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Lean Six Sigma Operational - Delegate Workbook

Single Minute Exchange of Die (SMED)

- Delegate Workbook Single Minute Exchange of Die (SMED) Definitions 2 SMED : ‘Single Minute Exchange
- Delegate Workbook Single Minute Exchange of Die (SMED) Definitions 2 SMED : ‘Single Minute Exchange
- Delegate Workbook Single Minute Exchange of Die (SMED) Definitions 2 SMED : ‘Single Minute Exchange

Definitions

2

SMED: ‘Single Minute Exchange of Die’ or how to change a tool in the single minute range (less than 10) or if possible

OTED: ‘One Touch Exchange of Die’ or how to change tool in less than one minute

Both are ‘Rapid Changeover Techniques’

than one minute Both are ‘Rapid Changeover Techniques’ SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008 SSG06101ENUK - SMED/Issue 11/ Septemberl 2008 1 ©The

Lean Six Sigma Operational - Delegate Workbook

 

3

History of SMED

• Developed by Shigeo Shingo over a period of almost 20 years

 

• The development involved intensive study and improvement of setup operations in many factories and industries

• Facilitated by the recognition that set-up operations can be categorised:

Internal Setup (machine must stop to perform the operation)

External Setup (machine can be kept running whilst operations performed)

• SMED aims to minimise internal Setup time

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008
 

4

Why use SMED?: The Lean Principles

 

Remember:

• Define Value from the customer’s perspective

 

• Identify the Value Stream needed to go from customer request to requirement delivered

• Ensure the product Flows through the value stream without delays

• Use Pull scheduling so that product is made only when the customer wants it (Just in Time)

• Strive continuously to eliminate Waste from processes

What wastes might be applicable to process changeover & set-up?

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

Lean Six Sigma Operational - Delegate Workbook

 

5

Why use SMED?: Large Lot Production Waste

 

Large batches are produced to reduce the number of ‘changeovers’ as setup times are usually long. Leading to:

Overproduction & Excess Inventory (unsold product, raw material and work in progress)

Waiting Time (customers wait for entire batches to be complete, rather than just what they need now)

Defects (storage risks damage and deterioration of product)

Transport/Motion (can be affected by the need to manage large batches of raw material, WIP or product)

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008
 

6

Why use SMED?: Changing Customer Needs

 

• Customers are seeking an ever increasing variety of products that are available when they want them (product diversity, not mass production)

• Product life-cycles are being compressed as innovation becomes a key

• Shorter timescales are required to facilitate these needs in both the design/ development cycle and in production

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

Lean Six Sigma Operational - Delegate Workbook

 

7

Why use SMED?: The Concept of Time

 

• From a logistical standpoint a company looks to deliver On Time In Full (OTIF) to it’s customers

• Economically it’s advantageous if process lead time or the duration required to produce the product is short

• Many time consuming activities, however, do not add value to products

• SMED can facilitate the removal of NVA (in setup) or at least ensure that necessary NVA activity occurs concurrently with VA activity

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008
 

8

Why use SMED?: The Benefits

 

• Flexibility – without the need to hold stock

• Quicker delivery – reduced lead time & customer waiting

• Improved quality – fewer storage related defects

• Greater equipment productivity – shorter downtime & changeovers (linked with OEE)

• And for operators simpler, safer, better understood and standardised changeovers, in an better environment free from clutter (link to 5S)

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

Lean Six Sigma Operational - Delegate Workbook

 

9

OEE & SMED

Remember overall equipment effectiveness Availability (Concerns Downtime)

1. Equipment breakdowns

2. Set-up and adjustment of equipment

Performance (Concerns Reduced Speed Losses)

 

3. Idling/ minor stoppages of equipment

4. Equipment continually running at a reduced speed

 

Quality (Concerns Defects)

5. Reduced quality start-up period losses

6. Overall quality losses due to equipment

‘Aim to reduce all of the Six Big Losses’

 
SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008
 

10

5S & SMED

Remember the 5S’s

Sort (Seiri)

Set in Order or Simplify (Seiton)

 

Shine (Seiso)

Standardise (Seiketsu)

Sustain (Shitsuke)

‘Everything in it’s place & a place for everything’

 
SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

Lean Six Sigma Operational - Delegate Workbook

 

11

OEE & 5S – Link to SMED: Exercise

 

Let’s pair up and spend 10 minutes discussing how:

• 5S (workplace organisation)

• OEE (recording and analysis of equipment losses)

 

Are linked to or maybe could facilitate a reduction in changeover and setup time

Are there any other techniques you may consider useful?

