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MONTHLY NEWSLETTER PUBLISHED BY HULL HISTORICAL~THE HISTORIC EXPERTS

N O V E M B E R 2 0 0 3
V O L U M E 1 ~ I S S U E 3
This window is a photo from a late 1920s catalog
showing a Queen Anne window with a very subdued and
typical upper sash. Technologically, there was little change
in this window from 1870-1930.
See more on page 3.
QUEEN ANNE STYLE WINDOW
This is our first double hung window and is the 3rd of 4 plates from Pencil
Points details book from the 1930s. It is placed in a frame wall with
siding and outside casing. There are a number of important details to note.
The treatment at the sill is a good one A (see detail on page 3). The weight pocket has pendulums that separate the
weights and keep them from hanging up on one another. This was an expensive detail that was not common, but I have
seen it in the fields in the best of projects. Finally the check rail is a stepped check rail which performs better. Weather
stripping would help these perform better but we will spend time on weather stripping in future issues.
PLATE NUMBER 3
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A
A LOOK AT PROJ ECT COMPL ET ED HHPM0 0 8
A love for millwork AND the perfect Molding Package for a Californian
resident exemplifies the successful partnership between design and
function...the Hull Historical way.
Below at right is Hull Historical Molding Package HHPM008, P. 74 found in
the Hull Historical Catalog 2003-2004. This Arts & Crafts package combines
classic Arts & Crafts detailing, like the header that overhangs the casings and
the tall wainscotting (optional). The plinth is plain and a reminder of
classical detailing. It is a simple but strong package.
The Californian resident that brought this package to reality The rendering
of this package was adjusted and modifies by the Hull Historical draftsman
that took the measurements from the client and modified it. Photo 2 shows
the stair area, the wood was stained cherry but any wood species can be used.
The detail and beauty of photo 3 is the skylight area. Great job Mr. Taylor!
MORE ON WINDOWS FROM PAGE 1: By 1920, no new innovations were seen in the millwork
catalogs. However, because of the popularity of the Period Revival architectural styles, millwork
appropriate to these styles was common. Casement windows were fashionable at this time, and the Queen
Anne sash had been developed and refined. Because the Victorian style was no longer in vogue, the
Queen Anne window which was initially Victorian, became much more subdued. Simple, plain upper sash
was common. Excerpt from Brent Hulls published book Historic Millwork, A Guide to Restoring and
Re-Creating Doors, Windows, and Moldings, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (See www.hullhistorical.com to order.)
KEEP THE HOME FIRES BURNING
WITH A HULL HISTORICAL MANTEL
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Left: I have made the sill a highlighted
item before, but it is an important
design feature that determines how
well the window performs in wind and
water infiltration tests. There are three
steps in this sill and that keeps the
water from traveling up the sill in heavy
rains. Further this sill should be pitched
at between 10 and 20 degrees for best
performance. Finally, note the height of
the interior stool. This helps create
pressure equilibrium which keeps the
water out.

MONTHLY NEWSLETTER PUBLISHED BY HULL HISTORICAL~THE HISTORIC EXPERTS


THE LAKOTA: ARTS & CRAFTS
1895-1920: Here is another great
arts and crafts mantel This is available
in paint or stain grade but should
only be stained in quarter sawn white
oak. The hinges will be hammered
hinge and glass should be wavy and
historic. Simple and elegant, this
great mantel will make a statement in
any home and is available today on
www.hullhistorical.com
Molding Package HHPM008
DETAIL PLATE N
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