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paint"? Jose may say, "Paint is in the art area".

"That is right, I would like you to


take the blue paint back over to the art area please".
Jose, since you painted the blocks blue, you will need to wash the blocks in the
sink and then find another area of the room to play in. The logical consequence
of painting the blocks is that Jose needs to be responsible and clean the blocks.
Feeney et.al., states that "such consequences are consistent with values of justice
and responsibility" (Feeney, et.al. , 2009, pg. 307).
After Jose has returned the paint and washed the blocks, I could redirect his
energy by saying, "Jose I can see that you really enjoyed painting the blocks blue.
Maybe you could find a cardboard box in the art area and paint it blue so that you
have a blue block". If Jose agrees, we would go into the art area and look for a
cardboard box that he could turn into his blue block. This is allowing him to
focus his energy into an activity that is similar to the one he was doing but is not
destructive of the materials and keeps the paint in the art area where it belongs.
When Jose is in the art area painting his blue block I will say, "I see that you are
carefully painting the cardboard box so that you will have a blue block". Our
textbook states that when you use these statements, you are showing the children
that you see what they are doing (Feeney et.al. , 2009, pg. ~
Short term goals:
One short term goal for Jose would be to use the aint and the to s carefull . Jose
will in the short term future be able to self-regulate his behavior and be able to
keep the paint in the art area and know that the wooden blocks in the block area
are not for painting.
Another short term goal for Jose is-supportingJ1is-ere1itiity. By acknowledging
Jose' s creativity and giving him a safe outlet to pursue his project, he will realize
that his ideas are valued and that he will be able to be.-GFeative in the classroom.
Long term goals:
One long term goal that my approach is supporting is that Jose is building_ an
inner control of his behavior. In the future Jose will be able to control the desire
to take the paint out of the art area and paint the wooden blocks. He will be able
to realize that there may be another way to do accomplish what he wants.
Another long term goal that I think I am supporting is promoting a positive sense
of self. Through the R & R statements, I am helping Jose build strength and
confidence in himself and his decision making. Feeney et.al. , writes, "This sense
of self supports their ability to accurately identify their own S9ngths and to
accept their challenges and limitations" (Feeney, et.al. , ~ pg. 283).
Scenario 4:
Brenda loves playing in the house area. She always wants to pretend that she is the
baby and that Desiree is the mommy. They play together for long periods of time
without conflict. However, when another child tries to enter the play Brenda
becomes frustrated and angry, sometimes yelling at the other child. Today, when
Katie wanted to join in their play, she grabbed up all the dress up clothes and said,
"No one else can play in our family. It's just the mommy and the baby!!? How
would you respond?
The first guidance technique that I would use for this situation is the "I" message.
I believe that it is important to show Brenda my expectations of her without
blaming her. She is not misbehaving rather the behavior is mistaken. Feeney
et.al. , write, "Mistaken behavior, on the other hand, suggests that children are
learning to behave acceptably and are therefore subject to making
mistakes"(Feeney, et.al., 2009, pg. 305).
The second guidance tool that I will use in this situatiQE is conflict resolution.
While this scenario does not appear to be a conflict at first is the start of conflict
\ J\ within the group of children in the area. As a teacher, I want to be careful to
r:P: ..[ watch first and intervene only when necessary. Feeney, et.al. write, "Although it
\J \ is tempting to step in to solve problems for them, this intervention does not help
them learn to be problem solvers" (Feeney, et.al, 2009, pg. 293).
The third approach that I would use in this situation is to give Brenda and the
other children some choices. I would ask the children if they know of any ways
to solve the conflict. I would hope that Brenda would be able to come up with a
compromise that would help the children to enjoy their play experience. Children
need a couple of real choices so that they can problem solve and come up with an
acceptable solution.
If the situation could not be handled and Brenda still did not want to allow other
children to play with her or in the dramatic play area near her, then I would have
her do a time-in. It is my hope that I would not need to use this guidance tool
because my goal for Brenda would be to resolve the conflict peacefully so that all
the children involved were satisfied with the solution. Time-in is a last resort.
According to our lecture notes, time-in is having the child sit next to you and not
necessarily having to talk but they are not isolated from others. (Principals and
Practices lecture notes, 2013).
Detailed Description:
As I approach the children, I want to make sure that I let Brenda know my
expectations of her without placing blame on her. I would say, "I am
J,. there is so much yelling on in the dramatic play area. It is
"\ _,l - for the other children to concentrate on their play activities.
Brenda can you tell me how many children are allowed to play in the dramatic
_ \

