations of the earth$ -ecause e,ery beautiful and wise thought that any man concei,es is the heritage of the whole race of men3 and an earnest and fore-gleam of what all men will some day in,iolably hold for true$ And forasmuch as .oets are the ad,anced guard of the marching army of humanity3 therefore they are necessarily the first disco,erers and .roclaimers of the new landsca.es and ranges of Duties and 2ights that rise out of the horiJon3 .oint after .oint3 and ,ista after ,ista3 along the line of .rogress$ +or the sonnet of the .oet today is to furnish the key-note of the morrowGs s.eech in Parliament3 as that which yesterday was song is today the current .rose of the hustings3 the .ul.it3 and the market$ Wherefore3 9 .oet3 take heart for the world% thou3 in whose utterance s.eaks the ine,itable +uture% who art thyself BodGs .ro.hecy and co,enant of what the race at large shall one day beL Sing thy songs3 utter thine whole intent3 recount thy ,ision% though today no one heed thee3 thou hast ne,ertheless s.oken3 and the s.oken word is not lost$ ),ery true thought li,es3 because the S.irit of Bod is in it3 and when the time is ri.e it will incarnate itself in action$ 8hou3 thou art the creator3 the man of thought% thou art the .ioneer of the agesL [Page "+*] Somewhat on this wise sang the fairy bird3 and thereby the .oet was comforted3 and took courage3 and lifted u. his ,oice and his a.ocaly.se$ And though few .eo.le cared to hear3 and many Heered3 and some rebuked3 he minded only that all he should say might be well said3 and as .erfect and wise and worthy as he could make it$ And when he had finished his testimony3 he went forth from the gates of the town3 and began once more to tra,erse the solitudes of moor and forest$ Page "?

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


-ut now the winter had set in o,er the land3 and the wastes were bleak3 and the trees stood like .allid ghosts3 sheeted and shrouded in snow$ And the north wind moaned across the o.en country3 and the tra,eler grew cold and weary$ 8hen he s.oke to the bird and said3 (-ird3 when : and my com.anions set out on our Hourney from the land beyond the sunset3 the Princess .romised us each a guide3 who should bring us back in safety if only we would faithfully heed his monitions$ Where then is this guideK for hitherto : ha,e walked alone3 and ha,e seen no leader$ And the bird answered3 *9 .oet3 :3 whom thou bearest about in they bosom3 and that guide and monitorL : am thy director3 thine angel3 and thine inward light$ And to each of thy com.anions a like guide was ,ouchsafed3 but the man of a..etite dro,e away his monitor3 and the man of intellect did e,en worse3 for he ga,e o,er to death his friend and is better self$ Bold against dross3 the wisdom of the Bods against the knowledges of menL -ut thou3 .oet3 art the child of the Bods3 and thou alone shalt again behold with Hoy the land beyond the sunset3 and face of &er whose true ser,itor and knight thou artL/ 8hen the tra,eler was right glad3 and his heart was [Page "++] lifted u.3 and as he went he sang$ -ut3 for all that3 the way grew stee.er to his feet3 and the icy air colder to his face% and on e,ery hand there were no longer meadows and orchards full of laboring folk3 but glittering snow-wreaths3 and diamond bright glaciers3 shining hard and keen against the dee.s of darkening s.ace% and at times the roar of a distant a,alanche shook the atmos.here about him3 and then died away into the silence out of which the sound had come$ Peak abo,e .eak of crystal-white mountain ranges rose u.on his sight3 massi,e3 and still3 and awful3 terrible affirmations of the ,erity of the :deal$ +or this world of colossal heights and fathomless gulfs3 of blinding snows3 of .rime,al silence3 of infinite re,elation3 of s.lendid lights u.on manifold summits of o.al3 to.aJ 3and sardony3 all seemed to him the witness and ,isible manifestation of his most secret and dreadful thoughts$ &e had seen these things in his ,isions3 he had sha.ed them in his hidden re,eries3 he had dared to belie,e that such a region as this might be I nay3 ought to be I if the uni,erse were of Di,ine making$ And now it burst u.on him3 an a.ocaly.se of giant glories3 an em.ire of absolute being3 inde.endent and careless of human .resence3 affirming itself eternally to its own immeasurable solitudes$ : ha,e reached the to. and .innacle of life/3 cried the .oet% *this is the world wherein all things are madeL/ And now3 indeed3 sa,e for the fairy bird3 he trod his .ath alone$ Now and then great clouds of mist swe.t down from the heights3 or rose from the icy gorges3 and wra..ed him in their soft gray folds3 hiding from his sight the glittering e0.anse around him3 and making him afraid$ 9r3 at times3 he beheld his own shadow3 a ,ast [Page "+7] and .ortentous Self3 .roHected on the nebulous air3 and looming in his .athway3 a solitary monster threatening him with doom$ 9r yet again3 there arose before him3 multi.lied in bewildering eddies of fog-wreath3 a hundred s.ectral sel,es3 each abo,e3 and behind the other3 like images re.eated in re,erberating mirrors - his own form3 his own mien3 his own garb and as.ect a..alling in their omni.resence3 maddening in their grotesFue immensity as the goblins of a fe,er dream$ -ut when first the tra,eler beheld this sight3 and shrank at it3 feeling for his sword3 the fairy bird at his breast sang to him3 *+ear not3 this is the 6himaera of whom the Princess s.oke$ You ha,e .assed unhurt the sirens3 the ogres and the hydra-headed brood of .lain and lowland% now meet with courage this .hantom of the heights$ ),en now thou standest on the confines of the land beyond the sunset% these are the dwellers on the border3 the s.ectres who haunt the threshold of the farther world$ 8hey are but shadows of thyself3 reflections cast u.on the mists of the abyss3 .hantoms .ainted on the ,eil of the Page "@

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


sanctuary$ 9ut of the ,oid they arise3 the offs.ring of =nreason and of the &adean Night$/ 8hen a strong wind came down from the .eaks of the mountain like the breathing of a Bod3 and it rent the clouds asunder3 and scattered the fog-wreaths3 and blew the .hantoms hither and thither like smoke% and like smoke they were e0tinguished and s.ent against the crags of the .ass$ And after that the .oet cared no more for them3 but went on his way with a bold heart3 until he had left behind and below him the clouds and mists of the ra,ines among the hills3 and stood on the to.most e0.anse of daJJling snow3 and beheld once more the golden gate of the >and that lies beyond the Sun$ [Page "+ ] -ut of his meeting with the Princess3 and of the gladness and s.lendor of their es.ousals3 and of all the Hoy that he had3 is not for me to tell3 for these things3 which belong to the chronicles of that fairy country3 no mortal hand in words of human s.eech is in any wise able to relate$ All that : certainly know and can s.eak of with .lainness is this3 that he obtained the fulness of his heartGs desire3 and beyond all ho.e3 or knowledge3 or understanding of earth3 was blessed for e,ermore$ And now : ha,e finished the story of a man who say and followed his :deal3 who lo,ed and .riJed it3 and cla,e to it abo,e and through all lesser mundane things$ 9f a man whom the senses could not allure3 nor the cra,ing for knowledge3 nor the lust of .ower3 nor the blast of s.iritual ,anity3 shake from his .erfect rectitude and ser,ice$ 9f a man who3 seeing the good and the beautiful way3 turned not aside from it3 nor yielded a ste. to the enemy% in whose soul the ,oice of the inward Di,inity no rebuke3 no derision3 nor neglect could Fuench% who chose his .art and abode by it3 seeing no reconciliation with the world3 not weakly re.ining because his faith in the Mustice of Bod distanced his sym.athies of common men$ ),ery .oet has it in him to imagine3 to com.rehend3 and desire such a life as this3 he who li,es it canoniJes his genius3 and3 to the to.most manhood of the Seer3 adds the Di,inity of &eroism$ [Page "+!]

Page ";

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - & - A T-RN OF .-CK


( #essieurs3 faites ,otre Heu L $ $ $ >e Heu est faitL $ $ $ 2ien ne ,a .lus L $ $ $ 2ouge gagne et la couleur L $ $ $ 2ouge gagne3 la couleur .erdL $ $ $ 2ouge .erd et la couleur L$ $ $ ( Such were the monotonous continually recurring sentences3 always s.oken in the same im.assi,e tones3 to which : listened as : stood by the tables in the gaming-rooms of #onte 6arlo$ Such are the sentences to which de,otees of the fickle goddess3 6hance3 listen hour after hour as the day wears itself out from early morning to late e,ening in that beautiful3 cruel3 enchanting earthly .aradise3 whose shores are washed by the bluest sea in the world3 whose gardens are dotted with globes of golden fruit3 and .lumed with feathery .alms3 and where3 as you wander in and out among the delicious shadowy foliage3 you hear3 incessantly3 the sound of guns3 and may3 now and then3 catch sight of some doomed creature with delicate white breast and broken wing3 dro..ing3 hel.less and bleeding3 into the still dark waters below the cliff$ A wicked .lace L A cruel .laceL &eartless3 bitter3 .itiless3 inhuman L And yet3 so beautifulL : stood3 on this .articular afternoon3 Hust o..osite a young man seated at one of the rouge et noir tables$ As my glance wandered from face to face among the .layers3 it was arrested by his3 I a singularly .allid3 thin3 eager face% I remarkably eager3 e,en in such a .lace and in such com.any as this$ &e seemed about twenty-fi,e3 but he had the bowed and shrunken look of an in,alid3 [Page "7#] and from time to time he coughed terribly3 the ominous cough of a .erson with lungs half consumed by tubercle$ &e had not the air of a man who gambles for .leasure3 nor3 : thought3 that of a s.endthrift or a neKerAdoA"eel % disease3 not dissi.ation3 had hollowed his cheeks and set his hands trembling3 and the unnatural light in his eyes was born of fe,er rather than of greed$ &e .layed an0iously but not e0citedly3 seldom ,enturing on a hea,y stake3 and watching the game with an intentness which no incident di,erted$ Suddenly : saw a young girl make her way through the throng towards him$ She was .lainly dressed3 and had a sweet3 sad face and eyes full of tenderness$ She touched him on the shoulder3 stoo.ed o,er him3 and kissed him in the frankest3 sim.lest manner .ossible on the forehead$ (4iens3( she whis.ered3 (He mEetouffe ici3 il fait si frais dehors% sortons$( &e did not answer% his eyes were on the cards$ Rouge perd# et la couleur3 said the hard official ,oice$ With a sigh3 he rose3 coughed3 .assed his hand o,er his eyes3 and took his wifeEs arm$ 1: felt sure she was his wife$5 8hey .assed slowly through the rooms together3 and : lost sight of them$ -ut not of his face I nor of hers$ Sitting by the fountain outside the gaming saloons half an hour afterwards3 : fell to musing about this strange cou.le$ So young3 I she scarcely more than a child3 and he so ill and wasted L &e had .layed with the manner of an old habituR3 and she seemed used to finding him at the tables and leading him away$ : made u. my mind that : had stumbled on a romance3 and resol,ed to hunt it down$ At the table dEh[te dinner in my hotel that e,ening : met a friend from Nice to whom : confided my curiosity$ (: know(3 said he3 (the young .eo.le of whom you s.eak% they are [Page "7"] .atients of Dr S$ of #onaco3 one of my most intimate acFuaintances$ &e told me their story($ ( They(3 : inter.olated3 I ( is the wife3 then3 also ill K ( #y friend smiled a little$ (Not ill e0actly3 .erha.s(3 he answered$ ( -ut you must ha,e seen3 I she will ,ery shortly be a mother$ And she is ,ery young and delicate($ ( 8ell me their story(3 : said3 ( since you know it$ :t is romantic3 : am certain($ ( :t is sad(3 he said3 ( and sadness suffices3 : su..ose3 to constitute romance$ 8he young manEs name is Beorges Saint-6yr3 and his family were poor relations of an aristocratic house$ : say "ere3 because they are all dead3 I his father3 mother3 and three sisters$ 8he father died of tubercle3 so did his daughters% the son3 you see3 inherits the same disease and Page "A

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


will also die of it at no ,ery distant time$ Beorges Saint-6yr ne,er found anybody to take him u. in life$ &e was Fuite a lad when he lost his widowed mother3 and his health was3 e,en then3 so bad and fitful that he could ne,er work$ &e tried his best% but what chef can afford to em.loy a youth who is always sending in doctorEs certificates to e0cuse his absence from his desk3 and breaking down with headache or swooning on the floor in office-hours K &e was totally unfit to earn his li,ing3 and the little money he had would not suffice to kee. him decently$ #oreo,er3 in his delicate condition he .ositi,ely needed comforts which to other lads would ha,e been su.erfluous$ Still he managed to struggle on for some fi,e years3 getting co.ying-work and what-not to do in his own rooms3 till he had contri,ed3 by the time he was twenty-two3 to sa,e a little money$ &is idea was to enter the medical .rofession and earn a li,elihood by writing for scientific Hournals3 for he had wits and was not [Page "7$] without literary talent$ &e was lodging then in a chea. Fuarter of Paris not far from the \cole de #Rdecine$ Well3 the .oor boy .assed his baccalaureat and entered on his first year$ &e got through that .retty well3 but then came the hos.ital work% and then3 once more he broke down$ 8he rising at si0 oEclock on bitter cold winter mornings3 the going out into the bleak early air sometimes thick with snow or sleet3 the long attendance day after day in unwholesome wards and foetid postmortem rooms% the afternoons s.ent o,er dissecting3 I all these things contributed to bring about a catastro.he$ &e fell sick and took to his bed3 and as he was Fuite alone in the world3 his tutor3 who was a kind-hearted man3 undertook to see him through his illness3 both as .hysician and as friend$ And when3 after a few weeks3 Beorges was able to get about again3 the .rofessor3 seeing how lonely the young man was3 asked him to s.end his Sundays and s.are e,enings with himself and his family in their little a.artment au cin@uiIme of the rue 6luny$ +or the .rofessor was3 of course3 .oor3 working for fi,e francs a lesson to .ri,ate .u.ils3 and a much more modest sum for class lectures such as those which Beorges attended$ -ut all this mattered nothing to Beorges$ &e went gladly the ,ery ne0t Sunday to Dr >e NoirEs3 and there he met the .rofessorEs daughter I whom you ha,e seen$ She was only Hust se,enteen3 and .rettier then than she is now : doubt not3 for her face is an0ious and sorrowful now3 and an0iety and sorrow are not becoming$ You donEt wonder that the young student fell in lo,e with her$ 8he father3 engrossed in his work3 did not see what was going on3 and so PaulineEs heart was won before the mischief could be sto..ed$ 8he young .eo.le themsel,es went to him [Page "7%] hand in hand one e,ening and told him all about it$ #adame >e Noir had long been dead3 and the .rofessor had two sons studying medicine$ &is daughter was3 .erha.s3 rather in his way% he lo,ed her much3 but she was growing fast into womanhood3 and he did not Fuite know what to do with her$ Saint-6yr was well-born and he was cle,er$ :f only his health were to take a turn for the better3 all might go well$ -ut then3 if not K &e looked at the young manEs .ale face and remembered what his stethosco.e had re,ealed$ Still3 in such an early stage these .hysical warnings often came to nothing$ 2est3 and fresh air3 and ha..iness3 might set him u. and make a healthy man of him yet$ So he ga,e a .reliminary assent to the engagement3 but forbade the young .eo.le to consider the affair settled I for the .resent$ &e wanted to see how Beorges got on$ :t was early s.ring then$ &o.e and lo,e and the A.ril sunshine agreed with the young man$ &e was much stronger by Mune3 and did well at the hos.ital and at his work$ &e had reached the end of his fin dKann2e e0aminations% a yearEs res.ite was before him now before beginning to .ass for his doctorate$ >e Noir thought that if he could .ass the ne0t winter in the south of +rance he would be Fuite set u.3 and lost no time in im.arting this idea to Beorges$ -ut Beorges was not Hust then in funds% his time had been lately wholly taken u. with his studies3 and he had been unable to do any literary hacking$ When he told the .rofessor that he could not afford to s.end a winter on the 2i,iera3 >e Noir looked at him fi0edly a minute or two and then said' I E PaulineEs dot will be C3CCC francs$ :t comes to her from her mother$ With care that ought to kee. you both till you ha,e taken your doctorate and can earn [Page "7&] money for yourself$ Will you marry Pauline this autumn and take her with you to the southKE Well3 you can fancy whether this .ro.osal .leased Beorges or not$ At first he refused3 of course% he would not take PaulineEs money% it was herEs% he would wait till he could earn money of his own$ -ut the .rofessor was .ersuasi,e3 and when he told his daughter of the discussion3 she went .ri,ately into her fatherEs study where Beorges sat3 .retending to read chemistry3 and settled the matter$ So the u.shot of Page "7

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


it was that late in 9ctober3 Pauline became #adame Saint-6yr3 and started with her husband for the 2i,iera$ (8he winter turned out a bitter one$ -itter and wild and treacherous o,er the whole of )uro.e$ Snow where snow had not been seen time out of mind% biting murderous winds that nothing could esca.e$ #y friend Dr S$ says the 2i,iera is not always kind to consum.ti,es3 e,en when at its best% and this .articular season saw it at its worst$ Beorges Saint-6yr caught a ,iolent chill one e,ening at St 2a.hael3 whither he and his wife had gone for the sake of the chea.ness rather than to any of the larger towns on the littoral% and in a ,ery short time his old malady was on him again3 I the fe,er3 the cough3 the weakness3 I in short3 a fresh pouss2e3 as the doctors say$ Pauline nursed him carefully till #arch set in% then he reco,ered a little3 but he was far from con,alescent$ She wrote ho.efully to her father% so did Beorges% indeed both the young man and his wife3 ignorant of the hold which the disease had really got u.on him3 thought things to be a great deal better than they actually were$ -ut as days went on and the cough continued3 they made u. their minds that St 2a.hael did not suit Beorges3 and resol,ed to go on to Nice$ #arch was already far [Page "7*] ad,anced% Nice would not be e0.ensi,e now$ So they went3 but still Beorges got no better$ &e e,en began to get weaker% the cough tore him3 he said3 and he leaned wearily on his wifeEs arm when they walked out together$ 6learly he would not be able to return to Paris and to work that s.ring$ Pauline3 too3 was not well3 the long nursing had told on her3 and she had3 besides3 her own ailments3 for already the .ros.ect of motherhood had defined itself$ She wrote to her father that Beorges was still .oorly and that they should not return home till #ay$ -ut before the first ten days of of A.ril had .assed3 something of the true state of the case began to dawn on Saint-6yr$ E : shall ne,er again be strong enough to work hard3E he said to himself3 E and : must work hard if : am to .ass my doctorate e0aminations$ #eantime3 all PaulineEs dot will be s.ent$ : may ha,e to wait months before : can do any consecuti,e work% .erha.s3 e,en3 : shall be unable to make a li,ing by writing$ : am unfit for any study$ &ow can : get money I and get it Fuickly I for her sake and for the childEs KE (8hen the thought of the tables at #onte 6arlo flashed into his mind$ )ight thousand francs of PaulineEs dot remained% too small a sum in itself to be of any .ermanent use3 but enough to ser,e as ca.ital for s.eculation in rouge et noir$ With good luck such a sum might .roduce a fortune$ 8he idea caught him and fascinated his thoughts slee.ing and waking$ :n his dreams he beheld .iles of gold shining beside him on the green cloth3 and by day as he wandered feebly along the Promenade des Anglais with Pauline he grew silent3 feeding his sick heart with this new fancy$ 9ne day he said to his wife' I E >et us run o,er to #onte 6arlo and see the .laying% it will amuse us% and the gardens are [Page "7+] lo,ely3 You will be delighted with the .lace$ ),erybody says it is the most beautiful s.ot on the 2i,iera$E So they went3 and were charmed3 but Beorges did not .lay that day$ &e stood by the tables and watched3 while Pauline3 too timid to ,enture into the saloons3 and a little afraid of le ?eu3 sat by the great fountain in the garden outside the casino$ Beorges declared that e,ening as they sat o,er their tea at Nice that he had taken a fancy for beautiful #onaco3 and that he would rather finish the month of A.ril there than at Nice$ Pauline assented at once3 and the ne0t day they remo,ed to the most modest lodgings they could find within easy access of the gardens$ 8hen% ,ery warily and gently3 Saint-6yr unfolded to Pauline his newborn ho.es$ She was terribly alarmed at first and sobbed .iteously$ E :t is so wicked to gamble3 Beorges3E she said% I E no blessing can follow such a .lan as yours$ And : dare not tell .a.a about itE$ E:t would be wicked3 no doubt3E said Beorges3 Eto .lay against oneEs friend or oneEs neighbour3 as they do in clubs and .ri,ate circles3 because in such cases if one is lucky3 someone else is beggared3 and the money one .uts in oneEs .ocket lea,es the other .layers so much the .oorer$ -ut here it is Fuite another thing$ We .lay against a great firm3 an administration3 whom our indi,idual successes do not affect3 and which makes a trade of the whole concern$ Scru.les are out of .lace under such circumstances$ Playing at Page "!

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


#onte 6arlo hurts nobody but oneself3 and is not nearly so re.rehensible as the legitimate !usiness that goes on daily at the -ourseE$ E StillE3 faltered Pauline3 Esuch horrid .ersons do .lay3 I such men3 I such women L :t is not res.ectable$E E :t is not res.ectable for most .eo.le certainly3E he said3 E because other ways of earning are [Page "77] o.en to them$ 8he idle come here3 the dissolute3 the good-for-nothings$ : know all that$ -ut we are Fuite differently .laced% and ha,e no other means of getting money to li,e with$ At those tables3 Pauline3 : shall be working for you as sincerely and honestly as though : were buying u. shares or in,esting in foreign railroads$ :t is the name and tradition of the thing that frightens you$ >ook it in the face and you will own that it is sim.ly $ $ $ s.eculationE$ E Beorges3E said Pauline3 E you know best$ Do as you like dear3 : understand nothing3 and you were always cle,er$E (So Saint-6yr had his way3 and went to work accordingly3 without loss of time3 a little shyly at first3 not daring to ,enture on any considerable stake$ So he remained for a week at the roulette tables% because at the rouge et noir one can only .lay with gold$ 8he week came to an end and found him neither richer nor .oorer$ 8hen he grew bolder and ,entured into the dee.er water$ &e .layed on rouge et noir3 with luck the first day or two3 but after that fortune turned dead against him$ &e said nothing of it to Pauline3 who came e,ery day into the rooms at inter,als to seek him and say a few words3 sometimes leading him out for air when he looked weary3 or beguiling him away on .retence of her own need for com.anionshi. or for a walk$ No doubt the .oor girl suffered much% an0iety3 loneliness3 and a lingering shame which she could not su..ress3 .aled her cheeks3 and made her thin and careworn$ She dared not ask how things were going3 but her husbandEs silence and the increased sickliness of his as.ect set her heart beating hea,ily with dread$ Alone in her room she must ha,e we.t much during all this sad time3 for my friend Dr S$ says that when she made her first call u.on his [Page "7 ] ser,ices he noted the signs of tears u.on her face3 and ta0ed her with the fact3 getting from her the re.ly that she E often cried$E (>ittle by little3 being a kind and sym.athetic man3 he drew from her the story : ha,e told you$ Beorges became his .atient also3 but was always reticent in regard to le ?eu$ Dr S$ tried to dissuade him from ,isiting the tables3 on the ground that the atmos.here in the saloons would .ro,e .oisonous to him and .erha.s e,en fatal$ -ut although3 in deference to this counsel3 the young man shortened somewhat the duration of his sittings3 and s.ent more time under the trees with Pauline3 he did not by any means abandon his speculation# ho.ing always3 no doubt3 as all losers ho.e3 to see the luck turn and to take re,enge on +ortune$( (And the luck has not turned yet in Saint-6yrEs case3 : su..oseK( said :$ (No(3 answered my friend$ (: fear things are going ,ery ill with him and .oor PaulineEs dot( As he s.oke he rose from the dinner-table3 and we strolled out together u.on the moonlight terrace of the hotel$ ( :n ten minutes3( said :3 ( my train starts$ : am going back to Nice tonight$ Des.ite all its lo,eliness3 #onte 6arlo is hateful to me3 and : do not care to slee. under its shadow$ -ut before : go3 : ha,e a fa,our to ask of you$ >et me know the seFuel of the story you ha,e told me tonight$ : want to know how it ends I in trium.h or in tragedy$ Dr S$ will always be able to kee. you informed whether you remain here or not$ Write to me as soon as there is anything to tell3 and you will do me a signal kindness$ You see you are such an admirable raconteur that you ha,e interested me irresistibly in your subHect and must .ay the .enalty of talentL( [Page "7!]

