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MWH FIJI WATER SECURITY PROJECT


Final Report

2013







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Introduction -Water for Life ................................................................................................................ 3
The Situation ........................................................................................................................................ 4
The Challenges and the Response ............................................................................................... 5
Methodology - Resilience through Empowerment ...................................................................... 6
Village Infrastructure Improvements Simple, Life-changing Solutions ........................ 10
Implementation and Results: Village by Village .................................................................. 10
Navotua Village ........................................................................................................................... 11
Matacawalevu Village ............................................................................................................... 12
Vuake Village ................................................................................................................................ 13
Nacula Village............................................................................................................................... 14
Naisisili Village ............................................................................................................................ 14
Enedala Settlement .................................................................................................................... 15
Blue Schools Project - The Next Generation of Rainwater Harvesters ........................ 16
Ratu Meli Memorial School, Nacula Village, Yasawa Islands ..................................... 17
Navunisea Primary School, Silana Village, Dawasamu ................................................ 19
Dawasamu Secondary School, Dawasamu District ....................................................... 21
Cumulative Project Impact .......................................................................................................... 23
How the funds were spent ........................................................................................................... 24
Impact by Project Phase ............................................................................................................... 25
Project Phase 1 ............................................................................................................................ 25
Project Phase 2 ............................................................................................................................ 25
Project Phase 3 ............................................................................................................................ 26
Conclusion -Water for the Future ................................................................................................... 27
Next Steps Expanding Our Impact .............................................................................................. 30







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Introduction -Water for Life
In 2013 MWH Global and The Global Vision International Charitable Trust
formulated a partnership with the goal of addressing the water security issues that
many people in Fijis rural and remote communities face on a daily basis. The MWH
Water Security Project was designed around the idea of creating WAI NI BULA
water for life. The overall goals of the project were to improve access to and
awareness surrounding, safe drinking water in both remote communities and
schools.

MWH allocated 10,000 New Zealand Dollars for the improvement of water security
in areas of Fiji suffering from a lack of consistent and reliable water sources. Global
Vision International was responsible for implementing and designing the project
operations around the MWH Fiji Water Security Project goals and objectives over a
12 month period.

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Figure 2- A basic rainwater harvesting system installed in Vuake Village

The Situation

In the Northern Yasawa Island chain access to safe drinking
water is limited. These volcanic islands have limited natural
water catchment due to the porous nature of the bedrock.
Many villages rely upon a number of different water sources
by utilizing seasonal wells, boreholes, and rainwater
collection. Water shortages in the northern Yasawas are
exasperated and become critical during, what can be, a six
month dry season, May-October. During periods of drought,
the Fiji government has in the past, been required to send
drinking water to the islands via barge after wells and water
tanks have run dry.

The collection of rainwater as a source of drinking water is
practiced by villages throughout the Yasawa Island chain and
throughout the Republic of Fiji. It is a safe and reliable way to
source drinking water. However, without sufficient collection
capacity, appropriate materials, long term water management
plans, system upkeep, filtration, and a system of water
reserves, villages become particularly vulnerable to severe
water shortages, especially during the dry season.


A proactive
approach
Water is
always a major
problem in the
Western
Division during
the dry season.
A proactive
approach is
being taken so
people do not
suffer during
the dry
season.

Commissioner
Western Commander

Mr. Joeli Cawaki







Figure 1 - Villagers help unload
a water tank between boats


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The Challenges and the Response

The MWH Water Security project was designed to offer long term simple and
sustainable solutions to village water problems and shortages. The main challenges
to water security in the Yasawas can be summarized as the following:

Lack of reliable water sources due to poor natural water catchment and
porous volcanic bedrock
Extended dry season is experienced in the Yasawa region which has
historically lasted up to 6 months
Poor upkeep of existing water infrastructure and lack of income to fund
new infrastructure
Theres remote islands have few transport options capable of carrying
drinking water during emergencies and historically the government has
been required to mobilize government barges from Suva to help ferry
water to the northern region of the Yasawas
Poor management and awareness of water conservation
