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008
 

12

‘Change of Die’: A Definition

 

‘The time that elapses between the last good part being produced on one production run and the first good part being produced on the next following a changeover from one setup to another. Note that the parts should also be produced at the right pace’

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

Lean Six Sigma Operational - Delegate Workbook

13 The Best Example of Rapid changeover? During a pit- stop, these guys don’t mess
13
The Best Example of Rapid
changeover?
During a pit-
stop, these
guys don’t
mess
around!
SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008
14
The SMED Process
• For some setup operations a piece of machinery has to be stopped
(internal), eg the attachment of a new die to a press
• For other setup operations it can remain running (external), eg the
attach bolts of the die can be sorted and assembled
• SMED aims to minimise internal operations by elimination or
conversion to external
Preliminary:
Stage 1:
Stage 2:
Stage 3:
No differentiation
between internal &
external
Internal & external
setup operations
are separated
Internal are
converted to
external if possible
Setup operations
are streamlined
(internal first)
SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

Lean Six Sigma Operational - Delegate Workbook

 

15

The Four Stages of Traditional Setup

 

1. After process adjustments, preparation and checking of materials, equipment & tools

Ensures everything is in place & running as it should be

2. Removal & mounting of tools, blades, parts etc

Includes removal of parts used on previous batch and attachment of those for new batch

3. Settings, measurements & calibrations

 

All measurements necessary for production to recommence, eg calibration, centering etc

 

4. Settings, measurements & calibrations

 

Any adjustments made after a trial product/ piece has been made

 
SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008
 

16

Setup Analysis for SMED

 

• Setup analysis is a preliminary requirement for SMED. Typically it involves:

Videoing the entire setup operation

Focus on movements (eg hand, eye, body) of setup personnel

Review video with those involved

 

Understand the actions that are being taken and why

 

Note the times & motions involved in each step

Use a stopwatch, or timer

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

Lean Six Sigma Operational - Delegate Workbook

 

17

SMED Stage 1 (Separate Internal from External)

 

• The most important stage as setup times can often be cut by 30-50% here

• Identify taks that are carried out as internal (after the machine is stopped), but could be external (whilst machine is still running).

• For example:

Ensuring the right people are present and ready Preparation of tools, parts & equipment Transport of tools, parts & equipment to the required location

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008
 

18

SMED Stage 1 Tools to Help

 

Checklists – to detail requirements for next operation and prevent oversights

 

Including equipment & people requirements, specifications, operating conditions, dimensions & measurements

Function Checks – to ensure parts/ equipment are in working order

 
 

Should be performed before mounting to reduce delays

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

Lean Six Sigma Operational - Delegate Workbook

 

19

SMED Stage 1 Tools to Help

 

Improved transport – reducing movement of parts, jigs, tools etc during the internal phase

 

To ensure that the tools needed are close and ready for setup

To facilitate start up can occur before old tools are returned to storage

 

‘Anything that can be done as external should be’

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008
 

20

SMED Stage 2 (Convert Internal to External Setup)

 

• Two steps are involved in this stage

 

Understand the function/ purpose of each operation in the current internal setup

Consider how to convert to external

 

• Examples can include:

 

Preheating die molds rather than heating after setup

Performing centering operation on a standardised jig before fitting tool to machine

 
SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

Lean Six Sigma Operational - Delegate Workbook

 

21

SMED Stage 2 Tools to Help

 

Advanced Preparation of Operating Requirements – ensuring tools, parts and conditions are ready before internal setup begins

Preheating of parts, tools or materials should be performed before stopping or fitting to the machine

The use of temporary stock holders can avoid transport delays during setup

Standarisation of Essential Functions – where possible standardise the elements whose functions are essential to setup

 

Allows a reduction of time consuming adjustments and activities during changeovers (see following slide for an example)

Looks to standardise functions and dimensions not tool shapes

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008
 

22

Standardisation of Functions

 
 
 

• In press setup shut height adjustment is an internal operation that needs skill & time to perform

 

• Function standardisation of the die part that’s clamped to the machine can reduce internal setup (shut height adjustment is made unnecessary)

• Here two dies of differing lengths are standardised through the use of two shims

• The clamping heights are now standardised enabling common clamping bolts to be used thereby cutting out adjustment work

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

Lean Six Sigma Operational - Delegate Workbook

 

23

SMED Stage 2 Tools to Help

 

The use of Intermediary Jigs – ensuring tools, parts and conditions are ready before internal setup begins

 

The jig consists of a plate/ frame that has standard dimensions that can be attached and removed from the machine