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


&e laughed3 broke off the laugh in a sigh3 then shook hands with me3 and we .arted$ About two months later3 after my return to )ngland3 : had from my friend the following letter' I (You ha,e3 : do not doubt3 retained your interest in the fortunes of the two young .eo.le who so much attracted you at the tables last A.ril$ Well3 : ha,e Hust seen my friend Dr S$ in >yons3 and he has related to me the saddest tale you can imagine concerning Beorges and Pauline$ &ere it is3 Hust as he ga,e it3 and while it is fresh in my memory$ :t seems that all through the month of A.ril and well into #ay3 Saint-6yrEs ill luck stuck to him$ &e lost daily3 and at last only a ,ery slender remnant of his wifeEs money was left to .lay with$ Week by week3 too3 he grew more wasted and feeble3 fading with his fading fortune$ As for Pauline3 although she did not com.lain about herself3 Dr S$ saw reason to feel much an0iety on her account$ Brief and sickened ho.e and the wear of the terrible life she and Beorges were leading combined to break down her strength$ Phthisis3 too3 although not a contagious malady in the common sense of the term3 is a.t to e0ercise on debilitated .ersons constantly e0.osed to the com.anionshi. of its ,ictims an e0tremely baleful effect3 and to this danger Pauline was daily and nightly subHected$ She became fe,erish3 a sensation of unwonted languor took .ossession of her3 and slee.3 ne,ertheless3 became almost im.ossible$ Beorges3 engrossed in his .lay3 obser,ed but little the deterioration of his wifeEs health% or3 .erha.s3 attributed it to her condition and to ner,ousness in regard to her a..roaching trial$ 8hings were in this state3 when3 one day towards the close of #ay3 [Page " #] Beorges took his customary seat at the rouge et noir table$ 8he weather had suddenly become e0tremely hot3 and the crowd in the salles de ?eu had considerably diminished$ 9nly serious and ,eteran habituRs were left3 staking their gold3 for the most .art3 with the coolness and resolution of long e0.erience$ Pauline remained in her room3 she felt too ill to rise3 and attributed her indis.osition to the heat$ 4ery sick at heart3 Beorges entered the gaming-rooms alone3 and laid out on the green cloth the last of his ca.ital$ 8hen occurred one of those strange and com.lete re,ersions of luck that come to ,ery few men$ Beorges won continuously3 without a break3 throughout the entire day$ After an hour or two of steady success3 he grew elated3 and began to stake large sums3 with a recklessness that might ha,e a..alled others than the old stagers who sat beside him$ -ut his temerity brought golden returns3 e,ery stake rea.ed a fruitful har,est3 and louis dEor accumulated in tall .iles at his elbow$ -efore the rooms closed he had become a rich man3 and had won back PaulineEs dowry forty times o,er$ #en turned to look at him as he left the tables3 his face white with fatigue3 his eyes burning like li,e coals3 and his gait unsteady as a drunkardEs$ 9utside in the o.en air3 e,erything a..eared to him like a dream$ &e could not collect his thoughts% his brain whirled% he had eaten nothing all day3 fearing to Fuit his .lace lest he should change his luck or lose some good coup3 and now e0treme faintness o,ercame him$ Stoo.ing o,er the great basin of the fountain in front of the 6asino he bathed his face with his hands3 and eagerly drew in the cool e,ening !ree>e of the #editerranean3 Hust swee.ing u. sweet and full of refreshment o,er the .arched rock of #onte 6arlo$ 8hen he made his way [Page " "] home3 climbed with toil the high narrow staircase3 and entered the little a.artment he shared with Pauline$ :n the sitting room he .aused a minute3 .oured out a glass of wine and drank it at a draught3 to gi,e himself courage to tell her his good news like a man$ &is hand turned the key of his bedroom% his heart beat so wildly that its throbbing deafened him% he could not hear his own ,oice as he cried' E Pauline I darling L I we are rich L my luck has turned LE $ $ $ -ut then he sto..ed3 stricken by a blow worse than the stroke of death$ -efore him stood Dr S$3 and a woman whom he did not recognise3 bending o,er the bed u.on which Pauline lay3 .allid and still3 with hands folded u.on her breast$ Beorges flung his .orte-monnaie3 stuffed with notes3 u.on the foot of the bed3 and sank down on his knees beside it3 his eyes fi0ed u.on his young wifeEs face$ Dr S$ touched him u.on the shoulder$ E Du courage3 Saint-6yr3E he whis.ered$ E She has gone $ $ $ first$E 8he kindly words meant that the se.aration would not be for long$ 8he woman in charge by the Page CC

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couch of the dead girl we.t aloud3 but there were no tears yet in the eyes of Beorges$ E And the child KE he asked at length3 ,aguely com.rehending what had ha..ened$ 8hey lifted the sheet gently3 and showed him a little white cor.se lying beside its mother$ E : am glad the child is dead3 too3E said Beorges Saint-6yr$ (&e would not ha,e her buried by the #editerranean% I no I nor would he let the cor.se be taken home for burial$ 8he desire for flight was u.on him3 and he said he must carry his dead with him till he himself should die$ 8hat night he left #onte 6arlo for 2ome3 bearing with him those dear remains of wife and child% and the good doctor seeing his des.eration and full of .ity for so [Page " $] ,ast a woe3 went with him$ EPerha.sE3 he told me3 Ehad : not gone3 Beorges would not himself ha,e reached 2ome ali,e$E 8hey tra,elled night and day3 for the young man would not rest an instant$ &is design was to ha,e the body of his wife burned in the crematorium of the )ternal 6ity3 and Dr S$ was3 fortunately3 able to obtain for him the fulfilment of his desire$ 8hen Saint-6yr enclosed the ashes of his belo,ed in a little sil,er bo03 slung it about his neck and bade his friend farewell$ : asked the doctor where he went$ )orth"ard3 he answered3 E but : did not ask his .lans$ &e ga,e me no address% he had money in .lenty3 and it matters little where he went3 for death was in his face as he wrung my hand at .arting3 and he cannot li,e to see the summer out$E ( 8hat was the end of the letter$ And for my .art3 with the sole e0ce.tion of Beorges Saint-6yr3 : ne,er heard of any man who became rich o,er the tables of #onte 6arlo$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - * - NOE')6 OR4 T(E S).5ER R)00ON
: ha,e often heard .ractising .hysicians and students of .athology assert that no one e,er died of a !ro%en heart I that is3 of course3 in the .o.ular sense of the .hrase$ 2u.ture of the heart3 such as that which killed the .assionate tyrant Mohn of #usco,y3 is a rare accident3 and has no connection with the mental trouble and strain im.lied in the common e0.ression heartA!rea%ing$ : [Page " %] ha,e3 howe,er3 my own theory u.on this Fuestion3 I a theory founded on some tolerably strong e,idence which might ser,e more scientifically-minded .ersons than myself as a te0t for a medical thesis% but3 as for me3 : am no writer of theses3 and had much ado to get honestly through the only .roduction of the sort which e,er issued from my .en3 my ThIse de Doctorat$ +or : studied the di,ine art of Aescula.ius at the \cole de #Rdicine of Paris3 and it was there3 Hust before taking my degree3 that : became in,ol,ed in a singular little history3 the circumstances of which first led me to ado.t my .resent ,iews on the subHect alluded to in the o.ening words of this story$ :t is now many years since : inhabited the studentsK @uarter in the gay city3 and rented a cou.le of little rooms in an hotel meu!l2 not far from the gardens of the >u0embourg$ #edical students are ne,er rich3 and : was no e0ce.tion to the rule3 though3 com.ared with many of my associates3 my .ecuniary .osition was one of en,iable affluence$ : had a library of my own3 : drank wine at a franc the litre3 and occasionally smoked cigars$ #y little a.artment o,erlooked a wide street busy with incessant traffic3 and on warm e,enings3 after returning from dinner at the restaurant round the corner3 it was my habit to throw o.en my window-casement and lean out to inhale the fresh cool air of the coming night3 and to watch the crowds of foot-.assengers and ,ehicles going and coming like swarms of ants along the .a,ed street below$ 9n a certain lo,ely Muly e,ening towards the close of my student career3 : took u. my fa,ourite .osition as usual3 lu0uriating in the fumes of my cigarette and in that sweetest of mental enHoyments3 absolute idleness3 earned at the cost of hard and long-continued toil$ 8he sun [Page " &] had but Hust gone down3 the sky was brilliant with .ink lights and mellow tints of golden green blending with the blue of the dee. ,ault o,erhead3 scores of swift-darting birds were wheeling about in the still air3 uttering shar. clear cries3 as though calling one another to rest$ -elow3 women stood at their house-doors gossi.ing with their neighbours% .eals of laughter and the incessant chatter of feminine ,oices mingled with the din of horsesE hoofs on the hard road and with the ne,er-ending Hingle of the harness-bells$ BaJing laJily down into the street3 my attention was suddenly arrested by the singular a..earance and beha,iour of an odd-looking brown dog3 which seemed to be seeking someone among the hurrying crowds and rattling carts$ &alf-a-doJen times he ran u. the street and disa..eared from ,iew3 only to retrace his ste.s3 each time with increasing agitation and eagerness of manner$ : saw him cross the street again and again3 scan the faces of the .assers-by3 dash u. the ,arious turnings and come .anting back3 his tongue3 his tail droo.ing% one could e,en fancy there were tears in his eyes$ At length3 e0hausted or des.airing3 he crossed the street for the last time and sat down on the doorste. of the house : inhabited3 the .icture of grief and dismay$ &e was lost L Now : had not ser,ed my fi,e yearsE a..renticeshi. to medical science in Paris without becoming intimate with the horrible secrets of .hysiological laboratories$ : knew that a lost dog in Paris3 if not handsome3 and ,aluable to sell as a .et3 runs a terrible chance of falling directly or indirectly into the hands of ,i,isecting .rofessors3 and dying a death of torture$ &e may be .icked u. by an employ2 engaged in the search for fitting ,ictims3 and so handed o,er to immediate martyrdom3 or [Page " *] he may be hurried off to languish for weeks in that Page C<

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


horrible fourriIre for lost dogs whose managers hang their wretched ca.ti,es by fifties e,ery 8uesday3 and liberally su..ly the demands of all the .hysiologists who take the trouble to send to them for su!?ects$ Knowing these things3 and .ercei,ing that my concierge was absorbed in discussing scandal on the o..osite side of the street3 : took ad,antage of her absence from her .ost to sli. down to the re>A deAchauss2e3 .ounce on the unfortunate dog3 whom : found seated ho.elessly at the entrance3 and smuggle him u.stairs into my rooms$ 8here : de.osited him on the floor3 .atted him encouragingly3 and ga,e him water and a cou.le of sweet biscuits$ -ut he was abHectly miserable3 and though he drank a little3 would eat nothing$ After taking two or three turns round the a.artment and sniffing sus.iciously at the legs of the chairs and wainscot of the walls3 he returned to me where : stood with my back to the window watching him3 looked u. in my face3 wagged his tail feebly3 and whined$ : stoo.ed again to caress him3 and3 so doing3 obser,ed that he had3 tied round his neck3 and half-hidden in his rough brown hair3 a ribbon of sil,er tinsel3 uncommon both in material and design$ : felt assured that the dogEs owner must be a woman3 and hastily remo,ed the ribbon3 e0.ecting to find embroidered u.on it some such name as Am2lie or (2ontine$ -ut my e0amination .ro,ed futile3 the sil,er ribbon afforded me no clue to the antecedents of my canine waif$ And indeed3 as : stood contem.lating him in some .er.le0ity3 the con,iction forced itself on my mind that he was not e0actly the kind of animal that Am2lie or (2ontine would be likely to select for a .et$ &e was a .oodle certainly3 but of an ill-bred and uncouth descri.tion [Page " +] and instead of being sha,ed to his centre3 and wearing frills round his .aws3 his coat had been suffered to grow in its natural manner3 I an indication either of neglect or of want of taste im.ossible in a feminine .ro.rietor$ -ut his face was the most .uJJling and at the same time the most fascinating thing about him$ :t bore a more human e0.ression than : had e,er before seen u.on a dogEs countenance3 an e0.ression of singular a..eal and childishness3 so comic withal in its contrast with the rough hair3 round eyes3 and long nose of the creature3 that as : watched him an in,oluntary laugh esca.ed me$ (6ertainly(3 : said to him3 (you are a droll dog$ 9ne might do a good deal with you in a tra,elling cara,anL ( As the e,ening wore on he became more tranFuil$ Perha.s he began to ha,e confidence in me and to belie,e that : should restore him to his owner$ At any rate3 before we retired to rest he .re,ailed on himself to eat some su..er which : .re.ared for him3 .ausing e,ery now and then in his meal to lift his infantile face to mine and wag his tail in a halfhearted manner3 as though he said3 (You see : am doing my best to trust you3 though you are a medical studentL( Poor innocent beastL Well indeed for him that he had not chanced to sto. at the door of my neighbour and camarade3 Paul -ouchard3 who had a .assion for .ractical .hysiology3 and with whom no amount of animal suffering was of the smallest im.ortance when weighed against the remote chance of an insignificant disco,ery3 which would be challenged and contradicted as soon as announced by scores of his fellow-e0.erimentalists$ :f torture were indeed the true method of science3 then would the ,aunted tree of knowledge be no other than the u.as tree of oriental legend3 beneath [Page " 7] whose fatal shadow lie hecatombs of miserable ,ictims slain by its .oisonous e0halations3 the odour of which is fraught with agony and death L #y .oodle remained with me many days$ No one a..eared to claim him3 and no inFuiries elicited the least information regarding him$ >a douceur of fi,e francs had soothed the natural indignation and resentment dis.layed by my concierge at the first sight of my canine prot2g2% the restlessness and sus.icion he had e,inced on making my acFuaintance had subsided% and we were getting on in a ,ery comfortable and friendly manner together3 when accident threw in my way the clue : had laboriously but ,ainly sought$ 2eturning one day from a lecture3 and being unusually .ressed for time3 : took a shorter cut homeward than was my wont3 and at the corner of a narrow and ill-smelling street : came u.on a little heterogeneous sho.3 in the windows of which were set out a ,ariety of faded and biJarre articles of millinery$ &anging from a front shelf in a cons.icuous .osition among the collection was a stri. of the identical sil,er ribbon which had encircled Pe.inEs throat I : called the dog Pe.in I on the night : rescued him from the streets$ Without hesitation : entered the sho. and Fuestioned a slatternly woman Page C?

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


who sat behind the counter munching gruyere cheese and garlic$ ( Will you tell me3 madame3( said : with my most agreeable air3 ( whether you recollect ha,ing sold any of that tinsel ribbon lately3 and to whomK( She was not likely to ha,e much custom3 : thought3 and her clients would be easily remembered$ (WhatEs that to youK( was her retort3 as she .aused in her meal and stared at me% ( do you want to buy the rest of itK( [Page " ] : took the hint immediately3 and .roduced my .urse$ (With all the .leasure in life3( : said3 (if you will do me the fa,our : ask$( She darted a keen look at me3 laughed3 .ushed her cheese aside3 and took the ribbon from its .lace in the sho. window$ (: sold half a m]tre of it about three weeks ago3( said she slowly3 ( to NoRmi -ergeron% you know her3 .erha.sK SheEs not been this way lately$ 8hereEs a m]tre of it left% itEs one franc twenty3 monsieur$( (And where does NoRmi -ergeron li,e K( : asked3 as she dro..ed the money into her till$ ( Well3 she used to lodge at number ten in this street3 with #aman PaFuet$ #aybe sheEs gone$ :E,e not seen either her or her dog this fortnight$( (A .oodle dog3( cried : eagerly3 (with his coat uncli..ed3 I a rough brown dogK( (Yes3 e0actly$ Ah3 you know NoRmi3 I !ien sLrL( And she leered at me3 and laughed again un.leasantly$ (: ne,er saw her in my life3( said : hotly% ( but her dog has come astray to my lodgings3 and he had a .iece of this ribbon of yours round his throat% nothing more than that$( ( Ah K Well3 she li,es at number ten$ Tene>3 I thereEs #aman PaFuet the other side of the street% youEd better go and s.eak to her$( She .ointed to a hideous old harridan standing on the o..osite .a,ement3 her bare arms resting on her hi.s3 and a greasy yellow kerchief twisted turban-wiseround her head$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


#y heart sank$ NoRmi must be ,ery .oor3 or ,ery unfortunate3 to li,e under the same roof with such an old sorciIre L Ne,ertheless3 : crossed the street3 and accosted the hag with a smile$ [Page " !] (Bood-day3 #aman PaFuet$ 6an you tell me anything of your lodger3 NoRmi -ergeronK( (.einK( She was deaf and surly$ : re.eated my Fuestion in a louder key$ ( : know nothing of her3( she answered3 in a ,oice that sounded like the croak of a frog$ ( She couldnEt .ay me her rent3 and : told her to be off$ #aybe sheEs drowned by this$( (You turned her outK( : cried$ (Yes3 turned her out3( re.eated the hag3 with a sa,age oath$ ( :t was her own fault% she might ha,e sold her beast of a .oodle to .ay me3 and she wouldnEt$ Why not3 : should like to know3 I she sold e,erything else she hadL( (And you can tell me nothing about her now3 I you know no more than that K ( (Nothing$ Bo and find herL( She muttered a curse3 glared at me ,iciously3 and hobbled off$ : had turned to de.art in another direction3 when a skinny hand suddenly clutched my arm3 and looking round3 : found that #aman PaFuet had followed and o,ertaken me$ ( You know the girl3( she sFueaked3 eyeing me greedily3 I (will you .ay her rentK She owed me a monthEs lodging3 se,en francs$( She looked so loathsome and horrible with her withered e,il face so close to mine that : ga,e a gesture of disgust and shook her off as though she had been a toad$ (No(3 said :3 Fuickening my ste.s% ( she is a stranger to me3 and my .ockets are em.ty($ #aman PaFuet flung a curse after me3 more foul and em.hatic than the last3 and went her way blas.heming$ : returned home to PR.in saddened and disFuieted$ (So3 after all(3 : said to him3 ( your owner belongs to the fair se0L -ut3 hea,enL in what misery she and [Page "!#] you must ha,e li,edL And yet you cried for her3 PR.inL( Not long after these incidents I three or four days at the latest I a .arty of my fellow-students came to smoke with me3 and as the shell always sounds of the sea3 our con,ersation naturally sa,oured of our .rofessional .ursuits$ We discussed our hos.ital chefs3 their crotchets3 their in,entions3 their medical successes3 their .olitics% we criticised new methods of o.eration3 related anecdotes of the theatre and consulting-room3 and s.eculated on the chances of men about to go u. for e0amination$ 8hen we Page C;

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


touched on the subHect of obscure diseases3 unusual mental conditions3 .rolonged delirium3 and kindred to.ics$ :t was at this .oint that one of us3 )ug]ne Brellois3 a house-surgeon at a neighbouring hos.ital3 remarked3 I (-y the way3 we ha,e a curious case now in the womenEs ward of my ser,ice3 a .retty little Alsatian girl of eighteen or twenty$ She was knocked down by a cart about three weeks ago and was brought in with a fracture of the neck of the left humerus3 and two ribs broken$ Well3 there was .erforation of the .leura3 traumatic .leurisy and fe,er3 and her tem.erature went u. as high as @ ^-!$ She was delirious for three days3 and talked incessantly% we had to .ut her in a se.arate cabinet3 so that the other .atients might not be disturbed$ : sat by her bed for hours and listened$ You ne,er heard such odd things as she said$ She let me into the whole of her history that way$ : donEt think : should ha,e cared for it though3 if she were not so wonderfully .retty L ( (Was it a lo,e story3 )ug]neK ( asked Auguste 4illemin3 laughing$ (Not a bit of it% it was all about a dog who seemed [Page "!"] to be her .et$ Such an e0traordinary dog L +rom what she said : gathered that he was a brown .oodle3 that he could stand on his head3 and walk on his hind .aws3 that he followed her about where,er she went3 that he car,ed in wood for illustrated books and Hournals3 that he wore a sil,er collar3 that she was engaged to be married to him when he had earned enough to kee. house3 and that his name was Antoine L( All his hearers laughed e0ce.t myself$ As for me3 my heart bounded3 my face flushed3 : was sensible of a keen sensation of .leasure in hearing )ug]ne describe his .atient as "onderfully pretty$ : lea.t from my chair3 .ointed to PR.in3 who lay doJing in a corner of the room3 and e0claimed3 I ( : will wager anything that the name of your Alsatian is NoRmi -ergeron3 and that my dog there is Antoine himselfL( And before any Fuestions could be .ut : .roceeded to recount the circumstances with which my reader is already acFuainted$ 9f course PR.in was immediately summoned into the midst of the circle we had formed round the o.en window to ha,e his re.uted accom.lishments tested as a criterion of his identity with Antoine$ Amid bursts of laughter and a clamour of encouragement and a..robation3 it was disco,ered that my canine prot2g2 .ossessed at least the first two of the Fualifications im.uted to him3 and could walk on his hind legs or stand on his head for .eriods a..arently unlimited$ :n fact3 so obedient and willing we found him3 that when for the third time he had in,erted himself3 no .ersuasion short of .icking him u. by his tail3 a .roceeding which : deemed necessary to a,ert as.hy0ia3 could induce him to resume his normal .osition$ -ut that [Page "!$] which rendered the entertainment s.ecially fascinating and ludicrous was the inimitable and unbroken gra,ity of PR.inEs e0.ression$ No matter what his attitude3 his eyes retained always the solemnity one obser,es in the eyes of an infant to whom e,erything in the world is serious and nothing grotesFue$ (-ut now for the engra,ing on wood L( cried Mules >euret3 when we had e0hausted oursel,es with laughing$ (What a .ity you ha,e no im.lements of the art here3 Ber,aisL( Page CA

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


(8hatEs )ug]neEs chaffL( : cried$ (NoRmi ne,er said anything of the sort3 : warrantL ( (9n my honour she did3( said he3 em.hatically$ ( 6ome and see her tomorrow% sheEs Fuite sane now3 no fe,er left at all$ SheEll be delighted to hear that you ha,e her dog3 and will tell you all about him3 no doubt$( (After the chefs ,isit3 then3 and weEll breakfast together at noon$( (Agreed$ >aughing makes one dry3 mon ami% let me ha,e some more of your wine$ We canEt afford good wine like that3 nous autres L (

$
When the following morning arri,ed3 : rose sooner than my wont' )ug]neEs ser,ice was an early one3 and by half-.ast ten oEclock he and : were alone in the wards of his hos.ital$ &e led me to a bed in one of the little s.aces .artitioned off from the common salle for the rece.tion of s.ecial cases or refractory .atients$ 8here3 .ro..ed u. on her .illows3 her arm bandaged and su..orted by a cushion3 lay a young girl with fair braided hair and the sweetest face : had e,er seen out of a [Page "!%] .icture$ Something in the childish and wistful look of her dee. eyes and serious mouth reminded me strangely of PR.in% it was PR.inEs .lainti,e e0.ression refined and intensified by s.iritual influence3 a look such as one might imagine on the face of some young no,ice3 brought u. in a con,ent and innocent of all e,il3 I an ing2nue untainted by the world and ignorant of its ways$ 6ould such a creature as this come out of the foul and sin-reeking @uartier : had ,isited four days ago3 with its filthy houses3 its fetid alleys3 its coarse blas.heming women and drunken men K #y mind misga,e me' surely3 after all3 this could not be NoRmi -ergeron L : .ut the Fuestion to her fearfully3 for : dreaded to hear her deny it$ She was so beautiful% if she should say no : should be in des.air$ A ,oice as sweet as the face answered me3 with Hust a faint infle0ion of sur.rise in it3 and as she s.oke a slight blush suffused her cheeks and showed the delicate trans.arency of her skin$ (Yes3 that is my name$ Does monsieur know me3 thenK( :n my turn : blushed3 but with delight$ No wonder PR.in had re.ined at se.aration from so lo,ely a mistress L (: went to your house to inFuire for you the other day3 mademoiselle3( stammered :3 ( for : think : ha,e a dog which belongs to you$ &a,e you not lost a brown .oodle with a ribbon like this round his throatK(

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


As : s.oke : .roduced the tinsel ornament from my .ocket3 but before : finished my last sentence she started forward with a Hoyous cry3 and but for the timely inter,ention of )ug]ne3 who stood beside the bed3 the inHured [Page "!&] arm might ha,e suffered seriously from the effects of her e0citement$ (AhL( she cried3 wee.ing with Hoy% (my -ambin3 my dear -ambin L &e is found then3 he is safe3 and : shall see him again L ( ( -ambin L( re.eated :3 dubiously$ (#onsieur Brellois thought that his name was Antoine L( 8he rosy colour dee.ened under her delicate cheeks and cre.t to the roots of her braided hair$ (No(3 she re.lied in a lower tone3 ( monsieur is mistaken$ #y dogEs name is -ambin% we called him so because he is so like a baby$ DonEt you think him like a baby3 monsieur K ( She looked wondrously like a baby herself3 and : longed to tell her so% : could not restrain my curiosity3 her blushes were so enticing$ (And Antoine K ( .ersisted :$ (&e is a friend of mine3 monsieur% an engra,er on wood3 an artist$( )ug]ne and : e0changed glances$ (And you and he are engaged to be married3 is it not soK( =nconsciously : Fuestioned her as : might ha,e Fuestioned a child$ She hardly seemed old enough to ha,e the right o,er her own secrets$ (Yes3 monsieur$ -ut : do not know where he is% and : ha,e looked for him so long3 ah3 so long L( (What3 ha,e you lost him too3 then3 as well as -ambinK( She shook her head3 and looked troubled$ (8ell me3( said :3 coa0ing her3 (.erha.s : maybe able to find him also$( (We are Alsatians3( said NoRmi3 with her eyelids [Page "!*] droo.ing3 doubtless to hide the tears gathering behind them% (and we li,ed in the same ,illage and were betrothed$ Antoine was ,ery cle,er3 and could cut .ictures in wood beautifully3 I oh so beautifully3 I and they sent him to Paris to be a..renticed to a Page C!

