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Walking Tour #1

1. Starting point Radisson Plaza Hotel & Suites corner of West Michigan Avenue and Rose Street

HEAD NORTH ON ROSE STREET

2. National City Bank (Lawrence Chapin Building) NW corner of Rose and Water Streets Originally
home of Kalamazoo Ironworks. Completed in 1872. By 1874 the company employed 60 to 100 men
making steam engines, circle and mullay sawmills, plows, cultivators, scrapers, horsepower machines,
wood-sawing machinery, iron fences and ornamental ironwork. The iron used was pig iron which was
mined along the banks of the Kalamazoo River. The company stayed in business through the 1890s.
Since that time it has been a rescue mission, hub of the interurban, a skating rink and was a furniture
store up until 1983 when First of America Bank/National City Bank renovated the building into office
space. Architectural style: Second Empire.

3. Kalamazoo Valley Museum 230 N Rose Street Originally this was a commercial Italianate building
which housed the Wheeler-Blaney Company for several decades. In 1937, local theater mogul Peter
Schram announced that his Mayfair Theater (later renamed the Uptown ) would go into the building.
After a 20-year life, the Uptown closed. In 1967, the Schram estate sold the building which was then
leased for a number of years. In 1991, the Citys Downtown Development Authority took title and
razed the building for the Arcadia Creek Redevelopment Project. The museum was completed in
1996.

4. Arcadia Creek runs E to W from Westnedge Avenue to the Arcadia Creek Festival Place Over a
century ago, Kalamazoo buried Arcadia Creek underground. By the 1980s, the streets flooded often
because underground pipes backed up as a result of the citys growth. With the 1986 major
renovation of the downtown area, the Creek was resurrected which brought revitalization to the
downtown as well as alleviating the flooding problems. The Arcadia Creek Festival Place holds
numerous festivals throughout the year.

5. Parrish Associates (Salvation Army) 244 N Rose Erected for God and Humanity 1926 are the words
on the cornerstone of the original headquarters for the Salvation Army. It served the community until
1991. It was designed by local architect Ernest Batterson and constructed by local contractor Lather &
Sons. It became known as the Citidel which reflected the organizations military emphasis. In 1992,
renovations took place to convert this original two story building, including religious sanctuary, into a
three story office building. The discovery of a full-height window at the end of the sanctuary was
advantageous to adding light to the overall space. The offices are organized around the perimeter of
the interior, creating a town-square common meeting space in the center for the use of the various
tenants. Architectural style: English Tudor Revival

6. Rose Street Market (Masonic Temple) 303 N Rose Street This distinctive landmark was built in 1913
as the local Masonic Temple. The building was designed by Detroit architect F. H. Spier and built by
Henry Vanderhorst. Included in the building were three auditoriums, office space and ground level
shops. The building declined in the 1970s when it was sold by the Masons. It stood vacant and
threatened by demolition. In 1988 it was given a new lease on life as the Rose Street Market, which
now houses office space and restaurant/deli/banquet hall.

RIGHT ON KALAMAZOO AVENUE

7. Transportation Center (Michigan Central Railroad Station) 459 N Burdick Street The first train
through Kalamazoo was a Michigan Central in 1846. A few years later, passengers and freight could
move on as far west as Chicago. Eventually, four rail lines converged at the edge of downtown but the
Michigan Central played the major role. In 1887, the Michigan Central Railroad Station was built of red
brick and stone. It offered Kalamazoo the fashionable Romanesque architecture that Henry Hobson
Richardson had made popular in the East. Heavy arches and turrets gave it something of the
massiveness of a medieval castle. By 1906 fifty trains a day came into Kalamazoo. By WWI, thirty-five
passenger trains stopped at the station platform. Fortunately, the depot was never razed but
renovated and added canopied bus ports to reflect the original style. Architectural style:
Richardsonian Romanesque

8. Rickman House (Rickman Hotel) 345 N Burdick Street - This finely detailed white brick and stone
structure was one of the leading hotels for years since the location was just a few steps from the
Michigan Central Depot. When the railroad fortunes declined, so did those of the Rickman Hotel.
Operations ceased in the 1960s. It is now a half-way house. Architetural style: Classical Revival

9. Sarkozy Bakery 335 and 339 North Burdick Street Built in 1892, coincidentally, by baker Nicholas
Lutten. Over the years the building has housed a bakery, a drug store and a pool hall. The second
floor contained apartments. Since 1978, Sarkozy Bakery has been a Kalamazoo institution. The
second floor now contains an office, employee lounge and storage.

