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Table of Contents

Section 1 - Cover Page

- Table of Contents

- Coaches Info

- Schedule

- Important dates

Section 2 - Strength and Cond. Manual

- Welcome to the Griffin Family

Section 3 - General

- Purpose

Section 4 - Strength and Power

- Pillars of Successful Lifting

Section 5 - Flexibility

- Proper Stretching Techniques and Stretches

Section 6 - Speed Training

- Speed Development

- Interval Training

- Agility Drills

Section 7 - Skill Development

- Skill Pattern Running

Section 8 - Nutrition

- Proper Nutrition

Section 9 - Rest and Recovery

- Proper Recovery time

Section 10 - In-coming Weight Program / Speed Training

- Griffin Football Exercises Explanation

- Strength Training Weight Lifting Routine

Griffin Football Address : Seton Hill University Attn: Football 1 Seton Hill Drive Greensburg, PA

Griffin Football

Address:

Seton Hill University Attn: Football 1 Seton Hill Drive Greensburg, PA

15601

One

Griffin Football Coaching Staff

Joel Dolinski Head Coach/Offensive Line

E-mail: dolinski@setonhill.edu Head coach/Quarterbacks Office Phone: 724-830-4615 E-mail: msnyder@setonhill.edu Office Phone: 724-830-1187

Mike Snyder Offensive Coordinator/Assistant

Greg Huster Defensive Coordinator/Defensive Backs E-mail: huster@setonhill.edu Office Phone: 724-830-1188

Anthony Jordan Line Backers/Academic Coordinator E-mail: jordan@setonhill.edu Office Phone: 724-830-1870

Office Fax number- 724-830-1181

Jeremy George Defensive Line/Recruiting Coordinator E-mail: jgeorge@setonhill.edu Office Phone: 724-830-1189

Don Burns Running Backs/Work Study E-mail: burns@setonhill.edu Office Phone: 724-830-1190

Matt Harnish Defensive Graduate Assistant Corners

Nate Mahone Offensive Graduate Assistant Wide Receivers / Tight Ends

Griffin Football 2008 Football Schedule August 30 t h Slippery Rock September 6 t h

Griffin Football

2008 Football Schedule

August 30 th

Slippery Rock

September 6 th

@ Geneva

September 13 th

@ Walsh

September 20 th

@ Glenville State

September 27 th

Shepherd

October 4 th

@ West Virginia Wesleyan

October 11 th

West Virginia State

October 18 th

@ Charleston

October 25 th

Concord

November 1 st

@ Fairmont State

November 8 th

West Liberty

Griffin Football Important Dates: Early Registration Dates: (Setonian Days) When Saturday May 17 t h

Griffin Football

Griffin Football Important Dates: Early Registration Dates: (Setonian Days) When Saturday May 17 t h Friday

Important Dates:

Early Registration Dates: (Setonian Days)

When

Saturday May 17 th

Friday July 11 th

Monday July 21 st

Thursday August 21st

Transfer Students TBA

Where

Administration Bld.

Administration Bld.

Administration Bld.

Administration Bld.

As iron sharpens iron, one man sharpens another.

Griffin Football

Griffin Football Seton Hill University Football Strength and Conditioning Manual

Seton Hill University Football

Strength and Conditioning Manual

Griffin Football Seton Hill University Football Strength and Conditioning Manual

Dear Future Griffins,

Welcome to the family. This manual will introduce you to the Griffin Strength and Conditioning program. It will serve to help you better understand the many different facets that play a role in helping you to become the best football player you can be. It will also provide you with a workout that will provide total body conditioning. A successful weight program does not just address lifting weights. A successful weight program deals with the following areas ----- flexibility, skill development, rest and recovery, both aerobic and anaerobic conditioning, nutrition, speed development, explosive power and strength power. Think of all these areas as spokes on a wheel all meeting together to form you the Griffin football player.

Toughness, Discipline

form you the Griffin football player. Toughness, Discipline You must have the discipline to do the

You must have the discipline to do the tough things now or suffer the agony of defeat later. The true test of an athlete is the ability to sustain maximum effort over the length of the training program. Many athletes can work hard sporadically. This, however, will not get it done. You must embrace toughness and discipline and blend them together in order to be successful. It is not easy, that’s why so few make it to the winners circle. The players that commit themselves to lifting and conditioning are the players that will be relied on. The time is now for you to establish a great work ethic and begin contributing to the Griffin football team.

