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VOICE

OF
BUDDHISM
1
9
6
4
JULY
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(rs+s)
%MW,
Wirh the Compliments
From
JEWELS AND DIAMOND MERCHANTS
KUALA LUMPUR
ASSOCIATE COMPANY:
B. P. DE SILVA
AND PENANG.
LTD.
SINGAPORE
VOIBE OF BUDDHISM
Reg. No. KDN 974
I
Vol. 1 No. 2
euarrerly
July 1964
Published by
The Buddhist Missionary Society, Jalan Berhala, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
BUDDHISM
CAN HELP
BUILD NATION
(A
speech delivered by Hon. Mr. Tan Siew Sin,
t!9 Minjlter of Finance on Vesak Day at the
Cheng Hoon Teng Temple, Malacca)'.
A living faith which can exert a real influence
"Buddhists in this cgunjry. are more concemed with the external trappings
of their religion than with. its basic teachings and its etemal values',.
"We have concentrated on form rather than on substance. This is not what
it should be".
Buddhism, he_ pointed
out, preached
the very antithesis of materialism, but the
chinese were probably
one of the most materiaristic races in the world.
If Buddha had taught anylhing,_ it was that devotion to an impersonal cause
or an impersonal ideal transcerided
-devotion
to woddly possessions.
Devotion
"This
fundamental teaching
of his could have tremendous
relevance in the con-
telt
9{
-a
4ilura!-
gociety^ like ours,- living.in the second half of trre tweniieth ;rtrty,
of which the Chinese form a substantial and not unimportant segment," fre saii.
"Devotion to an impersonal cause can be a trernendous asset in our task of
nation-building".
o'If
we" the Malaysian Chinese in this land of promise, can absorb this part
of
his-tlaching to the full we could in this cou_ntry,_make Buddhism not only iliuirg
faith but also in the process contribute a worthy
-
share to the nation to wtrictr wE
have the honour to belong."
.
"lf I
Tay
say so in all humility, because I am not a teacher of
,the
religion,
nor do
I
urEr-" to be on^e, rhe a_ctual practice of Buddhism today is a rar cry ?rom
whatthisnoblescionofanoblefamilytriedtoinculcatein'us'''
Mr. Tan added that this was why he had advocated the establishment of a
Buddhist Council for the cgqnt^ry, with- the oqjgct of making Buddhism u huiog
faith which could exert a real influence on the diily lives and ionduct of those whfi
professed
it.
'=T
RETIGIOUS HAMilONY
(Speech by Mr. Lee Kuqn Yew,
Prime Minister of Singapore, at the
Mass Meeting ctf Vesak Celebrqtions at
Victoria
Memorial Hatrl on 25th May 1964)
This is the first major religious celebr-
ation which it has been my honour to take
part in since Malaysia. I am happy, to
say that in the nine months since Malaysia,
religious tolerance and inter-r"eligious har-
mony has continued and kept all our
'
different communities happy.
It is this broad tolerance which will
ensure our survival as multi-racial, multi-
religio,us society. There ate too many
examples around us in Asia to show what
happens when politics and religion are mixed
up. When religion makes a bid for secular
power through political parties or move-
ments, then religious intolerance sets in.
The end result is a great deal of strife and
unhappiness for the whole country.
There are as many religions in Malaysia
as there ate difierent races who have
migrated here, and the different missionary
societies have done valuable work here.
All of them contribute to the spiritual needs
of the population. They give a set of
moral values more or less of universal
application. ,All the great religions have
certain comrnon virtues which they inculcate
into their followers
-
humanity, humility,
righteousness and a social conscience.
Even in the oldest Communist country in
the world, religion still continues to play
its role, eloquent testimony of man's neeil
for moral and spiritual solace in tirnes of
stress and strain. It is when a society
becomes more and more souless that the
doctor and the tranquilliser are relied upon
for the mental and spiritual health of the
society.
It is not without reason that despite
the divergent political and religio,us back-
grounds of the Ministers who constitute
the Central Govemment and the Singapore
Goveinment they are' completely ugtJed on
the principle of freedom of worship. It
not only upholds a basic human right but it
aiso helps to prevent a vacuum in men's
mind which the Communist doctrines will
expolit.
But this policy can oly succeed if we
all remain conscious of our dutv to the
over-riding principle
of intei-religious
tolerance. Every religion should be allowed
to practise its faith and propagate its ideals.
But no one religion should in the exercise
of its faith, upset the susceptibilities and
sensitivities of the followers of another.
Other"wise the value of having so many
roligions working amongst our po,pulation
in keeping out godless philosophy that
leads to trouble will be lost in lhe even
greater trouble that could follow a conflict
between fervent and fanatical followers of
religions making a bid for secular power
in the political
arena.
The Buddhist religion is renowned for
the qualities
of kindliness and tolerance
that it preaches. On this birthday of Lord
Buddha, the epitome of that kindliness, the
serence and tranquil approach to life and
its proiblems, I take this opportunity to
wish all its followers spiritual fulfilment in
a woild of constant tension in which we
live. The work of our religious leaders
can be of as great a value as that of the
Government. Whilst it is the dutv of the
Government to look after the
'physical
needs and health of the population, it needs
the help of religious leaders to look after
the spiritual health o'f the nation. If we
do our respetive duties well, we shall always
have a wellbalanced and healthy society.
It is on this note that I extend my
felicitations to all Buddhists on this
auspicious occasion of Vesak.
I
SIGNIFICANCE OF BUDDHISM IN
THE MORDEN WORLD
By Rev. Kodo Matsunami (
Hawcii)
In our morden v5a, we seem to
acquire almost everything we want if we
work and earn money. Money has certainly
brought us modern conveniences which
shorten our working hours and we find
Ieisures in our daily life.
However, we realise at the same time
that those modern conveniences do not
necessarily solve our life problems. An
interesting number of people are suffering
from their material or mental burdens
which shake their very foundation of being.
Even for us, our life is always threatened
by the endless flow of insecurity and fear.
The rnan whom we met yesterday might
have an accident and die to-day. Tomorrorv
there might be another war which would
kill our lives.
The possession of an automobile or a
house is no compensation for inner in-
security and fear. When we mme to
realise that materials are necessary but not
a prior means to enrich our lives, we find
only in religion that which enables us to
find the inner security and the meaning
of life.
