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EMS-1B Environmental Aspects and Impacts Register (SUMMARY)

EMS-1B Environmental Aspects and Impacts Register (SUMMARY)


Contents Page

1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0

Introduction and Definitions.... 3 Methodology............................... 3 Summarised Results Table ........... 5 Associated Documents and References.. 11

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1.0 Introduction to Environmental Aspects and Impacts and definitions 1.1 This document is a summary of the more detailed University Environmental Aspects and Impacts Register. An Environmental Aspects and Impacts Register is an integral part of an Environmental Management System the purpose of this document is for the reader to see in a concentrated form the significant environmental aspects and impacts that are created as a result of the activities and services provided by the University. 1.2 The aspects and impacts were identified after a thorough environmental review of the Universitys activities and services. The aspects and impacts identified have then been categorised based on the environmental element affected and the significance of the impact. 1.3 Definitions Environmental Aspects can be defined as the Universitys activities, services and operations that have interactions with the environment such as electricity usage, food waste, chemical waste and etc.

Environmental Impacts can be defined as the changes to the environment whether positive or negative that resulted from the Universitys activities, services and operations. For examples, energy depletion due to electricity usage, water contamination due to chemical waste.

2.0 Methodology 2.1 The University of Sunderland has four Faculties, seven Services and the Institute of Sport. There are two main campuses which are City Campus and St. Peters Campus. In order to carry out a comprehensive environmental aspects and impacts register, all the activities and operations of the Faculties and Services have to be studied and understood. Desk study was carried out to identify the relevant legislations related to the aspects and impacts of the University. 2.2 Template 2.1 In order to record and document the findings neatly and presentable, a good environmental aspects and impacts register template needed to be developed. The template used in this assessment looked at the following elements: 1. The environmental element of the aspect, 2. The nature of the aspect, 3. The effect of the impact, 4. Relevant legislations related to the aspect. The template then provided a risk assessment table which included: 1. The frequency of the activities/operations, 2. The effect of the events, 3. Legislation compliance, 4. Stakeholders concern,
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5. Control. Every element in the risk assessment table is given the score of 1 4 (minimum to maximum) with explanation of the score. This enables the reader to understand the reason of the score. The scores of each element are added up to produce a final score which describe the significance of that aspect. The significance of the aspect is determined as follow: 1. Score 1 -9 = low significant 2. Score 9 15 = medium significant 3. Score over 16 = high significant

2.3 Environmental Risk Assessment Scoring Legend 2.4 The table below explains the scoring of each element. For example, the usage of electricity is high and daily, a scoring of 4 will be put in the frequency column in the risk assessment matrix. Another example, the air conditioning units are being checked and inspected regularly, there is a full control and the score 1 will be put in the control column in the risk assessment matrix. Risk Assessment Score 2 = low usage/ 3 = moderate normal usage/ frequent operation operation 2 = minor environmental impact 2 = complies with legislation 2 = limited/ minor concern 2 = moderate control 10 15 = medium level of significance 3 = moderate/ potential major impact 3 = potential breach/ lack of 3 = Moderate/ potential major concern 3 = limited/ minor control 16 20 = high level of significance

Frequency

Effect

1 = negligible usage/ infrequent operation 1 = insignificant environmental impact 1= no relevant legislation 1 = insignificant/ no concern 1= full control/ no need for control 1 9 = low level of significance

4 = very high usage

4 = major environmental impact 4 = breaching legislation 4 = major concern 4 = no control

Legislation compliance Stakeholders concern Control

Result

2.5 Site Visit 2.6 Site visits were undertaken in the following areas to collate the findings Faculty of Art, Design and Media, Faculty of Applied Science (St. Peters Campus), Faculty of Business and Law, Faculty of Applied Science (City Campus), Faculty of Education and Society, National Glass Centre
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Facilities (Technology Park)

2.6 During the site visits, with the help of the Area Health, Safety and Environment Coordinators (ASHECs) every activity, service and operation was recorded as well as the frequencies, effects and controls. The findings were recorded in the template and risk assessment score was given to the each of the elements depending on the findings of the site visits. 2.7 The drafts of the findings were sent to the ASHECs for that Faculty/Service to check for validity. The results were discussed and feedback from the ASHECs was taken in order to increase the validity and accuracy of the results.