Remember, you win football games long before the lights come on. Games are won in the weight room long before the game is played.

Good luck with the program and if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to call me at (513-309-1645)

Sincerely

Greg Huster

Griffin Football General

Griffin Football

General

Griffin Football General
Griffin Football Purpose The purpose of this manual is to provide you with a general

Griffin Football

Purpose

The purpose of this manual is to provide you with a general overview of our strength and

conditioning program.

methods and lessons you will learn in the weight room are

based on the latest research and

physiological fact.

characteristics that the program instills in you will help to add to your success long after your career as a Griffin is over.

The

The traits and

WE WILL CREATE A BIGGER, MORE EXPLOSIVE AND FASTER

FOOTBALL PLAYER AT SETON HILL UNIVERSITY.

Griffin Football

FOOTBALL PLAYER AT SETON HILL UNIVERSITY . Griffin Football Pain is weakness leaving your body

Pain is weakness leaving your body

Griffin Football Strength and Power

Griffin Football

Strength and Power

Griffin Football Strength and Power
Griffin Football The purpose of strength training is to fatigue your muscles. The best methods

Griffin Football

The purpose of strength training is to fatigue your muscles. The best methods of strength training are those that produce the greatest amount of fatigue, in the shortest amount of time, in the safest possible manner.

The following principles are the pillars of our high intensity training:

1) Perform each exercise through its full range of motion.

2) Eliminate momentum at all times. Use you muscles to raise and lower the weight.

3) Emphasize the negative phase of the lift. The muscles that are used to raise the weight are the same ones used to lower the weight.

4) Lift until you reach momentary muscle fatigue. This occurs when you can no longer properly lift another repetition. Every set of every exercise must be performed with an all out effort until momentary muscle fatigue is reached.

5) Always lift with a partner. This will ensure that every repetition of every exercise is supervised to guarantee proper execution.

The importance of progression

The most important component of successful strength training is an unremitting desire to progress. The body changes by force of will. To be productive, strength training must be difficult and progressive. Try to increase your weight or repetitions each workout.

Griffin Football We have never seen an athlete who could increase a repetition or two

Griffin Football

We have never seen an athlete who could increase a repetition or two every workout, but there will be times that your progress will amaze you and your coach. For the more experienced athlete, it can be frustrating training for weeks to only increase one repetition. However, if you only increase one repetition every three weeks that is an increase of twenty five pounds per year, which is not bad by any means.

Demand improvement from yourself every time you train. Refuse to duplicate previous results. In the short run, you are trying to add repetitions. In the long run, you are trying to add weight. Small increases over time will get you where you are trying to go. Do not look for magic. Ultimately, you will determine your results, not the program, coach or equipment. Look to yourself, your motivation, and your effort for the answers.

Intensity and Time

Training below a certain level of intensity will not produce any results. If you are capable of lifting two hundred pounds for six reps and you stop at five, it is obvious that the exercise was not as productive as it should have been. The dramatic changes that occur in the body as a result of lifting weights are due to the intense nature of the exercise. There is simply no other mode of exercise that works the muscles as hard.

Muscles respond to tension over time. You can get stronger performing large amounts of volume. However, performing only a few heavy reps is very dangerous and not specific to the needs of our athletes. The competitive weight lifter has needs that are specific to his sport, while the college athlete has needs specific to his sport. The longer the tension is applied to the muscle, the more fibers can be activated.

Research has shown that the best results occur from training the muscles to fatigue within the time frame of thirty to ninety

muscles to fatigue within the time frame of thirty to ninety Griffin Football seconds. Assuming about

Griffin Football

seconds. Assuming about five to six seconds per rep would set a standard rep range from eight to twenty reps.

There has been a lot written about set and rep schemes without anyone really defining what is really being discussed. When discussing the set and rep schemes, individuals are really referring to the amount of time used to fatigue the muscles. If someone states five sets of five reps is the best set/rep scheme, are they really saying that the best way to work the muscle is with two and a half minutes of work broken up into thirty second intervals? The fact of the matter is that muscles do not keep track of reps. The majority of the research has indicated that one to three reps are equally effective. An athlete can spend 45 minutes or two hours in the weight room and accomplish the same amount of work. But as intensity of the work increases, the volume must decrease proportionately.