Basic Objectives of the MWH Water Security Project

Through infrastructure repairs and new installations provide an increased
water capacity of at least 40,000 Litres of drinking water.
Improve access to drinking water for at least two communities
Assist two Schools to Achieve Blue School status recognition by the
International Rainwater Harvesting Alliance.
Ensure impact of the program and improved access to fresh water,
sanitation, health and Education impacts at least 400 School children

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Methodology - Resilience through
Empowerment






















EXAMPLE WATER SECURITY ASSESSMENT (Data Collection Methodology)

The primary objectives are as follows:

1) Visually inspect all existing water systems (tank lid, guttering, note water level,
check filter, note any leaks or damage)
2) Document the condition of each system
3) Document parts needed
4) Document components used on the system ie

o Village: Naisisilli
o House #57
o New System
o 1x 5200 litre tank, 4 lengths guttering, 4 guttering connectors, 8
brackets, 2x stop ends, 1 x filter system with tap and all connections
Assessment Methods

The first stage of this project required detailed
assessments of existing water infrastructure
across five islands and over ten communities.
Through the collection of data and through
consultation with village leadership a database of
information was compiled. From this information
the MWH/GVI team made informed decisions on
how to deploy the project, where to focus efforts,
how to best utilize the budget, and what materials
would be required.


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o Status: Collecting water
o Condition: Filter changed 1x filter used
o GPS point: XXXXXXX
o Photo Number: img_12345

5) Photograph each system and ensure you have a way of connecting the photo to
your notes
6) Place a GPS point on all new systems and pre-existing systems (new meaning
tank and all components were installed by historical GVI Water Security
programs)
7) Village map one volunteer can be responsible for drafting a basic map of the
village, locating the water sources and other notable structures church,
school, etc.

Assessment Roles
The team must be methodical in its approach to the work as it will be easy to double
up on information, assess the same tank twice etc. Recommended role split is as
follows:
1) Photographer, documenting each tank and referring it to the data collected
either by the order of the photos or from the photos image number on the SD
card
2) Data Scribe responsible for writing down all the data on each system and
ensuring that all required information has been recorded at each work site.
Also responsible for geo tagging tanks with GPS.
3) Assessor this team member will assess the system and provide the data for the
scribe. Assessor may need to climb up on roof to check guttering, will need to
open filters, look inside tanks, interview villagers on the system etc.
4) Cartographer- This member of staff will move freely around the village and
create a map of the manage landmarks, assets, water sources in the village. The
mapping of all villages should be simple and functional
5) Repairs This person will work with the assessor to carry out on the spot
repairs / improvements such as filter change, gutter cleans, guttering repairs
etc. Repairs should bring basic tools and replacement materials to the field and
must ensure than any work carried out or new materials used are documented
by the Scribe.


6) Village Liaison Surveyor- this person will be responsible for interviewing locals
and collecting data through conversation. The information can either be
written down or recorded with an audio recording device. The idea is to ask
questions, collect quotes, note requests/problems, and learn more about the
village and its current challenges through conversation. Some of the types of
questions that should be asked and info recorded could include the following:

a) What is the current situation with water in the village?
b) How are the systems working?

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c) What is the current main source of drinking water?
d) Has the program made a difference?
e) What vegetables are grown in the village?
f) Fishing practices? (if marine team participate they can handle marine
related enquiries)
g) Do the villagers lock the tanks taps in preparation for dry season?



Figure 3 Examples of visual and geographic data collected during assessment phase

Analysis

After the above assessments were completed. The team complied the data into a
database for assessment. Village population was used as the defining factor in
determining how much water holding capacity should be available to sustain the
community during dry season. By comparing the population to the existing
availability of water and capacity for storing water, the project managers were able
to calculate and compare the capacity deficits between villages. From this it was
made clear which villages were most vulnerable to water shortages and how much
added water capacity would be needed to reduce water shortages throughout the

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year. Finally, the team analyzed the state of existing infrastructure to determine
where repairs where needed and which villages should be prioritized to receive
complete rainwater harvesting systems. The project managers then looked at the
cost of materials and the budget available in order to plan the most effective way to
utilize the project budget and maximize impact.