10. The Shakespeare Company (Speareflex Building #10) 241 East Kalamazoo Avenue Dating from
1941, this building was the office of the Shakespeare Company which manufactured fishing tackle,
automotive parts, and products used in WWII. Originally called the Shakespeare Company for the
family who started the business, it was renamed Speareflex to reflect their most popular item. Its
manufacturing building was located just to the east. In the 1970s, Speareflex relocated to South
Carolina and other subsidiary locations. Shakespeares Pub opened in July of 2003. Architectural
style: Art Deco

11. Emporium Antiques 313 E Kalamazoo See Little Brothers

12. Woodruff Building (National Storage Building) on corner of Kalamazoo Avenue at 309 E Water In 1912,
the National Storage Company building was erected. Constructed of concrete with brick curtain walls, it
provided 30,000 feet of space. Within the next decade, an addition was constructed to mimic the
originals details on the west side, roughly doubling the square footage. Starting with a horse-drawn
truck, National Storage offered garment and fur storage; climate-controlled piano storage; vault rental
for personal belongings and household goods; packing and crating shipments; and moving services. Over
the next 25 years, the company added sales of household furniture and appliances as a discount house.
It bought railroad carloads of goods at a larger discount than those offered to traditional main street
retailers. By 1938, its advertisements claimed it was The Big Warehouse Furniture Store and offered
living, dining and bedroom suites, washing machines, ranges, carpets and rugs. National Storage moved
its business to another part of town and sold the building in the mid-1970s. The building was bought in
1978 and parts are still used for storage, but it also houses offices and a commercial kitchen. In 1999, the
buildings masonry was cleaned, repaired and reappointed contributing to the areas renaissance.


TURN RIGHT ON WATER STREET


13. Little Brothers East Kalamazoo and Water Street The Little Family has a long agriculture industry
history in Kalamazoo, beginning with the feed grain business in 1904 founded by George Little. In
1912, brother George joined the business to form Little Brothers. Growth continued and in the
1920s, Georges sons, Alvin and George R. joined the business. Over the next decades, in addition to
buying and re-selling grain, Little Brothers prepared custom-mixed livestock and poultry feeds and
bred poultry. The Emporium Antiques building was the straw storage and flour and feed warehouse.
In 1965, the business was sold to Farm Bureau. This building, along with the Emporium, are the only
buildings left of the Little Brothers complex the city razed its 1864 grain elevator and numerous
other buildings in 1974. It is now under renovation.

14. Arcus Foundation (Grand Rapids and Indiana Line Station) 402 E Michigan Avenue Initially a weigh
station in a plan to run rail lines from Ft. Wayne through Grand Rapids to Mackinac and then to
connect across the Upper Peninsula with the Northern Pacific. In 1870, tracks stretched from Ft.
Wayne to Grand Rapids and a little north. The Grand Rapids and Indiana line was soon to receive its
passengers and freight in the stately Italian Revival station which now stands at the corner of Pitcher
and East Michigan. This line ran until after WWI when it was leased to the Pennsylvania Line. It was a
popular restaurant and night club in the late 1970s and early 1980s. In 2005, the structure was
renovated into office space which includes a state-of-the-art, closed-loop geothermal heat pump
system which provides heating and cooling for the building. This historic structure is complemented
by a modern glass, steel and aluminum addition. The renovation also incorporates exterior pedestrian
gathering plaza space. Architectural style: Italian Revival

RIGHT ON EAST MICHIGAN AVENUE

15. Columbia Plaza (The Columbia Hotel) 350 E Michigan Avenue Built in the 1890s and bought by
German Adam Ehrmann in the early 1900s and expanded. Ehrmann would give his hotel the flavor of
his home country and offered 150 guestrooms, a dining room, and a bar named the Beer Stube. He
staffed his hotel restaurants by German immigrants and the facilities were top notch. This was
Kalamazoos 3
rd
largest hotel. Today it houses offices. Architectural style: Georgian