Griffin Football Flexibility

Griffin Football

Flexibility

Griffin Football Flexibility
Griffin Football Griffin Flexibility Training Flexibility is a term used to define range of motion.

Griffin Football

Griffin Flexibility Training

Flexibility is a term used to define range of motion. When undergoing a stretching program the following strategies should be adhered to:

Warm-up- It is important to raise the muscle temperature before stretching. This can be done during a low intensity aerobic exercise, such as slow jog or riding a stationary bike. You should break a sweat before stretching.

Pre-Stretch- Begin with a slow pre-

stretch that ads only slight tension to the

muscles. This position should be held for 10-30 seconds while the muscle accommodates tension. This phase should be light and should not be painful to the athlete.

Stretch- During stretching phase, slowly

lengthen the muscles group involved.

The range of muscles involved is dictated and developed by the activity you perform. You are interested in developing “functional flexibility.” When you increase the range of motion of a joint you want to also increase the strength of the muscles in the new range of motion. If you properly strengthen a muscle, you will increase its

flexibility. A properly designed strength program should increase an athlete’s flexibility.

strength program should increase an athlete’s flexibility. Griffin Football Tips to remember when Stretching • MAKE

Griffin Football

Tips to remember when Stretching

MAKE SURE TO WARM UP before stretch

DO NOT BOUNCE when you stretch

STRETCH BEFORE AND AFTER WORKOUTS

MAKE SURE YOU STRETCH ALL BODY PARTS

PERFORM EACH STRETCH WITH PROPER TECHNIQUE

HOLD EACH STRETCH

STRETCH UNTIL YOU FEEL LIGHT TENSION

STRETCH WITH A PARTNER when excessive tightness is evident and extra stretching is needed.

Griffin PRE-WORKOUT ROUTINE

WARM-UP: Light jog, bike etc

STRETCHES: Following diagram for stretches

Perform each stretch 2x’s Hold each stretch for 30 seconds

Perform each stretch 2x’s Hold each stretch for 30 seconds

“The quality of a person’s life is in direct proportion to their commitment to excellence, regardless of their field of endeavor.”

- Vince Lombardi

Griffin Football Speed Training

Griffin Football

Speed

Training

Griffin Football Speed Training
Griffin Football Griffin Speed development program A. Speed can be taught B. Speed is developed

Griffin Football

Griffin Speed development program

A. Speed can be taught

B. Speed is developed while changing body movements on the run

C. Speed development is not form running

D. Speed vocabulary: There are a number of key words, which reinforce our training techniques and will help you with on the field speed development. Select specific upper or lower body techniques to work on each day. Select no more than two each day

UPPER BODY

1. PINCH- Emphasize rotating arms at shoulders straight ahead and not side to side. The action of the right arm effects the left arm and vice versa.

2. FOCUS- Keep eyes straight ahead on a horizontal plain, do not lean head forward or back, this hinders speed

3. FIX- Maintain an arm angle of 90 degrees. (Elbow joint)

4.

ROTATE- Swing the arms through the shoulder area. Remember to keep arms fixed at 90 degrees.

5. LOW- The position of the hands must go through the pocket below the hip and past the butt.

must go through the pocket below the hip and past the butt. Griffin Football 6. PULL-

Griffin Football

6. PULL- The hard downward and backward action of the arm, from the chest height, through the pocket, below the hip and past the butt.

7. LOCKOUT- The freeze position of the upper arm occurs with the shoulder down and the hand past the butt.

8. CHOKE- The forward swing of the hands stopping at the sternum level.

9. CRACKDOWN- Just like the toes of

the foot pointing to the ground in a downward action while running, we want the hand and knuckles of the hand to “crackdown” at the wrist joint

- as if you are cracking a whip - to put as much force down into the ground as possible.

10. HAMMER- Aggressive speed downward. Point you knuckles to the ground and extend your wrist.

Griffin Football LOWER BODY 1. HANG- Create and maintain a 90 degree angle at the

Griffin Football

LOWER BODY

1. HANG- Create and maintain a 90 degree angle at the knee in the recovery phase. Your leg should be inactive from the knee down. Lead with your knee. Keep your foot and foreleg down and under your knee. When the 90 degree angle is lost, the leg slows up.

2. PUNCH- Drive your knee out and forward, not up, on your initial movement from the ground. A forward and upward knee action rotates the hips to cover more ground.

