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ENGLISH

TESTS AND TASKS


Gillian Butcher and Louise Moore
Revised by Rachel Rick
Series Editor: Colin McCarty
FREE SAMPLE COPY
Tests and tasks can be marked by the teacher, or by the pupil. Pupils
may assess their own work or swap tests and mark another pupils test.
Use the mark scheme and your own professional judgement to award
marks. Do not award half marks.
We suggest you annotate the mark grid for the writing task with a tick
to indicate the bullet points for which you are awarding credit. Circle or
write the mark you are giving.
The mark schemes for reading include information about the level of
each question and the assessment focus (AF) that is targetted through
individual questions.
Step 2 Mark the test
The tests are linked to the range of genres and text types recommended
by the Primary Framework for literacy and mathematics. Explain to the
class that they will take one reading test and two writing tasks each
half-term. This will give them the opportunity to show what they know
and can do. The tests are designed to give them the opportunity to show
their reading and writing fiction and non-fiction and results can be used
to record and monitor progress throughout the year.
At the end of each half term, photocopy the test and give it to the class
to complete.
With younger age groups you may also project the test onto a
whiteboard to support the whole class or a group in the reading tests or
writing tasks.
Step 1 Introduce the tests
Quick start guide to Rising Stars Assessment
Use the mark and level threshold tables to convert the pupils mark to a
sub-level. The final row in each table give an overall sub-level for each
terms tests. If you have the CD-ROM version of English Tests and Tasks
you can use the interactive Level Calculator to convert automatically
marks to levels.
The mark and level threshold pages also include a summary of the
distribution of marks and levels for each test.
Use a five-minute session with pupils to talk through the test and give
them the opportunity to make their own corrections. Identify strengths
and weaknesses and agree targets for learning.
Encourage pupils to complete the diagnostic profile for reading and self-assessment sheets for writing
after each test or task. Students can keep these sheets and use them to record their progress
throughout the year.
Step 4 Feed back to the pupils
Levels are given for individual reading tests and pairs of reading tests for each term.
Levels are also given for short and long writing tasks. A combined writing level from a short writing
task and a long writing task is also given. In this way, reading and writing may be monitored
individually.
For schools following a half-termly assessment policy in English, we provide a combined level
comprising each half terms reading piece with its accompanying short and long writing task. Spelling
and handwriting are also included in the calculation of the level.
Balance of marks and levels in each reading test:
NC level Test 1 Test 2 Test 3 Test 4 Test 5 Test 6
2 6 6 5 4 3 7
3 8 9 10 11 10 8
4 1 2
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 1: Here Be Dragons
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
1 23 45 67 89 1012 1315
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 2: The Herald
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
12 35 67 89 1012 1315
Autumn term reading level
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
1 2 36 711 1215 1619 2025 2630
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 3: Harriets Morning
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
12 3-5 67 89 1012 1315
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 4: Aliens
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
1 2 34 56 78 911 1215
Spring term reading level
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
1 25 610 1114 1518 1924 2530
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 5: How Do I Feel?
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
12 34 56 78 9 1011 1215
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 6: South View Youth Group
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
1 2 34 5 67 89 1011 1213 1415
Summer term reading level
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
2 3 47 810 1114 1518 1921 2225 2630
56
The marks and level thresholds for Year 4
Mark schemes for reading tests
39
Reading Test 2: The Herald
Framework: Y4 Non-fiction Unit 1 Recounts: newspaper/magazines,
Non-fiction Unit 2 Instructions and Non-fiction Unit 3 Information texts AF Mk Lvl Extra information
1. date/price/headline 4 1 2
2. in the hills/around Buxworth/in the Peak District 2 1 2
3. he didnt know what it was/it was unusual 3 1 2
4. alliteration or it has the same letter as the other words 3 1 3 accept any reasonable answer
5. five 2 1 2
6. Australia and Komodo Island 2 1 3
7. Spain and China 2 1 3
8. they eat their young 3 1 2
9. to show it is fierce or to emphasise the size of the teeth 5 2 3
10. an instructional text 4 1 3
11. to help explain the instructions/make it easier 4 1 3
12. accept any reasonable explanation referenced to the text 2 1 2 e.g. YES because its made from
things that are easy to find
NO because you have to sew it
13. to fit on the sock or because dragons have mean, small eyes or to make
the dragon look fierce, not cute and cuddly
3 1 3 accept any reasonable answer
14. to encourage individual effort/for the puppets to look different/so they
could be proud of their own puppet
6 1 3 accept any reasonable answer
Reading Test 1: Here Be Dragons
Framework: Y4 Narrative Unit 2 Stories set in imaginary worlds and
Poetry Unit 1 Creating images AF Mk Lvl Extra information
1. as a warning or to show that these lands were unexplored or to show
there may be danger
2 1 2
2. the dragon taking their children 2 1 2
3. Thats what you always say! 3 1 3
4. a) because it fell fast or because it was heavy or because it was
frightening
b) they were cold/hard/sharp/strong
5
5
1
1
3
3
accept any reasonable answer
accept because they were like knives
5. accept any answer suggesting magical powers/potential of the feathers 7 1 4 indicates the reader understands the
elements of traditional tales
6. he was a wizard-in-training, or a young wizard 2 1 3
7. lay eggs and sleep on piles of gold 2 1 2
8. hate all humans 2 1 2
9. unprepared and weaponless 5 2 3 1 mark for each
10. any two pairs from: rhymes/doesnt rhyme; kenning/not a kenning; two-
line verse/five-line verse; description/story; three-syllable lines/line
syllables varied; short lines/longer lines; has a consistent rhythm/rhythm
changes with each line; short verses/longer verses; first line each verse
different/first line repeated each verse
4 2 3 1 mark for each correct contrast up to
2 marks
11. any two from: Dragon Day it tells a story, it sounds like somebody
talking, repetition of first lines, dramatic ending, its sad because they
werent ready; Dragon it rhymes, I like kennings, it tells us lots about
dragons, its like a puzzle, it paints a picture with words
6 2 2 accept any appropriate responses that
refer to the texts
1 mark for each correct answer up to 2
marks
Total for
this page
Name: Class: Date:
1 mark
2
1 mark
4a
1 mark
4b
1 mark
5
1 mark
AF2
AF2
AF3
1
1 mark
3
1 mark
6
Reading Test 1: Here Be Dragons
Why did mapmakers put Here Be Dragons on their maps? 1
Of what were the women of the village particularly scared? 2
a) Why does the writer say that the dragon fell from the sky like a
stone?
b) Why does the writer describe the dragons claws as steel-sharp?