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


great house of business3 and to learn engra,ing thoroughly$ And : stayed at home with my father3 and Antoine used to write to me ,ery often3 and say how well he was getting on3 and how he had in,ented a new method of wood-car,ing3 and how rich he should be some day3 and that we were to be married ,ery soon$ And then my father died3 Fuite suddenly3 and : was all alone in the house$ And Antoine did not write% I week after week there was no letter3 though : ne,er ceased writing to him$ So : grew miserable and frightened3 and : took -ambin I Antoine ga,e me -ambin3 and taught him all his tricks I and : came to Paris to try and find him$ : had a little money then3 and besides3 : can make lace3 and : thought it would not be long before Antoine and : got married$ -ut he had left the house of business for which he had worked3 and they knew nothing of him at his lodgings3 and there were e,er so many of my letters on the table in the conciergerie uno.ened$ So : could learn nothing3 for no one knew where he had gone3 and little by little the money : had brought with me went in food for me and -ambin$ 8hen somebody told me that #aman PaFuet had a room to let that was chea.3 and : went there and tried to li,e on my lacemaking3 always ho.ing that Antoine would come to find me$ -ut the air of the .lace was so horrible I oh3 so horrible after our ,illage L I and : got the fe,er3 and fell sick3 and could do no work at all$ And by degrees : sold all the things : had I my lace-.illow and all I and when they were gone the old [Page "!+] woman wanted me to sell -ambin3 because he was cle,er3 and she was sure : could get a good .rice for him$ -ut : would rather ha,e sold the heart out of my body3 and so : told her$ 8hen she was angry3 and turned us both out3 -ambin and me3 and we went wandering about all day till at last : got ,ery faint and tired3 for : had been ill a long time3 monsieur3 and we had nothing to eat3 so that : lost my senses and fell in the road all at once3 and a cart went o,er me$ 8hen the .eo.le .icked me u.3 and carried me here3 but none of them knew -ambin3 and : had fainted and could tell them nothing$ So they must ha,e dri,en him away3 thinking he was a strange dog3 and had no right to follow me$ And when my senses came back : was in the hos.ital3 and -ambin was gone3 and : thought : ne,er would see him again$( She sank down on her .illow and drew a great sigh of relief$ :t had e,idently comforted her to tell her story to sym.athetic listeners$ Poor childL scant sym.athy could she ha,e found in #aman PaFuetEs unwomanly breast and e,il associations$ We were silent when she had finished3 and in the silence we heard through the o.en window the Hoyous song of the birds3 and the hum of the bees wandering blithely from flower to flower3 laden with their sweets3 I sounds that ne,er cease through all the long summer days$ Alas L how strange and sad a contrast it is3 I the eternal and e0uberant gladness of NatureEs soulless children3 I the uni,ersal ine,itable misery of human li,es L Presently the religieuse who had the charge of the adHoining ward o.ened the door softly and called )ug]ne$ (#onsieur3 will you come to No$ 7 for a momentK &er wound is bleeding again badly$( [Page "!7] &e looked u.3 nodded3 and rose from his seat$ (: must go for the .resent3 Ber,ais(3 said he$ ( :f you stay with our little friend3 donEt let her disarrange her arm$ 8he ribs are all right now3 but the humerus is a longer affair$ Au re oir L ( -ut : found NoRmi too much e0cited and fatigued for further con,ersation% so3 .romising to take e,ery .ossible care of -ambin and to come again and see her ,ery soon3 : withdrew to the adHoining ward and Page C"

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


Hoined )ugene$ No need to say that both these .romises were faithfully obser,ed$ 8hroughout the whole of Muly and of the ensuing month NoRmi remained an inmate of the hos.ital3 and it was not until the first two weeks of Se.tember were s.ent that the fractured arm was consolidated and the mandate for dismissal issued$ 8wo days before that fi0ed for her de.arture : went to .ay her the last of my customary ,isits3 and found her sitting at the o.en window busily engaged in wea,ing lace u.on a new .illow3 which she e0hibited to me with childish glee$ (See3 monsieur3 what a beautiful .resent : ha,e had L ( she cried3 holding u. the cushion for me to e0amine$ ( :t is much better than the old one : sold% only look how .rettily the bobbins on it are .ainted L( : had ne,er before beheld a lace .illow3 and the curiosity which : dis.layed fairly delighted NoRmi$ (And who is your generous benefactorK( : asked3 re.lacing the cushion in her la.$ (DonEt you knowK( she asked in turn3 o.ening her eyes wide with sur.rise$ (: thought he would ha,e been sure to tell you$ Why3 it was that good #onsieur [Page "! ] Brellois3 to be sure L &e ga,e some money to the sister to buy it for me$( Kind )ug]neL &e had ,ery little money to li,e u.on3 and must3 : know3 ha,e economised considerably in order to .urchase this gift for his little .atient$ Still : was not Healous of his bounty3 since for many days .ast : had been greatly occu.ied with NoRmiEs future welfare3 and had busied myself in secret with certain schemes and arrangements the issue of which it remained only to announce$ (So3( said :3 taking a chair beside her3 ( you are going to earn your li,ing again by making lace K ( (8o try( she answered with a sad em.hasis$ (>ace-making does not .ay well3 then K ( (9h no3 monsieur L :t cannot be done Fuickly3 you see3 I only a little .iece like this e,ery day3 working oneEs best3 I and so much lace is made by machines now L( (-ut it cannot cost you much to li,e3 NoRmi K ( Page C

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


(8he eating and drinking is not much3 monsieur% it is the rent% and all the chea. lodgings are so dirty L :t is that which is the most terrible$ : canEt bear to ha,e ugly things about me and hideous faces3 I like #aman PaFuetEsL( She had the .oetEs instincts3 this little Alsatian .easant$ #ost girls in her case would ha,e cared little for the unlo,ely surroundings3 so long as food and drink were .lentiful$ (-ut su..osing you had a nice room of your own3 clean and comfortable3 with an iron bedstead like this one here3 and chairs and a table3 and two windows looking out o,er the >u0embourg gardens3 I and nothing to .ay$( (Ah3 monsieurL( [Page "!!] She dro..ed her .illow3 and fi0ed her great brown eyes earnestly on my face$ (:t is im.ossible(3 .ursued :3 reddening under her gaJe3 ( for you to return to the horrible @uartier in which #aman PaFuet li,es$ :t is not fit for a young girl% you would grow wicked and base like the .eo.le who li,e there3 I or else you would die3 I and : think you would die3 NoRmi$( (-ut : ha,e no money3 monsieur$( (:f you ha,e no money3 you ha,e friends% a friend has gi,en you your new .illow3 you know3 and another friend3 .erha.s3 may gi,e you a room to li,e in$( &er eyelids droo.ed3 her colour came and went Fuickly3 : detected beneath her bodice the con,ulsi,e mo,ement of her heart$ 8he agitation she betrayed communicated itself to me% : rose from my chair and leaned against the window-sill3 so that my face might be no longer on a le,el with her eyes$ (: understand you3 monsieur L ( she cried3 and immediately burst into tears$ (Yes3 NoRmi(3 : said3 (: see you understand me$ 8here is really a room for you such as : ha,e described$ :n two days you will lea,e the hos.ital3 but you are not without a home$ 8he woman of the house in which you will li,e is kind and good3 she knows all about you and -ambin3 and has .romised me to take care of you$ Your furniture is bought3 your rent is .aid3 I you ha,e nothing to do but to go and take .ossession of the room$ : ho.e you and -ambin will be ha..y there$( She made me no re.ly in words3 but bending forward o,er her .illow she took my hand and timidly kissed it$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


:t would be hard to say which of us was the ha..ier on the day which saw NoRmi installed in her new abode3 [Page $##] I she3 or :3 or -ambin$ -ambinEs delight was certainly the most demonstrati,e% he careered round and round the room uttering Hoyous barks3 returning at inter,als in a .anting and e0hausted condition to his .retty mistress to gi,e and recei,e caresses which : own : felt greatly dis.osed to en,y him$ : left my four-footed friend with some regret3 for he and : had been good com.anions during NoRmiEs soHourn at the hos.ital3 and : knew that my rooms would at first seem lonely without him$ &is fair owner3 as she bade me good-bye at the door of her new domicile3 begged me to return often and see them both3 but hard as : found it to refuse the tem.ting reFuest3 : summoned u. resolution to tell her that it would be best for us to meet ,ery seldom indeed3 .erha.s only once or twice more3 but that her landlady had my name and address and would be able to gi,e me tidings of her .retty often$ &er childlike nature and instincts were ne,er more a..arent than on this occasion$ (What ha,e : done3 monsieur K( she asked with a bewildered e0.ression3 her brown eyes lifted .leadingly3 and the corners of her mouth de.ressed$ ( : thought you would like to come and see us$ Bam!in is so fond of you3 too3 I we shall both be so sorry if you donEt come$( As gently and as tenderly as : could3 : tried to e0.lain to her our mutual .osition and the e,il construction which others would be sure to .lace on any friendshi. between us$ -ut she only shook her head in a troubled way and sighed$ (: donEt understand3( she said3 ( but of course you know best$ : used to hear something like that at #aman PaFuetEs3 about other girls3 but : ne,er understood it$ [Page $#"] 9nly say that you are not angry with me3 and let me hear about you as often as you can$( : .romised3 smiling3 and left her standing at the o.en door with -ambin tucked under her arm3 looking after me down the street and nodding her .retty golden head$ #any days went by I : concentrated my mind u.on my books3 and de,oted the whole of my time and of my thoughts to .re.aration for my last two doctorate e0aminations3 contenting myself with only a few .assing inFuiries of NoRmiEs landlady concerning the welfare of her lodger3 and with the assurance that both she and her dog were well and ha..y$ -ut one e,ening late in Se.tember3 as : sat immersed in study3 my ear caught the sound of light girlish footste.s on the staircase leading to my rooms% then came a momentary .ause3 a ta. on the door3 and the ne0t minute NoRmi herself3 closely followed by the faithful -ambin3 burst u.on my solitude$ (: ha,e found him3 monsieur L( she cried breathlessly$ (: came at once to tell you3 I : knew you would be so glad L( (What3 I AntoineK( : asked3 rising and laying my book aside$ Page <

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


(Yes% I Antoine L : met him in the street$ &e was dressed like a gentleman% no one would ha,e known him e0ce.t me L &e had no idea : was in Paris% he turned Fuite white with the sur.rise of seeing me$ And : told him what a search : had made for him3 and how miserable : had been3 and how good you were to me3 and where : was li,ing$ And he is coming to see me this ,ery e,ening L 9h3 : am so ha..y L( (You should ha,e sent me word of this3 NoRmi3( said [Page $#$] : gra,ely$ ( You ought not to ha,e come here$ :t is ,ery foolish ------ ( She interru.ted me with an im.loring gesture$ (9h3 yes3 : know% : am so sorry L -ut Hust at the moment : forgot$ : longed to tell you about Antoine3 and e,erything else went out of my head$ DonEt be cross with me L( 6ould any one be angry with herK She was thoroughly innocent3 and natural3 as innocence always is$ (#y child3 it is only of yourself : am thinking$ Antoine will teach you to be wiser by-and-by$ 8ell him to come and see me$ : su..ose you will be married soon now3 wonEt youK( (9h3 yes3 monsieur3 ,ery soon K Antoine only wanted money3 and he has .lenty now% he has a business of his own3 and is a patron himselfL( (Well3 NoRmi3 : am ,ery glad$ You must let me come to your wedding$ : shall call at your house tomorrow3 and ask all about it% for no doubt Antoine will want you to settle the arrangements at once$ And now run home3 for your own sake3 my child$( (Bood-bye L monsieur$( She .aused at the door and added shyly3 (You will really come tomorrow morningK( ( Yes3 yes% before breakfast3 Bood-bye3 NoRmi$(

%
At about ten on the ensuing day : re.aired to NoRmiEs lodging3 and found #adame Meannel3 the landlady3 on the look-out for me$ ( NoRmi told me you were coming(3 she said% ( : will go and fetch her$ &er fianc2 was here last night3 and she has a great deal to tell you$( [Page $#%]

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


:n two minutes she returned with my .retty friend3 radiant as the sunlight with ha..iness and renewed ho.e$ Antoine lo,ed her more than e,er3 she said3 and he had brought her a beautiful .resent3 a sil,er cross3 which she meant to wear on her wedding-day3 tied round her throat u.on the bit of tinsel ribbon : had gi,en her3 and which matched it e0actly$ And was the wedding-day fi0ed K : asked$ No3 not the .recise day% Antoine had said nothing about it% but he had s.oken much of his lo,e3 and of the ha..iness in store for them both3 and of the lo,ely things he should gi,e her$ 8he day was nothing% that could be settled in a minute at any time$ 8hen she fetched me some lace she had made3 and told me that Antoine knew of a rich lady who would buy it3 I a marFuise3 who doated on lace of the sort3 and who ga,e enormous sums for a few yards% and the money would do for her dot3 it would buy her wedding-dress3 .erha.s$ So she .rattled on3 blithe and ingenuous3 the frank sim.licity of her guileless soul reflected in the clear de.ths of her eyes3 as the light of hea,en is mirrored in .ure waters$ Days went by3 and weeks3 but Antoine ne,er came to see me3 and whene,er : called at #adame MeannelEs and asked for NoRmi I which : ,entured to do se,eral times3 now that the good woman knew she was engaged to be married3 and understood so well our relations with each other I : always heard the same story3 and always recei,ed3 on AntoineEs behalf3 the same ,ague e0cuses for the .ost.onement of the ,isit : had in,ited him to .ay me$ At one time3 he bade NoRmi tell me his work was too .ressing3 and he could find no time to come% at another3 that he feared to disturb me3 knowing : was ,ery busy% and again3 that he had been Hust about to [Page $#&] start when an im.ortant letter or an ino..ortune customer had arri,ed and detained him$ As for the wedding-day3 he would ne,er come to the .oint about it3 and NoRmi3 naturally shy of the subHect3 ne,er .ressed him$ She was Fuite ha..y and confident% Antoine lo,ed her with all his heart3 and told her so e,ery day$ What more could she want K &e brought her lo,ely bunches of red and white roses3 little trinkets3 sweetmeats3 ribbons% indeed3 he seemed ne,er to come em.ty-handed$ She used to take walks with him when his dayEs work was o,er3 in the >u0embourg gardens3 and once or twice they went out as far as the 6ham.s-)lysRes$ 9h3 yes3 Antoine lo,ed her dearly3 and she was ,ery ha..y% they should certainly be married before long$ We were already in No,ember3 the days were getting bleak and chill3 : had to light my lam. early and close my windows against the dam. e,ening air$ 9ne afternoon3 Hust as it was beginning to grow dark3 #adame Meannel came to see me3 looking ,ery disturbed and an0ious$ (#onsieur(3 she said3 ( a strange thing has ha..ened which makes me so uneasy that : cannot hel. coming to tell you of it3 and to ask your o.inion and ad,ice$ Antoine came about half-an-hour ago and took NoRmi out for a walk$ Not ten minutes after they had left the house3 a lady whom : do not know came to my door and asked if #ademoiselle -ergeron li,ed there$ : said yes3 but that she was out$ 8he strange lady stared hard at me and asked if she had gone out alone$ : told her no3 she was with her fianc23 but that if any message could be left for her : would be careful to gi,e it directly she should return$ :mmediately the lady seiJed me by the arm so tightly : almost screamed$ She grew white3 and then red3 then she seemed to find her ,oice3 and [Page $#*] asked me if she could wait u.stairs in NoRmiEs room till she came back$ At first : said E NoE3 but she would not take a refusal% she insisted u.on waiting% and there she is3 : could not get her to lea,e the .lace$( #adame Meannel stood o..osite to me% : lifted my eyes3 and met hers steadily$ When : had satisfied myself of her sus.icions3 : said in a low ,oice3 I (You ha,e done rightly to fetch me$ 8here is great trouble in store for our .oor child$ : fear this woman may ha,e a better right to Antoine than NoRmi has$( Page @

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


(: am sure of it3( res.onded #adame Meannel$ ( :f you could but ha,e seen how she looked L 8hank the good Bod she has come in time to sa,e our NoRmi from any real harm L( (:t will blight the whole of her life(3 said :% (she is so innocent of e,il3 and she lo,es him so much($ : took u. my hat as : s.oke3 and followed #adame Meannel downstairs and into the street$ When we reached her house3 : left her in her own little .arlour u.on the entresol3 and with a resolute ste. but a hea,y heart : went alone to confront the strange woman in NoRmiEs room$ Alas L the worst that could ha..en had already befallen$ NoRmi had returned from her walk during the absence of her landlady3 and : o.ened the door u.on a terrible scene$ #y .oor child stood before me3 with a white scared face3 and hea,ing breast3 u.on which was .inned a bunch of autumn ,iolets3 AntoineEs last gift to her$ &er slender figure3 her fair hair3 her .allid com.le0ion looked ghost-like in the uncertain twilight% she seemed like a troubled s.irit3 beautiful and sorely distressed3 but there was no shame in her lo,ely face3 nor any sense of guilt$ Seeing me enter3 she uttered a cry of relief3 and s.rang forward as though to seek .rotection$
[Page $#+]

(S.eak to her3 monsieurL( she e0claimed in a ,oice of .iercing entreaty% (oh3 s.eak to her and ask her what it all means L She says she is AntoineEs wife L( 8he strange woman whose back had been turned towards the door when : o.ened it3 looked round at the words3 and her face met mine$ She was a brunette3 with shar. black eyes and an infle0ible mouth3 a face which beside NoRmiEs seemed like a dark cloud beside clear sunlight$ (Yes indeed L( she cried% and her ,oice was half choked with contending anger and des.air3 (: am his wife% and what then is she K : tracked him here$ &e is always away from me now$ : found a letter of hers signed with her name% she writes to him as if she lo,ed him L SeeL( She flung u.on the table a crum.led scra. of .a.er3 and suddenly burying her face in her hands3 burst into a torrent of .assionate tears and sobs$ NoRmi stood silent and watched her3 terrified and wondering$ : closed the door softly3 and a..roaching the unfortunate woman3 laid my hand u.on her shoulder$ (:t is your husband who is alone to blame3(: whis.ered to her$ (Do not re,ile this innocent girl% she suffers Fuite as much as you do3 I .erha.s e,en more3 for she was betrothed to him years ago$( #y grief for NoRmi3 and my resentment against Antoine made me im.rudent% : s.oke unHustly3 but the .ro,ocation was great$ (You take her .artL( she cried3 re.elling me indignantly$ (:nnocent I she innocent K -ah L She must ha,e known he was married3 for why else did he not marry her K Do you think me a child to be fooled by such a taleK( [Page $#7]

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


(No(3 answered : sternly3 looking away from her at NoRmi$ (3ou are not a child3 madame3 but she is one L &ad she been a woman like yourself3 your husband would ne,er ha,e decei,ed her$ She trusted him wholly$( With a gesture that was almost fierce in its .ride3 AntoineEs wife turned her back u.on NoRmi3 and mo,ed towards the door$ ( : thank my Bod(3 she said solemnly3 choking down her sobs3 and bending her dark brows u.on me3 ( that : was ne,er such an innocent as she isL : am not your du.e3 monsieur3 : know well enough what you are3 and what it is that constitutes your right to defend her$ 8he neighbours know her story% trust them for finding it out and re.eating it$ 8his room belongs to you3 monsieur% your money .aid for e,erything in it3 and your innocent there no doubt is included in the bargain$ Kee. her to yourself for the future% AntoineEs foot shall ne,er again be set in this wicked houseL( She o.ened the door with the last words3 and ,anished into the darkness without$ +or a moment there was a dee. silence3 the ,oice which had Hust ceased seemed to me to ring and echo around the dim3 still room$ 8he sense of a great shame was u.on me% : dared not lift my eyes to NoRmiEs face$ Suddenly a faint cry startled me$ She stretched her arms towards me and fell on her knees at my feet$ (9 monsieurL Antoine is lostL #y heart is dead L( 8hen she struck her breast wildly with her clenched hand3 and swooned u.on the floor$ None of us e,er saw Antoine again after that terrible e,ening$ Whether he had been most weak or most wicked we could not tell% but3 for my .art : always [Page $# ] belie,ed that he had really lo,ed NoRmi3 and that his marriage had been one of worldly con,enience3 contracted3 in an e,il hour3 for the sake of gain$ &is wife was rich3 NoRmi was a beggar$ As for her3 .oor child3 she ne,er uttered a word of re.roach against him% ne,er a gesture of im.atience3 or an e0.ression of com.laint betrayed her suffering$ She had s.ent all her innocent life u.on her lo,e3 and with the lo,e her life also went from her$ Day after day she lay on her bed like a flower crushed and fading slowly$ 8here were no signs of organic disease in her3 there was no a..reciable malady% her heart was broken3 so said #adame Meannel3 and more than that the wisest could not say$ -ambin3 dimly com.rehending that some great sorrow had befallen his dear mistress3 lay always at her feet3 watching her with eyes full of tender and wistful affection3 refusing to lea,e her by night or by day$ :t must ha,e comforted her somewhat to see in him3 at least3 the e,idence of one true and faithful lo,e$ So white and spirituelle she grew as she lay there3 day by day3 so delicately lo,ely3 her dee. lustrous eyes shining as with some inward light3 and her hair of gold surrounding her head like the aureole of a .ictured saint3 that at times : fancied she was becoming de-materialised before our eyes% her s.irit seemed as it were to grow ,isible3 as though in the intensity of its .ure fire the mere earthly body which had contained it were being re-absorbed and consumed$ Sometimes in the e,enings her .ulse Fuickened and her cheeks flushed with the hectic touch of fe,er% I it was the only sym.tom of .hysical disorder : e,er detected in her% I but e,en that was slight3 I the tem.erature of her system was hardly affected by Page A