16. Bimbos Pizza (The Arlington Hotel/Columbia Annex)338 E Michigan Avenue Hotelier Adam
Ehrmann connected the neighboring Columbia Hotel with the Arlington being renamed the Columbia
Annex. Architectural style: Romanesque

17. U. S. Post Office / Monaco Bay (Rosenbaum Block) 310 E Michigan When Samuel Rosenbaums
Kalamazoo Pant Company outgrew its quarters in the A. J. Doyle building, he had this six story steel
and concrete structure erected and moved into the Block in 1907. It was one of the first buildings in
Kalamazoo to exceed four stories. Adjacent to the six-story Rosenbaum Block is the U. S. Post Office
which was also built for Rosenbaums Kalamazoo Pant Company. The two structures were connected
for the company but now house both the post office and Monaco Bay with office space and condos on
the upper stories.

18. Town Wigs (Hugh McHugh Building) 276 E Michigan This three-story structure is one of the more
unique structures on East Michigan. It was built by Hugh J. McHugh, an Irish stone mason. Completed
in 1885, McHugh rented the building to J. H. Hobart Babcock. Babcock operated a pharmacy on the
ground floor with offices and living space on the upper levels. It would remain the site of various
pharmacies for nearly a century. Architectural style: Italianate with Queen Anne accents

19. Coney Island (Hall Building) 266 E Michigan Built in 1896, the Hall Building is home to Kalamazoos
oldest continuously operating restaurant, Coney Island. In 1906, the upper floors were converted to a
hotel of about 44 rooms. Glass panels found in the attic suggest the name Hotel Reed. The 1939 city
directory identifies the address as Hotel Windsor.

20. Uncle Bens Uniform Company 262-264 E Michigan This building housed a harness shop in 1885. In
later years it housed retail, a grocery, a used furniture outlet, and sporting goods store. Until 1950,
the second and third floors served as offices and residences. Architectural style: Italianate

21. Symmetry (The Jannasch-Shortt Musical Institute) 254 E Michigan This red brick gothic inspired
structure was built in 1878 by Charles Jannasch for his daughter Anna. Anna Jannasch was a skilled
musician and music teacher at one of the village ward schools and she established a musical institute
in the building. She would teach music in the building from 1878 to 1909. Please note the reminder of
its past in the musically-inspired frieze. Architectural style: Italianate

22. Vertigris (The Button Jannasch Building) 254 E Michigan This is the oldest surviving building on East
Michigan Avenue. It was built in 1869 by Charles Jannasch. He was a prominent German businessman
who came to Kalamazoo from Germany in 1850. Architectural style: Italianate

23. Aries London Grill (Fischers Meat Market) 254 E Michigan In the 1880s, this building housed
Fischers Meat Market. The 1939 City Directory lists the Lee Moy Laundry and the Celery City
Tailoring Company. Architectural style: Italianate

24. Olde Peninsula (The Humphrey Block) intersection of E Michigan and Portage In 1869, Nicholas
Baumann erected a fine three-story Italianate building. It originally housed the Peninsular restaurant
and over its long life, the building provided space for Parsons Business College, the Starkey and
Gilbert Furniture Company, Samuel Folz clothing store, the Kalamazoo Stove Company and many
others. Upholsterers, jewelers, tailors and dentists occupied its second and third floors. The building
was remodeled multiple times the last coming in mid-1990s to create the Olde Peninsula Brewpub
on the main floor with offices and apartments on the second and third floors. Architectural style:
Originally, Italianate

25. Main Street East Building (Doyle Building) 251 E Michigan early home of the Kalamazoo Pant
Company. It also had apartments on the upper floors. Today it is professional office space.

26. Haymarket Building (Edwards & Chamberlain Building) 161 E Michigan At the convergence of
Michigan Avenue and Portage Street is the Haymarket Building, so named for its proximity to the
farmers hay market of the mid-1800s. The building was completed in 1908 to house the hardware
store of Edwards & Chamberlain. Its unique angled front faade was designed to accommodate the
bend on Michigan Avenue. By the 1950s, it was home to Sears & Roebuck and since the 1980s, it has
functioned as an office building, retail and restaurant space.