3. SNAP- Pull your foot down and back under the hip in the recovery phase. Any time the foot hits ahead of the hip forward momentum is broken.

4. LIFT- Run tall as if someone where measuring your height. The lift occurs after the first ten yards of the 40, in the open field.

E. Speed train progressively

1.

¼ speed

2. ½ speed

3. ¾ speed

4. Full speed

F. Quality is more important than quantity

G. Train in speed distances that apply to game situations, 20 to 50 yards

H. When applying principles always start of fresh

I. Utilize set principle

1. Initial stages, 2 sets, 5 reps, 40 yds

2. Increase to 3 sets when the first two sets are run without a drop off in time or tech

3. The maximum goal is 5 repetitions per set, 3 sets per session, 40 yds at full speed. Full recovery is necessary

I. Speed stance

1. Point Stance

2. Distance from back foot to front door = 1 ½ feet

3. Both feet should be pointing straight

4. Place the ground hand directly under shoulder

5. Scrape down hand to a lock, do not lift

6. Punch toward destination, do not punch up

7. Focus forward with the understanding that the focus of the eyes change

8. The free arm should be kept high, at a 90-degree angle, the lockout position

9. All of the weight should be on the front leg and down hand

10. Use the thigh of the front leg as a spring

Griffin Football Interval Training Since football is played in both short and long distances, we

Griffin Football

Interval Training

Since football is played in both short and long distances, we will incorporate sprints that involve longer yardage. These sprints will help keep up your cardiovascular endurance, allowing you to perform at a high level through out the game.

The demands of anaerobic conditioning are best met by interval training. Because of the intensity, it can only be continued for short periods of time that must be followed by rest.

An athlete's interval training should use 35 seconds as the constant rest period between each sprint. The time of each sprint should be recorded and compared to previous workouts. The first week of training you may find yourself running 6 intervals in the prescribed time. The next week you may have improved to 7 intervals within the prescribed time.

The interval test will be administered upon reporting to camp. The purpose of the test is to evaluate your anaerobic endurance that is your ability to sustain next to maximal effort for a series of repeated sprints without significant drop in performance.

The following page will give you examples of some Interval drills you can do:

Griffin Football 1. 300 yard shuttle - This is a shuttle that covers the entire

Griffin Football

1. 300 yard shuttle

- This is a shuttle that covers the entire length of the field three times. From the goal line, sprint to the opposite goal line, back and down again. Rest 90 seconds before going again.

2. Intervals -Intervals are a sprint that covers the width of the field two times. Go up and back, then up and back again. Allow 35 seconds rest before beginning another sprint.

3. Wind Sprints

- These are progressive sprints (1/2 speed, ¾ speed,

full speed, ¾ speed, ½ speed) of 100 yards. Starting on the goal line, begin with a half speed sprint until about the 20 yard line. There, increase your speed to a ¾ sprint. At roughly the 40 yard line begin a full speed sprint until you reach the far 40 yard line. Bring your speed back down to ¾ until reaching the 20 yard line. At that point, finish through the goal line at a half speed sprint. Allow 30 seconds rest in between sprints

THE TEST (FOR SUMMER CAMP)

600 YARD SHUTTLE—TEST ORGANIZATION

1. Athlete begins on the 20 yard line and runs to the opposite 20 yard line. (this is a distance of 60 yards= 1 length).

2. The athlete repeats this until 5 lengths are completed (20 yard line to 20 yard line).

3. The athlete must touch his foot to the 20 yard line before changing direction.

4. Athlete finishes on the opposite 20 yard line from where he started. Total distance covered is 300 yards.

5. The athlete’s time is recorded and rounded down to the nearest .5 seconds.

6. The athlete gets 1 minute 45 second rest.

7. Procedure is repeated with athlete starting at the same 20 yard line where he finished.

8. After the 5 lengths are completed, the athlete’s time is recorded. (Total distance covered is 600 yards—300 yards + 300 yards)

9. The time is rounded down to the nearest .5 seconds and combined with the score the first heat.

10. Time must equal or better position group goals listed.

Group Goals: WR/DB: 96 SECONDS QB/RB/P/K: 100 SECONDS LB/TE: 104 SECONDS DL: 110 SECONDS OL: 114 SECONDS

Griffin Football AGILITY DRILLS Bag Drills - bag drills are a useful device when working