There are many forms of reiigion
around us which seim to appeal to
"our
qind.
.
However, they only approach us
indirectly. Some emphasize so-cial service
almost to the point of forgetting other as-
pects of religious life, and some others
emphasize routine participation in cere-
monie$ and acceptance of dogma of the
authority of the church. Their theological
docl.rines regarding supernatural powers
lound in healing or miracles are nol easily
related to our daily life. Therefore, they
become increasingly difficult to understand
and practise.
Those unsatisfied and vet earnest
people seeking some real solution to the
many problems of their troubled lives, some
solution that will satisfy both their intellect
and sentiment, and not finding it in either
of the traditional religions, leave religion
entirely, hoping to find the answer in the
wodds of pleassure.
Ilowever, they fail
to find the meaning of life in them ancl
become nihilistic
or mentally distorted so
that they can no longer face their life
problems objwtively.
We must be aware that the Sabbath
was made for man, not man for the
Sabbath. We must become masters, not
slaves, of conventional ways of the life
which are always depriving us.
.In
this
sense, Buddhism stands out in growing
relief.
Buddhism is a world retrigion and a
ryay
of trife which was founded by
Gautama the Buddha, about 2500 years
ago. What he revealed was the unique
teaching which had not been manifesfed
by any sage in this world. He himself
having had a bitter experience on life
problems and through his own struggles.
found the way how to overcome tliern.
This way is called the Oneness of life which
has no exact parallel in Western religions.
Gautama Buddha deenlv oursued that
all sentient beings have in dommon the
desire to live and realise themselves in
thqir own ways. All cling to existence and
are able to survive only at the expe,nse of
other life. Therefore, he finally
-believed
that the only way we can serve without
hurting each other is in only experiencing
the bisic identity of all life'tnoigtr Uei"E
extinct from it.
Our world is nothing but the manifest-
ation of the Oneness of life where all
beings, animate or inanirnate, exist
independently. On this basic ground of
life, man sets out distinctions and separates
wiiat is "mine" from what is not 'irnine".
This distinction arises from a ciccit :r::rc:
of attachment in man called blind'craving.
According to Buddhism, blind craving
differentiates Oneness into a plural world
of Manyness" and there arises conflict, mis-
understandings, and frictions within man
4
himself. From this blind craving comes
the conscious self, affirrning its essential
selffishness. Because of man gain against
Oneness by affirming the blind craving
within, he' creates an illusory world of
Manvness which is not a real world but
a world create.d in the imagination of man.
If we understand the importance of the
Oneness of life, we can partake other's
joy, being happy with and for other's
happiness, since we are one and the mis-
treatment of another is none other than
the mistreatment of self.
Oneness is, therefore, the highest truth,
and is called the Buddha, the Enlightened
Ono, the one who has attained clear
understanding of life. When his disciples
asked him, "Are you a God?" he said,
"No". "A saint?" "No". "Then, what
are you?" He answered, "I am awake".
His answer becams his title, for this is
what Buddha means.
The Buddha is accordingly not the
God who creates the universe nor a supreme
deity with a transcended authority and
po*"r. He is also not the
judg6
who
punishes us nor the
jealous
God who dis-
criminates man good or bad. He is
rather the guiding light imminent in the
universe. His immeasurable wisdo,m and
boundless cornpassion give us the insight
to see the fragility of our human life and
the urge to actively embrace all into the
Oneness of life.
T'hus, we are the potential Buddhas,
and the Buddha and us are independent
and interrelated. In this Oneness of life
is achieved its sigrificance to realise the
Buddha in man I in the Buddha. This
is not the mystical nor speculative
experiences which only the qualified man
could acquire, but is the spontaneous
experience which is manifested in our daily
life.
The Buddha's teaching is sought not
by inferring, nor by argument but only
by the direct experience based on the truth,
the laws of causation. The Buddha said
"One thing I teach is nothing but the
existence of suffering and the ceasing of
suffering". His teaching is therefore
scientific and practical, and is always related
to us, our problems, our nature, and the
dynamics of our development.
When the Buddha was about to pass
away, he left his final message to Ananda,
one of his disciples; "Therefore, O Ananda,
be ye lamps unto yourself. Be ye a fefuge
to yourself. Betake yourself to not external
refuge. Hold fast.slithe:Truth as a lamp.
Hold fast as a refuge
"to
the Truth . . .
Work out your own salvation with
diligence.
For over 2500 years Buddhism has
developed systems of thought and institu-
tions, and yet they have ons end called
the Oneness of Life in the Buddha's
Wisdom and Compassion.
(Extracted from World Buddhism)
VI/ORLD BUDDHISM
(Established 2495
-
l95l)
International Monthly devoted
Buddhiun, Buddhist Literature,
Culture and News, published
BUDDHIST PUBLICATIONS
Circulates in all Buddhist Countries
Annual Subscriplion
Ceylon, India and Pakistan Rs. l0
Other Commonwealth Countries Sh. 20
Countries outside the Commonwealth
$3
Advertisement rates on application to
the Manager.
Book and periodicals for review and
articles and other contributions should
be addressed to the Editor.
gl
ll,
Dutugemunu Street,
.
Dehiwela, Ceylon.
to
Art,
by
TRIBUTE TO T!-IE LATE MR.. NEHR.U,
PRIME MINIST'ER OF INDM
A Memorial Service was held on 30th
May at the Buddhist Temple, Brickfields,
to transfer the merits to late Pandit Nehru
according to Buddhist rites. A big crowd
took part in the Service.
Addressing
the gathering
Ven. K.
Dhammananda said the world without
Nehru, he feels, is an ernpty world. The
world as a whole was alwavs ever readv
and waiting to get his advice often t6
settle the disputes and conflicts. Whenever
there was any trouble in any part of the
world, people used to say "dbn't worrv
Nehru is there to set{.le it;. Todav he is
gone.
His majestic figure is tto more
among us. But his good example, principles
and good namc will remain forever.
The name he left behind has overnieht
become an immortal
one.
Mr. Nehru was a great
man in everv
sense of the word. He was not onlv thL
leader of a. great country which throulhout
the centuries has always produced
*great
people but a leader for the entire w-odd.
There was never in History where a single
politician was honoured and loved so muih
by so many.