27. Fifth Third Bank (American National Bank) 136 E Michigan This is the tallest commercial building in
Kalamazoo. It was designed by Chicago architects Weary and Alford and completed in 1930. Chicago
immigrant Otto Stauffenberg hand painted the lobby mural. The curved entry leads to the soaring
perception of the building, departing from classical monolithic architecture. The building has
consistently housed a variety of professional offices. Modern amenities in the original design include
the 8
th
-10
th
floors being equipped with air, gas and specialized electrical service for the medical
profession. Architectural style: Art Deco

28. Kalamazoo Building (corner of Burdick and Michigan) Kalamazoos first skyscraper was built in 1907
and was originally the Kalamazoo National Bank Building since the bank was the primary tenant. The
upper floors housed a variety of small businesses. Kalamazoo National Bank moved out in 1929 and
thereafter has been called the Kalamazoo Building. It has housed such businesses as a cigar store;
law, dental, and doctor offices; and a photography studio. There is also a privately-owned penthouse.
Its architectural style has been described as utilitarian due to its boxy design and rows of equal-sized
windows.

29. Kalamazoo County Court House 222 W Michigan Avenue Built in 1937, this is the 3rd Kalamazoo
County Court House. It now houses the 9
th
Circuit Court, 8
th
District Court, and the Prosecuting
Attorneys office. Originally, the top floor housed the county jail. The exterior is Mankato stone. The
interior features marble hallways, brass, and metal ornamentation. Surrounding the entrances are
reliefs which depict Law, Justice, and Vigilance which were wrought by Corrado Joseph Parducci. The
architect was M. C. J. Billingham. Architectural style: Art Deco.




Walking Tour #2

1. Starting point Radisson Plaza Hotel & Suites, corner of West Michigan Avenue and Rose Street

HEAD EAST ON WEST MICHIGAN AVENUE (SOUTH SIDE OF STREET)

2. Kalamazoo County Court House 222 W Michigan Avenue Built in 1937, this is the 3rd Kalamazoo
County Court House. It now houses the 9
th
Circuit Court, 8
th
District Court, and the Prosecuting
Attorneys office. Originally, the top floor housed the county jail. The exterior is Mankato stone. The
interior features marble hallways, brass, and metal ornamentation. Surrounding the entrances are
reliefs which depict Law, Justice, and Vigilance which were wrought by Corrado Joseph Parducci. The
architect was M. C. J. Billingham. Architectural style: Art Deco.

3. First Baptist Church 315 W Michigan Avenue This structure was built in 1856 and is the oldest church
in the county. The First Baptist Church was founded in 1836 and built on one of the four lots which
Titus Bronson (white founder of Kalamazoo) had designated for churches of the town. For many
years the clock built into the bell tower was known as THE town clock because it could be seen from
many outlying areas (and many town residents did not own a time piece). At one time a tall steeple
was atop the clock tower; however, after the tornado of 1980, it was considered too unsafe to remain.

HEAD SOUTH ON CHURCH STREET TO BRONSON PARK

4. Bronson Park has been a New England-style commons in the center of Kalamazoo since the 1850s.
The park has provided a meeting place for entertainment and public gatherings, a setting for
monuments significant to the community, and a shady spot for downtown residents, workers, and
visitors.

In 1856, then-attorney Abraham Lincoln, spoke at a rally for presidential candidate John Fremont. In
later years, Stephen A. Douglas, William Jennings Bryan, Theodore Roosevelt, and both John and
Robert Kennedy spoke to assembled crowds in the park.

An interesting spot at the southwest side of the park is The Mound. It is believed to be a remnant of
the mound-building Hopewell Indians who lived in the area centuries ago. The mound was first
excavated in 1832 but revealed nothing. In the early 1800s, local businessman Alexander J. Sheldon
restored the mound which had been damaged over the years. During this process, he buried a time
capsule containing coins, information about the time, and issues of the Kalamazoo Telegraph, which
he published. In the early 1950s, the mound was re-excavated. Recovered was that time capsule and
the outlines of a grave (presumably left by the Hopewell Indians) were discovered. A new time capsule
replaced the original with the intention it remain until at least 2054.
Fountains have decorated the park since 1879. The Fountain of the Pioneers has stood at the center
of the eastern half of Bronson Park since 1940. Designed by Alfonso Iannelli, it symbolizes the
removal of the Native Americans from the local area by the federal government. The sculpture has
been criticized for its theme but remains a stark reminder of local history. The reflecting pool, part of
the original Ianelli design, was adorned with bronze sculptures of Kalamazoo children to
commemorate the United States bicentennial in 1976. Local artist, Kirk Newman, used the biblical
verse When justice and mercy prevail, children may safely play as the inspiration for his sculptures.