Griffin Football

AGILITY DRILLS

Bag Drills - bag drills are a useful device when working on foot speed and quickness. The bags used are 1x1x3 and are placed between 18 and 24 inches apart. Each line should have a total of 6 bags with a starting cone set 5 yards before the first bag and a finish cone set 5 yards away from the last bag. Some examples of drills used are:

DRILL

Single Leg High Knees

DESCRIPTION

Sprint to the first bag. By using an exaggerated stride, step directly over the bag placing one foot in between each bag. Make sure to raise your knee high enough so that your foot travels over the bag and not around it. Always keep a good, upright position. After reaching the last bag sprint through the finish line. Sprint to the first bag. Step directly over the bag making sure to stutter-step with both feet before moving to the next bag. Keep yourself in a good upright position while focusing on quickness with your feet. Sprint through the finish after the last bag. Sprint to the first bag. When you reach the first bag, quarter pivot to the left. Step over the bag laterally (keeping your shoulders square) with your right foot by raising the knee to the front and stepping out to the side. Follow with the left foot bringing both feet together. After finishing the last bag, turn and sprint through the finish. Repeat in the opposite direction.

EXAMPLE

1 foot 1 foot

Repeat in the opposite direction. EXAMPLE 1 foot 1 foot D o u b l e
Repeat in the opposite direction. EXAMPLE 1 foot 1 foot D o u b l e

Double Leg Chop

both feet both feet

Lateral High Knee

both feet both feet

e r a l H i g h K n e e both feet both feet

In & Out Drill

Starting with the first bag to your right and your toes at the front edge of the bag, back peddle to the rear of the bag keeping the shoulders square and hips low. Once reaching the end of the bag, move laterally to the next bag and sprint forward. Keep moving in an S fashion until reaching the final bag. At the last bag, turn and sprint. Repeat the in opposite direction. Starting with the first bag to your right and your toes at the edge of the bag. Move to your right by performing a Lateral High Knee keeping the shoulders square. Once you reach the third bag, allow only your right foot to travel over the bag. Once your right foot hits the ground, plant, push off, and begin moving back to

the bag. Once your right foot hits the ground, plant, push off, and begin moving back

Cadillac

the bag. Once your right foot hits the ground, plant, push off, and begin moving back
your left. Continue the Lateral High Knee (now moving to the left) until reaching the

your left. Continue the Lateral High Knee (now moving to the left) until reaching the first bag. At the first bag, allow only your left foot to travel over the bag. Once your left foot hits the ground, plant, push off, and begin moving back to your right. Continue again until reaching the third bag. Once you reach the third bag, allow only your right foot to travel over the bag. Once your right foot hits the ground, plant, push off in a slightly forward direction so that the bags will be out of your path. Sprint back to your starting cone. Repeat in the opposite direction.

Griffin Football

40 yd.

Directional

Change

Drill

You will need 5 cones and a hurdle for this drill. Place cones 1 & 3 0n the goal line 7yds. apart. Place cones 4 & 5 on the 5-yard line, 7yds. apart. Place cone 2 in between cones 1 & 3, but 2yds. behind the goal line. From cone 1, open the hips and sprint around cone 2 to cone 3. From cone 3 make a hard cut left heading towards cone 4, hurdle the bag in your path. Touch cone 4 with your hand and immediately change direction back toward cone 3; again, hurdle the bag in your path. Once reaching cone 3 cut hard to the left and sprint toward cone 5. At cone 5, make another hard cut to the left sprinting through the finish at cone 4. Set up another drill that mirrors the example, and repeat in the opposite direction.

4 5

1 3 2

the example, and repeat in the opposite direction. 4 5 1 3 2 Cone Drills –

Cone Drills – cone drills are an excellent way to work on speed and change of direction. These drills can be performed anywhere, however, they will be most effective on the football field. This will ensure that you are familiar with the playing surface of real life game situations, and will help you execute the drills more specifically and effectively.