Construction

The methodology for construction and repair of rainwater systems was developed
in reference to basic standards for collecting rainwater for the purpose of human
consumption. The rainwater harvesting systems are kept as simple as possible using
locally sourced construction materials and water tanks. Local and international
volunteers were trained to identify appropriate roofs for water catchment, to
identify ways of improving and repairing existing systems, and the optimal methods
for installing diversion guttering (bracket spacing and gutter pitch, etc). Logistics for
the transport of materials from the mainland to the Yasawas was arranged by barge
and materials were deployed to the villages via long boat from the GVI base.



A Participatory Approach

All stages of the project in the villages were designed with a specific focus on
engaging local communities in the process of assessment and construction. Every
village project was supported by village youths to ensure that the methodology for
assessment, awareness of challenges to water quality, requirements for safe upkeep
of the systems, and the most efficient way to construct the systems were passed on
to the village stakeholders.

Over the period of the 12 month MWH Water Security project our team interviewed
and worked alongside over 200 local volunteers who participated in the processes
involved with a project designed to make permanent improvements to health and
livelihood. Over this period the interaction between Project managers, international
volunteers and local villagers ensure that a variety of perspectives were involved in
this process and most importantly ensured that local communities received training
on how to safely collect and store drinking water through the harvesting of
rainwater.










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Village Infrastructure Improvements
Simple, Life-changing Solutions

Working across six villages in the Nacula District, the MWH team carried out
multiple surveys in early 2013 that assessed the existing water infrastructure of
these villages and recorded detailed specifics on available water sources. This Audit
was used to inform the initial priority areas of the MWH water security project and
support was focused towards villages where either water sources were unreliable
or water holding capacity limited.

Implementation and Results: Village by Village

Each of the following project
sites were identified as high
risk areas for water
contamination issues and
water shortages. After
assessing over ten villages in
the Northern Yasawa Region
the villages depicted on the
map were deemed the most
vulnerable to water security
risks. The summaries below
describe the specific
challenges facing each village
and the steps that were taken
to ensure sufficient drinking
water is accessible
throughout the year.







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Navotua Village

Located on the northern coast of Nacula Island, Navotua is one of the most isolated
villages on Nacula Island and is home to 100 villagers. This community has limited
sources of income and limited transport options. In 2012 Navotua Village was
severely damaged by the high winds associated with Cyclone Evan. As well as
damage to buildings there was widespread damage to village water infrastructure.
Based on the project assessment, Navotua was found to have a severe deficit when it
came the drinking water required to safely support the village population.
Prior to the MWH project , approximately 100 people of Navotua depended on two
20,000L concrete tanks fed by rainwater for their drinking water. In addition- two
houses in the village have their own tanks that only their families use. The village
has 8 taps that supply water for cooking, washing and bathing. These taps are fed by
a 40,000L tank, which in turn, is fed by a nearby spring. There are also four wells,
one that can be pumped into a reserve 20,000L tank that can feed the taps in the
village if the 40,000L tank is empty. The three other wells are used for washing,
bathing and to water crops.

Before the MWH project began, the village had been required to ration drinking
water by opening the two existing drinking water tanks every Wednesday and
allowing people to fill as many containers as they feel is necessary to last
throughout the week. However, one 20,000L tank was damaged, leaving the village
with only one 20,000L tank. During the dry seasons the village allows the taps fed by
the spring to be opened every second Friday so people may collect their cooking and
washing water for the week. When the MWH/GVI team began consultation with the
village, it was confirmed that the village would need a minimum of a further 10,000
litres of drinking water to meet their basic drinking water needs and ensure enough
storage is available for the dry season. The MWH project funded and installed three
complete 5,300 Litre Rainwater Harvesting systems and improved the catchment
and reliability of an existing 10,000 litre system. The villagers of Navotua were
involved with the construction of the systems and trained in the proper upkeep of
the catchment. In the months following the project, there have been no reported
water shortages in Navotua Village.