He was not only a politician
but also
1
greal philosopher, good orator, wrirer,
free
.
thinker, man of great
courage,
principles
and wisdorn who did not agrie
to surrender his view under any circurn-
stances.
)
He suffered a lot to get back the lost
freedom of his country. He sacrificed
everything for the sake o{ his motherland
and his people.
There was never a single leader of
India who has done a gteat service for the
sake of Buddhism like Mr. Nehru after
Emperor Asoka. Almost all the Buddhist
sacred p,laces in India have been renovated
under his instructions. F{e had said on
many an occasion that he was trying to
adjust his life according to the teachings
of the Buddha. Wherever and whenever
he attended world conferences, he always
talked about the Buddha's message of
peace and advised the public if they really
wanted to have Peace in this world, then
the only solution is to follow the Buddha's
advice.
He said whenever there are worries
and miseries in his mind he alwavs used
to go to the Buddha image and
-editate
a little while and think how this great man
tried to solve the world's problems. The
Buddha image has on many an occasion
given him great comforl and pace of
mind.
His death in an irreplaceable loss to
the whole of humanity. Although very
often in life we use this word "irreplaceable"
yet here is a genuine case where a loss
is really irreplaceable.
Mr. Teh Thean Choo, President of the
World Fellowship of Buddhist, Selangor
Centre, and the Buddhist Missionary
Society" also addressed the gathering.
$:{
ffi
fj{
s:;l
*i
Stafi and Students of the Sunday Schoo{, Mangala
-Vihara
S'pore.
-*T
MR. NEHRU ON BUDDHISM
"The Buddha's eyes are closed, but some power of the spirit look out of them
and a vital energy fills the frame. The ages role by and Buddha seems not so
far away after all; his voice whispers in our ears and tells us not to run away
from the struggle but, clam-eyed, to face it, and to see in life ever greater opport-
unities for growh and advancement.
When I was in
jail,
I used to think of this statue of the Buddha, and it was
a source ol tremendous inspiration l"o me.
The only alternative weapon that humanity can choose against the destructivs
weapon of hydrogen bomb is the teaching of Lord Buddha. I have a great respect
and regard to Lord Buddha. We can only establish peace and happiness in the
world by following the teaching of the Buddha.
In this wodd of storm and strife, hatred and violence, the message of the
Buddha shines like a radiant sun. Perhaps at no time was that message more
needed than in the world of the atomic and hydrogen bomb.
Two thousand five hundred years have only added to the vitality and truth
of that message. Let us remember that immortal message and try to fashion our
thoughts and actions in the light of that teaching. So we may face with equanimity
even the terrors of the atomic bomb age and help a little in promo;ting right thinking
and right action.
The path that the Buddha showed us is, I believe" the only path humanity
must tread if it is to escape disaster, for us in India it should be our peculiar good
fortune to try to tread that path".
HAPPINESS
(BY VEN. M. SUMANA, STNGAPORE)
Buddhism is more a way of living
than a religion. The teaching of The
Buddha is not only for attaining emancipa-
tion after life, but for the upliftment for
the present and future lives. There are
many Suttas especially preached for lay-
men to practise, so that their lives would
be happy and pleasant. Maha Mangala
Sutta, Sigalovada Sutta, Vasala Sutta and
Vyaggapajja Sutta are sorne of them, which
should be followed by those, who want to
make this life a happy and a pleasant one.
Happiness is a state of mind. The
average man places his happiness in matters
external, such as property, rank, children,
wife and such others, which are imper-
manent. Once he losses anyone of these
external matters, then his happ'iness dis-
appears and there is disappointment. This
world of ours is full of disappointments as
things do not happen as we wish. Thus
one should train himself to face anv
situation with fortitude.
Buddha divided human beinss into
four groups, viz.
(1) Those who do not care for themselves
or for others;
(2)
T.hose who care for themselves but
not for others;
(3) Those who care for others but not
for themselves:
(4) Those who care for themselves as
well as for others.
Buddha praised the fourth group.
Purpose of life is two-fold
-
duties
towards one-self, and duties towards others.
Of these two duties, towards onself should
be the flrst. One should first establish
himself in what is proper
and then should
instruct others. That is the way of Buddha.
Let us always bear in mind that a
virtuous and a noble character built on
lofty principles is the manls highest
possession
that brings him true happiness.
There cannot be lasting happiness- in a
changing world. A look round the world,
would convince one the truth of this. Is
there a horne that has not mourned the
death of a near and a dear one? Is
there anyone who is free fro'm sickness, old
age and death? Everything that we depend
on to make us happy, the law of imper-
menance will lay its cruel hands on and
destroy the happiness expected tlrough
them.
,
Buddha gave
a definite message to
laymen. He pointed
out that fundmental
thing that one should bear in mind is "the
principal of moral growth".
The first
elementary stage of this moral growth con-
sits in practising the five Precepts. This
practice is very essential. Ground must be
cleaned for sornething new to be built.
Evil must be rernoved before good can be
practised. Removing these five evils one
is led to grow
as a moral being, and thus
to be a better social being. One who
practises Precepts will never be a source
of fear to anyone. He is a blessing to the
society. Having refrained from the five
evils and adhering to the precepts one
should practise "metta"
-
gobdwill to all.
We live among others, whom we may hate,
and who in rEturn hate us. One who hates
others does not grow in moral sLature. He
will be mentally unhealthy and unhappy.
VI.!t+,
therefore, is a means of attiirig
health and happiness. lt restores one to
peace,
_happiness,
calm and equanimity.
The only way of disarming those who widh
us evil, is to wish them good. As light
diqoels darkness, the good forces of good-
will vanquish the forces of ill-will.
-This
is a psychological truth.
Each individual's position in the
society consits of two things
-
duty to-
wards others, and practice
of goodwill
to
them.
No one should be-little this world. as
it..is impossible to do a sudden
jump
to
Nibbana. Our progress
should
^
be
gradual. This fact should be understood
and realised and should try to make this
life bettEr and better, and happier and
happier.
,:.
,1
'w. - -F
Some people in this country do not
seem to know about the end of colonial
rule and the recession of the missionary
wave that swept this country about a
century ago. Such peop'le, who have taken
not the slightest interest in the afiairs of
their country, are living in a dangerous
backwater. They are the types who send
out'young people to do the Billy Graham
kind of evangelism in this country. That
may be all right in countries with a certain
traditional religious background, but here
in Malaysia dozens of other religions and
sects abound to render the Billy Graham
typ: of evangelism ineffectual.