DRILL

Shuttle

Drill

Zig Zag Drill

DESCRIPTION

Place 4 cones 5 yards apart with cone 1 being your starting point. In progression, sprint to and from each of the cones without stopping. Make sure to touch each line with your hand. After reaching the fourth cone, finish with a sprint through cone 1. Place 7-10 cones in a slalom formation leaving roughly 12 yards in between each one. From the starting cone, sprint to the first cone. Upon reaching the first cone, plant with the outside foot and turn toward the second. Continue until

finishing through the last cone. Place 3 cones, 10 yards apart in an L shape. Start at cone 1 with the cone just to your right. Sprint to and from cone 2, touching the line. Next, sprint to and circle cone 2. Keeping the cone on your right side sprint toward the right side of cone 3. Circle around cone three heading directly toward the right side of cone 2. Upon reaching cone two, pivot to the left and sprint through the finish. Repeat on the opposite side.

EXAMPLE

through the finish. Repeat on the opposite side. EXAMPLE NFL 3 Cone Drill 2 3 1
through the finish. Repeat on the opposite side. EXAMPLE NFL 3 Cone Drill 2 3 1

NFL 3

Cone Drill

2 3

1

Repeat on the opposite side. EXAMPLE NFL 3 Cone Drill 2 3 1 2 0 Y

20 Yard Shuttle

Place 2 cones 10 yards apart with a midline directly in between them. Starting on the midline, in a three point stance, sprint to the right touching the line (cone 1) with your right hand. Immediately turn and sprint toward the opposite line (cone 2) touching that line with your left hand. Again, immediately turn and sprint through the finish line (midline). Repeat in the opposite direction.

your left hand. Again, immediately turn and sprint through the finish line (midline). Repeat in the
Griffin Football 3 and 4 Cone Drills- There is a number of 3 and 4

Griffin Football

3 and 4 Cone Drills- There is a number of 3 and 4 cone drills used here at St. Joseph's College. Rather than list them all for you, we will give you a few examples. All of which, though, are used for speed and agility training. Make sure, no matter what drill you use, that you train at the highest intensity possible.

DRILL

3 Cone

Drills

4 Cone

Drills

DESCRIPTION

These drills will help you with acceleration and change of direction. Set these cones up roughly 10-15 yards apart. Examples of drills used are:

Sprint/Sprint/Sprint Back Peddle/Shuffle/Sprint Sprint/Sprint/Back Peddle Shuffle/Shuffle/Back Peddle Sprint/Back Peddle/Sprint Sprint/Shuffle/ Back Peddle Remember to always finish through the starting point. These drills will help you with acceleration and change of direction. Set these cones up roughly 10-15 yards apart. Examples of drills used are:

Sprint/Shuffle/Back Peddle/Shuffle Sprint/Carioca/Back Peddle/Carioca Sprint/Sprint/Shuffle/Back Peddle Shuffle/Sprint/Sprint/Back Peddle Shuffle/Carioca/Shuffle/Carioca Remember to always finish through the starting point.

EXAMPLE

to always finish through the starting point. EXAMPLE Drills- dot drills are another exercise that we
to always finish through the starting point. EXAMPLE Drills- dot drills are another exercise that we

Drills- dot drills are another exercise that we use to help with foot speed. These dots are usually on pre- made mats, however, you can make your own dots with pieces of tape. Place the tape marks in a 2’x2’ X design with one dot directly in the center.

Dot Drills

Drills used are:

1 Foot Drills 2 Foot Drills 1,2,3,2,1 (1,5),2,(3,4),2,(1,5) 5,2,4,2,5 5,2,1,2,5 1,2,5,2,1 1,2,4,3,2, 5

5,2,1,2,5

1,2,4,2,5

5,2,3,2,1

2 Foot Drills 1,2,3,2,1 (1,5),2,(3,4),2,(1,5) 5,2,4,2,5 5,2,1,2,5 1,2,5,2,1 1,2,4,3,2, 5 5,2,1,2,5 1,2,4,2,5 5,2,3,2,1
Griffin Football Skill Development

Griffin Football

Skill

Development

Griffin Football Skill Development
Griffin Football Skill Pattern Running Skill and exercise are two separate, you must practice that

Griffin Football

Skill Pattern Running

Skill and exercise are two separate, you must practice that specific skill. The motor learning experts now inform us that it’s impossible to recreate the neuromuscular pattern used to perform a skill unless that specific skill is performed. As soon as you add resistance to a skill, it becomes exercise or a new skill.

Over the summer, the coaches will give you a set of skill

pattern drills to incorporate into your running.

make your skill work out as specific as possible. This means that quarterbacks should throw and run with the ball, receivers should run routes, defensive backs should cover, etc.