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


it$ [Page $#!] So she lay3 her body fading3 day after day and hour after hour$ #adame Meannel was dee.ly concerned3 for she was a good woman3 and could sym.athise with others in sorrow3 but nothing that she could say or do seemed to reach the senses of NoRmi$ :ndeed3 at times : fancied the .oor child had no longer eyes or ears for the world from which she was .assing away so strangely% she looked as though she were already beginning life in some other s.here and on some other .lane than ours3 and could see and hear only sights and sounds of which our material natures had no cognisance$ (6Eest le chagrin3 monsieur(3 said #adame Meannel% (cEest comme _a Fue le chagrin tue3 I touHours$( )arly in the third week of December : recei,ed my summons to .ass the final e0amination for the #$D$ degree$ 8he day was bitterly cold3 a keen wind swe.t the em.ty streets and dro,e the new-fallen snow into drift-hea.s at e,ery corner$ Along the boule,ards booths and !ara@ues for the sale of New YearEs gifts were already in course of erection3 the sho.s were gay with bright coloured !on!onniIres$ 6hildren3 merry with antici.ations of good things corning3 .ressed round the ,arious tem.ting dis.lays and noisily dis.uted their res.ecti,e merits$ All the streets were filled with mirth and laughter $and .re.arations for festi,ity3 and close by3 in her little lonely room3 NoRmi lay dying of a broken heart L : underwent my ordeal with success% yet as : Fuitted the e0amination-room and descended into the Fuadrangle of the \cole3 crowded with sauntering grou.s of garrulous students3 my s.irit was hea,y within me3 and the e0.ression of my face could hardly ha,e been that of a young man who has safely .assed the 2ubicon of [Page $"#] scientific a..renticeshi.3 and who sees the laurels and honours of the world within his reach$ 8he worldK 8he ,ery thought of its .ossible homage re.elled me3 for : knew that its best successes and its loudest .raise are accorded to men whose hearts are of steel and whose li,es are corru.t$ : knew that still3 as of old3 it slays the innocent and the ingenuous and stones the .ure of s.irit$ )sca.ing somewhat im.atiently from the congratulations of the friends and colleagues whom : chanced to encounter in the Fuadrangle3 : returned gloomily home and found u.on my table a twisted note in which was written this brief message' I ( Pray3 come at once3 monsieur3 she cannot li,e long now$ : dare not lea,e her3 and she begs to see you$ I #A2:) M)ANN)>$( With a shaking hand : thrust the .a.er into my ,est and hastened to obey its summons$ Ne,er had the distance between my house and NoRmiEs been so long to tra,erse% ne,er had the stairs which led to her Page 7

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


room seemed to me so many or so stee.$ At length : gained the door% it stood aHar% : .ushed it o.en and entered$ #adame Meannel sat at the foot of the little white-dra.ed bed% -ambin lay beside his mistress% the only sound in the room was the crackling of the burning logs on the hearth$ As : entered3 #adame Meannel turned her head and looked at me% her eyes were hea,y with tears3 and she s.oke in tones that were hushed and tremulous with the awe which the .resence of death ins.ires$ (#onsieur3 you come too late$ She is dead$( : s.rang forward with a cry of horror$ (DeadK( : re.eated3 (NoRmi deadK( White and still she lay I a broken lily I beautiful and [Page $""] sweet e,en in death% her eyes were closed lightly3 and u.on her lo,ely li.s was the first smile : had seen there since the day which had stricken her innocent life into the dust$ &er right hand rested on -ambinEs head3 in her left she held the .iece of sil,er ribbon : had gi,en her3 I the ribbon she had ho.ed to wear at her wedding$ (8hey are for you3( said #adame Meannel softly$ (She said you were fond of -ambin3 and he of you3 and that you must take care of him and kee. him with you always$ And as for the ribbon3 I she wished you to take it for her sake3 that it might be a remembrance of her in time to come$( : fell on my knees beside the bed and we.t aloud$ (&ush3 hush L( whis.ered #adame Meannel3 bending o,er me% ( it is best as it is3 she is gone to the angels of Bod$( Science has ceased to belie,e in angels3 but in the faith of good women they li,e still$ 8he chief work of the "ise among us seems to me to consist in the destruction of all the beautiful ho.es and lo,es and beliefs of the earth% of all that since the beginning of time till now has consoled3 or .urified3 or brought .eace to the hearts of men$ Some day3 .erha.s3 in the long-distant future3 the ,oice of Nature may s.eak to us more clearly through the li.s of a nobler and .urer system of science than any we now know3 and we may learn that #atter is not all in all3 nor human lo,e and desire gi,en in ,ain% but that torn hearts may be healed and ruined li,es .erfected in a higher s.iritual e0istence3 where3 ( beyond these ,oices3 there is .eace$( #eanwhile NoRmiEs body rests in its Fuiet gra,e3 and u.on the faithful bosom lies the sil,er cross which her lo,er ga,e her$ [Page $"$] She was one of those who could endure all things for lo,eEs sake3 but shame and falsehood broke her steadfast heart$ And it was the hand of her belo,ed which dealt the blow of which she diedL [Page $"$]

Page

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - + - T(E .)TT.E O.D 'AN7S STOR/
( 9 lo,e3 : ha,e lo,ed you L 9 my soul3 : ha,e lost you L ( I A=292A >):B&$

C(APTER "
(:t is getting ,ery dark now3 and : ha,e been sitting at my o.en bay window e,er since sundown$ &ow fresh and sweet the e,ening air is3 as it comes u. from my little flower garden below3 laden with the fragrance of Mune roses and almond blossom L Ah3 by the way3 : will send o,er some more of those same roses to my o..osite neighbour tomorrow morning3 I and there is a beautiful s.ray of white Hasmin nodding in at the casement now3 and only waiting to be gathered for him$ Poor old man L he must be ,ery lonely and Fuiet3 lying there day after day in his dark little bed-chamber3 with no com.anions sa,e his books and his old housekee.er$ -ut then Dr Peyton is with him ,ery often3 and Dr Peyton is such a dear kind soul that he makes e,ery one cheerful L : think they ha,e drawn down the blinds earlier than usual tonight at the little old gentlemanEs$ Dr Peyton says he always likes to sit u. in his arm-chair when the day closes3 and watch the twilight gathering o,er the blue range of the #al,ern hills in the distance3 and talk dreamy bits of .oetry to himself the while3 but this e,ening : noticed the blinds were .ulled down [Page $"%] almost directly after sunset$ And such a lo,ely sunset as it was tonightL : ne,er beheld anything more glorious L What a wondrous glamour of molten mellow light it threw o,er all the meadows and cottage gardensL :t seemed to me as though the gates of hea,en itself were unfolded to recei,e the returning sun into the golden land of the &ereafterL Dear3 dear3 : shall get Fuite .oetical in my old age L 8his is not the first time : ha,e caught myself stumbling unawares on the confines of romance L #iss >iJJie3 #iss >iJJie3 you must not be fanciful L Do you forget that you are an old maid L Yes3 an old maid$ Ah3 well-a-day3 Etis a ,ery ha..y3 contented3 .eaceful sound to me now% but twenty years ago3 ------ &ere comes dear old Dr Peyton himself u. my garden .athL &e does not seem to walk so blithely tonight as usual3 I surely nothing is the matter% : wish : could see his face3 but it is much too dark for that3 so :Ell go at once and let him in$ Now : shall hear news of my o..osite neighbour L Ah3 : ho.e he is no worse3 .oor little old man L ( Bentle reader3 : shall not trouble you much in the story : am going to tell3 with any .ersonal e0.eriences of my own$ -ut you may as well understand before we .roceed farther3 that : I #iss )liJabeth +airleigh I am a s.inster on the shady side of forty-fi,e3 that : and my two ser,ing-maids occu.y a tiny3 greenlatticed3 .orticoed3 one-storeyed cottage Hust outside a certain little country town3 and that Dr Peyton3 the one medical man of the .arish3 is a white-haired old gentleman of wondrous kindliness and goodness of heart3 who was Pythias to my fatherEs Damon at college long3 long ago3 and who is now my best friend and my most welcome and freFuent ,isitor$ And on the .articular e,ening in Fuestion3 : had a s.ecial interest in his ,isit3 for : wanted ,ery much [Page $"&] to know what only he could tell me3 I how matters fared with my neighbour and his .atient3 the little old man who lay sick o,er the way$ Now this little old man bore the name of #r Ste.hen Bray3 and he was a bachelor3 so Dr Peyton said3 a Page "

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


bachelor grown3 from some cause unknown to my friend3 .rematurely old3 and wiJened3 and decre.it$ :t was long since he had first come to reside in the small house o..osite mine3 and from the ,ery day of his arri,al : had obser,ed him with singular interest3 and conHectured ,ariously in my idle moments about his .robable history and circumstances$ +or many months after his establishment o er the "ay3 this old gentleman used morning and e,ening to .erambulate the little country road which di,ided our res.ecti,e dwellings3 su..orting his feeble limbs with a ,enerable-looking staff3 sil,er-headed like himself% and on one occasion3 when my flower garden ha..ened to look es.ecially gay and in,iting3 he .aused by the gate and gaJed so wistfully at its beauties3 that : ,entured to in,ite him in3 and .resented him3 bashfully enough3 with a .osy of my choicest rarities$ After this uncon,entional introduction3 many little courtesies .assed between us3 other nosegays were culled from my small .arterre to adorn the little old gentlemanEs .arlour3 and more than once #iss )liJabeth +airleigh recei,ed and acce.ted an in,itation to tea with #r Ste.hen Bray$ -ut by-and-by these in,itations ceased3 and my neighbourEs .edestrian e0cursions u. and down our road became less and less freFuent$ Yet when : sent my maid3 as : often did3 to inFuire after his health3 the answer returned alternated only between two inflections3 I #r Bray was always either pretty "ell3 or a little !etter today$ -ut .resently : noticed that my friend Dr Peyton [Page $"*] began to .ay ,isits at my o..osite neighbourEs3 and of him : inFuired concerning the little old manEs condition3 and learned to my sur.rise and sorrow that his health and strength were ra.idly failing3 and his life surely and irreco,erably ebbing away$ :t might be many long months3 Dr Peyton said3 before the end3 it might be only a few weeks3 but he had seen many such cases3 and knew that no human skill or tenderness had .ower to do more than to .rolong the .atientEs days u.on earth by some brief s.ace3 and to make the weary hours of feebleness and .rostration as .leasant and calm as .ossible$ When Dr Peyton told me this3 it was late autumn3 and the little old gentleman li,ed on in his weakness all through the snow-time and the dim bleak winter days$ -ut when the S.ring came round once more3 he rallied3 and : used often to see him sitting u. in his arm-chair at the o.en window3 arrayed in his dressinggown3 and looking so cheerful and .lacid3 that : could not forbear to nod to him and smile ho.efully3 as : stood by my garden gate in the soft warm sunshine3 thinking that after all my o..osite neighbour would soon be able to take his daily walks3 and ha,e tea with me again in his cosy little .arlour$ -ut when : s.oke of this to Dr Peyton3 he only shook his head incredulously3 and murmured something about the flame burning brighter for a little while before going out altogether$ So the old gentleman lingered on until Mune3 and still e,ery time : sent to ask after his health returned the same old re.ly3 I his (kind regards to #iss +airleigh3 and he was a little better today$( And thus matters remained on that identical e,ening of which : first s.oke3 when : sat at the bay window in my tiny drawing-room3 and saw Dr Peyton coming so soberly u. the garden .ath$ [Page $"+] Dr Peyton3( said :3 as : .laced my most comfortable chair for him in the .rettiest corner of the bay3 ( you are the ,ery .erson : ha,e been longing to see for the last half-hour L : want to know how my neighbour #r Bray is tonight$ : see his blinds are down3 and : am afraid he may be worse$ &a,e you been there this e,ening K ( : .aused abru.tly3 for my old friend looked ,ery gra,ely at me3 and : thought as his eyes rested for a moment on my face3 that notwithstanding the twilight3 : could discern traces of recent tears in them$

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(>iJJie(3 said he3 ,ery slowly3 and his ,oice certainly trembled a little as he s.oke3 ( : donEt think #r Bray was e,er so well in his life as he is tonight$ : ha,e been with him for se,eral hours$ &e is dead$( (DeadL( : echoed faintly3 for : almost doubted whether my ears heard aright$ ( #y little old gentleman dead K 9h3 : am ,ery3 ery grie,ed indeed L : fancied he was getting so much stronger L( Dr Peyton smiled3 one of his .eculiar3 sweet3 gra,e smiles3 such as : had often seen on his kindly face at certain times and seasons when other men would not ha,e smiled at all$ (>iJJie(3 he answered3 (there are some deaths so beautiful and so full of .eace3 that no one ought to grie,e about them3 for they bring eternal rest after a life that has been only bitter disFuiet and hea,iness$ And such a death I aye3 and such a life I were #r BrayEs$( &e s.oke so certainly and so calmly3 that : felt comforted for the little old manEs sake3 and longed to know3 I woman-like3 : su..ose3 I what sad story of his this had been3 to which Dr PeytonEs words seemed to .oint$ (8hen he had a romance after all L( : cried3 (and you knew of itL Poor old gentleman L : often wondered [Page $"7] how he came to be so lonely$ #ay you tell me3 as we sit here together K : should so like to hear about it$( (Yes(3 said he3 with that same .eculiar smile3 ( : may tell you3 for it is no secret now$ :ndeed3 : came here .artly for that ,ery .ur.ose3 because : know well how much you were interested in your o..osite neighbour3 and how you used to s.eculate about his antecedents and associations$ -ut : ha,e not known this story long$ &e only told it me this e,ening% Hust an hour or two before he died$ Well3 we all ha,e our little romances3 as you are .leased to call them L ( (Yes3 yes3 all of us$ ),en :3 un.retentious3 .lain )liJabeth +airleigh3 I but no matter($ : mind me3 reader3 that : .romised not to talk of my own e0.eriences$ Ah3 there are no such .henomena in the world really3 as commonplace li,es3 and (commonplace .ersonsL (Poor little old man L( : sighed again$ (Did he tell you his story then of his own accord3 or ( I And : .aused in some embarrassment3 for : remembered that Dr Peyton was a true gentleman3 and .ossessed of far too much delicacy of feeling to Fuestion anybody u.on .ersonal matters or .ri,ate concerns$ -ut either he did not actually notice my hesitation3 or .erha.s understood the cause of it well enough to .re,ent him from a..earing to notice it3 for he resumed at once3 as though no interru.tion to his discourse had taken .lace$ (When : went this afternoon to ,isit your neighbour3 >iJJie3 : .ercei,ed immediately from the change in him that the end was not far off3 though : did not think it would come today$ -ut he did$ &e was in bed when : entered his room3 and as soon as he saw me3 he looked u. and welcomed me with a .leasant Page <

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


smile and said3 EAh3 Doctor3 : am so glad you are comeL : was Hust [Page $" ] going to send round for you L Not that : think you can do me any more good u.on earth3 for : know that tonight : shall go to my long rest$ 8o my long rest$E &e lingered so strangely and so contentedly o,er these words3 that : was singularly touched3 and : sat down by his bedside and took his thin white hand in mine$ E Doctor3E said he3 .resently3 E you ha,e been ,ery good and kind to me now for more than ten months3 and : ha,e learned in that time to trust and esteem you as though : had known you for many long years$ 8here are no friends of mine near me in the world now3 for : am a lonely old man3 and before : came here : li,ed alone3 and : ha,e been lonely almost all my life$ -ut : cannot die tonight without telling you the story of my .ast3 and of the days when : used to be young3 I ,ery long ago now3 I that you may understand why : die here alone3 a white-haired old bachelor% and that : may be comforted in my death by the knowledge that : lea,e at least one friend u.on earth to sym.athise in my sorrow and to bless me in my solitary gra,e$ E:t is a long story3 Doctor3E said the little old man3 E but : feel stronger this afternoon than : ha,e felt for weeks3 and : am Fuite sure : can tell it all from end to end$ : ha,e ke.t it many years in my heart3 a secret from e,ery human soul% but now all is o,er with my sorrow and with me for e,er3 and : care not who knows of it after : am gone$E 8hen after a little .ause he told me his story3 while : sat beside him holding his hand in mine3 and : think : did not lose a word of all he said3 for he s.oke ,ery slowly and distinctly3 and : listened with all my heart$ Shall : tell it to you3 >iJJie K :t is not one of those stories that end ha..ily3 like the stories we read in childrenEs fairy books3 nor is it e0citing and sensational like the modern .o.ular [Page $"!] no,els$ 8here are no dramatic situations in it3 and no .assionate scenes of tragical lo,e or remorse% Etis a still3 neutralcoloured3 dreamy bit of .athos3 I the story of a lost life3 I that it will make you sad .erha.s to hear3 and maybe3 a little gra,er than usual$ 9nly that$( ( Please tell it3 Dr Peyton3( : answered$ ( You know : ha,e a s.ecial liking for such sad histories$ E8is one of my old-maidish eccentricities : su..ose% but somehow : always think sorrow more musical than mirth3 and : lo,e the Fuiet of shadowy .laces better than the brilliant glow of the o.en landsca.e$( (You are right3 >iJJie(3 he returned$ (8hat is the feeling of the true .oet in all ages3 and the most .oetical li,es are always those in which the melancholy element .redominates$ Yet it is contrast that makes the beauty of things3 and doubtless we should not fully understand the sweetness of your gra,e harmonies3 nor the lo,eliness of your shadowy ,alleys3 were all music gra,e and all .laces shadowy$ And inanimate nature is most assuredly the faithful ty.e and mirror of human life$ -ut : must not waste our time any longer in such idle .rologues as these L You shall hear the little old manEs story at once3 while it is still fresh in my memory3 though for the matter of that3 : am not likely3 : think3 to forget it ,ery easily$( So Dr Peyton told it me as we sat together there in the growing darkness of the warm summer night3 and this3 reader mine3 is the story he told$

C(APTER $
Some forty years ago3 there li,ed in one of the .rettiest houses in Kensington3 a rich old wine-merchant3 and his two only children$ 8hese young men3 Ste.hen [Page $$#] and #aurice Brey3 were twins3 whose mother had died at their birth3 and all through their infancy and childhood the old wine-merchant had been to them as father and mother in one3 and the brothers had grown u. to manhood3 lo,ing him and each other as dearly as heart could wish$ Already Ste.hen3 the first-born of the twins3 had become .artner in his fatherEs flourishing business3 and #aurice was .re.aring at a military college for ser,ice in Page <<

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


the army3 which he was shortly to Hoin3 when a certain e,ent occurred at Kensington3 trifling enough in itself3 but in the seFuel .regnant with bitter misfortune to at least two human souls$ 8here came to reside in the house adHoining old #r BrayEs3 an elderly widow lady and her or.han niece3 I #rs >amertine and #iss AdelaXs 6ameron$ 8hey came there .rinci.ally for the sake of the latter3 I a .ale consum.ti,e girl of eighteen3 whose delicate health and constitution it was thought might be considerably benefited by the mild soft air of that .articular neighbourhood$ Soon after the arri,al of these ladies in their new abode3 the old wine-merchant in his courtesy and kindliness of heart saw fit to .ay them a ,isit3 and in due time and form the ,isit was returned3 and a friendly come-and-go understanding established between the two houses$ :n this manner it ha..ened that Ste.hen3 the elder son3 by li,ing always in his fatherEs house3 from which he was absent only during the office-hours of the day3 saw a great deal of AdelaXs 6ameron3 and learnt before long to lo,e her with all the de.th and yearning that a young man feels in his first ra.turous adoration of a beautiful woman$ +or a beautiful woman AdelaXs certainly was$ 4ery fair to look u.on was the .ale3 trans.arent face3 and the [Page $$"] .lentiful braided hair3 golden and soft almost as undyed silk3 that wreathed about the lo,ely little head$ 6lear and sweet too were the eyes whence the soul of AdelaXs looked forth3 clear and brown and sweet% so that .eo.le who beheld her fair countenance and heard her musical ,oice for the first time3 were fain to say in their hearts3 ( Such a face and such a ,oice as these are not earthly things% AdelaXs 6ameron is already far on her road towards the land of the angels$( -ut at least #rs >amertine and her friendly neighbours the Brays could .ercei,e that the .ale girl grew none the .aler nor sicklier for her residence at Kensington3 and as days and weeks flew .leasantly by in the long autumn season3 the old lady talked more and more confidently of her nieceEs com.lete restoration to health and youthful ,igour$ 8hen by-and-by 6hristmas drew round3 and with it #aurice Bray came home to his fatherEs house for his last ,acation-time% #aurice3 with his frank handsome face and curly hair3 always so cheerful3 always so good-humoured3 always so unconscious of his own attracti,eness3 that where,er he went3 e,erybody was sure to trust and to idolise him$ Ay3 and to lo,e him too sometimes3 but not as AdelaXs 6ameron did3 when her full womanly soul awoke first to the li,ing intensity of .assion3 and she found in him the one god at whose feet to cast all her new wealth of tenderness and homage$ Ne,er before had #aurice Bray been so belo,ed3 ne,er before had his own lo,e been so desired and co,eted by human soul$ And now that the greatest blessing of earth lay so ready to his gras.3 #aurice neither .ercei,ed the ,alue of the gift3 nor understood that it was offered to him$ Such was the .osition when 6hristmas Day arri,ed3 and the widower begged that #rs >amertine and her niece [Page $$$] would do him the .leasure to dine in his house and s.end the e,ening there3 that they might sing songs and .lay forfeits together and kee. u. the ancient institutions of the time3 as well as so tiny and staid a .arty could manage to do% to which sociable in,itation3 the old dame3 nothing a,erse to .leasant fellowshi. at any season3 readily consented$ -ut when AdelaXs 6ameron entered #r BrayEs drawing-room that 6hristmas e,ening with her soft white dress floating about her like a haJy cloud3 and a single bunch of snowdro.s in the coils of her golden hair3 Ste.henEs heart lea.t in his throat3 and he said to himself that ne,er until now had he known how e0ceeding .erfect and sweet was the beautiful woman whom he lo,ed with so absorbing a tenderness$ Alas3 that life should be at times such a terribly earnest game of cross .ur.oses3 such an intensely bitter reality of mistakes and blunders L Alas3 that men and women can read so little of each otherEs heart3 and yet can com.rehend so well the language of their own L