3.0 Summarised Results Table 3.1 Below are the tables containing the summarised results of the Environmental Aspects and Impacts Register.

3.2

Summary Table

Note: indicates a policy is in place indicates that the risk assessment scoring for the element is 3 or more than 3 L indicates low significance M indicates medium significance H indicates high significance ADM = Faculty of Art, Design and Media FAS (P) = Faculty of Applied Science St. Peters Campus FAS (C) = Faculty of Applied Science City Campus FES = Faculty of Education and Society FBL = Faculty of Business and Law NGC = National Glass Centre FC = Facilities Service Some aspects may have multiple impacts on different environmental element. For example, fleet vehicles impact the air by emitting greenhouse gases and impact the energy resources by consuming petrol. Thus, these aspects are recorded under both environmental elements

Stakeholders concern

Element

Aspects

Impacts Policy

Air

Air-Conditioning System ADM Air-Conditioning System FAS (P) Air-Conditioning System FAS (C) Air-Conditioning System NGC Air-Conditioning

Leaking of air-conditioning coolant into the atmosphere can cause ozone depletion.
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Significance L L L L L

Legislation

Frequency

Effect

Control

System FES Air-Conditioning System FBL Air Extraction System ADM

Wood dust and metal dust is filtered and collected in the hopper, however, some dust may leak out into the atmosphere as particle matters. Fume from the CNC Laser Machine, spray-back and fume furnace is extracted directly into the atmosphere; low density of particle matter may be extracted together. Dust and airborne particles generated may pollute the air in the workplace and affect workers health. The effect can cause air pollution. Excessive generation of CO2, SOX and NOX will make the laboratory become a confined space and may endanger the human health if those gases are not extracted.

Air Extraction System in the CNC Machine Room FAS (P)

Air Extraction System in the SU Racing Laboratory FAS (P)

Air Extraction System in the Laboratories and Fume Cupboard FAS (C)

Toxic gas may pollute the air and affect human health.

Stakeholders concern

Element

Aspects

Impacts Policy

Air Extraction System in the General Workshop FES

Extraction of Metal dust, wood dust and medium density fibre generated from the general workshop. The usage of the fleet vehicles contributes greenhouse gases into the environment and global warming is a serious issue. Green house gas emissions. Cooking, heating and electricity usage contribute to greenhouse
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Fleet Vehicles Air

Staff and Students Travel Student Accommodation

M M

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Significance L

Legislation

Frequency

Effect

Control

Cafeterias and Kitchens

gases. Air particles generated may affect the air quality of the University area.

Water

Water Used For Cleaning Purposes ADM Water Used For Cleaning Purposes FAS (P) Water Used For Cleaning Purposes FAS (C) Water used for Cleaning Purposes FES Water Used For Cleaning Purposes FBL Cafeterias and Kitchens Student Accommodation Water Used For Washing Photography Printing ADM Water Used For Washing Brushes

Water is used for the cleaning purposes in the toilets, workshops, and other facilities may deplete water resources.

Stakeholders concern

L L L M M M M Significance M L L L L

Waste water and contaminated water is discharged through the drain system and it may pollute water sources.

Element

Aspects

Impacts Policy

Water

Water used in Cleaning Apparatus and Equipment of the Laboratory FES Chemicals Storage and Management FC

Waste water and contaminated water is discharged through the drain system and it may pollute water sources.