(
extra:cted
fram
Malayan Times)
CONGRATULATIONS
To Senator T. H. Tan, one of the
Iratrons of our Society for having been
conferred a Datoship by the Yang Di-
Pertuan Agong on his birthday, in recogni-
tion of his loyal service to the country.
Senator Tan is an ardent supporter and
leader of the Buddhist cornmunity in this
country. We invoke the blessings of the
Holy Trip'le Gem for his happiness and
prosperit-y to do more service to this
country.
SELIING PARAI}TSE
From time to time certain religious
sects" not indigenous to this country, send
out their young members on house-to-house
canvassing assignments. These youngsters,
imbued with the evangelistic spirit, knock
at doors and try to preach to people about
saving their souls.
Some people, out of politeness, tell
them they have their own religions which
they do not wish to change. But some
o,f these young preachers start to argue
like some milk salesmen why their brand
of milk is better than all the other brands.
Young people in their late teens or
early twenties are
just
entering the thres-
hold of adult life and have not yet tasted
the bitterness, frustrations, and other acute
problems of living. Yet such chaps are
sent out by their missions to start a one-
sided argument about the virtues of their
particular faith with peop,le who have seen
life at its best and at its worst.
During colonial times, droves of such
indoctrinated young religious workers were
sent out among the masses to bring thern
in for conversion. Today conditions have
changed, and not many people will have
the patience to listen to these young sales-
men of paradise, or tolerate their bablings
about a sinless heaven.
Recently a father was puzzled why
the mission school his son attended did not
allow the boy to offer religious knowledge
as a subject for a certain local examination.
The reason was this subject was not in the
curriculum.
The father cornplained about lack of
religious training in schools.
'-[his
man
should send his children to Sunday school
or other religious centres of receive train-
ing in their religion. Ordinary schools
should remain secular, o'therwise there
would be no end to the numbor o{ religions
clamouring for instruction in our schools.
BUDDHIST
MISSIONARY SOCIITT
Office Bearers for The Year 1964
Patrons
Hon. Mr. Tan Siew Sin, r.p.
Dato T. H. Tan, J.M.N., M.p.
Hon. Mr. Cheah Seng Khim, J.p., M.p.
Spiritual Director/Gendral Adviser
Ven. K. Dhammananda Thera
Religious Advisers
Ven. Itr. Gunaratana Thera Ven. Pandit Pemaratana
Thera
Ven. M. M. Mahaweera Nayaka Thera Ven. Ananda Mangala Thera
Ven. Pra Visalsamangun Ven. Chim Bin
Ven. Tripitakacharya K. Mangala Thera Ven. Sait Paik Wan
General Committee
President
Mr. Teh Thean Choo, a.ira.w.
Vice-Presidents
Mr. K. A. Albert Mr. Thor Beng Seng, e.r.r.
Mr. Goh Chin Keat Mr. Michael Chua Ngoh Chuan
Hon. Secretary Hon. Treasurer
Mr. Neoh Hoay Pow Mr. A. E. De Alwis
Hon. Asst. Secretary Hon. Asst. Treasurer
Mr. Lim Chin Km Mr. Teoh Eng Lim
Committee Members
Mr. Khoo Teng Hooi Miss A. Jina
Mr. V. L. S. De Silva Mr. Chew Chee Cheong
Mrs . Ho Ah Loke Mr. Ng Ban Onn
Mr. E. O. B. Wickramanayaka Mr. S. D. Jayawardane
Mr. M. H. Albert
.
Mr.
Quah
Kok Seng
Mr. Tan Huck Boo Mr. Goh Cheng Soon
Hon. Auditors
Mr. Boon Kok Ching Mr. D. S. Goonatilake
i!:
i.
iJ;
I
l-
t.:.
\
I
r
I
I
4/*l
10
STTME
BF BUR LIFE MEMBERS
Hon. Mr. Cheah Seng Khim,
J.P., M.P.
Fenang
Mr. Ong Chin Kow
I(ota Bharu
Dr. Bak Hin Ong
Malacca
Dato Eu Eng Hock
Kuala Lumpur
Madam Tan Cheng Sim
Kuala LumPur
Mr. Tan Hoon Siang
Singapore
Mr. Choo Boi Thiong
Kota Bharu
Mrs. Ho Ah Loke
Kuala Lumpur
NIr. Ong Kean Hin
TaiPing
il
V[SA[ CII,IBRATIOI{ IN MAI.AY$IA
We, in Malaysia, a cosmopolitan country
of diverse races and creeds, are most fortun-
ate in having Vesak Day declared a general
public holiday try our benign Government.
For this we are extremely grateful to our
democratic and
.
open-hearted Leaders led
by our beloved Prime Minister Tunku
Abdul Rahman.
The generous gesture on the part of the
Government has helped termendously in
ouf efforts to bring Buddhism to our
countless devotees in this country. In all
the principal towns, Penang, Ipoh, Taiping,
Kuala Lumpur, Kota Bharu anci Singapore,
this year's Vesak Day was celeibrated on
a scale surpassing that of prcvious years.
Decorated floats, with the image of Lord
Buddha, were taken in grand lighted pro-
cessions along the main streets of the
various towns, with Buddhist Priests
chanting suttras invoking the blessings of
I.ord Buddha for peace and prosperity for
the pople and the countty.
In Kuala Lumpur, the celebrations were
centred in three principal temples
-
the
Birch Road Kuam Im Temple, the Buddha
Jayanti Temple in Circular Road and the
Buddhist Ternple in Jalan Berhala, Brick-
fields. All day long thousands of devotees
conv-erged on many temples for ofiering
of flowers and incense to Lord Buddha-.
The highlight of the day was the illumin-
ated procession
organised by the Vesak
Celebration Committee in the evening, with
the glittering image of Lord Bu0Ana,
wending its way from the Buddha Jayanti
Temple at Circular Road to the Buddhist
Temple at Brickfields followed by thousands
of devotees. Many devoted followers,
dressed in pure white, stayed in the
respective tempiles the who,le day long, in
meditation and taking the eight precepts.
Lectures were delivered in English, Chinise
and SinhaLese. Captive birds were released
by the devotees,
We are extremely grateful to Radio
Malaysia and the Television Departrnent for
giving us full co{/erage on our cele rations.