Navotua Village
Total New Capacity Added: 15,900 Litres
Existing Capacity Made Available: 10,000 Litres


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Matacawalevu Village

Matacawalevu village depended on pumped borehole water
for many years. The water quality changes drastically
throughout the year and frequently it is brackish and
undrinkable. Due to the availability of this unreliable water
source, Matacawalevu has historically been the least proactive
village in the region when it comes to utilizing rainwater
harvesting as a source of drinking water. With ongoing reports
of tadpoles, sediment, and salt in the water the borehole has
become less and less reliable. After assessing the situation
that the villages population of over 100 people has been
facing, GVI and MWH approved the installation of three
complete 5,300 litre rain water harvesting systems that would
be placed at key points throughout the village to ensure that
all homes had access to one of the tanks.


Figure 4- Apisai and Selema (Chief of Matacawalevu Village)

Matacawlevu Village
Total New Capacity Added in Navotua Village: 15,900 Litres




The spring
does not
always give
us enough
water to use
for drinking
and cooking.
The
rainwater
tanks you
have provided
will really
help us!.

Selema Natovi,
Chief of
Matacawalevu
Village

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Vuake Village

Vuake Village has been one of the main major focal points of
the MWH water security project. This is due to the inadequate
mixture of water sources that the village relies upon
throughout the year and the relatively large population of
around 250 villagers.

Vuaki village initially had 14 tanks which collect
approximately 122,200 liters of rainwater. In addition, the
village has two tanks with a combined approximate capacity of
50,000 litres; these collect water from the bore hole behind
the village which feeds a number of taps throughout the
community. The members of the village use the rainwater for
drinking water and the water from the taps for cooking,
washing and bathing. During the assessment phase the main
pipe line connecting the two collection tanks to the bore hole
water source was found to be damaged beyond repair. As a
result the limited amount of drinking water from the
rainwater tanks was being used for cooking and cleaning. In
order to ensure greater water security and protect the
drinking water capacity MWH funds were used to repair and
improve over 60,000 litres worth of water collection capacity
through a variety of improvements to guttering, tanks, roofing,
and diversion piping. New PVC pipe were dug in and installed
to reconnect the village to the bore hole water source. Major
guttering repairs and catchment improvements were made to
various large rainwater harvesting systems which utilize large
cement tanks built in the 1980s.

These repairs rendered the systems more efficient,
maximizing the amount of water captured and extending the
life of the existing plastic tanks by ensuring tanks are installed
on solid and level bases. In addition to the repair to existing
infrastructure a further three complete rainwater harvesting
systems were funded and installed by the project. This
included two 5,300 litre systems and one large 10,000 litre
system. The complete overhaul of the water infrastructure and
installation of further catchment capacity in Vuake village has
drastically and permanently changed the water security
profile of this village.

Vuake Village
Total New Capacity Added in Navotua Village: 20,600 Litres
Existing capacity made available through efficiency
improvements and repairs: 60,000 Litres





Before MWH
and GVI brought
the water tanks
people relied on a
spring which is
dammed behind
the village for
drinking water.
But with heavy
rain, the spring
gets muddy and
the drinking
water gets dirty
so it is much
safer to get
drinking water
from the
rainwater tanks.

Meli Rainima
Matacawalevu
Village Headman

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Nacula Village

The largest village in the Nacula Tikina, Nacula relies heavily
on rainwater for drinking water. The existing systems in the
village have come from a number of sources and were in
various states of disrepair. The MWH/GVI team focused on
encouraging members of the village youth and various village
groups to take part in the assessment of the tanks and work
with the water team to flag issues with catchment area, tank
cleanliness, leaks, guttering damage, and overall collection
efficiency. By the end of phase three the collection efficiency
was drastically improved across seven of the villages key
rainwater harvesting systems and an estimated 50,000 litres
of holding capacity was made available.

