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Sunday lessons Lesson # 16

(March 29, 2009)

Published by Erika M. Karohs, Ph. D., Ed. D. emkarohs@earthlink.net

DOMINANT VERSUS COUNTER-DOMINANT The French graphological school coined the term “dominant.” It refers to group of indicators which

1. complement each other;

2. are conspicuous by the frequency of their occurrence thus dominating the psychological profile of the writer.

An example of a group of dominant features would look like the following:

garlanded letters,

right slant,

medium to large size lower loops,

well-rounded ovals,

moderate spaces between letters and words.

Taking these indicators collectively, we identify a friendly, responsive person, extraverted, open and willing to become involved. Saudek demonstrates, however, that many handwritings exhibit an additional feature that stands out prominently but is in complete contrast to all other indicators. He says that “we are forced to consider it as a dominating contradiction, to which we assign the term of „Counter Dominant‟, and that this feature leads more quickly to the real source of

personality than any

1926, p. 143) Let us assume that in the above-mentioned writing, we also found unusually regulated left and right margins giving evidence of extraordinary overcontrol. Such over-restraint is defensive and would be an internal contradiction to the other features, which in no way oppose each other. It would unquestionably be a counter-dominant revealing to us the essence of the personality: constantly recurring restriction of extraverted tendencies and self-protectiveness resulting in frustration and tension and/or anxiety.

examination

by

circuitous methods.” (The Psychology of Writing,

Literature: Erika M. Karohs, “Encyclopedia for Handwriting Analysts, Pebble Beach, 1986.

DOMINATING

The writer exercises control over others through the force of his will. Skilled at influencing others, he usually gets them to do things his way. The writer‟s place is in front and he does not like working under others. Happier giving orders than taking them, he has the ability to command and organize. Authority comes easily to him and he excels in delegating responsibilities. As far as he is concerned he is in charge and has the final say. He is able to handle groups of people with an authority that others seldom think to question. Being able to influence others to do as he wants them without causing resentment makes him a more effective leader. Progress is usually guaranteed because the writer has a talent for marshalling all available forces into one combined effort. If necessary, he does not mind pitching in and doing some of the labor himself. Likewise, he expects others do their job without excuses. The writer prefers that affairs be in his hands rather than anybody else‟s. If he cannot be boss, he wants at least an important position in the group. He will take orders while he deems it necessary but in reality, he considers his job an important stepping stone in his drive to take over and be in charge. The thought never leaves his mind for an instant. It is unlikely that the writer will change his position easily and he rarely backs down from conflict. Proud of his drive and his ability to work hard, he tries harder than is needed, most of the time. He pushes action rather than letting things unfold. A go-getter, he knows what he wants and will go all out to get it done. All of his drives are focused on a specific goal and nothing matters but getting the job done. Rarely thinking his way around difficulties, he pushes against and through obstacles with all the energy at his command. He is inclined to force issues and people. And if he feels he is not getting through, he steps up the pressure. More demanding than accommodating, it is difficult for him to cooperate. Efficient and self-directed, the writer is well suited for the business world. Others are bound to feel the effect of his forceful personality. He knows how to get what he wants and has the drive to make things pay off. Unwilling to be ordered around, he has the ability to direct, control and steer. In a relationship the quickest way to lose him is to make the first advance. He must be a leader here as everywhere else. The writer would be well qualified for a position in management where dynamic force is needed. He would be a natural in high pressure sales, law enforcement, crime prevention, disaster crews, or the military.

Graphic indicator for “dominating:” Downslanted t-bars that retain pressure (not thinning out).

Downslanted t-bars that retain pressure (not thinning out). Literature: Erika Karohs, Comprehensive Descriptions for

Literature:

Erika Karohs, Comprehensive Descriptions for 100+ Personality Traits.

DOMINEERING (A domineering attitude is a defense against inner feelings of inadequacy.)

The writer lacks true leadership ability. Frustrated by his inability to put his plans into action, he compensates with a domineering attitude. Unable to direct others effectively, he tries to control people and situations through bossiness. He often makes immoderate requests. Whether in a conversation or on the job, he usually makes excessive demands on others‟ time and resources. He expects his own wishes to be granted and his orders obeyed, without question and as quickly as possible. Pushy and demanding of others, he expects them to jump to do his bidding immediately. Selfish and inconsiderate, the writer tends to have trouble getting others to cooperate. He does not seem to know how to be d tactful even when he would like to be. His get- someone-else-to-do-it approach always involves a mixture of aggression and hostility. To gain his own ends, the writer uses different strategies. He smiles, ingratiates and flatters others into serving him or granting him special privileges. If this method fails, he may nag, whimper or whine until they do his bidding. He domineers with a “poor me” attitude and he is not above feigning sickness to elicit sympathy. He fails to realize that his complaints and his whining get on everybody‟s nerves. Basically, the writer wants love, comfort and companionship. Yet his domineering demeanor gets him only frustration and rebuff. Professionally and personally, the writer tries to control other people‟s lives. But after gaining another‟s affection, he ruins things by being domineering and bossy. He wants to make decisions for those with whom he is involved and he wants them to do things his way. Thinking he knows what is best for everyone, he tries to reform others “for their own good,” but in reality, he only creates resentment. Rather than drawing others out, the writer states his views. What he says sounds like judgment and he offends others by his tone. Critical and demanding, he tells others what to do. He may do this under the guise of showing others better ways of doing things, even though they manage in ways that better suit their traits. With his instructions usually sounding abrupt and lacking in courtesy, he is especially curt when he is irritated or upset. The writer creates much ill will with his attempt to run other people‟s lives. The effect on other people is that they become exasperated. While his domineering approach may produce outward conformity, it also gives rise to rankling resentment. It makes others all the more eager to get away from the domineering individual.