In Radio Malaysia special programrnes
touching on the significance of the day
were put on the air on Vesak Day. Revs.
Ananda Mangala, Dhammananda,
Gunara-
tana, Pek Wan and Mr. Teh Thean Choo,
Chairnran of the Vesak Celebration Com-
mittee, were given Radio and Television
time to discourse on the special significance
of Vesak Day.
The poor
and the needy were not for-
gotten on this auspicious day. Visits were
made by the members o,f the Vesak
Celebration Committee to the Sungei B,uloh
Leper Asylum, the Jubilee Home for dis-
tressed women, the Home for the Blind.
Childrens' Home anO-itre Orpfra*g" ir ifr.l
Fure Life Society, to presbnt glfts and
"ang-pows", bringing cheer to the inmates
of the various Homes.
,,si
t{
e*
Tee Tee Cee
THE MAHA BODHI
A monthly Journal of international
Buddhist Brotherhood. One of the
oldest Buddhist Joumal in the World.
Valuable articles on various aspects
of Buddhism
and international
Buddhist news
Yearly
.Subscription
:
trndia and Ceylon Rs" 6; Burma Rs. 6
U.S.A. $3/-. Other Eastern Countries
Rs. 8 Europe sh. 10; Life Subscription
to Joumai R.s. 150.
Maha Bodhi Society,
4-A,
Bankim Chatterjee Street,
Calcutta - 12.
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(Dr
tr)evolees iit processiott,
cctrrying the relics
of the BudcNhct under a paraxtl,
at the Vesak
Celebrati<;n, Mangala Viharq, Singapore.
Mangala Vihara with its adjoining
ground recently regained, has enabled the
Singapore Buddhist Pali Society to cele, rate
Vesak within the premises for three days
with pomp and pride. The colourful
iliuminations and the beautiful flags and
buntings gaily decorating the temple and
its compound and with a wide spread of
big crowd have given sp'lendour to the
sight. and grandelr
to the scene. On this
auspicious occasion a very large number
of people have come to pay homage to
Lord Euddha
-
they were then entertained
to vegelarian food and when they ieft the
temple they were each given with holy
13
water, a tie of five coloured thread and a
packet of scented flowers as token of
blessings.
At 7.30 p.m. on Vesak eve a special
service was held with the chanting of
Parittas (Suttas
of Blessings).
-
Tha celebration commenced in the
early morning of 26.5.64 by freeing captive
birds and then followed by morning services.
At 11.30 a:m. vegetarian food was served
to Bhikkhus and to lay people who
observed the Eight Precepts
^
anh to alt
guests.
At night the highlight o{ the celebration
was a lion dance which led the candle-
light procession
followed by a mile long
of devotees who walked round the spacioui
temple ground
three times covering- a dis-
tance of three miles, The Buddha Reilics
were carried on this occasion. The Relics
were placed in three silver caskets and
carried by three devotees which were
rooied with a large umbrella speciallv
bought from Thailand. Flower giris were
kept showering flowers on the way. Leading
the caskets were devotees carFyins burninE
incense, flags, banners, Iighted-ian'dles.
O;
the third day, distributed gifts in cash and
kind to various homes for irippled children,
the poor and aged and. also to bther temples
to cheer up the occasion.
Ven. M. M. Mahaweera
Nayaka Thera,
the resident of Mangala Vihara and as an
adviser to the Singapore Buddhist
pali
Society was rhe brain bb.nind the celebration
and thanks to the untiring efforts of the
hard working members of the Society and
devol.ees
.who
have given
full suppoit and
co-operation to make the occasion a
magnificent
,one
and for their pedormance
it was worthy of praise.
VESAT{
SINGAPORE
-
MANGALA
YIHARA
vis-
t4
BUDDHIST
ACTIVITIES
IN SINGAPORE
The
general programme
of^.activities
of Sri Lankaramaya
Temple,
smgapore'
Sunday
Dhamma
School
for children
9 to 11 a.m.
buiiu Adoration
Services
from 8 p'm'
Sp#ut
Saturday
Services,
8 to l0 p'm'
nLitins of Parittas,
Sundays
from 8 p'm'
vi*dituiions,
Tuesdays
and Saturdays
trom
6 u.m.
i.fii"*t
on Full and New
Moon DaYs
Soecial Ata Sil Day
-
Sunday'
nearest
td tne Full
Moon Day is regarded as the
-;;* dav tot those who could
not avail
iil"-F"ti
tiroon Dav owing to office work
etc.
fayanti
Vihara Building
Proiect
it
-*ut
decided
by the Singapore
Buddhist
Association,
in commernoratton
oI
-,tne
ilhh; Jayanti,
to erert a Buddhist
C"i"i"t
Hali cum Temple.
The foundation
stone of this building
was ceremonrously
laid bv Risht Honourable
D' S' Senanayake'
irr" rt''""
piime
Minister
of Ceylon, on l3{h
October
1951. A good portion of
-
the
Uuifaing was construcled
Uui owing to lack
"i
iotiott the continuation
of work had
to be
^suspended
in 1961.
Owine to the indefatigable
efforts of
the
-"mbers
of the Association,
con-
tt*"iion
work of the building
was restored
about a month ago with the determtnatton
oi
-
iompteting
the building
within four
months.
Appeal
So far more than $i00,000
had been
snent on this
proiect. and the present phase
;? work of
'
the project requires. about
$33,000/-.
Other works such as interior
iecotutiitg,
Buddhist
Architectural
Paintings
and a Digoba,
which of course, will
lrave
asain to
"be
done step by step' These
nioiects will
proceed according
to circum-
5tuti..t
in the future. Without
the whole-
ffi;i.d support o'f the Buddhists living.
in
Muiuytiu, it'would not be able to complete
ihis
'masnificent
edifice. We, there'fore
"""eat
to"all Buddhists
to donate
generously
ahh fiberatlv
towards this worlhy cause'
Please
forward
your donations,
no amount
;;-tdo small, to'the Hon. Treasurer,-Singa'
l"i"-
g"Jdttitt
Association,
30-C, St'
Michael's
Road, SingaPote,
12'
A. H. David,
Hon. SecretarY.
.