4
Why do you think the young man wanted three feathers from the
dragons wing as payment?
5
Why did the young man only have a few magic powers? 6
Look at page 1.
Look at pages 23.
Find one thing from the passage that tells us this was not the
dragons first visit to the village.
3
AF5
AF5
AF7
AF2
11

Rising Stars UK Ltd 2008. You may photocopy this page.


Step 3 Generate a level
4
English Tests and Tasks has been produced to help teachers provide effective assessment for learning
in English and to deliver formative assessment of progress across Key Stages 1 and 2. The assessment
materials have been:
designed by an assessment expert;
written by experienced classroom teachers;
reviewed by an educational consultant for English;
reviewed by a language expert to ensure accessibility of language and content;
trialled with schools;
equated and standardised by an assessment expert to ensure reliability of the levels.
The tests are easy to use and mark. The scores for each test and task have been converted to sub-
levels. The level and sub-level information can then be used to investigate, monitor and report on the
performance of each pupil by:
plotting each pupils progress from term to term (summative assessment);
diagnosing each pupils strengths and weaknesses against the assessment focuses for reading
and writing (diagnostic assessment);
enabling each pupil to review his or her own progress in a structured manner;
informing your own assessment for learning strategy and supporting your lesson planning
(formative assessment).
Combined, the results from the tests can be used to gather reliable evidence to assist target setting
and predicting a pupils future performance.
The table below summarises the range of National Curriculum levels covered in the tests and tasks for
each year. Further detail is provided in the mark schemes and the mark and level threshold section.
About the English Tests and Tasks
The tests are linked to the range of genres and text types recommended by the Primary framework for
literacy and mathematics (October 2006). Details of the block and unit to which each test and task is
linked are given in the mark schemes. For ease of use, the tests in this book are presented as a series
of assessments for use in the autumn, spring and summer terms respectively. There are two sets of
tests for each term. You may use them in different terms if you wish; they are not prescriptive. Each
set of tests comprises:
a reading test that measures performance against a range of the reading assessment focuses
(AFs);
a short writing task and a long writing task.
We believe it helps for the writing tasks to follow the reading test as this gives background and
pointers to assist pupils in their own writing.
If your schools assessment policy values a termly or bi-annual summative test, English Tests and Tasks
can be used to obtain a National Test-equivalent mark from any of the three sets of tests. To do this,
give pupils the following tests from any term:
a fiction reading test;
a non-fiction reading test;
a short writing task;
a long writing task.
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
Level P82c Level 1c3a Level 1a4b Level 2c4a Level 2b5c Level 3c6c
5
Introduction
YEAR 4/INTRODUCTION
6
The combined results of such a test, together with a spelling and handwriting mark, will give you an
accurate and reliable indicator of the level at which each pupil is working.
Furthermore, the reading tests and writing tasks will provide you with diagnostic information
throughout the year which will show the progress the pupils are making in each reading and writing
assessment focus. This will enable you to set and monitor each pupils targets for improvement.
If your schools assessment policy is to test towards the end of the academic year, it is recommended
that you select the following tests from the summer term section of the book:
a fiction reading test;
a non-fiction reading test;
a short writing task;
a long writing task.
Every effort has been made to ensure that the levels and sub-levels reported are accurate and reliable,
but a test is only a snapshot of a pupils performance and may vary quite significantly depending on a
wide variety of circumstances, interest and prior experience. Each sub-level obtained from one test
covers a small number of marks, so a change of one mark can affect a pupils sub-level.
The reading tests
The reading tests are worth 15 marks each. In the reading tests, the questions assess across the range
of assessment focuses for reading, at a level which is appropriate for the target age group. Details of
the AFs for reading are included in the mark scheme.
Reading assessment focuses covered
AF2: understand, describe, select or retrieve information, events or ideas from texts and use quotation
and reference to text;
AF3: deduce, infer or interpret information, events or ideas from texts;
AF4: identify and comment on the structure and organisation of texts, including grammatical and
presentational features at text level;
AF5: explain and comment on writers uses of language, including grammatical and literary features
at word and sentence level;
AF6: identify and comment on writers purposes and viewpoints and the overall effect of the text on
the reader.
The writing tasks
The writing tasks are worth 35 marks in total; 13 for the short task and 22 for the long task. In the
writing tasks, the challenges are chosen to be suitable for the age and experience of the pupil. The
writing tasks should enable pupils to demonstrate what they have learned against the criteria of the
writing assessment focuses, thus enabling them to achieve appropriate levels in the tests. The writing
tasks also provide opportunities to assess both spelling and handwriting.
Writing assessment focuses covered
AF1: write imaginative, interesting and thoughtful texts;
AF2: produce texts which are appropriate to task, reader and purpose;
AF3: organise and present whole texts effectively, sequencing and structuring information, ideas and
events;
AF4: construct paragraphs and use cohesion with and between paragraphs;
AF5: vary sentences for clarity, purpose and effect;
AF6: write with technical accuracy of syntax and punctuation in phrases, clauses and sentences;
AF7: select appropriate and effective vocabulary;
AF8: use correct spelling.
7
How to use English Tests and Tasks in your school
Preparation and timings
1 Copy the required number of sheets to form the chosen assessment. The reading test booklets are
created by folding the A4 pages in half. The booklet page numbers are included on the page of the
text to be read.