The largest addition to the park is the band shell which was built in 1999. Many outdoor concerts are
held in the park, as well as picnics, festivals, and art shows. Thousands gather in the park for the
annual tree lighting ceremony and to ring in the new year at New Years Fest.

5. Kalamazoo Civic Theatre 329 S Park Street (corner of Park and South) Dr. William E Upjohn financed
the building of this theatre in 1932. The exterior has the look of a circus tent, emphasized by the stone
entry archways that give the impression of tent flap openings. The 500 seat theater houses lead
crystal chandeliers imported from Yugoslavia and decorative limestone detailing. Legend has it that
Dr. Upjohns daughter was determined to head to Broadway in New York City to follow her acting
dreams. To keep her close to home, Dr. Upjohn built the Civic. The architect was Weary & Alford /
TPTA. Architectural style: Art Deco.

HEAD EAST ON SOUTH STREET

6. Kalamazoo City Hall 241 W South Street This building was built in 1931 in the midst of the Great
Depression. The concrete exterior is accentuated by deeply recessed elongated windows. The
stylized relief frieze by Studio of Architectural Sculpture depicts 12 local historical events. The interior
is showcased by the lighting fixtures, elevator, clock, drinking fountain, mailboxes and travertine and
Italian marble in the lobby. Artist Otto Stauffenberg painted the murals in the commission chambers
and municipal courtroom. Architectural style: Art Deco.

7. Park Club 219 W South Street For 20 years, the Park Club (a private dining club) sat on the corner of
West South Street and Rose in the previous home of Nathaniel Balch. In the early 1920s, the club
needed a larger and more up-to-date facility. The members decided to buy the William Lawrence
home (co-founder of the Lawrence Chapin Iron Works Company) which was located adjacent to the
club. The Balch home was demolished to make way for a lawn and a side motor entrance. This
structure was built in 1889 and was one of the most imposing homes in town. Mr. Lawrence probably
spent $30,000 to $35,000 on its construction. In 1955, the lawn gave way to the much needed parking
lot. Architectural style: Queen Anne.

8. Kalamazoo Public Library 315 S Rose Street The original library structure was built in 1955. The 1998
renovation of the building preserved the original buildings physical form by sheathing the building
with a variety of materials which exhibit different colors and textures. Included is reflective glass with
purple mullions, black granite towers topped with iridescent beacons, limestone cladding the original
cylindrical form, and a copper-shingled dome. As the sun travels through the day, colored light is cast
about the interior rotunda by a glass and holographic film sculpture created by Michael Hayden. A
unique canopy structure was created over the reading area illuminated by floating halogen lights
which reveal sparkles of color reflecting from the sculpture above. In addition, the second level of the
library appears to float on large columns above a recessed ground floor. The Kalamazoo Public
Library was named Library of the Year in 2002.

9. Miller Canfield Building 277 S Rose Street This multi-story structure was completed December 31,
2007 with a budget of $25,000,000. This 153,617 square foot building includes a parking structure (two
levels below grade, two levels above grade) with four levels of office space. Prominent building
features include the glass atrium at the face of the building and use of limestone and granite to
disguise the above grade parking levels.

STAY EAST ON SOUTH STREET TO BURDICK STREET (KALAMAZOO MALL) THEN HEAD NORTH

10. Kalamazoo Mall (Burdick street between Eleanor Street to the north to Lovell Street to the south) In
1959, the City of Kalamazoo created the first downtown pedestrian mall by blocking off traffic from
three blocks of the main commercial area on Burdick Street. It was hoped that the mall would
revitalize the downtown area to compete with the movement of retail businesses to suburban malls.
Lawns, fountains, and play areas were added to enhance the pedestrian mall experience. The mall
featured all the important department and clothing stores of its era but the trend in commerce was
away from department stores and mens clothing stores. The mall now features many specialty
shops, cafes, and restaurants (and an indoor rock climbing venue). In 2000, the mall was reopened to
limited automobile traffic.