play area at one time?'' Brenda may say, "Four people in this play area but I don't
cfJ' \ ,.,.) ,._ want to play with Katie" "I see Brenda but Katie's feeling got hurt, how do you
u.F lf\'f::. v think we can help her feel better?"
v01J (j To possibly get the children started in conflict resolution, I could say "How do
v.f}-- you girls think that the problem can be solved?" "Brenda, what do you think will
....,- _ '\V) . help Katie feel better?" Desiree may say "Urn, Katie can play With us and be the
o:J?' daddy or the sister." Katie may say that she wants to be the sister. Brenda may
say, "I don' t want to play with Katie, I don't want a sister." I want to sit back and
listen as long as possible before I intervene. I will only intervene and go on to the
next approach if the girls cannot come up with a solution or if the child' s physical
or emotional safety is in danger.
Ifthe children cannot come up with solutions on their own, I can step in briefly
and give them a couple of choices. I could say, "What happens if Katie is the
babysitter or the next door neighbor who comes over to visit?" Brenda would it
be alright is Katie asked another friend to come in to the dramatic play area and
play next to you?" At this point I would also say, "Do any of you girls have any
ideas?" Sometimes you can get children to generate solutions by giving them a
couple of ideas.
Finally if Brenda could not accept_@y reasonable solution and did not want Katie
to be anywhere near her and Desiree, I woUld say, "Brenda I think maybe you
need to come sit next to me. I think that you need to take a little break from the
dramatic play area. " Feeney et.al., writes, "providing a safe comfortable place for
a child to regain composure can be helpful. Different from time-out, offering a
place for calm reflection and "cooling off'' can be an help
children gain self-control" (Feeney et.al. , 2009, pg. 308)
Short term goals:
One short term goal for Brenda would be is to be able to "respect and show care
for the feelings and rights of others and of themselves" (Feeney et.al. , 2009, pg.
279). I believe that by using the that I have chosen will help
promote this goal for Brenda.
Another short term goal that I believe my approach will foster Brenda's social
skills as well as using the materials in the gpunatic play area in a way that is
acceptable and includes others. ___/'
Long term goals:
One long term goal that I believe my approach will help Brenda is to foster the
development of social and onal intelli ence. Brenda is just beginning to
understan and build on her own social and emotional control. According to our
textbook, effective guidance practices promote the child' s social and emotional
growth competence by supporting the child' s growing abilities to identify their
feelings and the feelings of others, demonstrate care and concern for other people,
develop warm and caring friendships and relationships with others, and to handle
situations calmly and in a constructive way (feeney, et.al. , 2009, pg. 280).
Another long term goal that I believe my approach is supporting is helping
Brenda to develop inner self control. By gtvmg Brenda the chance to resolve the
issue through conflict resolution, choices and a possible time-in, she is learning to
self-regulate her behavior. In future conflicts, she will be able to regulate her
behavior in a way that is acceptable.
/
Another long term goal that I believe that my approach is supporting is , ....._0\
developing the ability an effective member of the community. 'V D
"Children are not born with the ability to work cooperatively with others"
(Feeney, et.al., 2009, pg. 283). Through conflict resolution, Brenda is learning to
work cooperatively within a group setting which in turn will help her to b e c ~ e
an effective member of the community as she grows into an adult. ~
Scenario 5:
3 year-old Stephen has trouble sitting at circle time. If he sits near you he talks out
constantly and pulls on whatever is in your band. If be sits across the circle from
you be pushes the other children and tries to sit on their space, or rolls out into the
middle of the circle. How would you respond?
The first guidance tool that I would use in this situation would be the "I"
statement. I would want to address the problem without blaming Stephen.
Stephen seems to have a short attention span and does not handle large group time
well.