2 Ensure pupils are seated appropriately to prevent overlooking each others papers.
3 Pupils will need pens or pencils and erasers. Pupils should be encouraged to cross out answers
rather than rubbing them out.
4 The suggested time limits are:
1 hour and 15 minutes (including 15 minutes reading time) for the reading test. Help with
reading may be given using the same rules as when providing a reader with QCA Optional or
Key Stage tests. Allow up to 25% extra time allowance for poor readers.
Allow no more than 45 minutes for the longer writing task and no more than 30 minutes for
the shorter writing task.
5 The writing tasks should be read to pupils before they start to write their answers.
Supporting pupils during the tests
Before the test, explain to pupils that the test is an opportunity to show their progress in reading and
writing fiction and non-fiction.
Many pupils will be able to work independently in the tests, with minimal support from the person
administering the tests (usually the teacher or teaching assistant). This person may encourage the
student to have a go at a question, or to move on to a fresh question if they appear to be stuck,
ensuring that no pupil becomes distressed.
It is important that pupils receive appropriate support, but are not unfairly advantaged or
disadvantaged. Throughout the tests, therefore, the teacher may read, explain or sign to a pupil any
parts of the test that include instructions, for example by demonstrating how to circle an answer.
With younger age groups you may also consider projecting the test or task onto a whiteboard to
support a whole class or group. You may choose to refer to the words on the whiteboard and read
them aloud so that pupils can follow them and write their answers on their papers individually.
Marking the test
A variety of strategies is possible, including peer- and self-assessment
as well as marking by the teacher. Use the detailed mark scheme and
your professional judgement to award marks. Do not award half marks.
We suggest that you annotate the mark grid for the writing task with a
tick to indicate the bullet points for which you are awarding credit. In
addition, circle or write the mark you are giving.
The mark grids for the writing tasks indicate the typical performance a
pupil working at a specific sub-level is likely to show in their writing.
It is suggested that marked tests be returned to pupils so that they can
transfer the scores to their progress record sheets (see page 8). In this
way they will become more aware of their own strengths and
weaknesses. Pupils should be encouraged to make their own corrections
when they are undertaking the analysis of their performance.
Use a five-minute feedback session with a pupil as they transfer their test outcomes to the reading
diagnostic profiles and writing self-assessment sheets. This provides a useful opportunity to discuss an
individuals progress and to explore any areas of uncertainty.
Mark schemes for reading tests
39
Reading Test 2: The Herald
Framework: Y4 Non-fiction Unit 1 Recounts: newspaper/magazines,
Non-fiction Unit 2 Instructions and Non-fiction Unit 3 Information texts AF Mk Lvl Extra information
1. date/price/headline 4 1 2
2. in the hills/around Buxworth/in the Peak District 2 1 2
3. he didnt know what it was/it was unusual 3 1 2
4. alliteration or it has the same letter as the other words 3 1 3 accept any reasonable answer
5. five 2 1 2
6. Australia and Komodo Island 2 1 3
7. Spain and China 2 1 3
8. they eat their young 3 1 2
9. to show it is fierce or to emphasise the size of the teeth 5 2 3
10. an instructional text 4 1 3
11. to help explain the instructions/make it easier 4 1 3
12. accept any reasonable explanation referenced to the text 2 1 2 e.g. YES because its made from
things that are easy to find
NO because you have to sew it
13. to fit on the sock or because dragons have mean, small eyes or to make
the dragon look fierce, not cute and cuddly
3 1 3 accept any reasonable answer
14. to encourage individual effort/for the puppets to look different/so they
could be proud of their own puppet
6 1 3 accept any reasonable answer
Reading Test 1: Here Be Dragons
Framework: Y4 Narrative Unit 2 Stories set in imaginary worlds and
Poetry Unit 1 Creating images AF Mk Lvl Extra information
1. as a warning or to show that these lands were unexplored or to show
there may be danger
2 1 2
2. the dragon taking their children 2 1 2
3. Thats what you always say! 3 1 3
4. a) because it fell fast or because it was heavy or because it was
frightening
b) they were cold/hard/sharp/strong
5
5
1
1
3
3
accept any reasonable answer
accept because they were like knives
5. accept any answer suggesting magical powers/potential of the feathers 7 1 4 indicates the reader understands the
elements of traditional tales
6. he was a wizard-in-training, or a young wizard 2 1 3
7. lay eggs and sleep on piles of gold 2 1 2
8. hate all humans 2 1 2
9. unprepared and weaponless 5 2 3 1 mark for each
10. any two pairs from: rhymes/doesnt rhyme; kenning/not a kenning; two-
line verse/five-line verse; description/story; three-syllable lines/line
syllables varied; short lines/longer lines; has a consistent rhythm/rhythm
changes with each line; short verses/longer verses; first line each verse
different/first line repeated each verse
4 2 3 1 mark for each correct contrast up to
2 marks
11. any two from: Dragon Day it tells a story, it sounds like somebody
talking, repetition of first lines, dramatic ending, its sad because they
werent ready; Dragon it rhymes, I like kennings, it tells us lots about
dragons, its like a puzzle, it paints a picture with words
6 2 2 accept any appropriate responses that
refer to the texts
1 mark for each correct answer up to 2
marks
YEAR 4/INTRODUCTION
YEAR 4/INTRODUCTION
8
Obtaining levels and sub-levels
The tables on pages 56-58 give the mark ranges for each sub-level for
each test. The CD-ROM version of English Tests and Tasks allows you to
enter the raw score gained for each test, plus spelling and handwriting,
by each pupil. The sub-levels and overall levels for a set of tests are
computed and displayed. This data may then progress through the
school with the pupil allowing you to keep an electronic mark book for
his/her primary experience.