11. Kalamazoo Building (corner of Burdick and Michigan) Kalamazoos first skyscraper was built in 1907
and was originally the Kalamazoo National Bank Building since the bank was the primary tenant. The
upper floors housed a variety of small businesses. Kalamazoo National Bank moved out in 1929 and
thereafter has been called the Kalamazoo Building. It has housed such businesses as a cigar store;
law, dental, and doctor offices; and a photography studio. There is also a privately-owned penthouse.
Its architectural style has been described as utilitarian due to its boxy design and rows of equal-sized
windows.

Walking Tour #3

1. Starting point Radisson Plaza Hotel & Suites corner of West Michigan Avenue and Rose
Street

HEAD EAST ON MICHIGAN AVENUE

2. Kalamazoo Building (corner of Burdick and Michigan) Kalamazoos first skyscraper was built
in 1907 and was originally the Kalamazoo National Bank Building since the bank was the
primary tenant. The upper floors housed a variety of small businesses. Kalamazoo National
Bank moved out in 1929 and thereafter has been called the Kalamazoo Building. It has
housed such businesses as a cigar store; law, dental, and doctor offices; and a photography
studio. There is also a privately-owned penthouse. Its architectural style has been described
as utilitarian due to its boxy design and rows of equal-sized windows.

3. Kalamazoo Valley Community College Center for New Media (formerly W. S. Dewing
Building) corner of Michigan Avenue and Burdick Street Built in 1928, the Dewing Building
was an unusual structure which has a very narrow frontage along Michigan Avenue but fills
the entire block along N. Burdick from Michigan Avenue to Water Street. The block replaced
a series of rambling structures knows as Asbestos Row. Many of these old wooden
buildings dated back to Kalamazoos pioneer days and were considered eyesores.

In 2004, the Dewing Building was purchased for the Kalamazoo Valley Community College
Center for New Media and although much of the interior was renovated, the unique faade
stayed essentially in its original form. All the programs at Center for New Media are designed
to prepare students for the work within many creative industries like advertising, printing,
publishing, web design, web development, telecommunications, computer support, sales,
marketing, and multimedia production.

4. The Orpheum Building (formerly home of the Orpheum Theater) 119 E Michigan Avenue
(adjacent west of Subway) Michigan Avenue was once lined with blocks of Italianate
storefronts which only a handful survive. Among the survivors is the former home of the
Orpheum Theater. The City Directors list a movie house at this address from around 1910 to
the late 1940s. The theater is long gone but the frame which housed it still remains.

5. Subway Shop building 123 E Michigan Avenue Another Italianate building to survive now
houses the Subway Shop. The projecting 2
nd
floor bay window was added after the buildings
completion in the late 1860s. According to the 1939 City Directory, this building was home to
the Samuel Becker Shoe Store and the John Kling Tailor Shop.

6. Fifth Third Bank (American National Bank) 136 E Michigan This is the tallest commercial
building in Kalamazoo. It was designed by Chicago architects Weary and Alford and
completed in 1930. Chicago immigrant Otto Stauffenberg hand painted the lobby mural.
The curved entry leads to the soaring perception of the building, departing from classical
monolithic architecture. The building has consistently housed a variety of professional
offices. Modern amenities in the original design include the 8
th
-10
th
floors being equipped
with air, gas and specialized electrical service for the medical profession. Architectural style:
Art Deco

7. Haymarket Building (Edwards & Chamberlain Building) 161 E Michigan At the convergence
of Michigan Avenue and Portage Street is the Haymarket Building, so named for its proximity
to the farmers hay market of the mid-1800s. The building was completed in 1908 to house
the hardware store of Edwards & Chamberlain. Its unique angled front faade was designed
to accommodate the bend on Michigan Avenue. By the 1950s, it was home to Sears &
Roebuck and since the 1980s, it has functioned as an office building with retail and restaurant
space.