The coaches will

These skill patterns will help you simulate actual movements that are made on the football field for your individual position. The recovery rates will be decreased each week as we near training camp. This type of running will not only help you get in shape for camp, but will also help to work the muscles that may be problems for many people.

Griffin Football Nutrition 37

Griffin Football

Nutrition

Griffin Football Nutrition 37

Griffin Football

Griffin Football NUTRITION Nutrition is the one component of fitness programs that most people are misinformed

NUTRITION

Nutrition is the one component of fitness programs that most people are misinformed about or misunderstand. Everywhere you turn you hear or read about someone who has gained or lost twenty pounds in one week. This type of information is misleading and dangerous. As athletes, you must be able to separate the facts and fiction of dietary habits in order to perform at your optimum level.

The following facts that are listed below are published by the American Dietetic Association and have been reviewed by the Food and Drug Administration.

BALANCED DIET

Each person should eat a well balanced diet. A balanced diet should consist of eating sixty percent carbohydrates, thirty percent fat, and ten percent protein. The majority of one’s carbohydrates should come from fruit and vegetable sources. The majority of one’s energy supplied by fat should come from unsaturated fats, those that remain liquid at room temperature. Finally the majority of protein intake in one’s diet should come from chicken, fish, and beans as opposed to red meats.

Complex Carbohydrates = Grain products, vegetables, fruits, oatmeal, rice, and pastas

Fats = Low fat milk, low fat yogurt, low fat cheese, low fat ice cream, oils

Proteins = Skinless boneless chicken breast, fish (tuna, haddock, shrimp, roughy), beans, low fat peanut butter, ground or sliced turkey.

DO NOT SKIP MEALS

It is important to maintain food intake at constant levels throughout the day. Your weight regulation mechanism in your body is referred to as your set point. It can be compared to the thermostat in a heating and cooling system. Skipping meals to lose weight is counterproductive and actually slows your body’s metabolism down. Thus, if your goal is to lose weight then it is imperative that you eat five to six meals per day. A meal may include a turkey sandwich and a bag of carrots or a piece of fruit. You can wash all of this down with a glass of milk or water. The key here is small portions. A portion should be about the size of your fist. This will increase your metabolism thus decreasing the amount of calories that you store as fat. On the other hand if you are trying to increase your weight it is best to eat three good-sized meals every day. One

Griffin Football key factor that many athletes do not understand is that your body can

Griffin Football

key factor that many athletes do not understand is that your body can only absorb a certain amount of nutrients at one time. So it is imperative that you constantly fuel your body.

LARGE AMOUNTS OF PROTEIN ARE NOT ESSENTIAL

Protein is the most poorly understood and possibly the most abused nutrient in the athletic community. The recommended daily allowance for protein is calculated as follows, 1 gram per 2.2 pounds of body weight. Therefore a 220-pound male only needs 100 grams of dietary protein per day. This is equivalent to sixteen ounces of red meat. Thus protein supplements are unnecessary and can be money that is foolishly spent. It is also important to keep in mind that your body can only absorb about thirty grams of protein in one sitting. Any excess will be excreted. This reiterates the need to eat smaller meals more often throughout the day. Remember, weight gain is a combination of increasing a balanced diet, which increases total caloric intake.

ARE VITAMIN SUPPLEMENTS NECESSARY?

Athletes tend to consume large amounts of food and if a sensible selection occurs there should be an adequate intake of vitamins and minerals. On the other hand, if your diet is not balanced a supplement may prove to be beneficial. However, keep in mind that the finest sources of vitamins and minerals come from foods and not pills.

WEIGHT REDUCTION

Weight reduction is a simple mathematical formula. For every 3500 calories that you burn you will lose one pound. This reduction of 3500 calories may come from a combination of increased activity or decreased caloric intake. A combination of exercise and diet is the most sensible approach. If you reduce your diet by five hundred calories a day as well as engage in twenty minutes of cardiovascular activity per day you will lose about two pounds in one week. Losing more than two pounds in one week is actually counterproductive do to the fact that you begin to lose muscle mass as opposed to fat mass. Therefore do not fall for these fad diets that claim to enable you to lose ten pounds in one week. The key here is that you want to reduce your body fat and increase your lean muscle mass.

Excess weight in the form of fat will affect your speed and endurance levels. Our goal is to make you bigger, not fatter.