The second guidance tool that I would use in this situation would be choices .
Stephen appears to not be ready for large group time. Feeney et.al. writes, "
Young children who are not ready for group experiences will tell you by
wiggling, getting up, lying down, or walking away. These behaviors give you
valuable feedback-something (the activity or the timing) is not appropriate to their
needs (Feeney et.al., 2009, pg. 303).
The third guidance tool that I would use in this situatipn the R & R statements to
reinforce positive behavior from Stephen. I want him to see that I am paying
attention to what he is doing and that his needs and activities are just as important
as the other children.
Detailed Description:
When in the large group time, I would say "it is really hard for the group to listen
to the story when there is so much noise and moving around." Stephen can you
r tell me how what we are doing in circle today?" Maybe Stephen just needs to be
Y able to communicate an idea for circle time and by asking him about circle time
QO\ ~ r that may open up an appropriate way for Stephen to engage in large group time.
\ He might say, "Well I want to talk about trucks, big red ones."
~ The second tool that I would use in this situatiorW.s_ choicesl If the rest of the
children are enjoying group time and Stephen is the only one that is not
developmentally ready for large group time, I can offer him a couple of choices
for him to do quietly while the other children have group time. Feeney et.al.
Writes, "Sometimes one or two children have difficulty while the rest enjoy gro
time. If so, you can provide an alternative activity for these children" (Feeney
et.al. 2009, pg. 303). I would say "Stephen would you like to go into the art area
and create a drawing or would you like to go over to the quiet area and read a
book to yourself while the other children have group time?'' Stephen may come
up with an acceptable choice of his own such as "can I do a puzzle at the table
over there?"
With the third guidance tool, I would be using R & R statements to support
Stephen such as saying, "Stephen I see that you put that puzzle together quickly
and that is a tricky puzzle." I want to show Stephen that I notice and value his
activity as well as picking a quiet activity to respect the other children's needs that
were being met during large group time. I do not want to praise Stephen but
rather acknowledge what he is doing and let him know that his needs are valued
just as much as the other children. "When you use these statements frequently,
children are aware that you value their actions and interests. Regular use of R & R
statements also help ch_ildren make sense of what they are experiencing" (Feeney
et.al. 2009, pg. 288Y

Short term goals:
A short term goal that I believe my approach is supporting is for Stephen to learn
to show res ect for the ri ts and feelings of his classmates as well as his own
(Feeney, et.al. 2009, pg. 279). Stephen is learning that the other children like
group time and that even though he is not ready for large group time, he needs to
respect the needs of his classmates. By giving Stephen the choice of quiet
activities, he is learning that his feelings and needs are being respected as well.
Another short term goal that my approach is supporting is fostering Stephen's
independence. Children need to know that their independence and their different
needs are valued just the same as other children amnhat he was not misbehaving in
circle time rather his behavior was misguided.
Long term goals:
A long term goal that I believe my approach is supporting is helping Stephen to
develop a positive sense of self. Feeney writes "As children grow and have
experiences wtfu others, they develop a set of beliefs about who they are based on
the perceptions ofhow others see them" (Feeney, et.al. 2009, pg. 281). By
allowing Stephen the choice of quiet activities, he is not in group time disrupting
the other children' s enjoyment of the group activity, this helps the other children
see Stephen as a peer rather than a child who is disruptive, which can lead to
negative peer interactions.
Another long term goal that I believe my approach is supporting is helping
Stephen to develop social and emotional intelligence. Through the "I" statement
approach, the choices and the R & R statements Stephen is learning that other
children' s feelings are just as important as his and that he can cooperate within the
classroom dynamic. He is learning to make good choices and resolve conflicts
successfully and in turn make friends by respecting their needs and activities
(Feeney et.al. 2009, pg. 280).
Another long term goal that is being supported by my approach is that Stephen is
learning to build inner self control. By making the choice to do a quiet activity on
his own, he is learning to self-regulate and not be disruptive to the
rest of the children during large group time.
In conclusion, there are many guidance techniques that can be used when a teacher
encounters different difficult behavior situations with children. When selecting tools

to use, I want to be able to help foster the child' s positive short term and long term
goals while not blaming the child for their behavior. Children do not misbehave on
purpose rather their behavior is mistaken behavior and children will sometimes make
mistakes. As they make mistakes, teachers guide their behavior to teach children
acceptable ways to gain self-control and to self-regulate their behavior. Children are
not born with this ability; rather adults are guiding children in positive
promote the short term and long tern goals for children' s behavior.
Reference Page
Feeney, Moravcik & Nolte .. (2013). Who Am I in the Lives of Children? Upper Saddle
River, New Jersey: Pearson Education, Inc.
VVC Child Development lecture handout. (2013).
CHDV 110
Grading Rubric for Guidance Scenarios
Examine a variety ofguidance and interaction strategies to increase children's social competence and promote a caring classroom
community.
student, demonstrating a
guidance (teaching)
approach versus a
punishment approach.
1
___J!, willingness to teach the child social
skills instead of punishing the child,
understanding that often it is "mistaken"
1
versus "misbehavior "that often
mistaken" behavior versus
(Points Possible: 10) { U
Points received:
References:
The degree to which the
student integrates textbook
material in each section of
the response.
(Points Possible: 5) /'
Score on Rubric
Quality of writing. The
degree to which the essay is
proofread and edited for
spelling, grammar,
fom1atting, and correct in-
text citations. A reference
(works cited) page is
provided.
(Points Possible: 5)
Points Received:
r
Total Possible Points: 50
and/or outside sources are
I referenced 4 or 5 times in each scenario.
rS-"4
The paper is proofread and edited for
formatting, and
correct in-text citations. A reference
(works cited) page is provided.