8. Olde Peninsula (The Humphrey Block) intersection of E Michigan and Portage In 1869,
Nicholas Baumann erected a fine three-story Italianate building. It originally housed the
Peninsular restaurant and over its long life, the building provided space for Parsons Business
College, the Starkey and Gilbert Furniture Company, Samuel Folz clothing store, the
Kalamazoo Stove Company and many others. Upholsterers, jewelers, tailors and dentists
occupied its second and third floors. The building was remodeled multiple times the last
coming in mid-1990s to create the Olde Peninsula Brewpub on the main floor with offices and
apartments on the second and third floors. Architectural style: Originally, Italianate

9. Interurban Depot 167 Portage Street Built in 1906 by the Michigan United Railways, this was
Kalamazoos first interurban station. The curve off the street into the station was so sharp
that inbound or westbound cars had to run past the station up to Michigan Avenue, way in
the street, return down Portage Street and back up into the covered passenger area. The
freight loading facilities were at the rear of the building. This location remained a station
until 1914 when operations were transferred to a new station on Water Street. Today it has
be renovated into condominiums.

10. Rave 13 Movie Theatre (intersection of South and Portage Streets) State of the art 14-
screen stadium theater with digital projection system opened in November of 2006. The
70,000 square foot theater has 14 auditoriums ranging in size from 465 to 105 seats. The
parking ramp is six stories which holds 506 parking spaces. The center also houses 22
apartments and 23,000 square feet of retail space.

11. Upjohn Building 24 at 301 John Street - Built in 1934, Building 24 was the world headquarters
for the Upjohn Company through 1961. It then was executive offices for Upjohn, Pharmacia,
and lastly Pfizer until 2005. Bronson Healthcare Group now owns the facility and spent $6.6
million to renovate the 48,000 square foot, four-level building. Many original walls, doors,
flooring and accents remain but the infrastructure, windows and internal workings were
made energy efficient and were totally updated to complement the original design work of
Detroit architect Albert Kahn.

12. Kalamazoo Gazette Building (southeast corner of Lovell and Burdick Streets) 401 S Burdick
The Kalamazoo Gazette is Kalamazoos oldest business and the second oldest newspaper in
the state. The original portion of the building was erected in 1925 and is made of Indiana
limestone. The building was expanded in 2003 with an addition to the rear of the building
which houses the MAN Roland press and a GPS tower clock.

13. Epic Center (northeast corner of Lovell and Burdick Streets) Shortly after the mall was again
opened to vehicular traffic (1997), one of the last two remaining department stores,
Jacobsons, closed. This building was built in 1959 just as the pedestrian mall was finished.
The building replaced the old Central Fire Station and was remodeled and expanded in 1974.
Soon after the 1997 closing of Jacobsons, the empty store was converted to the Epic Center.
The building houses various art-related businesses such as the Arts Council of Greater
Kalamazoo, the offices of the Gilmore Keyboard Festival, the Black Arts Center, as well as the
Nature Connection and the Epic Bistro restaurant.

14. State Theater 406 S Burdick Street Built in 1927, the State Theater was the largest (1,569
seats) and grandest theater in Kalamazoo. The Chicago architect John Eberson developed
the atmospheric style of the State Theater. The auditorium resembles a Spanish courtyard
full of statues and false facades. The ceiling is painted a dark blue and is enhanced with a
cloud machine and glittering stars. The original pipe organ is still in working order. The State
opened on July 14, 1927 to run films and host vaudeville shows and was run by the Butterfield
Theaters organization. It was sold in 1987 and is currently an entertainment venue.

15. Kalamazoo Public Library 315 S Rose Street The original library structure on this site was
built in 1955. The 1998 renovation preserved the original buildings physical form by
sheathing the building with a variety of materials which exhibit different colors and textures.
Included is reflective glass with purple mullions, black granite towers topped with iridescent
beacons, limestone cladding the original cylindrical form, and a copper-shingled dome. As
the sun travels through the day, colored light is cast about the interior rotunda by a glass and
holographic film sculpture created by Michael Hayden. A unique canopy structure was
created over the reading area illuminated by floating halogen lights which reveal sparkles of
color reflecting from the sculpture above. In addition, the second level of the library appears
to float on large columns above a recessed ground floor. The Kalamazoo Public Library was
named Library of the Year in 2002.

16. Miller Canfield Building 227 S Rose Street This multi-story structure was completed
December 31, 2007 with a budget of $25,000,000. This 153,617 square foot building includes a
parking structure (two levels below grade, two levels above grade) with four levels of office
space. Prominent building features include the glass atrium at the face of the building and
use of limestone and granite to disguise the above grade parking levels.