Griffin Football Rest and Recovery 40

Griffin Football

Rest and Recovery

Griffin Football Rest and Recovery 40
Griffin Football Rest & Recovery At Seton Hill University , one of your greatest challenges

Griffin Football

Rest & Recovery

At Seton Hill University, one of your greatest challenges will be getting enough rest so that you are able to make steady gains from your lifting and running programs.

The ability to gain strength, speed, and conditioning levels is based upon the quality of work performed, not the quantity of work done. An individual’s genetic makeup and sound nutrition will determine strength and size potential. The amount of exercise that one is able to recover from will also vary.

The same amount of running may be just right to stress the system of a 190 pound athlete but would be too much for the 225 pound athlete. When running the same pace, an athlete weighing 225 pounds is performing more work per running interval than the 190-pound athlete. This is why you need to follow the prescribed amount of run to test ratio to ensure you are working within your group’s ability. The amount of rest that one needs to recover from a lifting bout will vary from athlete to athlete. One of the biggest factors is the amount of sleep that you get. The following are ways that you can improve your recovery:

1. Get on a schedule. Make sure you are in bed early enough to get seven to ten hours of sleep per night.

2. Take naps whenever you can fit them in during the day.

3. Eat properly. Exercise depletes the stored sugar in your muscles. A high carbohydrate diet will allow for more sugar to be stored in your muscles. In addition, research has indicated that within an hour after exercise you body’s ability to store sugar in the muscles is at its greatest. Consequently, you should eat or drink carbohydrate within sixty minutes of training.

Exercise is a form of stress and by itself produces nothing of value. It is the stimulus for producing strength and conditioning results. It is rest that allows improvement to occur. As you gain strength or become better fit, you are performing more work. As you approach your top levels of fitness at Seton Hill University, you will need less work and more rest to maintain your top level of fitness. If you find yourself not gaining strength before you have reached you maximum level, you are probably over training. At this point, we will cut back on the amount of exercise. Do not add more. You are just adding to the problem at hand.

Griffin Football In-coming Weight Program 42

Griffin Football

In-coming Weight Program

Griffin Football In-coming Weight Program 42
Griffin Football The incoming weight program is a four day a week program utilizing power

Griffin Football

The incoming weight program is a four day a week program utilizing power lifts and auxiliary lifts. Each power square is used for a certain week. The power blocks have calculated the percentages and periodization for you, follow them. Some exercises Levels. These levels are numbered 1,2,and 3. 1 means lighter weight done slow with attention to form, all reps completed on your own. Level 2 means the last two reps of your set you can barely get. Example if you are to lift 6 reps then the 5 th and 6 th rep would just barely make it, if you could do any more reps then it is to light. Level 3 means the last two reps could only be made with help from a partner. After you finish with one of the power cards then you will lift using your auxiliary card. The auxiliary cards are found after the power cards. They too are labeled with the month to start them at the top. When performing these lifts, go to muscle failure that means you physically can not move the weight any more. The auxiliary lifts are broken up into Red and Gold Cycles, you will alternate these cycles. So one week do the Red cycle and the next week do the Gold cycle.

You will no doubt have questions about the different lifts, below is a brief description of the ones you might not understand, if you have a question about a lift do not hesitate to call Coach Huster (513) 309-1645.

Power Card Exercises Barbell exercises- use the barbells

Dumb bell exercises- use the dumbbells.

S.L.D.- Straight leg Dead lift, hold the bar in front of you and bend down slowly with legs slightly bent. Your back should be straight, keep you shoulder blades pinched together. Go down as far as you can and hold for a 2 count, then come up slowly keeping straight back and push hips forward. Use light weight, this is not meant to be heavy!

Griffin Football Auxiliary card exercises M.R. Rear Dealt - M.R. is manual resistance, for the

Griffin Football

Auxiliary card exercises

M.R. Rear Dealt- M.R. is manual resistance, for the rear delts lay flat on back and have a partner place hand on elbow. Your elbows should be at a 90 angle and you will raise and lower elbows while a partner uses constant pressure to simulate lifting weight.

M.R. Side Raise- Manual resistance, Partner will grab forearms and lifter will start with arms to side and bring up.

M.R. Ankle- You can use bands or partner. Partner grabs foot providing resistance while you bring foot up for 10 and to each side for ten.

No Guts,

No Glory!