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All the e,ening3 throughout the con,ersation and the forfeits and the merry-making3 Ste.hen Bray s.oke and mo,ed and thought only for AdelaXEs3 and she for Ste.henEs twin brother$ :t was for #aurice that she sang3 while Ste.hen stood beside her at the .iano3 drinking in the tender .assionate notes as though they were sweet wine for which all his soul were athirst% it was at #aurice that she smiled3 while Ste.henEs eyes were on her face3 and to #aurice that she .rattled and s.orted and made mirthful Hests3 while Ste.hen alone heeded all that she said and did% for the younger brother was reflected in e,ery .ur.ose and thought of hers3 e,en as her own image lay mirrored continually in the heart and thoughts of the elder$ [Page $$%] -ut before the hour of .arting came that night3 Ste.hen drew AdelaXEs aside from the others as they sat laughing and talking o,er some long-winded story of the old wine-merchantEs e0.eriences3 and told her what she3 in the blindness of her own wild lo,e3 had ne,er guessed nor dreamed of3 I all the dee. adoration and worshi. of his soul$ And when it was told3 she said nothing for a few minutes3 but only stood motionless and sur.rised3 without a blush or tremor or sigh3 and he3 looking earnestly into her fair u.lifted face3 saw with unutterable .ain that there was no res.onse there to the .assionate yearning of his own$ (AdelaXs(3 said he3 .resently3 (you do not lo,e meK( (Yes3 yes3 Ste.hen(3 she answered3 softly% (as a brother3 as a dear brother$( (No moreK( he asked again$ She .ut her hand into his3 and fi0ing the clear light of her brown eyes full u.on him' (Why(3 she said3 hurriedly3 ( do you ask me this K : cannot gi,e you more3 : cannot lo,e you as a husband$ >et no one know what has .assed between us tonight% forget it yourself as : shall forget also3 and we will always be brother and sister all our li,es$( 8hen she turned and glided away across the room into the warm bright glow of the fireside3 that lay brightest and warmest in the corner where #aurice sat% but Ste.hen stood alone in the darkness and hid his face in his hands and groaned$ And after this there came a change o,er the fortunes of the two households$ Day by day AdelaXEs faded and .aled and saddened% none knew why$ Peo.le said it was the winter weather3 and that when the s.ring-time came the girl would be herself again3 and grow brisker and stronger than e,er$ -ut [Page $$&] when #aurice was gone back to his college3 to fulfil his last term there before lea,ing for :ndia3 the only brother of AdelaXs came u. from his home by the sea-side3 on a monthEs ,isit to his aunt and his sister at Kensington$ &e was a man of middle age almost3 this same Phili. 6ameron3 tall and handsome and fair-s.oken3 so that the old wine-merchant3 who dearly lo,ed good looks and courteous breeding3 took to him mightily from the first3 and made much of his com.any on all occasions$ -ut as he stayed on from week to week at #rs >amertineEs house3 Phili. saw that the .ale li.s and cheeks of AdelaXs grew .aler and thinner continually3 that the brown eyes greatened in the dark sockets3 and that the fragile limbs weakened and shar.ened themsel,es more and more3 as though some terrible blight3 like the curse of an old enchantment or of an e,il eye3 hung o,er the sweet girl3 withering and .oisoning all the life and the youth in her ,eins$

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She lay on a sofa one afternoon3 leaning her golden head u.on one of her .ale wan hands3 and gaJing dreamily through the o.en casement into the de.ths of the broad A.ril sky3 o,er whose clear blue firmament the drifting clouds came and went incessantly like white-sailed shi.s at sea$ And AdelaXs thought of the sea as she watched them3 and longed in her heart to be away and down by the southern coast where her brother had made his home3 with the free salt breeJe blowing in her face3 and the free ha..y wa,es beating the shore at her feet3 and the sea-fowl di..ing their great strong wings in the lea.ing surge$ Ah to be free3 I to be away3 I .erha.s then she might forget3 forget and li,e down her old life3 and bury it somewhere out of sight in the sea-sand% I forget and grow blithe and ha..y and strong [Page $$*] once more3 like the breeJe and the wa,es and the wild birds3 who ha,e no memory nor regret for the .ast3 and no thought for any Hoy3 sa,e the Hoy of their .resent being$ (Phil(3 she said3 as her brother came softly into the room and sat beside her3 (take me back with you to the sea-side$ : am weary of li,ing always here in Kensington$ :t is only >ondon after all$( (#y dearest(3 he answered3 kindly3 ( if that is all you wish for3 it shall certainly be$ -ut3 AdelaXs3 is there nothing more than this that troubles you K 8here is a shadow in your eyes and on your li.s that used not to be there3 and all day long you sit by yourself and muse in silence% and you wee. too at times3 AdelaXs3 when you fancy none is by to see you$ 8ell me3 sister mine3 for the sake of the lo,e that is between us3 and for the sake of our father and mother who are dead3 what cloud is this that o,ershadows you soK( >ong time he .ressed and besought her3 .leading by turns his .ower to hel.3 and her need of tenderness% but yet AdelaXs was afraid to s.eak3 for the lo,e that was breaking her heart was unreturned$ So the ne0t day he found her alone again3 and .rayed her to tell him her sorrow3 that e,en if he could not hel. nor comfort her3 they might at least lament together$ 8hen at last she bowed her head u.on his breast3 and told him of #aurice3 and of his near de.arture for :ndia3 and of her own disregarded lo,e% but not a word she said of Ste.hen3 because she had .romised him to hold her .eace$ And when she had told her brother all3 she laid her arms about his neck and cried3 wee.ing3 ( Now you know e,erything that is in my heart3 Phil% s.eak to me no more about it3 but only .romise to take me away with [Page $$+] you when you go3 that : may the sooner forget this .lace and all the sorrow and the .ain : ha,e suffered here$/ And Phili. 6ameron kissed her ,ery tenderly3 and answered3 *-e at rest3 sister3 you shall ha,e your will$/ -ut when e,ening came3 he went o,er to the house of the wine-merchant3 and Fuestioned him about #aurice3 whether he cared for AdelaXs or no3 and whether he had e,er said a word to his father or brother of the matter$ Ay3 ay/3 Fuoth the old gentleman3 musingly3 when Phili. had ceased$ *8is like enough if there be anything of the sort that the boys should talk of it between them3 for3 Bod be thanked3 they were always ,ery fond of each other% yet : ne,er hear it s.oken about$ -ut then youth has little in common with age3 and when young men make confidences of this kind3 it is to young men that they make them3 and not to grey-beards like me$ -ut tell me3 6ameron3 for you know : must needs di,ine something from all this% your sister lo,es my boy #auriceK/

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:f you think so3 sir/ answered Phili.3 *you must kee. her secret$/ 6ameron3 6ameron3/ cried the wine-merchant3 *AdelaXs is failing and sickening e,ery day$ ),ery day she grows whiter and sadder3 and more silent$ DonGt tell me itGs for lo,e of #auriceL :tGs not .ossible such a woman as she is can lo,e anybody in ,ainL SheGs an angel on earth3 I your sister AdelaXsL/ 8hen because the old man was kindly and wise and white-headed3 Phili. told him all that AdelaXs had said3 and how he had .romised to take her home with him3 and had come unknown to any one to ask before they went whether or not there was any ho.e for her of the lo,e on which she had so set her heart$ [Page $$7] And when Phili. was gone the old gentleman called his elder son3 Ste.hen3 and asked him - but warily3 lest he should betray AdelaXs - how #aurice bore himself in Ste.henGs .resence when they were alone together and chanced to s.eak of her3 and if Ste.hen knew or guessed anything of what was in his mind towards her$ 8hen the young man understood for the first time all the blindness of his eyes and the dullness of his heart% and the .ain and desolation and the ho.elessness of his life that was to be3 rose u. before him3 and he knew that from thenceforth the glory and the light of it were .ut out for e,er$ +ather/3 he said3 *: know nothing whate,er of all this$ :s it your wish then that these two should marryK/ :t is my wish3 Ste.hen3 and the wish also of our friend Phili. himself$ #aurice could not take him to :ndia a sweeter or a worthier wife than AdelaXs 6ameron$/ And does she wish it tooK/ he asked again$ *8ell me3 father3 for : ha,e guessed already$/ &e lifted his eyes to the old manGs face as he s.oke3 and .ercei,ed at once the sudden confusion and sur.rise that his words had caused there3 yet he said no more3 but waited still for a re.ly$ #y dear boy/3 said the old gentleman at last3 *if you ha,e guessed anything3 that is enough% say no more about it3 but let it rest with yourself$ : ha,e ne,er yet decei,ed either of my sons$ -ut when #aurice comes home again you can hel. us ,ery much3 for you can Fuestion him on the matter more naturally than : could do3 and no doubt he will tell you his mind about it3 as you say he always does about e,erything3 but with me he might be reser,ed and bewildered .erha.s$ Ask him3 my boy3 but kee. your guesses to yourself$/ [Page $$ ] (+ather3( cried Ste.hen3 .ressing his hands together in agony as though his heart were between them3 and he would fain crush it into dust and destroy it for e,er% ( tell me3 if : am to do this3 does AdelaXEs lo,e my brotherK( (:f : tell you at all3 boy(3 said the wine-merchant3 ( : shall tell you the truth% can you hold your .eace like a man of discretion K (

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(: ha,e ke.t other secrets3 father(3 he answered3 (: can kee. this($ 8hen his father told him$ )arly in #ay3 AdelaXs 6ameron went to the De,onshire sea-coast with her brother and her aunt3 and they stayed there together a long while$ -ut the accounts that came from week to week to Kensington were none of the best3 for AdelaXs had borne the long Hourney but ill3 and her strength did not return$ 8hen came the summer and the ,acation-time3 and #aurice Bray was home again3 full to the brim of schemes for his future life3 and busy all day with head and hands o,er his .re.arations for lea,ing )ngland in the autumn$ -ut when Ste.hen talked to him of AdelaXs3 and told him she was gone to the sea-side3 #aurice only laughed and answered lightly3 that she was a sweet lo,able girl3 and that he grie,ed to hear of her illness % no doubt the southern breeJes would bring back the colour to her cheeks3 and he should hear before he had been long gone that she was Fuite well and strong again$ At least he ho.ed so$ (8hen3 #aurice3 you donEt care to see her once more before you sail K You donEt want to say good-bye K ( (9 well3 if sheEs here3 of course3 but thatEs another thing% : wouldnEt for worlds ha,e her come back to [Page $$!] Kensington Hust to bid me good-bye$ And really you know3 Steenie3 :E,e too much to do Hust now to be running about and saying farewells e,erywhere$ 8he time thatEs left me now to be at home with you and my father is none too long$ What is AdelaXs 6ameron to me3 when all my world is here K ( ( #aurice(3 said Ste.hen again3 in a ,oice that sounded strained and hard3 like the ,oice of an old man trying to be young% (youEre a dear affectionate fellow3 and as things are3 .erha.s this is all ,ery well$ -ut su..osing AdelaXs lo,ed you3 and my father and I and I e,erybody else you know3 wished her to be your wife3 how would you feel towards her then K Su..osing3 #aurice I only for the sake of su..osing3 of course$( (What a strange fellow you are3 SteenieL Why3 su..osing as you say3 such a ,ery wild im.robable circumstance were to occur3 : should be heartily sorry for .oor AdelaXs L 9nly imagine me with such a wife as she would make L Why : wouldnEt ha,e so trans.arent3 white-skinned a beauty about my house all day for a mine of goldL : should be seiJed with lunacy before long3 through mere contem.lation of her ,ery unearthliness3 and be goaded into fancying her a .icture3 and hanging her u. framed and glaJed o,er my drawing-room mantel.iece L No3 no3 :Ell lea,e #iss 6ameron for you3 youEre Hust her style3 : take it% but as for me3 : ne,er thought of marrying yet3 Steenie3 for : ne,er yet had the luck or ill-luck to fall in lo,e3 and certainly youEll allow that nobody ought to think of marriage until heEs really in lo,e$ So :Ell wish you all success3 old boy3 and mind you write and tell me how the wooing gets on L ( 9 #aurice L #aurice L

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8hen3 by-and-by3 the young officer sailed3 and AdelaXs [Page $%#] heard of his going3 and her heart died within her for greatness of sorrow and .ain3 yet still she held her .eace3 and li,ed her life in .atience$ And so for two whole years they ke.t her by the sea3 ho.ing against ho.e3 and whis.ering those idle con,ictions that affection always suggests3 about the worst being o,er now3 and the time of con,alescence being always tedious and un.romising$ -ut in the third year3 when the autumn days grew darker3 and the sun set redder in the sea3 and .eo.le began to talk again of 6hristmas3 AdelaXs called her brother one e,ening and said' I (Phili.3 : ha,e been here ,ery long3 and : know that nothing more on earth can e,er make me well again now$ You will not refuse me the last reFuest : shall make you3 PhilK 8ake me back to the old house at Kensington3 that : may see dear old #r Bray3 and my friend Ste.hen3 once more% and you3 Phil3 stay with me and Auntie there until : die3 for it wont be ,ery long now3 and : want to see you near me to the last$( So they brought her back again to the old house3 ne0t door to the wine merchantEs3 and they carried her o,er the threshold3 because she was too weak to walk now3 and laid her on the old sofa in the old .lace by the window3 for she would ha,e it3 and Phili. 6ameron did her bidding in e,erything$ And that same e,ening3 Ste.hen Bray came in to see her3 and they met as old friends meet who ha,e been long .arted3 and sat and talked together until .ast sunset$ -ut at length AdelaXs asked him for news of #aurice3 what he was doing3 and how he was3 and when they heard from him last3 and what he thought of :ndia and of the new life there3 and his com.anions3 and the climate3 and the customs of the .lace% for she ne,er guessed that Ste.hen knew of her [Page $%"] ho.eless lo,e$ -ut Ste.hen turned away his face and answered her briefly3 that his brother was well and .ros.erous3 and wrote home constantly$ &ow could he tell her that #aurice had already found himself a rich handsome wife in :ndia K

C(APTER %
Soon after these things3 old #r Bray fell ill of a ,iolent cold3 which attacked him suddenly one afternoon on his return from his office$ :t was 6hristmas weather then3 and the cold and the frost of the season were unusually keen3 so that the .hysician3 whom Ste.hen called in to see his father3 looked ,ery gra,e and dubious% and before many days of his .atientEs illness were .ast3 he asked the young man whether there were any brothers or sisters of his3 whom the merchant might wish to see$ Ste.henEs heart beat fast when he heard the ominous Fuestion3 for he understood what tidings the gra,e tone and the strange inFuiry were meant to break to him3 and knew well that the .hysician who s.oke was one of the wisest and most skilful in >ondon$ -ut he answered as calmly as he could3 and talked of #aurice3 and of the boyEs fondness for his father3 and added3 that if there were really imminent danger3 he should like his brother to be called home3 because he was sure #aurice would wish it% but that otherwise the ,oyage was tedious and the need unim.ortant$ (>et him be sent for(3 said the .hysician$ (8here is Hust time$( So Ste.hen wrote to his brother3 and bade him lea,e his wife with her .arents in :ndia3 and come home Fuickly3 if he would see his father again3 for the time was [Page $%$] short3 and in those days the only way Page <!

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o.en to #aurice was the long circuitous sea-route$ #aurice arri,ed only three days before the old manEs death$ &e had not left his wife behind him3 as Ste.hen suggested3 for she lo,ed her husband too dearly to be .arted from him3 and #aurice brought her with him to his fatherEs house$ +rom her .lace on the sofa by the window3 AdelaXs 6ameron looked wearily out3 watching for the coming of the one she lo,ed most u.on earth$ And at last the coach drew u. at the old gentlemanEs gate3 and she saw #aurice dismount from the bo0-seat by the dri,er and o.en the coach door to hand out a handsome lady3 with dark hair and bright glowing eyes$ (Who is thatK( she asked of the maid3 who was arranging the tea-table beside her$ (DonEt you know3 #iss K ( said the girl3 sur.rised at the inFuiry$ ( 8hatEs #rs #aurice3 the rich young lady he married in :ndia a year ago% : was told all about it by the cook at #r BrayEs3 e,er-so-long ago$( -ut as the words were s.oken3 Ste.hen entered the room with a message for Phili. 6ameron3 and o,erheard both the Fuestion and the answer$ AdelaXs turned towards him and said3 I (Ste.hen3 you ne,er told me that #aurice had a wife$( 8he ne0t week they buried the old wine merchant ,ery Fuietly and sim.ly$ 9nly three mourners attended the funeral3 I Ste.hen and #aurice and Phili. 6ameron% but AdelaXs3 looking down on them from her casement corner3 as the coffin was carried forth from the house3 laid her golden head on her auntEs bosom and cried3 (Auntie3 auntie3 : ne,er thought to li,e so long as this L Why must those always die who are needed most3 while [Page $%%] such as : li,e on from year to year K : fancied : had only a few weeks left me u.on earth when we came back to Kensington3 and yet here : am stillL ( 8hen after a little while the brothers .arted once more% #aurice and his wife went back to :ndia3 and Ste.hen was left alone3 sole successor to his fatherEs business3 and master of the old house$ -ut AdelaXs 6ameron still li,ed on3 like the shadow of her former self3 fading in the sunset of her womanhood3 the beauty sa..ed out from her white death-like face3 and the glitter of youth and the sweetness of ho.e Fuenched for e,er in the de.ths of her luminous eyes$ 8hen when the days of mourning were o,er3 Ste.hen came again to AdelaXs3 to renew the wooing of old times% for he said to himself3 (Now that #aurice is married3 and my father dead3 she may .ity me3 seeing me so lone and desolate% and : may comfort her for the .ast3 and make her amends with my lo,e3 for the .ain and the bitterness that are gone by$( -ut when he knelt alone by the couch whereon AdelaXs lay3 and held her white blue-,eined hands in his and told his errand3 she turned her face from him and we.t sore3 as women wee. o,er the dead

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(AdelaXs3 9 AdelaXs(3 he cried in his des.air3 (Why will you refuse me always K DonEt you see my heart is breaking for lo,e of you K 6ome home with me and be my wife at lastL( -ut she made answer ,ery sadly and slowly' I (Ste.hen3 ought the li,ing and the dead to wed with one another K Bod forbid that you in your youth and manhood should take to wife such a death-like thing as :L +our years : ha,e lain like this waiting for the messenger to fetch me away3 and now that at last he is [Page $%&] near at hand3 shall : array myself in a bridal ,eil for a face-cloth3 and trailing skirts of silk or satin for a shroud K Dear Ste.hen3 donEt talk to me any more about this3 I we are brother and sister still3 I let nothing on earth break the sweetness of the bond between us$( (Not so3 AdelaXs(3 cried he3 .assionately% ( you cannot3 you must not die yetL You do not know what lo,e can do3 you do not know that lo,e is stronger than death3 and that where there is lo,e like mine death dare not come L 8here is nothing in all the world that : will not do for your sake3 nothing that : will lea,e undone to sa,e you3 nothing that shall be too hard a condition for me to .erform3 so that : may kee. you with me still$ >i,e3 li,e my darling3 my belo,ed3 and be my wifeL Bi,e me the right to take you with me3 my sweet% let us go together to #adeira3 to #alta3 to Sicily3 where the land is full of life3 and the skies are warm3 and the atmos.here clear and .ure$ 8here is health there3 AdelaXs3 and youth3 and air to breathe such as one cannot find in this dull3 misty3 hea,y northern climate3 and there you will grow well again3 and we will think no more about death and sickness$ 9 my darling3 my darling3 for BodEs sake refuse me no longer L( She laid her thin trans.arent .alm wearily o,er her left side3 and turned her calm eyes on the .assionate straining face beside her$ (8here is that here3( she said3 .ressing her wounded heart more tightly3 (that : know already for the touch of the messengerEs hand$ Already : count the time of my soHourn here3 not by weeks nor e,en by days3 I the end has come so ,ery3 ,ery near at last$ &ow do : know but that e,en now that messenger of whom : s.eak may be standing in our .resence3 I e,en now3 while you kneel [Page $%*] here by my side and talk to me of life and youth and healthK( (AdelaXs(3 .leaded the .oor lo,er3 hoarsely3 (you decei,e yourself3 my darlingL &a,e you not often s.oken before of dying3 and yet ha,e li,ed on K 9 why should you die now and break my heart outright K ( (: feel a mist coming o,er me(3 she answered3 (e,en as : s.eak with you now$ : hear a sound in my ears that is not of earth3 the darkness gathers before my face3 the light Fui,ers and fades3 the night is closing about me ,ery fast$ Ste.hen3 Ste.hen3 donEt you see that : am dyingK( &e bowed his head o,er the dam. colourless brow3 and whis.ered' ( :f it be so3 my belo,ed3 be as my wife yet3 and die in my arms$(

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-ut while he uttered the words there came a change o,er her3 I a shadow into the sweet eyes and a sudden s.asm of .ain across the white .arted li.s$ +eebly and uncertainly she .ut out her hands before her face3 like one gro.ing in the darkness3 her golden head droo.ed on his shoulder3 and her breath came shar. and thick3 with the sound of a..roaching death$ Ste.hen folded his arms about her with a cry of agony3 and .ressed the .oor Fui,ering hands wildly to his bosom3 as though he would fain ha,e held them there for e,er$ (9 Bod L( he groaned in his unutterable des.air% ( is there no ho.e3 no redem.tion3 no retrie,ing of the .ast K :s this the bitter end of all3 and must : lose my darling so K 9 AdelaXs3 AdelaXs3 my belo,ed L ( -ut e,en as he s.oke3 the gathering shadow broke softly o,er all her face3 the sobbing3 gas.ing breath ceased in the stillness of the darkened room3 the golden head fell lower3 I lower yet u.on the desolate heart whose lo,e had been so steadfast [Page $%+] and so true% and Ste.hen co,ered his face with the hands of the dead3 and we.t such tears as men can only wee. once in a lifetime3 I tears that make brown hairs grey and young men old$ Phili. 6ameron and his aunt did not stay long at Kensington$ 8hey ga,e u. the house to strangers3 and went away to the 6ontinent for awhile3 where they tra,elled about together3 until the old lady grew tired of wandering3 and settled down with her maid in a little ,illa near Bene,a% and after that3 Ste.hen heard no more of her nor of Phili.$ -ut Ste.hen himself stayed on in the old house until he grew old too3 for he lo,ed the .lace where AdelaXs had li,ed3 and could not bear to lea,e it for another$ And e,ery e,ening when he came home from his office3 he would sit alone at the window of his study whence he could see across the garden into the little chamber ne0t door3 the little chintJ-curtained old-fashioned chamber where she used to lie in her weakness years and years ago3 where they two had so often talked and read together3 and where she had died at last in his arms$ -ut he ne,er we.t3 thinking of these things now3 for he had grown into a little withered dried-u. old man3 and his tears were dried u. also3 and instead of his .assionate des.air and heartbreaking3 had come the calm bitterness of eternal regret3 and a still ,oiceless longing for the time that e,ery day drew nearer and nearer3 and for the coming of the messenger from the land that is ,ery far off$ -ut when #aurice came home once more to settle in )ngland with his handsome wife and his children3 rich and ha..y and .ros.erous3 he would fain ha,e taken some new house in >ondon to share with his twin brother3 that they might li,e together% but Ste.hen would [Page $%7] not$ 8hen when #aurice had reasoned and talked with him a long time in ,ain3 .leading by turns the lo,e that had been between them long ago3 the loneliness of his brotherEs estate3 and his own desire that they should not se.arate now3 he yielded the contest3 and said discontentedly3 I (&a,e your own way3 Steenie3 since you "ill make a solitary bachelor of yourself3 but at least gi,e u. your useless toiling at the wine-office$ 8o what end do you .lod there e,ery day3 I you who are wifeless and childless3 and ha,e no need of money for yourselfK gi,e me u. this great house in which you li,e all alone3 like an owl in an oak-tree3 and let me find you a cottage somewhere in the neighbourhood3 where : can often come and see you3 and where you may s.end your days in ha..iness and comfort$( And the little old man shook his head and answered3 ( Nay3 brother #aurice3 but : will go away from here to some country ,illage where : am not known3 for : ha,e toiled long and wearily all my lire3 and : cannot rest in .eace beside the mill where : ha,e ground down my life so many years$ Do not trouble yourself Page ?