Graphic indicator for “domineering”:

Downslanted t-bars that are fading or thinning out.

Literature: Erika Karohs, Comprehensive Descriptions for 100+ Personality Traits. DOUBLE CURVES We have to thank

Literature:

Erika Karohs, Comprehensive Descriptions for 100+ Personality Traits.

DOUBLE CURVES We have to thank Margarete Ivanovic for the discovery and interpretation of double curves. She had an unequaled perception of uncommon graphic indicators (she also discovered the “air stroke” or “immaterial stroke”). Double curves can provide much insight about a personality. Unfortunately, these significant indicators are widely neglected because (a) not much is written about them in the more popular graphological works and (b) recognizing them takes a trained eye and thorough knowledge of the graphological meaning of the various configurations. Once graphologists have familiarized themselves with these signs, however, they will realize how much additional information they can glean from them for a much more thorough analysis.

Double curves are delicately curved lines consisting of either

one convex and once concave portion

one concave and one convex portion

two concave portions or

two convex portions

The direction can be vertical, horizontal, leftward, or rightward.

Important! The double curve has to be an individual addition to a letter. It cannot be part of a copybook letter formation; for instance, the letters S or L are not comprised of double curves.

Double curves of creativity and music The musical and the creative curves consist of one smaller convex and a larger concave curve.

consist of one smaller convex and a larger concave curve. The musical and creative curves are

The musical and creative curves are similar, except that in the creative curve pressure is on the larger curve, in the musical curve, pressure is on the smaller curve.

creative curve pressure is on the larger curve, in the musical curve, pressure is on the

creative

creative curve pressure is on the larger curve, in the musical curve, pressure is on the

musical

Double curve of creativity The writer has the ability to create without precedent. His mind functions inventively, reaching conclusions that are not the norm. He has an original approach to things and puts his personal stamp on whatever he does. He adds creative thinking to his work. His creativity may be expressed in small ways or on a larger scale. His need for self- expression may find an outlet in the creative field, and he is probably gifted in poetry.

in the creative field, and he is probably gifted in poetry. Double curve of music Musical

Double curve of music Musical aptitude is indicated by this formation. If they writer does not have musical talent him/herself, he will show appreciation for the musical field.

he will show appreciation for the musical field. Double curve of insincerity According to Magdalene

Double curve of insincerity According to Magdalene Ivanovic, the double curve of insincerity consists of two unrelated curves.

curve of insincerity consists of two unrelated curves . These formations are additions to the letter

These formations are additions to the letter formations. They are not part of the actual letters themselves. While ideally these signs should be supported by additional evidence in the writing they are strong evidence of insincerity by themselves.

they are strong evidence of insincerity by themselves. The writer is an individual who intentionally deceives

The writer is an individual who intentionally deceives and misleads people with whom he deals. He deliberately tries to obscure his real intent from others. He hides and misrepresents and he may lie and evade the truth. There exists a real risk in dealing with him. His leading motivation is for personal advantages at others' expense.

Double curve of pretense

advantages at others' expense. Double curve of pretense The double curve of pretense also consists of

The double curve of pretense also consists of two unrelated curves. Once graphologists are aware of this indicator, they will be surprised at its frequency in handwriting. Double curves of pretense can occur in initial or final position. The eight different possible positions of this formation are:

Basically, the writer feels less than others around him. To counteract this, he often name-

Basically, the writer feels less than others around him. To counteract this, he often name- drops, or boasts. His basic fear is that someone would see through the facade and detect his inner insecurities. He does not want anyone to discover how he truly feels about himself. In an effort to hide his inferiority he conceals the feelings of inner helplessness. He puts up a false front to keep others from seeing him as he really is.

false front to keep others from seeing him as he really is. The writer gives himself

The writer gives himself an air of importance he does not possess and makes a frantic attempt to project an appearance of fortitude. Because he feels inadequate, he puts on a show of extra determination for all to see. He uses this form of pretense to handle threatening situations without losing face.

to handle threatening situations without losing face. He may try to intimidate with idle warnings that

He may try to intimidate with idle warnings that he cannot follow up on. In order to gain advantages for himself, he may be saying one thing and doing another. He may be using excuses or alibis to avoid liability. In any case, he cannot be counted on to act in good faith. Others have to take everything that is said with a grain of salt.

Double curves of tact Double curves of tact consist of two even-sized related curves.

curves of tact consist of two even-sized related curves. Double curves of tact can occur in

Double curves of tact can occur in initial or final position in letters or words.

can occur in initial or final position in letters or words. The writer possesses an instinctive

The writer possesses an instinctive mastery of the art of diplomacy. He has an intuitive sensitiveness for the feelings of others, the skill of not hearing certain things that could cause others embarrassment. At all times, he is tactful in dealing with people. He does exactly what is suitable and possesses the skill of saying the proper thing to avoid giving

offense. He conserves energy by avoiding friction during social encounters and he makes situations smooth and comfortable for all involved. The writer reflects before speaking and expresses himself in such a way as to decrease apparent threat. He says and does what lessens friction and prevents others from losing face. He can appease opposing sides and settle disagreements on the job. He is skilled at smoothing things over between irate customers in a store, for example, or between two workers who are at odds. He gets along with both superiors and peers. He shares his ideas without upsetting those whose support he needs. This is valuable were feelings and egos are involved. As a perfect host, he tries to seem interested in the conversation of his guests even if the topic does not captivate him at all. The writer would make a natural arbitrator. Tact would be a valuable quality in social service work or sales. He could be a nurse, doctor, teacher, or funeral parlor employee.

Literature:

Erika M. Karohs, Encyclopedia for Handwriting Analyts, Pebble Beach, CA. 1986.

Copyright (c) 1999 2009 Erika M. Karohs