Pupil progress records
Building-up the whole year diagnostic profile for reading
All the reading tests have been analysed against the assessment focuses for reading. The pattern of
marks covering the assessment focuses for each test is supplied as a diagnostic profile bar chart.
Pupils should shade in the bar chart with their scores in each reading assessment focus for each
reading test, so that they can see their strengths and weaknesses at a glance. The six diagnostic
profiles covering a terms tests are on one page for ease of use. This series of profiles enables pupils to
build a dynamic picture of their strengths and weaknesses in reading. They can also be used to
identify where pupils need to do further work.
Completing the progress record sheets for writing
The self-assessment sheets, which are on the CD-ROM
version of English Test and Tasks, have been designed to
enable pupils to analyse their performance in writing. Pupils
will be able to identify strengths and weaknesses and set
their targets for future learning. Teachers have also indicated
that this process is extremely useful to establish a shared
vocabulary of assessment, which helps inform the next steps
in teaching and learning.
Levels are given for individual reading tests and pairs of reading tests for each term.
Levels are also given for short and long writing tasks. A combined writing level from a short writing
task and a long writing task is also given. In this way, reading and writing may be monitored
individually.
For schools following a half-termly assessment policy in English, we provide a combined level
comprising each half terms reading piece with its accompanying short and long writing task. Spelling
and handwriting are also included in the calculation of the level.
Balance of marks and levels in each reading test:
NC level Test 1 Test 2 Test 3 Test 4 Test 5 Test 6
2 6 6 5 4 3 7
3 8 9 10 11 10 8
4 1 2
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 1: Here Be Dragons
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
1 23 45 67 89 1012 1315
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 2: The Herald
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
12 35 67 89 1012 1315
Autumn term reading level
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
1 2 36 711 1215 1619 2025 2630
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 3: Harriets Morning
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
12 3-5 67 89 1012 1315
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 4: Aliens
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
1 2 34 56 78 911 1215
Spring term reading level
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
1 25 610 1114 1518 1924 2530
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 5: How Do I Feel?
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
12 34 56 78 9 1011 1215
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 6: South View Youth Group
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
1 2 34 5 67 89 1011 1213 1415
Summer term reading level
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
2 3 47 810 1114 1518 1921 2225 2630
56
The marks and level thresholds for Year 4
Pupil record sheet for writing (levels 3b and 3a)
Every time I reach a target, I can put a tick in a box beside it. When I have three ticks, I have achieved the target. When I achieve a target, I can colour in a box in the chart below.
Name: Class:
Level Punctuation, spelling and handwriting Writing stories Writing non-fiction
3a
Most of my sentences have proper
punctuation at the end and begin with a
capital letter.
I sometimes use commas in complex
sentences.
I usually use speech marks when I punctuate
dialogue.
My handwriting is mostly joined.
I can use a variety of tenses in my writing to
show what has happened, what is happening
and what might happen.
I can use adverbial phrases to add more
information to my writing.
I use a wide range of connectives.
I describe characters reactions to events in
my stories.
I always use paragraphs when I introduce a
new topic.
I know how to organise clauses in sentences
so that the most important idea is
highlighted.
I use expanded noun phrases to give more
information.
I can write a variety of persuasive texts.
I am good at: date:
I need to improve: date:
Level Punctuation, spelling and handwriting Writing stories Writing non-fiction
3b
I use full stops and capital letters properly in
more than half of my sentences.
I use commas in about half of the complex
sentences I write.
I know where to put speech marks when I
am writing dialogue.
I can spell ten of the words in list 2 correctly
in my writing.
I use speech in my stories.
I use the present tense for speech and I
remember to go back to the past tense
afterwards.
I use time adverbials (like suddenly; just then,
later on) to show the order of events.
I usually have five paragraphs when I write a
story (beginning, problem, climax, resolution,
ending).
I can write introduction and conclusions in
all text types.
I can show my own viewpoint in non-fiction
texts.
I make careful choices about the words that
I write.
I use topic sentences to introduce the
subject of my paragraphs.
I am good at: date:
I need to improve: date:
Reading Test 1: Here Be Dragons Date:
AF my scores totals
5 2
1
1 3
2 4
4 5
2 6
1 7
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
How Do I Feel?
JANE
Jane stared down at the baby. Its very crumpled-
looking, she remarked.
Hes beautiful! said her grandmother sharply. Hes the
spitting image of his dad.
Janes fingers curled tightly round the cots bars. Hes
nothing like dad, she thought fiercely; hes nothing like
any of us.
Janes mother glanced at her anxiously. Would you like
to hold him, love?
No, thank you, replied Jane coldly. Ive got to do my
homework.
As she left the room, she was aware of her mother and
grandmother bending over the cot, cooing gently. They
had forgotten her already.
In her bedroom, she hurled her homework into a corner,
threw herself onto her bed and reached hungrily for the
black velvet rabbit leaning comfortably against the
pillow.
Ill go and live with Aunty Sue, she thought, thats what
Ill do. Ill make them sorry!
4 1
ANGRY
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No, I cant be bothered its a stupid game, anyway,
snapped Henry.
Mark began to feel uncomfortable. He had been
surprised when Henry had invited him to the Club but
had accepted eagerly, flattered that someone like Henry
should seek his company. He had imagined an evening
where Henry, surrounded by a crowd of the friends he
was always talking about, would gradually draw him into
the group and make him part of it.
Surprisingly, however, although there were plenty of
young people in the room, apart from quick glances as
they entered, no-one had taken any notice of them.
HENRY
Henry swaggered into the Youth Club and flung himself
into the one comfortable chair still empty. Mark stepped
carefully over Henrys outstretched legs and perched
uneasily on a stool that creaked ominously as he sat
on it.
This place is a real dump, yawned Henry. I dont know
why I keep coming.
Theres no-one on the table tennis table, said Mark.
We could have a game.
Henry shot him a quick, suspicious glance. How good
are you?
Well, Im not bad, said Mark shyly. I play a bit with
my dad.