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


about me3 #aurice3 : shall find a home for myself$( 8hen they .arted$ #aurice and his family came to li,e in the big house at Kensington3 for they liked to be near >ondon3 and Ste.hen sold his fatherEs business to another merchant3 and went away3 #aurice knew not whither3 to bury himself and his lost life in some far-off ,illage3 until by-and-by the messenger for whom he had waited and yearned so long should come also for him3 ( and the day break and the shadows flee away$( Such3 reader mine3 is in substance the story that Dr Peyton told me$ 8he words in which he related it : [Page $% ] cannot of course Fuite remember now3 so : ha,e .ut it into words of my own3 and here and there : ha,e added somewhat to the dialogue$ -ut the facts and the .athos of the romance are not mine3 nor his% they are true3 actual realities3 such as no dressing of fiction can make more .oetical or com.lete in their sorrowful interest$ (:t was a long history(3 said :3 ( for a dying man to tell($ (Yes(E answered he$ (And se,eral times it was e,ident enough from his Fuick-drawn breath and sudden .auses3 that the recital wearied and .ained him$ -ut he was so set u.on telling3 and :3 >iJJie3 : confess3 so much interested in hearing it3 that : did not absolutely hinder his fancy3 but contented myself with warning him from time to time not to o,ertask his strength$ &e always answered me that he was Fuite strong3 and liked to go on3 for that it made him ha..y e,en to talk once more about AdelaXs3 and to tell me how beautiful and sweet and .atient she had been$ :t was close u.on sunset when he ended his story3 and he begged me3 that as his fashion was3 he might be lifted out of bed and carried to his armchair by the window3 to look3 as he said3 for the last time3 at the going down of the sun$ So : called the housekee.er3 and we did what he desired together3 and o.ened the green 4enetian blinds of the casement3 which had been closed all the afternoon because of the heat$ You remember3 >iJJie3 what a wonderfully bright and beautiful sunset it was this e,ening K Well3 as we threw back the outer shutters3 the radiant glory of the sky .oured into the room like a flood of trans.arent gold and almost daJJled us3 so that : fancied the sudden brilliancy would be too much for his feeble sight3 and : leaned hastily forward with the intention of .artly reclosing the [Page $%#] blinds$ -ut he signed to me to let them be3 so : relinFuished my design3 and sent the housekee.er downstairs to .re.are him his tea3 which : thought he might like to take sitting u. in his chair by the window$ : had no idea I doctor though : am I that his end was so near as it .ro,ed to be% for although certainly much e0hausted and agitated with the e0ertion of telling me his story3 : did not then .ercei,e any immediate cause for a..rehension$ Still less did : understand that he was then actually dying% on the contrary3 : began to think that my first im.ressions of his danger when : entered the room that afternoon had been erroneous3 and that the change : had obser,ed in him might .ossibly be an indication of tem.orary re,i,al$ At all e,ents3 : fancied the cu. of tea which was then being made ready3 would be of great use in stimulating and refreshing him after the weariness caused by his long talk3 and : .romised myself that if : could only .ersuade him to silence for the rest of the e,ening3 he would be none the worse for the recent gratification of his whim$ We sat some time by the o.en window3 watching the sun as it sank lower and lower into the golden-sheeted west3 and some unconnected s.eculations were straying through my mind about E the sea of glass mingled with fire3E when the old manEs words aroused me in the midst of my dreaming3 and the ,oice in which he s.oke was so unusual and so soft that it startled me$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


( E Doctor3E he said3 E : think : am dying$E (: s.rang from my seat and stood at his side in a moment3 but before the utterance had well .assed from his li.s3 : .ercei,ed that it was no mere in,alidEs fancy$ ( E 8hirty-fi,e years ago3E he continued3 s.eaking still in that new unusual ,oice3 I Ethirty-fi,e years ago this [Page $&#] ,ery selfsame day3 my AdelaXs died in my arms as the sun went down$ 8oday3 as the sun goes down3 : shall die also$E (Surely( cried :3 (this is a ,ery singular incidentL Does it not seem so to you L 8his e,ening3 then3 was actually the anni,ersary of .oor #iss 6ameronEs death L &ow strange L( (:t certainly a..eared so to me at first(3 he reHoined$ (-ut when my mind re,erted to it afterwards3 : thought it e0ceedingly .robable that his own knowledge of the fact had itself hastened his end3 for he had no doubt been long brooding o,er it3 and maybe desired that his death should occur that .articular day and hour$ :n his enfeebled condition3 such a desire would ha,e great .hysical effect% : ha,e known se,eral similar cases$ -ut howe,er that may ha,e been3 : of course ha,e no certain means of deciding$ : ha,e already told you3 that immediately on my entering his chamber in the afternoon3 he e0.ressed to me his con,iction that tonight he should go to his long rest3 and in the certainty of that con,iction3 related to me the story you ha,e heard$ -ut though it has been the necessary lot of my calling to be .resent at so many death-beds3 : ne,er before witnessed a calmer or a more .eaceful end than Ste.hen BrayEs$ :n his changed face3 in his watchful eyes3 in e,ery .lacid feature of his countenance3 : beheld the Fuiet antici.ation of that long rest about which he had s.oken so contentedly an hour or two since$ (&e took no further heed of me whate,er3 I : doubt if he was e,en aware of my .resence$ Wearily he laid his head back u.on the white .illows : had .laced in the arm-chair behind him3 folded his hands together3 and ke.t his eyes fi0ed steadfastly3 and I : thought I e,en [Page $&"] re,erently3 u.on the setting sun that was now fast sinking like a globe of fire3 towards the blue ridge of the #al,ern hills3 and my heart beat ,iolently as : saw it touch the to.most .eak$ While : watched3 there broke suddenly forth from between the low lines of sunset cloud3 a long ray of golden light3 that fell full on the u.lifted face of the little old man$ &e did not turn his head3 or shrink from its intense brightness3 but his li.s mo,ed3 though the utterance of the words he s.oke was so broken and indistinct3 that : stoo.ed to hear them$ ( E AdelaXs3 I 9 my lost darling3 I my AdelaXs3 I let me come to thee and be belo,ed at lastLE (8hen : looked again at the western sky3 and saw that the sun had gone down$( Ne0t morning : gathered my Mune roses and sweet Hasmin3 and took them o,er to the house of the little old man$ : went u.stairs into the darkened chamber where they had laid him3 and bestowed the flowers re,erently about the white-dra.ed bed$ All the wrinkles were wi.ed out of his .allid face now3 and he looked so wondrously calm and .eaceful3 lying there with his closed eyelids and crossed hands3 in the unbroken silence of the room3 that the tears of .ity : thought : should ha,e we.t at the sight ne,er rose in Page ??

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


my eyes% but instead3 as : turned away3 there came to my memory certain closing lines of a most beautiful .oem3 written not ,ery long ago by a master-hand that surely held BodEs commission to write$ :t is a dead hand now3 but the written words remain3 and the singer herself has gone to the land of the &ereafter3 where the souls of the .oets float for e,er in the full light of their reco,ered Bodhead3 singing such songs as mortal ear hath not yet heard3 nor mortal heart [Page $&$] concei,ed of$ And the .oem of which : s.oke3 has this ending' I ( EMas.er first3E : said3 E And second3 sa..hire% third3 chalcedony% 8he rest in order3 I last3 an amethyst$E (

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - 7 - T(E N)1(TS(ADE


( -ut silence is most noble till the end$( M Atalanta in Calydon$

C(APTER "
Somebody3 the other day3 .resented me with a bunch of crimson roses and .ur.le nightshade3 tied together$ 2oses and nightshadeL : thought the combination worthy of a .oem L +or the rose3 as all the world concei,es3 is the emblem of lo,e% and the nightshade ty.ifies silence$ : .ut my .osy in a little ,ase filled with water3 and when night came3 : lay down to rest3 with my head full of ,ague rhymes and unfledged ideas3 whose theme was still my eccentric nosegay$ Slee.3 howe,er3 o,ertook the muse3 and the soft di,inities of darkness3 wea,ing their tender s.ells about me3 dissol,ed my contem.lated sonnet into a dream$ :t seemed to my slee.ing fancy that : stood in a dee.3 serene light of shadowy .ur.le3 gra,e and sombre3 I a light which suggested to me the sound of low minor chords3 the last notes of some organ ,oluntary3 dying beneath a masterEs touch3 and rolling down the haJy aisles of an em.ty cathedral3 out into the gloomy night3 u.ward to the stars$ [Page $&%] A s.irit floated in the air before me3 I a .hantom dra.ed in hea,y swee.ing robes of dense .ur.le3 but with eyes of such ,i,id and fiery brightness3 that : could not look u.on them% and my heart Fuailed in my bosom with a strange o..ressi,e sense of fear and wonder$ 8hen : felt that her awful gaJe was fi0ed u.on me3 and a ,oice3 low and sonorous as the tones of an organ3 broke on my ear with an intense .athos3 unutterably solemn' I Daughter of earth3 : am the s.irit of the .ur.le Nightshade3 the Atro.a -elladonna of the south3 I the scent of whose dusky chalice is the fume of bitterness% the taste of whose dark fruit is death$ And because the children and the maidens shun my .oisonous berries3 when they go out into the woods to make garlands for #aryEs shrine3 or for wedding gala% and because the leech and herbalist find in me a mar,ellous balm to soothe the torments of .hysical anguish% because : gi,e the sick man ease3 and the slee.less man obli,ion3 and the miserable man eternal rest% because : am sombre of hue and unsweet of Page ?;

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


odour3 able to calm3 to hush3 and to kill3 the sons of earth ha,e chosen me to be the emblem of silence$ 8here is a shadow on your brow' my words sound strange and bitter to you% yet hear me' for once on earth : dwelt with one who thought and laboured in silence$ &is name is inscribed u.on no calendar of the worldEs heroes% it is written only in hea,en L Not far from a certain large town in Piedmont there was once a miserable little cottage$ :t had been let when : knew it3 to a .oor in,alid woman and her only child3 a boy about nine or ten years old$ 8hey were ery .oor3 this mother and son% and the little li,ing they had3 came mostly by means of needlework3 which the woman did [Page $&%] for .eo.le in the town3 and by the sale of dried herbs and such-like$ As for the cottage itself3 it was a craJy3 tumble-down tenement3 half in ruins3 and all the outside walls of it were co,ered with clinging i,ies and weeds and wild climbing .lants$ : was one of these$ : grew Hust underneath the solitary window of the small chamber wherein the .oor woman sle.t3 I the whole hut consisted of only two rooms3 I and : climbed and s.routed and twisted my head in and out of the net-work of shrubs about me3 and clung to the crumbling stone of the wall3 and stretched myself out and u. continually3 until : grew so tall3 that : could look in at the casement and see the inside of the room$ :t was in the summer-time that : first managed to do this3 and : remember well what a burning3 sultry summer it was L ),erything seemed .arched and calcined under the .itiless :talian sun3 and the whole sky was like a great blaJing to.aJ3 I yellow3 and hard to look at% and the water disa..eared from the runlets3 and there was not a breath of wind from one end of the sky to the other$ So it was no great mar,el to me3 when one day3 not long after my first a..earance at the window-sill3 : saw the .oor woman come into the room with a ,ery faltering ste.3 and a whiter3 sicklier look on her wan face than was usual to it$ She threw herself wearily down u.on her bed in the corner3 and .anted for breath$ She had been to the town to take thither the last .iece of needlework she had done3 and she laid on the wooden table by the bedside the money the .eo.le had gi,en her for her labour$ &ard-earned coins3 and few of them L She .ut her thin3 wasted hands to her head as she lay3 and : heard her murmur to herself in broken words that seemed [Page $&*] inters.ersed with half-su..ressed sobs3 and : could not understand what she said$ -ut by-and-by3 when she had grown a little calmer3 there was a shar.3 swift ta. at the door of the room3 and the boy entered3 with a small book in his hand3 and a s.arkle of .leasure in his eyes$ >ook3 motherL( he cried3 holding u. the ,olume gleefully% (this is one of the great Berman ProfessorEs Treatises on Chemistry L &err 2itter has bought it for me L :snEt it good of himK And he is here3 and wants to know if he may come and see you L ( She smiled3E I such a .oor ghost of a smile as it was L I and answered feebly3 (>et him come3 (8ista$( -ut : su..ose the &err had heard e,en that broken message3 for at the words the door was .ushed o.en a little further3 and an old man a..eared3 bare-headed3 wearing a long white beard3 and carrying a staff in his hand$ &e was bent with age3 and his forehead and cheeks were marked about with many lines and crosses3 I dee. furrows .loughed by the harrow of thought and sorrow$ : had often seen him before3 for he came freFuently to the cottage3 but : had ne,er been so close to him as on this occasion3 and had ne,er before noticed how .oor and worn his garments were$ &e came into the room with a courteous greeting on his li.s3 half-:talian3 half-Berman in its .hraseology3 and signed with a nod of his head to the boy -attista to be gone3 who immediately obeyed3 hugging his .riJe3 and closed the door softly behind Page ?A

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


him$ (&err 2itter(3 said the woman3 raising herself on the .illow3 and .utting both her hands into his% ( you are too good to my E8ista3 and too good to me$ Why will you do these things K ( [Page $&+] &e smiled3 as though the matter were not worth a word% but she went on3 I (: say you are too good3 dear friend$ Ne,er a day .asses3 but you bring me something3 I wine or fruit or some .iece of dainty fare% and as for E8ista3 there is nothing he does not owe to youL All he knows3 you ha,e taught him$ We can ne,er re.ay you$( (#y dear +rau E>ora3 who thinks of such things twice K 6hutL -ut you look ill and o,er-tired this e,ening$ You ha,e been to the town again K ( ( Yes$( ( : thought so$ You must lie here and rest now$ :t will get cooler by-and-by% and look3 : ha,e brought you some bunches of gra.es and some .eaches$ 8hey will do you good$( (9h3 &err 2itterL( (DonEt cry E oh3 &err 2itterLE in that re.roachful manner3 for this fruit really cost me nothing$ :t was gi,en to me$ >ittle Andrea -runo brought it to me today$( (8he fruit-sellerEs childK Yes3 yes3 : daresay% but it was not meant for me L :tEs no use trying to hide your good deeds3 &err 2itterL E8ista has told me how kind you were to AndreaEs little sister when she s.rained her foot last month% and how you bandaged it for her3 and used to go and read to her all the morning3 when her father and Andrea were out selling fruit3 and she would ha,e been left alone but for you% and : know3 too3 all about .oor cri..led Antonia and 6atterina Pic ------$ DonEt go away3 : wonEt say any more about itL -ut : couldnEt hel. telling you : knew% you dear3 good &err 2itter L( &e had half-risen3 but now he re-seated himself3 and [Page $&7] drew his chair nearer her couch$ :n doing this his eyes met hers3 and he looked earnestly into them a moment$ ( E>ora3 you ha,e been wee.ing$ What is the matter K ( She mo,ed restlessly on her hard .illows3 and dro..ed her gaJe from his face3 and : noted that a faint blush stole o,er her sunken cheeks and touched her forehead$ With that tender glow3 under the faded skin3 she looked almost beautiful$ She was young3 certainly3 not more than thirty at the utmost% but she Page ?7

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


was ,ery .oor and desolate3 and there is nothing so Fuick at sa..ing the blood and withering the beauty of women as .o,erty and desolation$ Nothing$ (&err 2itter(3 she said3 after a little .ause3 (: will tell you what is the matter$ Perha.s you may be able to ad,ise me% : donEt Fuite know what to do$ You know how ,ery3 ,ery much my E8ista wants to be a chemist3 so : neednEt say anything about that$ Well3 he must be brought u. to something3 you know% he must learn to be something when the time comes for him to li,e without me3 and : donEt think3 &err 2itter3 it will be ,ery long before I before that time comes3 now$( : noted again that the old man did not contradict her$ &e only watched her droo.ing face3 and listened$ (: ha,e worked early and late3( she went on in low3 swift tones3 ( to try and lay by a little money towards getting him a..renticed to some chemist in the town$ &e has worked3 too3 .oor child$ -ut it is little I nothing I we could sa,e between us% for we must li,e meanwhile3 you know3 dear friend3 and there is the rent to .ay$ Well3 now : am coming to my story$ When : was a young girl3 : had a sister3 ten years older than :$ We were or.hans3 and an old aunt took care of us$ : married I [Page $& ] against my auntEs wish3 in the face of my sisterEs warnings3 I a .oor im.ro,isatore$ We were .oor enough3 of course3 before that3 my sister and :3 but we were not beggars3 and the husband : took was below me$ Well3 my sister was ,ery angry3 dreadfully angry3 but : was young and strong3 and : was in lo,e3 so : didnEt care much about it then$ #y husband tra,eled from .lace to .lace3 telling his stories and singing his rhymes3 and : went with him3 and soon lost sight of my sister$ At last we came to 2ome$ E8ista was born there3 and soon after : got some news of my old home from a wandering .edlar3 who had .assed through the ,illage where : used to li,e$ #y aunt was dead3 and my sister had married3 I married a rich innkee.er% a match as far abo,e our station as mine had been below it$ Well3 &err 2itter3 my husband was badly hurt in a Fuarrel one e,ening in one of the sFuares$ Somebody insulted him before all the .eo.le as he was telling one of his stories3 and his blood got u. and he struck the man3 and they fought% and my husband was brought home to me that night3 half-murdered$ &e didnEt li,e long$ &e had had a hea,y fall3 : think3 in that fight3 for the back of his head was cut o.en3 and he took brain-fe,er from it$ : did my best3 but our money was scarce3 and our child was too young to be left alone with a sick man3 and : could get no work to do at home$ So one day3 at noon3 my husband died$ Poor -attistaL : could not hel. itL : could not sa,e him L Ah Mesu L what a terrible thing .o,erty is L what a mournful thing it is to li,e L ( She shrouded her face in her hands3 but not to wee.3 for when3 after a little silence3 she raised her large dark eyes again to meet the old BermanEs com.assionate gaJe3 : saw that they were calm and tearless$ (After that3 : used to lea,e little E8ista in the care of a woman3 ne0t door to me3 while : went out as a model$ : was handsome then3 the .ainters said3 and my hair and my com.le0ion were worth something in the studio% but not for long$ #y color faded3 and my hair grew thin3 for : .ined and sorrowed day and night after the husband : had lost3 and at last no one would gi,e two scudi for me3 so : took E8ista and left 2ome to tram.$ Sometimes : got hired out in the ,ine-har,est3 and sometimes : sold fruit3 or eggs3 or fish in the markets3 till at last : got a .lace as a ser,ant in a big town3 and E8ista went to school a bit$ -ut se,en months ago my mistress died3 and her daughters wouldnEt kee. me3 because : had become weak and couldnEt do the work of their house as well as : used to do it$ And nobody else would take me3 for all the .eo.le to whom : went said : looked half-way in my gra,e3 and should be no use to them as a ser,ant$ So : ga,e it u. at last3 and came on here and got this cottage3 almost for nothing3 though itEs Page ?!

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


something to me% but then they gi,e me so little for my work3 you see3 in the town$ Well3 &err 2itter3 : daresay you think my story a ,ery long one3 donEt you K : am Hust near the end of it now$ : went into the town today3 and while : was standing in the sho. with my needle-work3 a lady came in$ 8he sho.-woman3 who was talking to me about the .rice of the things : had done3 left me when the lady came in3 and went to ser,e her$ So : had to stand and wait3 and when the lady .ut back her ,eil to look at something she was going to buy3 : saw her face$ 9h3 &err 2itterL it was my sister3 my sister 6arlotta L : was certain of itL : was certain of itL Ne,ertheless3 after she had gone3 : asked the sho.-woman some Fuestions about the lady$ She did not tell [Page $*#] me much3 for : fancy she thought me inFuisiti,e% but she told me3 at least3 all : had need to know$ &er customer3 she said3 was the wife of a ,ery rich inn-kee.er3 and her name was 6arlotta Nero$ She is lodging3 the woman told me3 at the 6asa dE9ro$ : didnEt go to see her then3 of course3 because she could not then ha,e reached home% but : want to go tomorrow3 if : can manage to walk so far3 for : think she would like to see me again3 and : am sure : should like to see her$ And3 shall : tell you what else : am thinking about3 &err 2itterK :t is that3 .erha.s3 I .erha.s3 her husband3 being so rich3 he might be able to .ut (8ista in the way of doing something3 or of getting me some work3 so that we could sa,e u. the money for his a..renticeshi. by-and-by$ What do you think of it now3 &err 2itterK #y sister3 you know3 is the only friend : ha,e in the world3 e0ce.t you3 kind3 dear &errL and : donEt think she would mind my asking her this3 though we did .art in anger% do youK +or that was ten years ago$( She .aused again3 and &err 2itter gaJed tenderly at the .oor shar. face3 with its .ur.le eyelids and Fui,ering .asted li.s3 through which the hea,y ra.id breath came e,ery moment with a sudden .ainful shudder3 like a sob$ : think he was wondering3 .ityingly3 what such a feeble3 shattered creature as she could ha,e to do with "or%3 at least3 on this side of death$ (&err 2itterL &err 2itterL( cried E8ista3 bursting o.en the door of the little chamber3 in a state of great delight% (look what 6ristofero has Hust gi,en meL 8hese beautiful roses L Will you ha,e them K ( (Not :3 E8ista3 thank you$ Bay colors and sweet odors are not for me$ Put them here in this cu. by [Page $*"] your motherEs side$ Now3 +rau E>ora3 : will not be contradicted L( (WonEt you ha,e one of them3 &err 2itter K ( asked the boy3 wistfully3 holding out towards the old man a s.lendid crimson bud$ &e answered hurriedly3 with a gesture of a,oidance$ (No3 no3 E8istaL : ne,er touch roses L See here3 :Ell take a cluster of this3 Etis more in my line a great deal$( &e turned away to the lattice as he s.oke% rather3 : thought3 to conceal a certain emotion that had crossed his face at the sight of the roses than for any other reason3 and laid his hand u.on me$ (Why3 thatEs nightshade L( cried the boy in sur.rise$ (No matter(3 answered the old Berman3 breaking off my blossom-head3 and tucking its stalk into the buttonhole of his rusty coat% (: like it3 it suits me$ -elladonna is not to be des.ised3 as you ought to know3 Page ?"