VESAK CELEBRATION
The Singapore Regional--Centre
of the
World
Fello-wship
of Buddhists
takes
a
r"Ji.g
p*ii i" the Celebrations
of
.Vesak
Dav everv Yeaf'
A mass meeting
is
I#unit"o-'u"d
i colo'urful
Proc'ession.-of
irii.inui.a
noutt depicting
the Buddha'
Dhamma
and Sangha, cornmemorates
.the
sisnificance
of the occasion
by wendtng
u1-o"n *itft dienity
through the main streets
of Singupote-on-
Vesak Night'
On Vesak Eve' there was an additional
attraction
this
year in the Broadcast
fro-m
n"Oin"ti""
ot
'the
"significance
of. Vesak"
;;;ii
"a
"The Transiendental
Virtues.of
irt"
g;ddhu"
the Enlightened
one" including
a number
of Buddhist Hymns sung
by the
students.
I also broadcast
over Radto
Slnnuoot",
both in English and Chine::,,
on
ih"";'Fundu*ental
Teachings
of the Exaltec
Buddha"
following
by Buddhist Hymns
oy
students.
We also seek this oPPortunitY
to
exDress our
profound appreciation to Radio
Sinsanore for also availing
us with the
"iiiilin"
to broadcast on the Ethical
i*.ning.
of the Hono'ured
of thq World
on Vesit< Day and again our
gratitude to
them for sending their representatives-to
itt"
-Vi"totiu
Meirorial Hall to afford TV
un-O nuOi" of our mass meeting
thereby
neonle
who are in possession o[
'l
V sets
i" th"it homes were directly intimated
with
our Vesak Programme as well as to hear
ttt. different Jpeeches
delivered
by
- -His
Excellencv, the Hon. Mr. Lee Kuan Yew,
Frime Vihister of Singapore'
including.other
gonooteO
Guests as
-in^
the personalities of
ifii rn* Consul-General
of Thailand"
the
Consul of Burma and other Buddhist
leaders
in SingaPore.
I
With the inspiratio,n of the Buddha
before us on Vesak Day, a mass meeting
of Buddhists and Well-wishers was held at
the Victoria Memorial Hall with Mr. Payong
Chutikul, the Consul-Genoral for Thailand,
presiding the meeting. Adding to the high-
lights of the evening, we were honoured
with the kind presence of His Excellency,
the Hon. Mr. Ire Kuan Ye.w, Prirne
Minister of Singapore, to officiate the
opening of our Celebrations. Indeed, the
success of the mass celebration was evident
by the audience's enthusiastic response to
the illuminating speeches delivered by our
Honoured Guests and lay-Buddhists apart
from the inspiring voice of our Prime
Minister.
The day's programme reached the
climax when the Procession, comprising of
brilliantly lighted and decorated Flbats
organised by mutual co-operation of
Buddhist temples and organizations respect-
ively, was seen moving gracio'usly through-
out the main streets immediatelv after the
mass meeting.
On the 30th and 3lst May, 7964, the
Centre,
jointly
with members of the Singa-
pore Buddhist Federation, distributed Cash
Donations and Liberal Gifts to 33 Institut-
ions in Singapore.
15
DISTINGUISHED
VISITORS
i ]
Dr. Richard A. Gard, M.A.,ph.D.,D.H.L.
one of the Vice-Presidents of the World
Fellowship of Buddhists, and a very learned
scholar and author, visited Malaysia. He
is now attached to the Foreign Service
of the American Embassy in Hongkong.
He visited Kuaia Lumpur, Singapore,
Malacca, Ipoh and Penang and met several
Buddhist leaders to discuss wavs and means
of promoting Buddhism and'building the
solidarity of Buddhists in this country.
We are also happy to have privilege. of,
welcoming a notable and leading Buddhist
in South Vietnam. He is Mr. Mai Tho
Truyen, President of the Buddhist Asso-
ciation in Saigon and one of the Vice"r
Presidents of the Wo'rld Fellowship of
Buddhists. The purpose
of his visit is to
thank the Buddhist fraternity in rhis
aountry for the support and syrnpathy
extended to Buddhists in South Vietnam,
in their struggle for
just
and human righrs
and freedom of worship during the regirne
of Ngo Dinh Diem.
ln Singapore, Kuala Lumpur and
Penang, Mr. Mai mer severaf leadine
Buddhists. Films, brought by himl
depicting the Vesak Festival, Buddhist
activities and religious incidenls including
the burning of monks, who sacrificed their
lives, in Vietnam, were shown in various
places.
Miss Pitt Chin Hui.
Hon. Mr. Tan Siew Sin, r.p., Minister of Finance, addressing
the gathering at Lord Buddha's Temple, Gajah Berang Road,
Ma]acca, on the occasion of Vesak. On his left is Ven. Ananda
Mangala Thera.
7
t:
i+
WHY MEI}ITATION
I$ VENY
MPONTANT
(By
Yen. K. Dhammanandq)
In place of prayers to God Buddhists It is not very gifficult as people think.
Dractise
^
meditation or mental culture to Today we are living in a world where
bevelop
their mind for salvation. No one people have to^ work. very hard physically
can at^tain Nibbana without developing his or mentally. Otherwise there is no place
mind through the practice of meditatio,n. for them in the
.
modern society.
Y"ty
Any amourit of m^eritorious deeds alone keen
.competition
is going on- everywhere.
would not lead a person to attain the final One is trying tO beat the other in every
soal without training the mind. Naturally sphere and man has no rest at all. Mind
irina ir very wicked-and always persuades is the nucleus of life. If there is no real
the people fo commit evils and encourages pe.ace and rest in the mind the whole life
peofle [o be the slaves of the senses. One rvill collapse after some time. As long as
i"no knows how to practise meditation will energy and vitality exist men will be able
be able to control his mind when it is rnis- to carry on their activities but after middle
led by the senses. Most of the troubles age they will
_be
stricken down with certain
and ririsunderstandings
which we are con- unexpected diseases for which
.very, _few
fronting today, are due to untrained mind. would have realised the sesret of .it. Maly
ttterefSre *'"ditutirt is the remedy for people try to overcome their miseries by
phvsical
and mental sickness. Today it is pleasing the senses such as drinking,
itr.uav accepted by the medical authorities
gambling, enjoying the pictures, singing'
that mental^ frustration, worries, miseries, dancing, having big parties and going round
anxieties and fear are the causes of many the world, thinking that they are enjoying
diseases such as cancer, high blood pressure, the real happ'iness of the life. But vrhile
heart-attacks, stomach ulcers and gastritis. enjoying their life in that way sometimes
Many of these sicknesses can be avoided they create
-more.
worries. That is not the
if p6ople could spend few minutes a day real way of having-relaxation.