2 3

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Total for
this page
Name: Class: Date:
31

Rising Stars UK Ltd 2008. You may photocopy this page.


1 mark
2
1 mark
3
1 mark
4
1 mark
5
1 mark
AF3
AF3
AF3
AF2
AF3
AF6
1
Reading Test 5: How Do I Feel?
Choose two words to describe how Jane feels. 1
What had Mark been looking forward to doing at the Youth Club? 4
Why do you think Henry would not play table tennis with Mark? 5
Henry flung himself into the one comfortable chair still empty.
What does this quote from the passage tell you about Henrys
character?
3
and
Choose two words to describe how Mark feels. 2
and
Look at both texts.
Look at pages 23.
1 mark
6
Do you think that Henry had as many friends as he said he had?
YES NO
Give two reasons for your answer.
and
6

Rising Stars UK Ltd 2008. You may photocopy this page. 32


a) How did Jane intend to make them sorry?
b) Who was she referring to as them?
9
2 marks
11
1 mark
9a
1 mark
9b
1 mark
10
1 mark
12
Reading Test 5: How Do I Feel?
Do you feel sorry for Jane? YES NO
Give a reason for your answer.
They had forgotten her already. Is this:
what Jane hopes? what mum wants?
what mum said? what Jane believes?
Why does the author say Jane reached hungrily for her black
velvet rabbit?
Look at page 4.
2 marks
AF6
AF5
7
Which of the two boys does the writer intend the reader to dislike?
Explain your answer.
7
1 mark
8
Why does Jane refer to the baby as it at the beginning of the
story?
8
AF2
AF2
AF6
AF5
AF6
10
11
12
Total for
this test
/15

Rising Stars UK Ltd 2008. You may photocopy this page.


Jealous!
Write a story about someone who is jealous.
Continue this conversation between Jane and her dad.
33
Short Writing Task 5
Long Writing Task 5
Jane and Dad Talk
Reread the passage about Jane.
This is what happened next:
Janes dad went into her
bedroom.
Whats wrong, Jane?
he asked.
You wont understand,
muttered Jane.
You will need to think about:
what makes them jealous;
how they behave;
how they feel;
how the problem is solved.
Reading Test 5: How Do I Feel?
Framework: Y4 Narrative Unit 4 Stories which raise issues/dilemmas
AF Mk Lvl Extra information
1. any two from: jealous, angry, miserable 3 1 3 two required for mark
2. shy, embarrassed 3 1 3
3. he is selfish, he doesnt think about other people 3 1 3
4. being included with Henrys friends or making new friends 2 1 2
5. he thinks Mark would win or would be better than him 3 1 3 any answer showing that Henry feels
vulnerable
6. NO with reason no-one took any notice of them and Mark had been
surprised to be invited
6 1 3 accept any other reasonable answer,
including the implication that Henry
didnt want to go on his own
7. any reasonable answer, based on characters from the text 6 2 4 accept reference to Henrys selfishness
and rudeness, and Marks willingness to
be a friend
8. she doesnt think of him as a person yet; she doesnt want to accept the
baby/she is jealous of the baby
5 1 3 answers should refer either to the
newness of the baby or to Jane
distancing herself from the baby, not
accepting him
9. a) by going to live with Aunty Sue
b) her family or more than one family member listed, e.g. mum and
grandmother
2
2
1
1
2
2
10. what Jane believes 6 1 3
11. she needs the rabbit like you need food or
she needs the rabbit
5 2 3 full answer 2 marks
part answer 1 mark
12. YES with appropriate reason, e.g. shes being left out, or
NO with appropriate reason, e.g. she shouldnt think they dont want her
6 1 3
41
Spelling and handwriting
SPELLING
Using professional judgement
HANDWRITING
Award 1 mark if:
the handwriting is legible and shows some
features of regularity in size and spacing.
However, the overall effect is disjointed and
uneven.
Award 2 marks if:
overall, the handwriting is regular with some
flow and movement. Letters and words are
usually appropriate in size and position, but
there is some variation.
Award 3 marks if:
the handwriting is consistent and fluent with
letters and words appropriately spaced. The
handwriting may maintain a personal style.
Composition and effect
Dialogue is used to move the story on rather than just as commentary.
Some resolution is achieved rather than just as exchange of opinions about the
baby.
Adverbial phrases describe how (noisily), when (whenever) or where (in the
bedroom) events occur.
Sentence beginnings consistently highlight main ideas in a sentence (Forever, I
wait and wait. Or I wait and wait forever!).
67 marks
Some variation in sentence beginnings highlights meaning. (Its not fair because
No matter what I do, Sighing, she )
Vocabulary choices draw the reader in. Words are chosen carefully to provide
accurate information for the reader, showing how Jane (furious, jealous,
devastated) and Dad feel (disappointed in you, so proud I could burst).
Additional details are given to keep the reader interested. (I feel lonelier than I
have ever felt.)
5 marks
It is clear to the reader what is happening in the dialogue as well as in the
surrounding text.
Some vocabulary is chosen carefully to interest the reader, including adjectives
(boring, horrible, smelly) and powerful verbs (she muttered, mumbled,
stammered).
Settings and people are described carefully (the brightly coloured nursery; the
baby with the big nose).
4 marks
An attempt is made to show how Jane is feeling, but it may not be sustained.
Some additional detail is given (I am hungry!) on at least one occasion.
The tone (how angry Jane is) and register (is the language formal, chatty?) of
the conversation may not be sustained.
23 marks
A brief conversation in which Jane expresses her feelings. These should be
consistent with the source text.
The story includes good ideas which relate to the source text. (Jane and Dad
talk about her feelings about the baby.)
Limited vocabulary choices relate to topic.
At least three words are chosen carefully to interest the reader.
1 mark
Sentence structure, punctuation and text organisation
Dialogue punctuation and layout is at least 75% accurate.
Begins to use a varied range of tenses to indicate what might be, what is, and
what was.