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


#aster 6hemistL( 8hen3 in a softer tone3 ( : shall come and see you tomorrow morning3 +rau E>ora3 before you start$ Bood-night$( &e went out3 shutting the door behind him gently3 and : went with him$ &e did not walk ,ery far$ About half-a-mile from the town there stood three or four old-fashioned houses3 with .roHecting gables and low green ,erandahs slo.ing o,er their wide balconies3 and it was in the first of these houses that &err 2itter lodged$ &e had only one room3 a little dark3 studious-looking a.artment3 scantily furnished3 with a single window3 o.ening on to the balcony3 and in one corner a dee. recess3 within which was his bed$ 8here were some shel,es o..osite the window3 and u.on these se,eral .onderous old tomes in faded co,ers% a human skull3 and a few fossils$ Nothing else at all3 e0ce.t a tiny [Page $*$] .icture3 hung u.on the wall abo,e the head of his couch% but this : did not see at first$ >ater3 when he had taken me out of his coat3 and .ut me in water3 in a little glass bowl3 : was able to turn my great yellow eyes full u.on the .ainting3 and : saw that it was the miniature of a beautiful young girl3 dressed in a ,ery old-fashioned costume3 and wearing u.on her fair bosom a knot of crimson roses$ (Ah(3 : said to myself3 ( there has been a romance in this old BermanEs life3 and now there is I silence$(

C(APTER $
4ery early the ne0t morning -attista came to see &err 2itter$ :n his hand the boy carried a large clay flower.ot3 wherein3 carefully .lanted in dam. mould3 and su..orted by long sticks set cross-wise against each other3 : beheld my own twining branches and .endulous tendrils% all of myself3 indeed3 that had been left the day before outside the cottage window$ -attista bore the .ot trium.hantly across the room3 and de.osited it in the balcony under the green ,erandah$ ()cco L &err 2itter L( cried he3 with ,ast delight3 ( you see : donEt forget what you say L You told me yesterday you liked the belladonna3 so when you were gone : went and dug u. its root and .lanted it in this .ot for you3 that you may always kee. it in your balcony3 and always ha,e a bunch to wear in your coat$ 8hough3 indeed3 : canEt think how you can like it% it smells so nastyL -ut you are a strange old darling3 arenEt you3 &err 2itterK( -attista had set down his .ot now3 and was looking into the old BermanEs face with glistening eyes$ [Page
$*%]

(6hild(3 answered the &err3 smiling ,ery gra,ely and tenderly3 as one may fancy that .erha.s a Socrates or a Plato may ha,e smiled sometimes% ( your gift is ,ery welcome3 and : am glad to know you thought of me$ 8hese are the first flowers : ha,e e,er had in my little dark room% and as for the scent of them3 you Page @C

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


know3 E8ista3 that is a matter of taste3 isnEt it3 Hust like color$( (Yes3( Fuoth E8ista3 em.hatically3 : like roses L( -ut &err 2itter inter.osed hurriedly$ ( E8ista3 how is your mother todayK( (8hat is one of the things : came to talk about$ She is ill% too ill to rise this morning3 and she wants to see you$ Will you come back with me3 for : think she has something .articular to say to you K ( (Yes3 E8ista3 : will come$( &e took down his old ,el,et ca. from its .eg behind the door3 and stoo.ing o,er the little glass dish in which he had .laced the s.ray of my blossoms the .receding day3 lifted me carefully out of the water3 wi.ed the dri..ing stem3 and fastened me in his coat again$ : belie,e he did this to show the boy a .leasure$ -ut a little while after this3 and &err 2itter sat again in the old wooden chair by the widowEs couch$ )arly that morning she had written to her sister a long letter3 which she now .ut into the old BermanEs hands3 begging him to carry it for her to the 6asa dE9ro3 and bring her in return whate,er message or note 6arlotta NRro should gi,e him$ ( +or3( said the .oor woman3 with an0ious eyes3 and .allid li.s that Fui,ered under the burden of the words they uttered3 ( : do not know for how long my sister may be staying here3 and .erha.s : shall ne,er meet her again$ And since : am not able to go myself into the town today3 and : fear to miss her3 : thought3 [Page $*&] dear friend3 you would not mind taking this for me% and3 .erha.s3 if my sister should ask you anything3 saying you know me3 and I and I8ista K ( She faltered a little there3 and the old man took her hand in his with the tender3 .itying gesture we use to little children$ (-e at ease3 dear E>ora(3 he murmured3 (: will bring you good news$ -ut the hour is early yet3 and if : start so soon3 your sister may not be able to recei,e me$ So :Ell go back and take my cu. of coffee at home before : set out$( &e was rising3 but she laid her hand on his arm gently$ (Dear friend3 why should you lea,e us K E8ista is getting my breakfast ready now3 let him get yours also$( So &err 2itter stayed3 and the three had their morning meal3 together$ 8here was a little loaf of coarse black bread3 a tin Hug filled with coffee3 and some milk in a broken mug$ 9nly that3 and yet they enHoyed it3 Page @

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


for they finished all the loaf3 and they drank all the coffee and the milk3 and seemed wonderfully better for their frugal sym.osium when E8ista rose to clear the table$ 9nly black bread and coffee% and yet that sorry re.ast was dignified with such discourse as those who sit at the tables of Di,es are not often .ri,ileged to hear$ +or &err 2itter was a scholar and a .hiloso.her$ &e had studied from his youth the strange and growing disco,eries of geology3 astronomy3 and chemistry% he had wrested from the bosom of Nature her most subtle secrets3 and the earth and the hea,ens were written in a language which he understood and lo,ed to read$ : learned that he had been a student in earlier days at a Berman uni,ersity3 and had there first begun to thin%$ +rom [Page $**] the time he was twenty3 until this ,ery hour in which he sat by the side of E>ora Delcor3 he had been thin%ing% and now that he had become an ancient man3 with a beard of snow3 and a face full of the dee. furrows of a solitary old age3 he was thin%ing still$ &e had gi,en u. the world in order to think3 and yet3 he told us3 he was as far from the truth as e,er3 and was content to know nothing3 and to be as a little child in the .resence of >ife and of Bod$ And when E>ora asked him why he had ne,er cared to enter into the lists of argument and contro,ersy with other learned .hiloso.hers and doctors of his time3 and to make himself a name that should ha,e been re,erenced among men3 he answered mildly3 that he had no ambition3 or if he had once had any3 he had always felt the mysteries of e0istence too .rofoundly to make them ste..ing-stones to worldly honour$ (:t is im.ossible3( he said3 ( that any man should be able3 in this s.here of life3 and under these conditions of being3 to .enetrate into the meaning of things3 or to touch their inmost source with fingers of flesh$ All that we can attain to know is this3 that we can know nothing% and the fairest answer we can gi,e when we are Fuestioned3 is that we do not know$ :f3 then3 we know so little about life3 much less can we e,er ho.e to discern the meaning of death$ And as for the lesser considerations of our daily being3 what are theyK >ong ago : ceased to desire% ambition and lo,e are things of the .ast to me$( : thought the shadows of the hanging ,ine outside the lattice darkened o,er the old manEs face as he s.oke3 and there seemed to come into his clear keen eyes a sudden mist as of tears that would not flow$ Whether or not the gentle woman beside him also saw these things3 : [Page $*+] cannot tell3 but when he .aused she asked him softly3 if his life had not been a sorrowful one K She feared he must ha,e suffered dee.ly$ (8o all of us(3 he answered3 (life is a sorrowful thing3 because to all of us it is a mystery .ast finding out$ &a,e you found it sweet3 +rau E>oraK noK nor ha,e :$ -ut what : ha,e lost3 if indeed : lost anything3 : lost not wilfully$ Well3 I : ha,e realised my destiny% the meanest can do no less3 the greatest can do no more$( (-ut you withdrew yourself of your own accord from the world3 dear &err% you buried yourself in your own solitude3 and ke.t yourself a.art from the honour you might ha,e earned by your learning in the world K You chose to be silentK( (Yes(3 he echoed3 mournfully3 ( : chose to be silent$ Why should : ha,e wasted my breath in idle dis.utation3 or to what end should : ha,e laboured to get a string of em.ty letters tacked to my name3 like the fly-.a.ers of a boyEs kite K : do not seek to be dragged back to the ground3 : .refer to mount without a Page @<

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


string$ ),erything we attem.t to do falls short of its conce.tion in its fulfilment$ All glory is disa..ointment3 I all success is failure% how acutely bitter3 only the hero himself can knowL( (You ha,e no regrets3 then3 &err 2itterK( said E>ora3 with her clear earnest gaJe full u.on his face$ (None(3 he answered3 sim.ly$ (And will you always kee. silenceK( E (Always3 so far as : can see3( said the old Berman$ (8here are Fuarrels enough in the world without my inter,ention3 there are dogmas enough in the world without my enunciations$ : do not think : should do any good by s.eaking to men$ 6ould : make them any [Page $*7] wiser3 .urer3 gentler3 truer than they are K 6ould : teach them to be honest in their dealings with each other3 com.assionate3 considerate3 liberalK :f they ha,e not heard the .ro.hets3 nor e,en the di,ine teacher of NaJareth3 shall : be able to do them any good K Are not their ,ery creeds .rete0ts for slaughter and .ersecution and fraud K Do they not su..ort e,en their holiest truths3 their sincerest beliefs3 by organised systems of deceit and chicanery K 6hut L : tell you that the ,ery ,esture which men com.el 8ruth to wear3 is lined and stiffened with lies L 8he mysteries of life are so terrible3 and its sadness so .rofound3 that blatant tongues do not become .hiloso.hers$ Words only ser,e to rend and ,e0 and di,ide us$ 8herefore : think it best to hide my thoughts in my heart3 belie,ing that in matters which we cannot fathom3 silence is noblest% and knowing that when : say3 E : am nothing3 but Bod is all3 I : am ignorant3 but Bod is wise3E I all : am able to say is said$ -y-and-by3 in the brighter light of a more .erfect day beyond the sun3 : shall see the King in &is beauty3 face to face% : shall know3 e,en as : am known L ( (8his3 then3( asked E>ora3 gently3 ( is why you ga,e u. the world3 that you might be alone K ( (: ga,e u. the world3 dear +rau3 because : found in it all manner of o..ression done in the names of Mustice and of 4irtue$ #y heart turned against the Wrong3 and : had no .ower to set it 2ight$ 8he mystery of life o,ercame me% : refused the gold and the honours which might ha,e been mine3 if : could ha,e been content in being dishonest$ -ut Bod ga,e me grace to be strong3 and the world cast me out of its gilded nursery$ : became a man3 and .ut away childish things$( 8hen he rose slowly from his seat3 and as he laid his[Page $* ] hand on the door-latch3 and lifted it to go out3 a welcome little .uff of outside air darted into the chamber3 and stirred the nightshade blossoms in the breast of the old rusty coat$ And : raised my dark .ur.le head3 and .ercei,ed that the mournful shadow rested again u.on the face of &err 2itter3 like a cloud at sunset time3 when the day that has .assed away has been a day of storm$ We went to the 6asa dE9ro$ 6arlotta NRro was in her sitting-room3 and would see the &err there3 said the dark-haired smiling Page @?

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


contadina3 who admitted the old Berman into the house$ She was a nati,e of the .lace3 and e,idently remembered him with gratitude and .leasure$ So we .resently found oursel,es in a small well-a..ointed chamber3 on the first floor of the 6asa$ 9n a ta.estry-co,ered dormeuse3 by the o.en window3 and carefully .rotected with gauJe curtains from the glare of the coming noon3 reclined a handsome woman of middle age3 so like3 and yet so strangely unlike E>ora Delcor3 that my dusky blooms Fui,ered and fretted with emotion3 as the contadina closed the door behind us$ 8he same delicate features3 the same lu0uriance of hair3 but I the eyes of E>ora L ah3 I a soul3 a di,inity looked out of them% but in these one saw only the metallic glitter of the innkee.erEs gold L 8hey turned coldly u.on &err 2itter as he stood in the doorway3 and a hard ringing utterance I a gain how unlike E>oraL for this was the dry tintinnabulation of coin I inFuired his errand$ (&err 2itter3 : am told$ You wish to s.eak to meK( : obser,ed that she allowed the old man to stand while she s.oke$[Page $*!] (Yes3 Signora(3 he answered3 mildly3 ( : bring you this letter% may : beg you will read it now3 before : go K for the writer charged me to carry back to her your answer$( &e drew E>oraEs note from his ,est with a gesture of re,erent tenderness3 as though he lo,ed the ,ery .a.er his friend had touched3 and were something loath to .art with it to such indifferent hands and eyes as these$ 6arlotta NRro took it coldly3 and glanced through the close-written .ages with the languid air of a su.ercilious fine lady$ 9nce : fancied : saw her cheek flush and her li. Fui,er as she read3 but when she looked u. again and s.oke3 : thought : must ha,e been mistaken in that fancy3 or else her emotion had been due to another cause than that : had imagined$ +or there was no change in the ungentle glittering eyes% no softening in the dry tinkle of the ,oice that deli,ered the SignoraEs answer$ (: am sorry : can do nothing for your friend$ You will tell her : ha,e read her letter3 and that : lea,e this .lace tomorrow morning$( She inclined her head as she said this3 : su..ose by way of indication that the &err might acce.t his dismissal% and laid the letter on an ebony console beside her sofa$ -ut the old Berman ke.t his ground$ (Signora(3 he said3 tremulously3 and my blossoms thrilled through all their delicate fibres with the indignant beating of his heart% do you know that letter comes from your sisterK 8hat she is .oor3 in want3 widowed3 and almost dying K ( 6arlotta NRro lifted her .encilled eyebrows$ Page @@

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


(:ndeed K ( she said$ (: am .ained to hear it$ Still : cannot do anything for her$ You may tell her so$( (Signora3 : beg you to consider$ Will you suffer the I the fault of ten years ago to bear weight u.on your sisterly kindness3 I your human com.assion and sym.athy3 no"K( ()0cuse me3 &err 2itter3 : think you are talking romance$ : ha,e no sisterly kindness3 no com.assion3 no sym.athy3 for any one of I of this descri.tion$( She motioned im.atiently towards the letter on the console% and : thought she s.oke the truth$ &err 2itter was s.eechless$ (Dolores chose her own .ath3( said the innkee.erEs wife3 seeing that her ,isitor still waited for something more3 ( and she has no right to a..eal to me now$ She disgraced herself deliberately3 and she must take the conseFuences of her own act$ : will not mo,e a finger to hel. her out of a condition into which she wilfully degraded herself3 in s.ite of my most stringent remonstrances$ All im.rudence brings its own .unishment3 and she must bear hers as other foolish .eo.le ha,e to do$ She is not the only widow in the world3 and she might be worse off than she is% a great deal$( (: am to tell her this( I asked &err 2itter3 reco,ering himself with a .rodigious effort I (from I you K ( (As you .lease(3 returned the great lady3 still in the same indifferent tone$ ( :t will be useless for her to call here3 : cannot see her% and besides3 : lea,e tomorrow with my husband$( Again she bowed her head3 and this time &err 2itter obeyed the signal$ : felt his great liberal heart hea,ing3 I thum.3 thum.3 under the la.el of the old fusty coat% but : breathed my s.irit into his face3 and he said no more as he turned away than Hust a formal ( -uon giorno3 Signora$( (Silence is best(3 : whis.ered$

C(APTER %
&e went home to his little dark studio3 where the sunlight so rarely entered3 and where the big tomes and the skull and the fossils3 and the .icture of the beautiful girl and her crimson roses3 greeted him with unchanged looks$ All the room was .er,aded with the aroma of the belladonna .lant in the balcony3 and all the soul of the old .hiloso.her was filled with an atmos.here of silent liberality$ &e stood before the book-shel,es and laid his withered fingers falteringly u.on the ,olumes3 one after another$ : knew already what was .assing in his heart3 and my rising .erfume assisted the noble Page @;

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


sacrifice$ 8hen he lifted the books from their .laces3 I one3 two3 three3 I the ,olumes he .riJed the most3 ancient classical editions that must ha,e been an )l Dorado of themsel,es to such a student and connoisseur as he$ +or a moment he lingered o,er the o.en .ages with a lo,ing3 tremulous tenderness of look and touch3 as though they had been faces of dear and life-long friends% then he turned and looked at the .icture in the dark corner$ A name rose to his li.s% a soft-sounding Berman diminuti,e3 but : hardly heard it for the e0ceeding bitterness of the sigh that caught and drowned the muttered utterance$ -ut : knew that in that moment his liberal heart renounced a double sweetness3 for surely he had cherished the gift of a dead lo,e no less than he had treasured the noble work of immortal genius$ 8hen3 with his books under his arm3 he went silently out of the studio3 and back again into the town3 along many a dingy winding court3 a,oiding the o.en sFuares and the market-.lace3 until we came to a tall dark-looking [Page $+$] house in a narrow street$ 8here &err 2itter .aused and entered3 .assing through a long ,estibule into a s.acious a.artment at the back of the house3 where there was a gentleman lounging in an easy attitude o,er the back of an arm-chair3 from which he seemed to ha,e Hust risen3 and slashing with an i,ory .a.er-knife the lea,es of a book he was holding$ 8he room in which we found oursel,es had a curiously hybrid a..earance3 and : could not determine whether it were3 indeed3 .art of a .ublisherEs warehouse3 or of a literary museum3 or only the rather e0.ansi,e sanctum of an o.ulent homme de lettres. &err 2itter laid down his three big ,olumes on a table that was absolutely littered from end to end with old manuscri.ts and curious fossilised-looking tomes in ,ellum co,ers$ (Ah3 EBiorno3 &errL( said the gentleman3 looking u. from his book% ( what is thatK ( &e came towards us as he s.oke3 and o.ening the to.most ,olume of the .ile which the old man had de.osited on the table3 e0amined the title-.age$ (Sancta #ariaL ( cried he3 his whole manner changing in a moment from easy indifference to earnest interest' ( what3 you will .art with this after all K Why3 it is the same book : offered you two hundred .istoles for at 2ome L You wouldnEt sell it then at any .rice3 you said L( (No3 Signer3 but : will now$( Ah3 it was a generous martyrdom3 but the .angs of it were ,ery grie,ous% what wonder that the martyr sighed a little L (8he same .rice3 then3 &errK DonEt let us bargain about it$ 8he )minenJa is liberal in these things3 you know% and youEre .oor3 my friend3 V know$([Page $+%] &e nodded at the old Berman with a sort of familiar .atronage3 as though he would ha,e said3 (DonEt be modest3 :Ell stand by you L( Page @A

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


-ut the &err seemed to notice neither words nor manner3 though : thought the heart beneath the shabby coat recoiled at that instant somewhat unusually$ (8he same .rice3 if you .lease3 Signor$( 8he 6ardinalEs agent3 for such : guessed this tenderhearted indi,idual before us to be3 flashed a keen sudden glance of mingled scrutiny and sur.rise at the calm dignified face of the .hiloso.her3 whistled .leasantly a short aria of two notes3 a..arently with some design of assisting his mental digestion to ,ictory o,er a tough morsel% and then turning to an iron-bound cash-bo0 at his elbow3 unlocked it3 and .roduced therefrom the sti.ulated sum3 which he counted out with much celerity3 and forthwith handed to the old Berman$ With tremulous fingers the &err gathered u. the money3 as though it had been the .rice of a friendEs betrayal3 and droo.ed his noble head u.on his breast3 like a war-horse smitten to the heart in the .assionate front of battle$ What he had done was registered in &ea,en$ Addio3 &err$( (Buten-tag3 Signor$( &err 2itter did not go back to his lodgings then$ &e went .ast the low house with its green ,erandah3 blistering under the fierce noon-sun3 and across the .astures to the cottage of E>ora Delcor$ She was sitting at the o.en door3 her thin trans.arent .alms .ressed tightly together3 as though she were .raying3 and her great fringed eyelids dark and hea,y with their burden of .ain$ Ah L E>ora L E>oraL ( blessed are they that mourn3 for they shall be comfortedL( Not in the world that men ha,e made3 [Page $+&] daughter of earth3 ah3 not in that% but in the world that Bod shall make hereafter L (&err 2itter L you ha,e been K 9 tell me what she said L E8ista is not here3 he is gone into the woods to gather herbs$( (&a,e you told E8ista anything K( (About this K Nothing$ : thought : would wait until : knew ------ ( She had risen from her seat to greet him3 with .ainful agitation% and now she staggered3 and : think would ha,e fallen3 but that the old man timely caught and held her in his gentle gras.$ (-e comforted3 dear E>ora(3 he whis.ered% (: bring you good news($

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She dro..ed into her wooden chair and co,ered her face with her bloodless hands3 wee.ing and sobbing for Hoy3 as only women can who ha,e suffered much and long and alone$ &err 2itter stood by3 watching her kindly3 and stroking his white flowing beard in silence3 until she had we.t her fill% and her dark blissful eyes3 dreamy with the mist of fallen tears3 were lifted again to his face3 like ca,erned .ools in summer refreshed with a ha..y rain$ (What did she sayK she sent me a noteK a messageK( &err 2itter .oured his .istoles into her la.$ (: bring you these(3 said he3 sim.ly$ ( Mesu-#aria L She sent me all this L how good L how generous L but ought : to take it3 &errK( (:t is for E8ista% to .ay his a..renticeshi.$ -ut there is a condition3 dear +rau% E8ista is not to know who sends him this gift$ &e is to be told it comes from an unknown friend$ When he is older he will know3 .erha.s$( [Page $+*] (#y kind dear E>ottaL Ah3 she would ha,e E8ista learn to lo,e her3 then3 before she tells him of her goodness L +or him : cannot refuse the money% can :$ &errK -ut : may go and thank her myself% : may go and thank herK( (Not Hust yet3 E>ora$ Your sister is obliged to lea,e this .lace tomorrow morning% Signor NRroEs engagements com.el him to .roceed% and so for the .resent time she charged me to bear you with the gift3 her greeting3 and her farewell$( &e was looking at her with gra,e mild eyes3 while he leant against the cottage-wall and stroked his sil,er beard$ Daughter of earth3 let Bod be Hudge% for &e alone understands the heart of mortal man$ As for me3 : am only a flower of the dust of the ground3 yet : confess : thought the deceit the old .hiloso.her used3 at least more graceful and gentle than the candour of 6arlotta NRro$ E(>ora' you are ha..y nowK( She looked u. and smiled in his eyes$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


:n that smile the .hiloso.her had his reward$ Soon afterwards -attista Delcor was a..renticed to a chemist in the town3 and the cu. of his content was filled to the brim% but as yet3 neither his mother nor &err 2itter told him the name of his unknown friend$ 8hen it grew towards the end of summer3 and the ferns and the brake began to tarnish in the woodlands3 and Dolores Delcor sickened3 and failed3 and whitened more and more from day to day3 till at last she could do no work at all3 but li,ed only at the hands of E8ista and &err 2itter$ [Page $++] As for me3 : blossomed still in the balcony beneath the green ,erandah3 looking always into the dark studio3 and noting how3 one by one3 the tall musty books u.on the old BermanEs shel,es were bartered away for gold$ -ut one morning3 Hust at dawn3 the woman of that sorrowful name and dolorous life .assed away into her rest3 while she sle.t$ And when (8ista3 with his heart almost breaking for grief3 came at the hour of sunrise to tell &err 2itter that she was dead3 the old man looked out across the haJy blue of the eastern reaches at the sea of golden s.lendour breaking beyond them3 and answered only in his Fuiet .atient way3 that he had known it could not be for long$ : heard the words and understood them3 but to the boy they meant nothing$ 8hen there came a night when the shel,es stood em.ty3 sa,e for the skull and the fossils3 and &err 2itter wore a strange luminous as.ect u.on his .lacid face3 that was not of the shadows nor of the lights of earth$ +or fi,e days he had broken no bread3 and his strength had failed him for want and for age3 and no friend had been to ,isit him$ E8ista3 : su..ose3 had his business now3 and of late his .resence in the dark studio had become more and more rare% not that he was unkind3 but that he was full of youth3 and the ,igorous lo,e of youth% and the old manEs talk was wearisome to ears that delighted in sounds of laughter and frolic$ And besides all this3 he did not know how much he owed to the old .hiloso.her3 for &err 2itter still ke.t silence$ All the autumn day had been sultry3 and the wind seemed to ha,e fallen aslee. in some remote corner of the sky3 for there had scarce been air enough to stir the [Page $+7] feathery tassels of the .asture grasses3 and the stillness of drought and heat had been e,erywhere unbroken$ -ut when : looked towards the west at sun-down3 : saw that all the long low horiJon was shrouded in twirling cumuli3 with to.s of lurid flame% and great shafts of red tem.estuous light3 shot u.ward from the dying sun3 launched themsel,es o,er the hea,ens3 and hung there like fiery swords abo,e a city of doom$ &err 2itter sat u. late that night3 reading a .acket of old worn-looking letters3 which he had taken out of a small wooden bo0 beneath his bed% and as he read them3 burning them to tinder one by one in the flame of his lam.$ A little torn morsel of a note3 yellow with age3 and half charred with the smoke of the destruction it had esca.ed3 fluttered down from the table through the o.en casement3 and fell in the Page @"