Legislation

Frequency

Effect

Reuse and Recycle

Reusing of Design and Modelling Materials ADM Using Recycled and Materials are being reused & Reused Materials ADM recycled & this reduces the Repair and Reuse of depletion of natural resources. Broken Computers, Electronic Equipment and Computer Parts FAS (P)
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Control -

Materials Reusing FAS (P) Recycle of Scrap Metal Recycling of Materials NGC Materials Reusing FES Paper used in Offices FES Repair and Reuse of Broken Computers, Electronics Equipment and Computer Parts FBL Paper Used in Offices and Libraries

L L L L M

Stakeholders concern

Element

Aspects

Impacts Policy

Waste

Materials Used for Modelling ADM Metal Dust and Wood Dust Collected in the filters FES Cafeterias and Kitchens General Waste Produced by the Staff and Student Skip at Ashburne House

Wastes that cannot be reuse or recycle were disposed by O Brien Waste Management Company. Thus consume energy in transporting and dealing with the waste. Land occupied and all kind of waste such as wood, empty tank, design waste, metal, amplifier, stone, plastic were found. Uncovered waste may pollute storm water as the waste is exposed to rain.

M M

Temporary Skip NGC

Waste Management

The waste may be treated wrongly and the effects are unpredictable. There is a severe impact if the
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H M

Significance L L

Legislation

Frequency

Effect

Control

FC Chemical Waste and Container ADM Laboratories Waste FAS (C) Cleaning of the Work Piece Containing Chemicals and Hazardous Waste NGC Computers and Electronics Waste FAS (P)

waste is not dealing correctly. Depletion of energy resources for transporting and treating the waste. Chemical waste that leak into ground and drainage system may affect ground water, surface water and human health. Reduce the natural resources depletion. Consumed energy in transporting and recycling the waste. L M

Hazardou s waste

WEEE

Stakeholders concern

Element

Aspects

Impacts Policy

WEEE

Replacement of Old and Broken Computers and Electronics ADM Replacement of Old and Broken Computers and Electronics FBL Computers Replacement Project in David Goldman Building FAS (C)

Depletion of natural resources such as raw materials to manufacture the computers. Energy consumption for transporting the waste.

Purchasing of new computers can deplete the raw materials for manufacturing the computers. Recycle the old computers reduces depletion of natural resources. Consumed energy in transporting and recycling the waste.

Electronic Equipments Waste FES

Depletion of natural resources. Space occupied for landfill. Unpredictable impact because some WEEE may contain hazardous waste. Occupied land Land occupied and consumed
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Land

General Waste Landfill Waste NGC Refurbishment of

M M

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Significance L

Legislation

Frequency

Effect

Control

Energy

Murray Library, Priestman Building and David Goldman Building Electricity Usage of The Appliances ADM Electricity Usage FAS (P) Electricity Usage of The Appliances FAS (C) Electricity Usage NGC

energy in transporting the waste.

Depletion of energy resources and indirect CO2 emission.

Stakeholders concern

M M M M Significance M M M M M L L M M M M M M M M

Element

Aspects

Impacts Policy

Electricity Usage FES Electricity Usage of The Appliances FBL Student Accommodation Electricity Used in Offices and Libraries Fleet Vehicles Petrol used in SU Racing Gas used in MicroFlaming at The Jewellery Laboratory Gas Used in Heating System ADM Gas used in Heating System FAS (P) Gas Used in Heating System FAS (C) Gas Usage NGC Gas used in Heating System FES Gas Used in Heating System FBL Student Accommodation Gas Used in Offices and Libraries

Depletion of energy resources and indirect CO2 emission. Energy depletion Depletion of energy resources. CO2 Emission.

Legislation

Frequency

Effect

Energy

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Control -

4.0

Associated Documents and References

University of Sunderland: Environmental Aspects and Impacts Register- EMS-1A

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EMS-1B Environmental Aspects and Impacts Register (SUMMARY)

Reference Number: Number: Reference Version: Version: Date of of Issue: Issue: Date Date of of Last Last Approval: Approval: Date Approved by by (e.g. (e.g. Committee, Committee, Director, Director, etc): etc): Approved Next review review date: date: Next Author/owner: Author/owner: Faculty/Service: Faculty/Service:

EMS-1B EMS-1B 11 June 2012 June 2012 June 2012 June 2012 Director Director June 2015 June 2015 Health, Safety && Environment Team Health, Safety Environment Team Human Resources Human Resources

This Policy can be obtained from the Human Resources website, Docushare or by contacting Human Resources.

If you would like this Policy in larger print please contact Human Resources.

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