Full stops and capital letters 80%95% accurate. Commas used to separate
clauses in complex sentences.
Complex sentences joined with a wide range of appropriate connectives.
6 marks
Dialogue punctuation and layout is 50%75% accurate.
Sentences joined with a range of more specialist connectives such as: however,
although.
Correct use of pronouns (I, they, it).
Time adverbials show when things happen (Then, After).
Full stops and capital letters 50%75% accurate. Commas used in lists.
5 marks
A new line of writing is used when a speaker begins talking and simple speech
marks are sometimes used correctly.
Sentences joined with connectives such as: because, when, so on more than
one occasion.
Some careful use of adjectives (ugly baby).
Full stops and capital letters 30%50% accurate.
4 marks
The story includes both action (e.g. Jane slamming a door) and dialogue
between Jane and her dad.
More than 30% of sentences end with full stops, question marks or
exclamation marks and begin with capital letters.
Sentences joined with connectives such as: and, but, then, when.
23 marks
Mainly simple sentences beginning with noun or pronoun and verb (I want
The baby is).
Sentences joined by connectives such as and, then to establish the order of
events.
No more than three uses of and in any sentence.
25%50% of sentences marked by full stops and capital letters.
The text is at least 50 words long.
1 mark
Level
3a
3b
3c
2a
2b
Mark scheme for Short Writing Task 5: Jane and Dad Talk Framework: Y4 Narrative Unit 4 Stories which raise issues/dilemmas
Marks
awarded
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
% words
spelled
correctly
510
1125
2640
4160
6175
7690
91100
Name: Class: Date:
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Reading results
Show whether the questions were
correct or incorrect.
Total correct:
Level:
Pattern of AF coverage in reading
test
Composition and effect
There may be some evidence of the narrators stance
through comments on characters in the story.
Expanded noun phrases (Anya had bouncy curls and a
winning smile) contribute to the creation of atmosphere.
Adverbial phrases describe how (carefully), when (after
school) or where (outside the shops) events occur.
Sentence beginnings consistently highlight main ideas
in a sentence (She saw the bike and she wanted it).
810 marks
The story is well structured and the writer shows an
awareness of audience.
Characters reactions to events are described (Her heart
was thumping as she touched the box).
Speech is used, where appropriate, to show characters
reactions to events. (Help! he cried as he ran away.)
Vocabulary choices draw the reader in. A variety of
appropriate powerful verbs is used. (She gripped the
handlebars.)
67 marks
Characters and settings are described using carefully
chosen words and phrases.
Some dialogue may be used to comment on events.
The reader is told clearly what is happening in the story
through the eyes of the narrator. The narrators attitude
to each character is consistent (e.g. a character could be
selfish, greedy, jealous).
Verbs chosen to help the reader see the action.
45 marks
An attempt is made to describe characters and places
(The jealous girl; the un-mown lawn).
At least five words are carefully chosen to interest the
reader.
Some additional detail is given (She knew it would make
her feel sick) on at least one occasion.
23 marks
The story includes a good idea which is relevant to the
problem. One of the characters should be jealous of
another, or of a situation. A solution should at least be
hinted at.
At least three words are carefully chosen to interest the
reader.
1 mark
Text structure and organisation
Paragraphing is generally (75%) used to introduce new
events, new characters, a change of place or time.
Throughout, events are well related to each other and
the progression from one to the next is clearly marked.
An attempt is made to control pace through sentence
length. Short sentences or three-part sentences (She
stamped her feet, yelled out then pounced on Becky) are
used for action and longer sentences for description.
6 marks
The story beginning is intended to interest the reader.
(No! It wasnt fair!)
Sentences joined with a wider variety of connectives
such as: however, although.
The story ending is not rushed but is the logical
conclusion to the sequence of events.
Time adverbials show order of events. (Later that
afternoon; Just then )
Paragraphs are sometimes used to demarcate the main
events in the story.
5 marks
Sentences joined with connectives such as: because,
when, so.
The story has a clear beginning, middle and end. It
shows a progression of ideas or events which lead to a
conclusion.
The ending may be hurried. (We had a fight and she won
so I said I would be her friend.)
A variety of adjectives in simple noun phrases is used.
4 marks
Connectives join sentences, e.g. and, but, then, when.
Simple noun phrases are sometimes used. (A fat dog.)
A mixture of simple and compound sentences is used.
A simple sequence of events is described leading to a
conclusion.
23 marks
Ideas are grouped into sequences of sentences which
are mostly in chronological order.
A simple sequence of events is described although there
may not be a clear conclusion.
Sentences joined by connectives such as and, then to
establish the order of events.
1 mark
Sentence structure and punctuation
Begins to use a varied range of tenses to indicate what
might be, what is, and what was.
Full stops and capital letters 80%95% accurate.
Commas used to separate clauses in complex sentences.
Complex sentences joined with a wide range of
appropriate connectives.
Speech punctuation is generally accurate.
6 marks
Accurate use of pronouns (I, they, it).
Consistent use of appropriate tense past tense with
present tense for dialogue.
Adjectives are used effectively both before and after
nouns (The beautiful dress; The dress was beautiful).
Some variation in sentence beginnings highlights
meaning and contributes to pace.
Full stops and capital letters 60%75% accurate;
commas used in at least one complex sentence; some
evidence of speech punctuation.
5 marks
Writing is in the past tense.
Pronouns are sometimes used to avoid repetition of
noun phrases.
50% of sentences end with full stops, question marks or
exclamation marks and begin with capital letters.
Commas are generally used in lists, including lists of
events. (He looked around, grabbed the bike and went.)
4 marks
Writing is generally in the past tense, though this may
not be consistent.
More than 30% of sentences end with full stops,
question marks or exclamation marks and begin with
capital letters.
Commas may be used in lists.
23 marks
Mainly simple sentences beginning with person and verb
(She said; He went).
25%50% of sentences marked by full stops and capital
letters.