Points R<Oeiv{!/ )
a willingness to teach the child
social skills instead of punishing the
child,
and understanding that often it is
"mistaken" behavior versus
"misbehavior"
There may be one or two instances
where the student takes a punitive
approach. 7
The textbook and/or outside sources are
referenced 3-4 times in each scenario.
This material may not always be clearly
related to the scenario
3
There are some spelling, grammar, and
formatting mistakes. Proper in-text
citations may be missing along with a
reference (works cited) page
' '
social skills instead of punishing
the child,
and understanding that often it is
"mistaken" behavior versus
"misbehavior"
It is clear through most of the dialogue
that the student is punishing the child
instead of viewing these scenarios as
opportunities to teach social skills. 6-00
Little or no textbook material or outside
sources are included in each scenario.
2-0
There are numerous spelling and
gran1D1atical errors. Student does not
include in-text citations or a reference
page.
s
CHDV 110
Grading Rubric for Guidance Scenarios
Examine a variety of guidance and interaction strategies to increase children's social competence and promote a caring classroom
community
Category
Choice of Guidance
Strategy:
The appropriateness of the
Meets Expectations
Excellent work in this category, revisions
for your Professional Portfolio will
consist of adding information to
demonstrate your continued growth in
knowledge( Score 4 or 5)
The student chooses an appropriate
for addressing each scenario at
least 4 out of 5 times. The rational for
guidance strategy chosen the particular guidance strategy
and the degree to which the s clearly articulated.
student articulates the 10-8
rational for choosing the
guidance strategy.
10) l Q
Pomts rece1ved: ----'-'--
Implementation of
Guidance Strategy:
The degree to which the
student clearly understands
how to implement the
guidance strategy selected.
The student clearly and consistently (at
least 4 out of 5 scenarios) demonstrates
knowledge ofhow to implement strategy.
the verbiage used by the
teacher and the children, accounting for
the various age-appropriate ways the
child(ren) might respond to the teacher's
(Points Possible: 20) -}-guidance.
I 20-16
Points received:
Goals for Guidance
The degree to which the
student demonstrates
knowledge of both the short
term and long term goals for
supporting social
development. This includes
the overall tone of the
Student clearly identifies both short and
long term goals for each encounter (in at
least 4 of the 5 scenarios).
The tone of the encounter along with the
verbiage used demonstrates the
following:
a philosophy of respect,
Minor Revisions Needed
Good work in this category, but does not
show the depth that we are looking for.
You will need to revise this assignment
prior to submitting it in your
Professional Portfolio (Score 3)
The student chooses an appropriate
strategy for addressing each scenario at
least 3 out of 5 times. The rational for
choosing the particular guidance strategy
is articulated, but may lack some clarity.
7
The student demonstrates knowledge of
how to implement the various guidance
strategies in at least 3 of the scenarios.
Student includes the verbiage used by
the teacher and the children, but may
not account for the various ways the
child(ren) might respond to the teacher' s
guidance.
15-13
Student correctly identifies both short
and long term goals for each encounter
(in at least 3 scenarios).
The tone of the encounter along with the
verbiage used might demonstrate one or
more of the following:
a philosophy of respect,
Major Revisions Needed
Poor work in this category. You will
need to make substantial revisions to
this essay in this area before
resubmitting it in your Professional
Portfolio. (Score: 1-2)
The student chooses an appropriate
strategy for addressing scenario in less
than 3 of the scenarios. The rational
for choosing the particular guidance
strategy is missing or does not make
sense.
6-0
The student demonstrates knowledge of
how to implement the various guidance
strategies in only 1 or 2 of the
scenarios. Student might only include
the teacher's words or if the children's
responses are included, the responses
may not be age-appropriate (i.e.,
verbiage that would be more likely
coming from an elementary age child).
Student does not account for the
various ways the child(ren) might
respond to the guidance.
Student correctly identifies both short
and long term goals in only 1 and 2
scenarios.
The tone of the encounter along with
the verbiage does not demonstrate:
a philosophy of respect,
a willingness to teach the child