17. Park Club 219 W South Street For 20 years, the Park Club (a private dining club) sat on the
corner of West South Street and Rose Street in the previous home of Nathaniel Balch. In the
early 1920s, the club needed a large and more up-to-date facility. The members decided to
buy the William Lawrence home (co-founder of the Lawrence Chapin Iron Works Company)
which was located adjacent to the club. The Balch home was demolished to make way for a
lawn and a side motor entrance. This structure was built in 1889 and was one of the most
imposing homes in town. Mr. Lawrence probably spent $30,000 to $35,000 on its
construction. In 1955, the lawn gave way to the much needed parking lot. Architectural style:
Queen Anne.

18. Kalamazoo City Hall 241 W South Street This building was built in 1931 in the midst of the
Great Depression. The concrete exterior is accentuated by deeply recessed elongated
windows. The stylized relief frieze by Studio of Architectural Sculpture depicts 12 local
historical events. The interior is showcased by the lighting fixtures, elevator, clock, drinking
fountain, mailboxes and travertine and Italian marble in the lobby. Artist Otto Stauffenberg
painted the murals in the commission chambers and municipal courtroom. Architectural
style: Art Deco

19. Kalamazoo Civic Theatre 329 S Park Street (corner of Park and South) Dr. William E Upjohn
financed the building of this theatre in 1932. The exterior has the look of a circus tent,
emphasized by the stone entry archways that give the impression of tent flap openings. The
500 seat theater houses lead crystal chandeliers imported from Yugoslavia and decorative
limestone detailing. Legend has it that Dr. Upjohns daughter was determined to head to
Broadway in New York City to follow her acting dreams. To keep her close to home, Dr.
Upjohn built the Civic. The architect was Weary & Alford / TPTA. Architectural style: Art
Deco.

20. Bronson Park has been a New England-style commons in the center of Kalamazoo since the
1850s. The park has provided a meeting place for entertainment and public gatherings, a
setting for monuments significant to the community and a shady spot for downtown
residents, workers, and visitors.

In 1856, then-attorney Abraham Lincoln, spoke at a rally for presidential candidate John
Fremont. In later years, Stephen A. Douglas, William Jennings Bryan, Theodore Roosevelt,
and both John and Robert Kennedy spoke to assembled crowds in the park.

An interesting spot at the southwest side of the park is The Mound. It is believed to be a
remnant of the mound-building Hopewell Indians who lived in the area centuries ago. The
mound was first excavated in 1832 but revealed nothing. In the early 1800s, local
businessman Alexander J. Sheldon restored the mound which had been damaged over the
years. During this process, he buried a time capsule containing coins, information about the
time, and issues of the Kalamazoo Telegraph, which he published. In the early 1950s, the
mound was re-excavated. Recovered was that time capsule and the outlines of a grave
(presumably left by the Hopewell Indians) were discovered. A new time capsule replaced the
original with the intention it remain until at least 2054.

Fountains have decorated the park since 1879. The Fountain of the Pioneers has stood at
the center of the eastern half of Bronson Park since 1940. Designed by Alfonso Iannelli, it
symbolizes the removal of the Native Americans from the local area by the federal
government. The sculpture has been criticized for its theme but remains a stark reminder of
local history. The reflecting pool, part of the original Ianelli design, was adorned with bronze
sculptures of Kalamazoo children to commemorate the United States bicentennial in 1976.
Local artist, Kirk Newman, used the biblical verse When justice and mercy prevail, children
may safely play as the inspiration for his sculptures.

The largest addition to the park is the band shell which was built in 1999. Many outdoor
concerts are held in the park, as well as picnics, festivals, and art shows. Thousands gather in
the park for the annual tree lighting ceremony and to ring in the New Year during New Years
Fest.

21. Kalamazoo County Court House 222 W Michigan Avenue Built in 1937, this is the 3rd
Kalamazoo County Court House. It now houses the 9
th
Circuit Court, 8
th
District Court, and
the Prosecuting Attorneys office. Originally, the top floor housed the county jail. The
exterior is Mankato stone. The interior features marble hallways, brass, and metal
ornamentation. Surrounding the entrances are reliefs which depict Law, Justice, and
Vigilance which were wrought by Corrado Joseph Parducci. The architect was M. C. J.
Billingham. Architectural style: Art Deco.