-
The-more
to
'calin
down their senses through the we try to please the senses through the
practice of meditation. Many people do sensual p,leasures the more we will becorne
not believe this or are too lazy to practise slaves to them and there will be no end
it due to lack of understanding. Sorne of it. The real way of relaxation is claming
people
say meditation is only wasting of down the senses to control the mind. If
ii-.i. W" must remember every great spir:itual we could control the mind then we will
master in this world had attained the be able to purify it. Through the purifl-
hiehest climax of their life through the cation of mind we can see things as they
prictice of meditation. They are honoured truly are.- When once it-is_ purified
it_"will
iodav bv rnillions of
p,eople because they be free from mental hindrances. When
have dohe wonderful services to manl<ind there are no hindrances in the mind people
with their supreme knowledge which they can do wcnderful things in this-world. By
obtained through the practice of meditation" focusing their mind they could see- many
things which o,thers cannot se through
We have already mentioned that the their naked eyes. Ultimalely thgy will be
Buddha obtained his enlightenrnent through able to find their salvation without any
the development of mind by only practising ciifficulty..
meditation and there was no divine power
bahind him. To have a healthy body and To practise this meditation one must
healthy mind and happiness of the life have a lot of patience because
ry.any
people
one must learn how to practise meditation. arc very eager to see the immediate results.
16
l7
We must remember that it will take many an object it is very difficult to trap the
years for a person to be qualified as a
jumping
mind. That object also must be
doctor, lawyer, mathematician, philosopher,
a thing which is free irom lust, angor,
historian and a scientist. Similarly to be a delusion and other passions. Many ped$le
good meditator it will take some time for take the Buddha image as an object and
him to control the wicked mind and to concentrate on it. Some people concentrate
calm down the senses. Therefore, one must on breath by counting the inhaling and
not get fed up ve, soon for not being exhaling breath. Whatever may be the
able to obtain the good results of his method, if anyone tries to practise this
meditation. Because practising meditation meditation, he is sure to have relaxation in
is like swimming in a river against the his mind which will help him a lot to have
current. physical and mental happiness and to con-
trol the mind whenever there are anger,
First of all, the person must have an over anxieties, worries and finally to attain
object for his meditation; because without the etemal bliss.
Dear Sir,
BUDDHTST PEN-PAL COLUMN
I fully endorsed and support Ven. Mahaweera Nayaka Thero's idea of having
a Buddhist Pen-Pal Co umn in the Voice of Buddhism. The idea of having such a
column in this Magazine is to exchange views and doubts one may have in mind with
regards to Buddhism.
I know it is quite a hard task but I am confident that with the invaluable
guidance and assistance frorn Ven. K. Dhammananda Thera together with the un-
stinted co-operation and whole-hearted support
from the Management Committee
of the Buddhist Missionary Society, the Editorial Board of the "Voice of Buddhism"
and the brothers and sisters not only financially but materially, I verily believe that
the hard tasks ahead will be easily overcome and that the
"Voice
of Buddhism"
will flourish with the everlasting Light of the Triple Gem.
Yours in the service
Tan Chin Kiat.
Mangala Vahara,
38, Jalan Eunos,
Singapore, 14.
Image of Lord Buddha taken
Celebration organised by
round the town during the Vesak
Kelantan Buddhist Association.
fl,
18
SE!.ANGOR BUDD!.IIST ASSOCIATION
The above Association, one of the oldest Buddhist Societies in Selangor, has
its Temple Building and Premises at No. 3174, Circular,Road,-Kuala-Lumpur,
and
is headJd by Mr.
"Yeoh
Cheow Chong, Proprietor_of Messrs. I(ean Leong &_9o.,
No. 42, Jalan Tuanku Abdul Rahman, with- Mr. Thor Beng Seng, r.:.r. as Hon-
orary Secretary.
R.egulai full-moon ser.rices are conducted co-mmencing frorn 7-'00 p.m. The
boys frori the Sungei Besi Boys Home attend the Temple every Sunday evening for
religious instructions.
--
"
-
Under its auspicies, a Youth Circle functions
with about 100 members com'
prising oflou"g UoVi unO girls above the age of-16 years.
.Most
of thern are students
InO-6m."'*or["tr.'
Their"activities includE Dhamma Classes, Debates, Oratorial
Sessions,
Excursions and Indoor games.
The Association ptrans to plrt up a preaching hall i1 th_e near future to cater
for wider activities and'better fabilities for devo'tees and the Youth Section.
TAIPING BI,.!DDHIST ASSOCIATION
OPening of A SundaY School
The N4anaging Committee of the Taiqing
llddhist
Association.is very.pl.*T{
to announce that" classes for the teaching of the Dhamma ( in English
)
will be held
everv Sunclav at Bodhi La,nkarama Temple-, Taiping. There will also be a Sinhalese
L^niuun.
-"iu5
tot those interested in learning ihe language. The classes will be
.onfril"uO by the learned officiating Bhikkhu, the Ven' Tripitakacarya K. Mangala
Thero,
(ts.A) and will commence at 9'00 a.m.
-------W",
therefore, appeal to all members,
parents and frie,nds to avail themselves
of this
goidett opporiuniiy
and to send their children
-and -
the young boys and girls
to leari and td-improv6 their knowledge of the.-holy Dhalm.a'
The Commitiee wishes to notify-that Gilampasa Buddha Puja
( Evening
Ofierings
):
is observed claily at the Ternple. It is expected that devotees bring
a10ng with thern some flowers.
K. A. noni"t,
Hon. SecretarY.
Ven. Tripitakacharya K. Mangala
Thero, s.4., resident monk of the Bodhi
Lankarama
Ternple, TaiP'ing.
Ven. Mangala Was invited recently frorn
Ceylon by the Taiping Buddhist Association
to rneet the needs of the Buddhist community
of Taiping. He is a learned scholar and well
versed
in the various aspects of Buddhisrn'
fr
.-q
19
BUDDHISM IN SABAH
By Mr. Gan Cheng Kin, Hon. Representative ol the Buddhist Missionary Society.