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


balcony by my side$ 8here were words on the .a.er3 written in stiff Berman characters3 orthodo0 and methodical in e,ery turn and u.stroke and formal .othook$ 8hey were these' I (: distinctly refuse to gi,e my daughter in marriage to a man who is so great a fool as to throw away his chances of wealth and fame for the sake of a mere whim$ Yesterday you thought fit to decline a Professorshi. which was offered you3 on account of a condition being attached to your acce.tance of it$ You fancied you could not honestly fulfil that condition3 and you lost your .romotion$ 4ery well' you ha,e also lost my daughter$ : see .lainly that you will ne,er be rich3 for you will ne,er get on in the world3 and no child of mine shall be wife to you$ 6onsider your engagement with her at an end$( Alas L :n this3 then3 was the story of the crimson roses L :t was far into the night when the last letter dro..ed to .owder u.on the table3 and the old Berman3 not .ausing to undress3 laid himself wearily down u.on the little bed in the dark corner to take his rest$ 8he oil of the lam. was well-nigh s.ent then3 and its languid flame Fui,ered dimly u.on the wan star,ed hands that were folded abo,e the rusty coat3 and on the noble face with its .ale closed eyelids and .atient li.s3 stedfast and calm as the face of a marble king$ 9,er his head the beautiful woman and her crimson flowers e,er and anon brightened in the fitful lea.ing light3 and shone like a beacon of lost ho.e u.on a life that had been wrecked and cast adrift in a night of storm$ &e died as he had li,ed3 in silence% and his death was the sacrifice of a martyr3 the fall of a warrior at his .ost$ 8hen the tem.est broke o,er all the Piedmont lands3 and the wind arose as a giant refreshed with his rest3 and dro,e the dark thunder-clouds u.ward before the sounding .inions of his might like demon hounds u.on the track of a flying world$ 8hen came the shar. swift hiss of the stinging hail and rain3 arid the baying of the hurricane3 and the awful roll of the storm that shook the whole broad hea,en from end to end$ Strange L that in the tumult of such a wild and terrible night as this3 so gentle and so calm a soul should be destined to .ass awayL 9nce again for a single instant : saw him3 in the midst of a daJJling flash of lightning that showed me3 clear and distinct as in a mirror3 the whole of the silent chamber where the lam. had gone out3 and the charred tinder of the burnt letters was scattered o,er the wooden table$ &e lay motionless u.on the white dra.ed bed3 a hero [Page $+!] slain in the hour of his trium.h3 with broad chi,alrous brows and tranFuil li.s3 whence s.eech had fled for e,er3 grand and serene in the re.ose of a slee. that3 like E>oraEs3 had borne him away into .eace$ +or him there was no longer storm3 nor darkness3 nor conflict$ &e beheld his Bod face to face in the light of the Perfect Day$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


Slowly at last3 beyond the farthest bounds of the dull landsca.e3 broke the white ghostly lines of dawn% and the shouting of the wind3 and the rage of the chattering tem.est fled down the watery sky with the flying scuds of cloud3 away into the distant horiJon of the west$ -ut the belladonna-.lant lay dead on the stones of the balcony3 torn and beaten by the hail and the wind3 its trailing stem and clinging tendrils seared with the lightning3 its .ur.le blooms scattered among the shards of the broken flower-.ot and the burnt tinder on the floor of the desolate studio$ &igh abo,e the white front of the coming morning3 the wind3 returning into the bosom of Bod3 bore u.on its limitless wings a twofold burden3 the s.irit of a .erished flower3 the oblation of a Bentle >ife$ 8he gra,e3 sonorous intonation sank and ended as it had begun3 like the organ-roll of minor cadences% and the countenance of the .hantom grew indistinct and fluctuating3 till it seemed to blend with the sombre .ur.le atmos.here that surrounded us$ -ut as : .ercei,ed her bright eyes still fastened u.on my face3 : lifted my hands im.loringly towards the floating .resence3 and would fain ha,e caught her fading im.al.able garments$ SpiritL : cried3 ( one Fuestion more L 8he boy E8ista surely came with the morning3 and learned at last3 [Page $7#] e,en though too late3 who had been his unknown friendK( Daughter of mortality3 returned the dying ,oice of the .hantom3 ( : cannot tell$ 8hat night my mission u.on earth was ended$ -ut some of my sister-flowers3 which bloom about the gra,es of the dead3 ha,e sent me messages from time to time by the breath of BodEs messenger3 the errant breeJe of hea,en$ And they tell me that a certain rich chemist of a large town in Piedmont3 a handsome .ros.erous young man3 named -attista Delcor3 has caused a great white cross to be set abo,e the resting-.lace of &err 2itter$ And u.on the base of the cross these words are gra,en in letters of gold' ( Pure religion and undefiled before Bod and the +ather is this% to ,isit the fatherless and widows in their affliction3 and to kee. oneself uns.otted from the world$( And again3 ( :nasmuch as ye ha,e done it unto the least of these #y brethren3 ye ha,e done it unto #e($

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford - ST 1EOR1E T(E C(E5A.)ER

[Although3 strictly3 neither a dream nor a dreamAstory3 this .a.er is included by the e0.ress wish of its writer3 the inter.retations contained in it being largely the .roduct of instructions recei,ed by her in slee.$ )d] D=2:NB the last few years a growing interest in the subHect of religious meta.hysic has shown itself in certain strata of our intellectual world$ 8his interest has taken many forms3 and attached itself to many de,elo.ments3 some of which ha,e been chiefly distinguished for [Page $7"] eccentricity3 and ha,e attracted attention rather by this Fuality than by their intrinsic ,alue as solid contributions to thought$ Phrases3 symbols3 and e0.ositions of theoso.hical doctrine gathered from sources unfamiliar to the ordinary Western mind3 and reFuiring for their com.rehension the study of a foreign tongue and of a strange and intricate .sychology3 task too much the intellect of a seeker trained in the 6hristian faith and seriously bent on the .rofitable study of its mysteries$ +ain would he learn what are these mysteries without recourse to a foreign inter.reter$ &is own 6hurch3 his own creed3 he thinks3 should teach him all that he seeks to know3 and he cares not to set aside and reHect names and symbols hallowed by the use of ages among his .eo.le3 in fa,our of others new to his ear and tongue$ :f a re,i,al of religious meta.hysic is imminent among us3 let it then be directed along the old channels worn dee. by the .rayers and as.irations of our fathers$ >et us hear what the tradition of our faith has to unfold to us of arcane secrets3 and to what mystic heights of transcendental thought the .aths trodden by 6hristian saints can lead us$ +or the legends and ,isions of the saints are full of .recious testimonies to the esoteric origin and nature of 6atholic dogma% and the older and more ,enerable the tradition3 the more fundamental and s.iritual its character$ 6hiefest for us3 and most im.ortant among such sacred legends3 is that of St$ Beorge the 6ham.ion3 not only because he is for )nglish folk .re-eminent among the saintly throng celebrated by our 6hurch as each No,ember-tide comes round3 but also because his story is thoroughly ty.ical of the class of esoteric tradition in which 6atholic truth and faith crystallised themsel,es in sim.ler and .urer-hearted [Page $7$] times than these$ Students of religious mystic thought can scarce do better than turn to such a tale by way of .roem to more elaborate research$ 8here3 in softened outlines and graceful language3 they will find an e0.osition of the whole argument of s.iritual meta.hysics3 and a com.lete ,indication of the method of theoso.hy$ At the outset of a new line of inFuiry the mind is usually more Fuickened to interest by .arable than by dissertation$ All great religious teachers ha,e recognised this fact3 and ha,e directed their instructions accordingly$ Nor can those who care to .ursue a systematic study of 6hristian mysticism afford to des.ise these .oetic embodiments$ 8he highest form of thought is3 after all3 imaginati,e$ #an ends3 as he begins3 with images$ 8ruth in itself is unutterable$ 8he loftiest meta.hysic is as .urely symbolic as the .o.ular legend$ 8he 6atholic tale of St Beorge3 our national .atron and cham.ion3 was once of world-wide renown$ -ut since our youth ha,e taken to reading #ill and &u0ley3 S.encer and Darwin3 in .lace of the old books wherein their ancestors took delight3 the romances of the Paladins and the knights-errant of 6hristian chi,alry lie somewhat rusty in the memories of the .resent generation$ : .ro.ose3 then3 first to recite the legend of the great St Beorge and his famous conFuest3 and ne0t to offer an inter.retation of the story after the esoteric manner$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


According to 6atholic legend3 St Beorge was born in 6a..adocia3 and early in the fourth century came to >ybia in Fuest of chi,alrous ad,enture$ +or this great saint was the noblest and bra,est knight-errant the ranks of chi,alry ha,e e,er known3 and the fame of his .rowess [Page $7%] in arms ,ied with the glory of his ,irtue3 and made his name a terror to all e,il-doers the wide world o,er$ :n >ybia there was3 in those days3 a city called Silena3 near whose walls lay a great lake3 inhabited by a monstrous and fearsome dragon$ #any a redoubted knight had fallen in conflict with this terrible beast% none had obtained the least ad,antage o,er it% and now for a long time it had laid waste and ra,aged all the country round3 no man daring to attack or hinder it$ ),ery day for many a long year .ast the miserable inhabitants of Silena had deli,ered u. to the dragon a certain number of shee. or kine from their herds3 so that at least the monster might be a..eased without the sacrifice of human life$ At last all the flocks and the kine were de,oured3 and the towns.eo.le found themsel,es reduced to a terrible strait$ 8he dragon besieged the walls of the city3 and infected all the air with his .oisonous breath3 so that many .ersons died3 as though smitten by a .estilence$ 8hen3 in order to sa,e the .eo.le3 lots were cast among all those who had children and he to whom the die fell was forced to gi,e a son or daughter to the monster$ 8his terrible state of things had already continued for some time3 when one day the fatal lot fell to the king3 none being e0em.ted from the ta0$ Now the king had an only child3 a fair and ,irgin daughter$ 8o sa,e her from so horrible a doom he offered to any man who would redeem the ta03 his crown3 his kingdom3 and all his wealth$ -ut the .eo.le would hear of no e0change$ 8hey demanded that the king should bear the stroke of fate in common with the meanest citiJen$ 8hen the king asked for a re.rie,e of eight days to lament his child and .re.are her for her [Page $7&] death$ #eanwhile the dragon3 infuriated at the unusual delay3 hung continually about the city gates3 e0.ecting his ,ictim3 and .oisoned all the sentinels and men-at-arms who guarded the walls$ Wherefore the .eo.le sent messengers to the king and re.roached him with his faint-heartedness$ ( Why(3 said they3 ( do you suffer your subHects to die for your daughterEs sakeK Why doom us to .erish daily by the .oisonous breath of the dragon K ( 8hen the king3 .ercei,ing that he could .ut off the e,il hour no longer3 clad his daughter in royal a..arel3 embraced her tenderly3 and said3 ( AlasL dear child3 : thought to see my race .er.etuated in thine heirs% : ho.ed to ha,e welcomed .rinces to thy nu.tials% but now thou must .erish in the flower of thy youth3 a sacrifice to this accursed monsterL Why did not the Bods decree my death before : brought thee into the worldK( When the .rincess heard these sorrowful words she fell at her fatherEs feet3 and3 with tears3 besought his blessing$ Wee.ing3 he ga,e it3 and folded her a last time in his arms$ 8hen3 followed by her afflicted women and a great concourse of .eo.le3 she was led like a lamb to the gates of the city$ &ere she .arted from her com.anions3 the drawbridge was lowered across the dee. moat3 and alone she .assed forth and went towards the lake to meet her destroyer$ Now it chanced that Hust then St Beorge3 in his shining armour3 came riding by3 and3 seeing a fair damsel alone and in tears3 he s.rang from his horse3 and hastened to offer her his knightly ser,ice$ -ut she only wa,ed him back3 and cried3 ( Bood sir3 remount your steed and fly in haste3 that you .erish not with meL( [Page $7*] -ut to this the Saint res.onded3 ( 8ell me first why thou art here with such sad mien3 and why this crowd of .eo.le on the city walls gaJe after us so fearfully$( And the Princess answered him3 ( 8hou Page ;?

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


hast3 : see3 a great and noble heart% but make the more haste to be gone therefore$ :t is not meet that one so good should die unworthily$( (: will not go(3 returned the knight3 (until thou tell me what : seek to know($ So she told him3 wee.ing3 all the woful tale% and St Beorge made answer with a bra,e heart3 in a ,oice that all the townfolk on the walls could hear3 ( +ear not3 fair maid% in the name of 6hrist : will do battle for thee against this dragon$( 8hen the Princess lo,ed him3 and wrung her hands and cried3 (-ra,e knight3 seek not to die with me% enough that : should .erish$ 8here is no man li,ing that can stand against this dragon$ 8hou canst neither aid nor deli,er me$ 8hou canst but share my doom$( As she s.oke the words3 the waters of the lake di,ided3 and the monster rose from its de.ths and es.ied its .rey$ At that the ,irgin trembled3 and cried again3 ( +ly L fly L 9 knightL stay not to see me .erish L ( +or all answer St Beorge flung himself u.on his steed3 made the holy sign of the cross3 and3 commending himself to 6hrist3 lowered his lance and rushed full on the o.en Haws of the hideous beast$ With such force he directed his aim that the dragon was instantly o,erthrown3 and lay3 disabled and .owerless3 at the feet of the saint$ 8hen3 with the words of a holy s.ell3 St Beorge cast a great fear u.on the monster3 so that it was shorn of all its fury3 and durst not lift its body from the dust$ 8hereu.on the blessed knight beckoned to the [Page $7+] Princess to a..roach3 and bade her loose her girdle3 and3 without fear3 bind it about the dragonEs neck$ And when this was done3 behold3 the beast followed the maid3 s.ell-bound3 and thus they entered the city$ -ut the .eo.le3 when they saw the dragon a..roaching3 fled tumultuously on e,ery side3 crying out that they would all surely .erish$ St Beorge therefore struck off the monsterEs head with his sword3 and bade them take heart and fear nothing3 because the >ord had gi,en him grace o,er all e,il things to deli,er the earth from .lagues$ So3 when the .eo.le saw that the dragon was slain3 they thronged about St Beorge3 and kissed his hands and his robe% and the king embraced him Hoyfully3 .raising his ,alour and .rowess abo,e the fame of all mortal men$ And when the saint had .reached to them the faith of 6hrist3 the whole city was straightway ba.tised% and the king thereafter built a noble church to the honour of our >ady and of the bra,e St Beorge$ And from the foot of the altar flowed forth a mar,ellous stream3 whose waters healed all manner of sickness% so that for many a long year no man died in that city$ Such is the legend of the .atron saint of )ngland3 I a legend re.roduced in S.enserEs .oem of the 1aNry Oueen3 wherein St Beorge a..ears as the 2ed 6ross Knight3 and the Princess as =na3 the mystical maid3 who3 after the o,erthrow of the dragon3 becomes the bride of her cham.ion$

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Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


Need : recall to any student of classic story the resemblance between this sacred romance and that of the Breek hero Perseus3 who rescued the fair Andromeda from the fangs of the sea-monster which would ha,e [Page $77] de,oured herK 9r whose di,ine fa,our it was that directed and shielded the Argi,e cham.ion% whose winged sandals bore him unharmed across sea and land% whose magic sword and helm armed and defended him K With all these symbols the name of &)2#)S is indissolubly connected$ &is are the Wings of 6ourage3 the 2od of Science3 and the &elmet of Secrecy$ And his3 too3 is the Sword of Power3 the strong and steadfast Will3 by which the elemental forces are o,ercome and controlled3 and the monsters of the abyss bound in obedience3 I those s.iritual dragons and chimeras that ra,age the ho.es of humanity and would fain de,our the 'ingKs Daughter$ +or &ermes I Archangel3 #essenger of &ea,en3 and slayer of Argos the hundred-eyed 1ty.e of the stellar .owers5 I is no other than 8hought' I 8hought which alone e0alts man abo,e the beast3 and sets him noble tasks to do and .recious rewards to win3 and lifts him at last to shine e,ermore with the gods abo,e the starry heights of hea,en$ All the heroes are sons of &ermes3 for he is the #aster and initiator of s.iritual chi,alry$ 8he heroes are the knights-errant of Breek legend$ >ike St Beorge and his si0 holy .eers% like ArthurEs knights% like the 8euton Siegfried3 the -ritish Artegal3 and many another saintly che,alier (sans peur et sans reproche(3 the heroes of yet older days I &eracles3 -ellero.hon3 8heseus3 Mason3 Perseus I roamed the earth under di,ine guidance3 waging ceaseless warfare with tyranny and wrong% rescuing and a,enging the o..ressed3 destroying the agents of hell3 and e,erywhere deli,ering mankind from the de,ices of terrorism3 thrall3 and the .ower of darkness$ [Page $7 ] 8he di,ine 9rder of 6hi,alry is the enemy of ascetic isolation and indifferentism$ :t is the 9rder of the 6hrist who goes about doing good$ 8he 6hristian knight3 mounted on a ,aliant steed 1for the horse is the symbol of :ntelligence53 and eFui..ed with the .ano.ly of #ichael3 is the ty.e of the s.iritual life3 I the life of heroic and acti,e charity$ All the stories about knights and dragons ha,e one common esoteric meaning$ 8he dragon is always #aterialism in some form% the fearsome3 irre.ressible s.irit of =nbelief3 which wages war on human .eace and blights the ho.es of all mankind$ :n most of these tales3 as in the ty.ical legend of St Beorge3 there is a .rincess to be deli,ered3 I a lady3 sweet and lo,ely3 whose sacrifice is imminent at the moment of her cham.ionEs arri,al on the scene$ -y this .rincess is intended the Soul' I the Woman of &oly Writ3 and the central figure of all sacred dramatic art of e,ery date and country$ 8hat the allegory is of such wide and ancient re.ute3 .ro,es the identity of the needs and troubles of humanity throughout the ages$ Yet one cannot fail to be struck with its s.ecial bearing on the .resent state of thought$ :t seems3 indeed3 as though the story of St Beorge and the Dragon might ha,e been written yesterday3 and dedicated to the men and women of our own times$ Ne,er3 surely3 has the dragon ra,aged and des.oiled the earth as he does now$ When at first he came u.on us3 it was not much that the monsterEs a..etite demanded$ :t was satisfied with the sacrifice of a few su.erstitions and antiFue beliefs3 which we could well s.are3 and the loss of which did not greatly affect us$ 8hese were the mere shee. and kine of our outlying .astures$ -ut at length all these were swe.t [Page $7!] away3 and the genius of #aterialism remained unsatisfied$ 8hen we began3 reluctantly3 to yield u. to it far more .recious things3 I our Page ;;

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


religious con,ictions3 our hold on sacred Scri.tures3 our trust in .rayer3 our confidence in hea,enly .ro,idence3 I the ,ery children of our hearts3 bone of our bone3 flesh of our flesh3 endeared to us by the hereditary faith which had become e,en as nature itself$ All these we ga,e and with tears% many of them had made life lo,ely and desirable to us3 and without them our hearth seemed desolate$ -ut com.laint and resistance we knew to be in ,ain% materialistic science de,oured them one by one% none were left in all that ancient city3 the &uman Kingdom3 whose ruler and monarch is #ind$ 8his our so,ereign I #ind I had hitherto cherished with fond delight one lo,ely and only child3 the Soul$ &e belie,ed that she would sur,i,e and .er.etuate him3 and that for e,er her heirs should sit on the throne of his kingdom$ 8o .art with her would be blight and ruin to all his ho.es and as.irations$ -etter that he should ne,er ha,e drawn3 breath than that he should be forced to see the child he had brought into the world .erish before his eyes$ Still3 with ominous .ersistence the terrible monster hangs about the gates of the city$ All the air is filled with the .estilent efflu,ium of his nostrils$ 2elentless3 indeed3 is this .essimistic science$ :t demands the sacrifice of the Soul itself3 the last lo,ely and .recious thing remaining to des.oiled humanity$ :nto the limbo of those horrid Haws must be swe.t I with all other and meaner beliefs and ho.es I faith in the higher Self-hood and its immortal >ife$ 8he Soul must .erish L Des.air seiJes the #ind of man$ +or some time he resists the cruel demand% he .roduces argument after argument3 [Page $ #] a..eal after a..eal$ All are una,ailing$ Why should the Soul be res.ected where nothing else is s.aredK +orced into surrender3 the #ind at last yields u. his best-belo,ed$ >ife is no more worth li,ing now% black death and des.air confront him% he cares no longer to be ruler o,er a miserable kingdom bereft of its fairest treasure3 its only ho.e$ +or of what ,alue to man is the #ind without the Soul K Poor and .uny now indeed the crown3 the wealth3 the royalty of #ind$ 8heir ,alue lay alone in this3 that some day they should de,ol,e on her3 that for her they were being garnered and stored and cherished$ So the dragon trium.hs% and the Soul3 cast out of the city3 stands face to face with the black abyss3 e0.ecting her Destroyer$ 8hen3 e,en at that last and awful hour3 the Di,ine Deli,erer a..ears3 the Son of &ermes3 Benius of :nter.retation3 6ham.ion of the S.iritual >ife$ As &ercules slew the &ydra3 the >ion3 and many another no0ious thing% as 8heseus the #inotaur3 as -ellero.hon the 6himera3 as 2ama the 9gre 2a,an3 as Da,id the Biant3 as Perseus the Borgon and Sea-monster3 so St Beorge slays the Dragon and rescues from its insatiable clutch the ho.e and .ride of humanity$ 8his hero of so many names is the &igher 2eason% the 2eason that %no"s 1gnosis5 as distinguished from the >ower 2eason of mere o.inion 1doFa5$ &e is no earthly warrior$ &e carries celestial arms3 and bears the ensigns of the Bod$ 8hus the commemoration of St Beorge3 and of the famous legend of which he is the hero3 in,ol,es the .raise of all ,aliant knights of the &ermetic art throughout the ages$ ),ery di,ine man who has carried the enchanted [Page $ "] sword3 or worn the sandals of the winged Bod3 who has fought with monsters and cham.ioned the KingEs daughter I =na3 the one .eerless maid I is celebrated in the .erson of our national .atron saint$ 8he 9rder to which he belongs is a S.iritual 9rder of the Barter3 or Birdle of the Page ;A

Dreams and Dream-Stories by Anna Kingsford


4irgin% and its ensign is the armed che,alier tram.ling under his horseEs hoofs the foul and furious agent of the nether world$ 8he idea of knighthood im.lies that of acti,ity$ 8he .attern saint and flower of chi,alry is one who gladly fights and would as gladly die in noble causes$ 8he words .ronounced of old times on the dubbing of a knight3 Be gentle3 aliant# and fortunate3 are not words which could realise themsel,es in the dullard or the churl$ 8o the good knight3 the ardent lo,e of beauty3 in all its as.ects3 is indis.ensable$ 8he fair lady of his dreams is the s.iritual bright-shining of goodness3 which e0.resses itself to him fitly and sweetly in material and ,isible things$ &ence he is always .oet3 and fighter in some cause$ And he is im.elled to fight because the lo,e of beauty burns so hot within him that he cannot abide to see it outraged$ &is ,ery gentleness of heart is the s.ur of his ,alour$ 6ham.ion and knight as well as thinker and student3 the Son of &ermes is of necessity a reformer of men3 a redeemer of the world$ :t is not enough for him to know the doctrine3 he must likewise do the will of the gods3 and bid the kingdom of the >ord come u.on earth without3 e,en as in the hea,en within his heart$ +or the rule of his 9rder is the >aw of >o,e3 and (>o,e seeketh not her own($

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