The text is at least 50 words long.
1 mark
Level
3a
3b
3c
2a
2b
Mark scheme for Long Writing Task 5: Jealous! Framework: Y4 Narrative Unit 4 Stories which raise issues/dilemmas
AF
3
3
3
2
3
6
6
5
2
2
6
5
6

Q
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9a
9b
10
11
12
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Assessment focus
2 3 4 5 6
Name: Class: Date:
5
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Name:
The bar charts show the patterns of marks against
the assessment focuses (AF) for reading.
Shade in your scores to see your strengths
and where you need to do more work.
Reading Test 1: Here Be Dragons Date:
AF my scores totals
5 2
1
1 3
2 4
4 5
2 6
1 7
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Reading Test 2: The Herald Date:
AF my scores totals
5 2
1
4 3
3 4
2 5
1 6
0 7
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Reading Test 3: Harriets Morning Date:
AF my scores totals
4 2
1
7 3
1 4
1 5
2 6
0 7
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Reading Test 4: Aliens Date:
AF my scores totals
4 2
1
7 3
0 4
2 5
2 6
0 7
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Reading Test 5: How Do I Feel? Date:
AF my scores totals
3 2
1
4 3
0 4
3 5
5 6
0 7
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Reading Test 6: South View Youth Group Date:
AF my scores totals
5 2
1
5 3
1 4
2 5
2 6
0 7
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
AF
Reading assessment focuses
This is what you have to do.
2 find information or ideas
3 understand and think about the information or ideas
4 work out how sentences and texts are put together
5 explain the writers choice of words and sentences
6
work out what the writer was trying to do and if it
was successful
7 understand when or where a text was written

Rising Stars UK Ltd 2008. You may photocopy this page. 42


Diagnostic profiles for reading
Pupil record sheet for writing (levels 3b and 3a)
Every time I reach a target, I can put a tick in a box beside it. When I have three ticks, I have achieved the target. When I achieve a target, I can colour in a box in the chart below.
Name: Class:
Level Punctuation, spelling and handwriting Writing stories Writing non-fiction
3a
Most of my sentences have proper
punctuation at the end and begin with a
capital letter.
I sometimes use commas in complex
sentences.
I usually use speech marks when I punctuate
dialogue.
My handwriting is mostly joined.
I can use a variety of tenses in my writing to
show what has happened, what is happening
and what might happen.
I can use adverbial phrases to add more
information to my writing.
I use a wide range of connectives.
I describe characters reactions to events in
my stories.
I always use paragraphs when I introduce a
new topic.
I know how to organise clauses in sentences
so that the most important idea is
highlighted.
I use expanded noun phrases to give more
information.
I can write a variety of persuasive texts.
I am good at: date:
I need to improve: date:
Level Punctuation, spelling and handwriting Writing stories Writing non-fiction
3b
I use full stops and capital letters properly in
more than half of my sentences.
I use commas in about half of the complex
sentences I write.
I know where to put speech marks when I
am writing dialogue.
I can spell ten of the words in list 2 correctly
in my writing.
I use speech in my stories.
I use the present tense for speech and I
remember to go back to the past tense
afterwards.
I use time adverbials (like suddenly; just then,
later on) to show the order of events.
I usually have five paragraphs when I write a
story (beginning, problem, climax, resolution,
ending).
I can write introduction and conclusions in
all text types.
I can show my own viewpoint in non-fiction
texts.
I make careful choices about the words that
I write.
I use topic sentences to introduce the
subject of my paragraphs.
I am good at: date:
I need to improve: date:
Levels are given for individual reading tests and pairs of reading tests for each term.
Levels are also given for short and long writing tasks. A combined writing level from a short writing
task and a long writing task is also given. In this way, reading and writing may be monitored
individually.
For schools following a half-termly assessment policy in English, we provide a combined level
comprising each half terms reading piece with its accompanying short and long writing task. Spelling
and handwriting are also included in the calculation of the level.
Balance of marks and levels in each reading test:
NC level Test 1 Test 2 Test 3 Test 4 Test 5 Test 6
2 6 6 5 4 3 7
3 8 9 10 11 10 8
4 1 0 0 0 2 0
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 1: Here Be Dragons
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
N/A N/A 1 23 45 67 89 1012 1315
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 2: The Herald
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
N/A N/A N/A 12 35 67 89 1012 1315
Autumn term reading level
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
N/A 1 2 36 711 1215 1619 2025 2630
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 3: Harriets Morning
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
N/A N/A N/A 12 3-5 67 89 1012 1315
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 4: Aliens
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
N/A N/A 1 2 34 56 78 911 1215
Spring term reading level
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
N/A N/A 1 25 610 1114 1518 1924 2530
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 5: How Do I Feel?
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
N/A N/A 12 34 56 78 9 1011 1215
Mark ranges for sub-levels for Reading Test 6: South View Youth Group
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
1 2 34 5 67 89 1011 1213 1415
Summer term reading level
2c 2b 2a 3c 3b 3a 4c 4b 4a
2 3 47 810 1114 1518 1921 2225 2630
56
The marks and level thresholds for Year 4
Reliability and predictions
Reading tests
All good reading tests should be a fair experience for each pupil; with some questions being easy,
some quite challenging and some hard. This makes the reading assessment a valid experience,
enabling the pupil to show progress in reading and writing, both fiction and non-fiction. The test must
also cover what has been taught. The questions assess across the range of assessment focuses for
reading, at a level which is appropriate for the target age group. In a properly designed and balanced
test it is possible to work out a set of theoretical pass mark thresholds and these are discussed below.
Theory and practice must come together, however, and the Rising Stars tests need to be standardised
and linked to the National Curriculum levels established by QCA in order for the levels to be reliable
and valid. These equated sub-levels are given on pages 5658.
Writing tasks
In the writing tasks, the challenges are chosen to be suitable for the age and experience of the pupil.