Buddhism is comparatively little known in Sabah. There are not very manv
Buddhists who know the teachings of the Buddha. Consequently, Buddhist activities
hers are relatively few and they are not as lovely as in Malaya. Very few Buddhist
celebrations are held and even when these are held they are on a vory small scale.
Nevertheless, our fraternal organisation at Jesselton, The Sabah Buddhist Asso-
ciation has given meritorious service to the studying and dissemination of the Dhamma.
In a letter to the Hon. representative of the' Buddhist Missionary Society for
Sabah, the president of the Association has expressed the hope that the former will
be ablg to help the Association in the study of the Dhamma. As the Hon. represen-
tative is not an authority on the Dhamma he, in turn, hopes that the Society and our
other fraternal bodies in Malaya and Singapore will kindly contact the Association
in Sabah and give it whatever it may need in the study and propagation of the
Dhamma.
Despite the set-back due to isolation, absence of regular missionaries and
lack of facilities Buddhism is slowly but certainly making headway here. In Sem-
porna a few people have become members of the Buddhist Missionary Society since
they were introduced to the Buddha Dhamma. Two Americans who have studied
the Buddha Dhamma in America have also becorne Members.
The Buddhist Missionary Society has given us much help and encouragement
for the study and pro'pagation of the Dhamma here. It has send us a lot of
Buddhist literature both in English and Chinese and application forms for member-
ship which have been distributed to those who would like to know about Buddhism
and also to becorne members of the Society. Some Buddhist literature has been
sent to the Sabah
Buddhist Association for distribution to its members. Names and
addresses of those who are keen in Buddhism have been sent to the Buddhist
Missionary Society for help individuatrly in study of Buddhism. For those who so
desired addresses of our fratemal organisations elsewhere have beren supplied to
them to which they can write to fo'r help in their search for the truth.-- Private
talk on Buddhism have been held with those who were interestsd in it.
As mentioned earlier the Society has given us much help and we wish to
express to it our hearty thanks. Our thanks also go to Ven. Pindit P. Perna-
ratana Thera of the Mahindarama Temple, Penang who has also send us many books
and pictures and has been helping us in many other ways. We ilso have to thank
tho Buddhist Association of Thailand and the world fellowship of Buddhists at
Bangkok rvhich have despatched to us many books and magazihes.
We hope that a study group can be formed here soon among the small
group of Buddhists in order to study the Dhamma.
May all beings be well and happy.
(We appeal to our tsuddhist fraternity to send' any booklets and pamphlets
available on Buddhism to
9u1 ,Hon. \epresentative
in Sabah, Mr. Gan Cheng Kin,
P. O. Box 48, Semporna, Sabah)
-
Ed.
7
-r-
i
n
We acknowledge with thanks
l. lAarld Buddhis'm:
2. The Buddhist:
3. Gotden Light:
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED
the receipt of the following publications : -
International monthly, 91/1, Dutugemunu
St., Dehiwala Ceylon.
YMBA., Colombo, Ceylon.
Penang Buddhist Association, Anson Road,
Penang.
1
{
_i
I
7.
8.
9.
10.
ll.
12.
13.
14.
4. Vafious Buddhist Booklets.
5. Kodo News:
6. Souvenir:
Buddhist Publication Society, Forest Hermit-
age, Kandy, Ceylon.
Kyodan Hqs., Yokohama, Japan.
lst. Annivesary Celeibration, Buddhist
Council Singapore.
Buddhist Associatio,n of Thailand, Aditya
Road, Bangkok, Thailand.
Mahindarama Temple, Kampaf Rd,, Penang
No. 11, Hankow Road, Taipei, Taiwan.
Buddhist Union, 28, Jalan Senyum, S'pore.
Singapore Buddhist Association, St. Michael
Road, Singapore.
Buddhist Books Distributors, 42, Bonham
Strand West, Hongkong.
96, Hoping Street, Taichung, Taiwan.
Singapore Regional Centre o,f W.F.B. 387,
Guillemard Road, Singapore.
Por Tay Institute, Bagan Jermal, Penang.
Saranapala Maha Vihara, Walana, Panadura,
Ceylon.
Buddhist Union, Singapore.
Buddhist Union, Singapore.
Vesakha Puja:
The Triple Anniversary of Vesak:
West and East:
News Letter :
NEWS LETTER..
Chinese Buddhist Literature :
Bodhedrum:
Various Buddhist Booklets
(Chinese
and English):
V ariows Chinese Buddhist
Booklets
Vesok Sirisara:
Me;sage of Peace, Love & Harmony
The Significance of Vesa:k:
#
15.
16.
17.
OUR PUBLICATIONS
It is a great pleasure
for us to inform that so far we have published
several books for distribution. We have already distributed a few thousand
booklets and pamphlets not only in Malaysia but also in sweral other countries.
These books are available free of charge to all our mernbers while non-members
have to pay a small token as mentioned below to assist in further publications.
(1)
BUDDHISM FOR BEGINNERS
Questions and answers on life of the Buddha
( for children
)
(2')
VANDANAGATHA (Book
of Devotion)
Daily recital for blessing services with
English translation.
(3). NOBLE LTVTNG
How to practise Buddhism, Importance of
Religious instructions, Advice to Parents and
Children, Youth at Cross-Roads, The Search
of Happiness, Why I became a Buddhist?,
by the late Mr. Bandaranayake, former Prime
Minister of Ceylon.
(4)
DO YOU BELTEVE rN REBIRTH?
The origin of life. How to believe in rebirth.
Illustration from various countries" What happens
when a man dies? Can man understan his destiny
before his death? How does rebirth take place?
How can we rernernber the past lifE, Can a man
be reborn as an animal?
(5)
WHAT DO BUDDHISTS BELIEVE? (in the press)
Answers to all questions pertaining to Buddhism.
Clariflcation of misunderstandings and misinterpre-
tations of Buddhism. How to practise meditation
in daily life. Differences between Buddhism and
other religions. The real path to salvation and
how to practise Buddhism.
30 cts.
20 cts.
30 cts.
50 cts
$1.00
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ROYAL JEWELLERS
KUALA LUMPUR.
Branclt,:
78, NORTH
BRIDGE ROAD,
SI}IGAPORE.
PRINTED BY P.K.S. PRINTERS, K.L.