The die is attached to the jig which is then mounted in the machine

A second jig is then used for a second die that is needed post- changeover

Centring and attachment of dies (or work pieces and machine tools) can thus become an external operation

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008
 

24

SMED Stage 3 (Streamlining all aspects of Setup)

 

Streamlining External Setup – includes storage and transport of key parts, tools, gauges and equipment

 

Consider the best way to organise items, eg most used tools are stored closest

How to keep all required items in optimal condition and ‘ready’

How many of each item is required in stock

 
SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

Lean Six Sigma Operational - Delegate Workbook

 

25

SMED Stage 3 (Streamlining all aspects of Setup)

 

Streamlining Internal Setup – involves a number of techniques to make things quicker and easier

• For example the following tools & techniques may be considered:

 

Introducing parallel operations

Using functional clamps

Eliminating or reducing adjustments

 

Mechanisation

 
SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008
 

26

SMED stage 3 tools to help

 

Implementing Parallel Operations – typically involves reducing time wasted due to motion

 

Where setup operations are required at both the front and rear of a machine, eg a large press, one operator changeovers can waste time (motion waste)

Use two operators to reduce the number of ‘steps taken’

Procedural charts detailing the actions and process order can help maintain safety and reliability

Signals can also to ‘go’ or ‘wait’ between setup operators are also used

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

Lean Six Sigma Operational - Delegate Workbook

 

27

SMED Stage 3 Tools to Help

 

Using Functional Clamps – ensuring attachment of dies and tools can be performed quickly and simply

 
 

Typically nuts and bolts are used in clamping, but they can get lost, mismatched & take too long to tighten

Consider the release and fasten of a nut & bolt happens on the first & last turn (the rest is waste)

 

A functional clamp is a device that hold items in place with minimal effort needed to fit & remove it

Ideally it remains attached to the machine to avoid loss

Modified bolts and one-turn locking or motion methods are considered as functional clamps (see next slide for examples)

 
SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008
 

28

Examples of Functional Clamps

 
2008   28 Examples of Functional Clamps   Pear shaped hole method (one turn) U shape
2008   28 Examples of Functional Clamps   Pear shaped hole method (one turn) U shape
2008   28 Examples of Functional Clamps   Pear shaped hole method (one turn) U shape
2008   28 Examples of Functional Clamps   Pear shaped hole method (one turn) U shape

Pear shaped hole method (one turn)

U shape washer method (one turn)

Split thread method (one turn)

 
 
 
 

Cam clamp method (one motion)

Spring stop method (one motion)

 
SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

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29

Other Examples of Functional Clamps

 

• One Turn Methods: eg C shaped washers, U slots

• One Motion Methods: eg cams, wedge & tapers, magnets & vacuums

• Interlocking Methods: eg tapered sections to join two parts without a fastener

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008
 

30

SMED Stage 3 Tools to Help

 

Eliminating Adjustments – ensuring settings are good before machine start up such that adjustments aren’t required

 

Using numerical scales for settings rather than intuition in setups (this can include gages, shims & visible markings)

Making centre lines and reference planes visible on machines to eliminate the requirement for future adjustment

Using the ‘least common multiple (LCM) system’ wherein the function, but not the mechanism is modified and settings not adjustments are made, eg rotating tools on a spindle, changing settings by flipping a switch (see next slide)

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

Lean Six Sigma Operational - Delegate Workbook

 

31

Eliminating Adjustments

 

Changing settings by flipping a switch

• Changing settings by flipping a switch
SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008
 

32

SMED Stage 3 Tools to Help

 

Mechanisation – using equipment and automation rather than people

 

Should be considered last as

 

The previous techniques which will usually reduce setup time drastically (hours to minutes)

 

Mechanising an inefficient process may reduce time, but won’t improve the process

Therefore always streamline first

 

Mechanisation processes that are common include

 
 

Using forklifts for tool insertions

Electric drives for shut height adjustment

 

Remote control die tightening/ loosening

Etc

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

Lean Six Sigma Operational - Delegate Workbook

 

33

Summary

 

• Think Smart and Reduce:

Effort (eg tightening, releasing),

Activity (searching for or transporting)

 

Adjustment (tools, dies, presses), and

Variety (tools, parts, items)

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008
 

34

Summary

 

• SMED is about inventory reduction and equipment efficiency

 

• SMED enables a more controlled, safer and less arduous setup process

• The use of SMED will facilitate:

 

An ability to produce smaller batches economically

 

Lower inventory and work in progress

Greater floor space

An increase in OEE and reduced NVA trials and adjustments on start up

 
SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008

SSG06101ENUK – Delegate Slides/Issue 1.1/ Septembe 2008