We believe it helps for the writing tasks to be taken after the reading test as this gives background
and pointers to assist pupils in their own writing. The writing tasks should enable pupils to
demonstrate what they have learned against the criteria of the writing assessment focuses, thus
enabling them to achieve appropriate levels in the tests. The writing tasks also provide opportunities
to assess both spelling and handwriting and so mirror the optional tests from QCA. The levels reported
on pages 5658 derive directly from the marking criteria in the mark schemes for the writing tasks.
Standardising the tests
Rising Stars conducted research with a sample of schools in April, May and June 2008. Pupils sat a
number of the reading tests, appropriate for each term of their year. The scores the pupils obtained on
pairs of tests were used to generate an overall score out of 30 for that term. These scores were then
equated to results obtained from QCA tests for English. The details are as follows:
In Year 1, teacher assessment was the benchmark;
In Year 2, pupils scores were standardised by equating to their KS1 results for English;
In Years 3, 4 and 5, the standardisation was to the reading sub-levels obtained from the
optional reading test. This method was chosen to provide an externally validated test-based
comparison for the levels;
In Year 6, pupils scores were standardised by equating to their KS2 English reading results.
The table below summarises the number of schools and pupils that undertook to participate in the
research.
Some of the schools were unable to complete the research or could only provide partial data.
Consequently, the final sample was approximately half the original size for each year.
Teachers and pupils in the schools also commented on the language, illustrations and suitability of the
questions in the tests. A number of the questions were refined and improved thanks to this advice.
The equating data for the reading tests
A series of equating exercises was undertaken to link the scores for the three pairs of tests to QCA
levels. This was done by an independent specialist using the same methodology used to equate
59
Year 1 2 3 4 5 6
Number of pupils 291 310 359 368 395 350
Number of schools 9 10 9 9 9 8
YEAR 4/RELIABILITY AND PREDICTIONS
60
National Curriculum tests from one year to the next in the development of QCAs tests. A review of
the performance of the pairs of tests for each term enabled levels to be determined for each individual
test. See the Appendix for further information.
Development of tests technical information
A level has been ascribed to every mark so that the tests can be seen from the outset to be balanced,
covering an appropriate span of levels for the year group in question.
The equating data was used to provide an empirical model that would enable theoretically-generated
sets of thresholds to be informed by the equated ones. We could then see how the tests compare in
terms of level of demand to the optional tests in particular. The algorithm Rising Stars evolved is
shown below. The algorithm works on the basis of the understanding that pupils will do better on
easier questions and score less well on harder ones.
Questions at their working level pupils get correct 40% of the marks available;
Questions at one level below their working level pupils get correct 60% of the marks
available;
Questions at two levels below their working level pupils get all of the marks available;
Questions at one level above their working level pupils are able to get correct 10% of the
marks available;
Questions at two levels above their working level are too hard for pupils and they get none of
the marks available.
Overall, we find that Rising Stars tests, by design, are quite challenging sometimes more challenging
than QCA optional reading tests and multiple choice-based commercial reading tests, where pupils
gain more marks. However, the equating process makes sure that the sub-levels we report match to
the optional test levels for year 4. Feedback from our research schools and users of Rising Stars tests
over the past years indicates that challenging tests, requiring written answers, taken throughout the
year improve pupils performance more than challenges that are too easy. The result of this high-
quality test practice is that pupils are better prepared when they take externally-set tests, be they
optional or end of Key Stage national tests.
A word of warning
Level threshold information is provided for each individual test, but it is recommended that at least
two tests be used to ensure there is sufficient coverage and balance for a valid and reliable
summative level for the term.
Appendix
The standard score and percentile table overleaf shows the distribution of marks and provides relative
information about a pupils performance against his or her year group. Standard scores greater than
115 are well above average; those less than 85 are well below average.
61
YEAR 4/RELIABILITY AND PREDICTIONS
Standard score 70 80 85 90 100 110 115 120 130
Percentiles 2% 9% 16% 26% 50% 74% 84% 91% 98%
RS Reading Tests 1
and 2 score (out
of 30 marks)
4 5 7 11 16 23 25 26 28
RS Reading Tests 3
and 4 score (out
of 30 marks)
1 6 7 10 14 20 24 25 29
RS Reading Tests 5
and 6 score (out
of 30 marks)
4 10 11 13 19 23 25 26 29
2.00
6.00
5.00
4.00
3.00
0.00 10.00 20.00 30.00
QCA
level
RS test mark
QCA level equated with RS test mark
Reading Tests 1 and 2
2.00
6.00
5.00
4.00
3.00
0.00 10.00 20.00 30.00
QCA
level
RS test mark
QCA level equated with RS test mark
Reading Tests 3 and 4
2.00
6.00
5.00
4.00
3.00
0.00 10.00 20.00 30.00
QCA
level
RS test mark
QCA level equated with RS test mark
Reading Tests 5 and 6
Reading Tests 1 and 2 combined
This pair of tests has a very strong correlation of pupils' levels with their test score, giving
Pearson's r= 0.70. There is no correlation of pupils levels with their age in months, giving
Pearsons r=0.06. This pair of tests is balanced and discriminates well.
Reading Tests 3 and 4 combined
This pair of tests has a very strong correlation of pupils' levels with their test score, giving
Pearson's r= 0.68. There is no correlation of pupils' levels with their age in months (Pearson's r= 0.06).
This pair of tests is balanced and discriminates well.
Reading Tests 5 and 6 combined
This pair of tests has very strong correlation of pupils' levels with their test score, giving
Pearson's r= 0.69. Correlation of pupils' levels with their age in months, however, is very weak, giving
Pearson's r= 0.12. This pair of tests has a few easy marks, is balanced and discriminates well.
The graphs below show the equating relationship for pairs of reading tests in each term between
overall marks and sub-levels. The closer pupils performance on the Rising Stars tests are to the KS1
performance, the nearer the Pearson correlation r is to 1.