Naisisili Village

Naisisili Village on the eastern coast of Nacula Island depends
almost entirely on rainwater for drinking. In 2013, GVI carried
out numerous repairs to RWH systems damaged by Cyclone
Evan, but the village identified a need for additional new
systems as well as further repairs. Thus, during MWH Water
Security Project, the team added a complete 5,300 litre
rainwater harvesting system to supplement demand. The
construction team repaired an existing system, increasing the
area of rainwater collection by approximately 43 square
meters, thus drastically improving the collection efficiency of
the system.
Nacula Village
Existing capacity made available through efficiency
improvements and repairs: 50,000 Litres


Nisisili Village
Total New Capacity Added through complete Systems: 5,300 Litres
Existing capacity made available through efficiency improvements
and repairs: 5,000 Litres



We thank
MWH and hope
to keep
working with
them and GVI
to make sure
everyone has
enough water
to drink. The
village youth
will help collect
the materials
needed to make
the concrete
base and help
with with the
labor.

Etuate Ratudradra
Vuake Village
Headman

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Enedala Settlement

The monthly demand in this small settlement was calculated at 7,600 litres. The
existing water situation involved reliance on a 5,000 tank and numerous buckets for
collecting rain from roofs with water for washing being sourced from brackish
wells. The MWH team funded, delivered, and installed a further two 5,300 litre
rainwater harvesting system, tripling the existing capacity of the settlement. Both
tanks were installed on the houses of the settlement elders ensuring that the most
vulnerable and least mobile people in the settlement have a local drinking water
source.




















Enedala Settlement
Total New Capacity Added through complete Systems: 10,600 Litres


Figure 5: Volunteers and Enedala Community Members pose in front of new RWH system

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Blue Schools Project -
The Next Generation of
Rainwater Harvesters


The International Rainwater Harvesting Alliance has
developed a set of criteria to recognize schools around
the world that have a proactive and efficient approach to
water, sanitation and health awareness.

Blue schools are institutions that have been recognized
by the International Rainwater Harvesting Alliance, as
being schools in which a high level of water awareness,
sanitation, and water solutions have been sustained in
keeping with basic human rights and the requirements
of an educational environment.








The International Rainwater
Harvesting Alliance (IRHA)
was created in Geneva in
November 2002 following
recommendations formulated
during the World Summit for
Sustainable Development in
Johannesburg two months
earlier. The mandate called
for the federation and
unification of the disparate
rainwater harvesting (RWH)
movement around the world,
to promote rainwater as a
valuable water resource and
to build on achievements in
this field for the fulfilment of
the Millennium Development
Goals.

In partnership with the most
eminent organisations and
individuals in the field, the
IRHA provides a lobbying and
advocacy platform for RWH.
It supports the growth of
RWH solutions to water
supply problems. It also
provides a forum for its
members to work together or
share experiences, and thus
for the benefit of people
living with water scarcity.

www.irha-h2o.org



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Relevant Components of the Blue Schools Programme Curriculum

Rainwater Awareness
Sanitation
Hygiene and Environmental Education
Initiation to Correct Waste Management

Infrastructure improvements to Sanitation facilities of schools

1. Composting Toilets (materials for construction)
2. Hand-washing facilities (materials for construction/improvements)
3. Access to drinking water (materials for improvements)

The MWH Water Security project utilized the criteria and methodology involved
with the IRHA Blue Schools program to help design a large component of the project
directed specifically at schools and children. Over the period of a year the MWH/GVI
team worked with four schools in the Dawasamu and Nacula Districts of Fiji. A main
focus of the project was to both physically improve school sanitation and water
facilities and actively enrich and promote water and sanitation awareness amongst
primary and secondary school aged children.

This component of the MWH water security project was implemented throughout
the 12 month project duration across three schools and extended beyond the initial
Yasawa Island project location to the Mainland of Viti Levu and the Dawasamu
District.

Ratu Meli Memorial School, Nacula Village, Yasawa Islands

Ratu Meli Memorial School is one of the largest schools in the Northern Yasawa
district with 117 students from five local villages. In 2012, RMMS was nearly closed
by the Fiji Ministry of Health due to concerns regarding the compounds toilet
facilities, general lack of sanitation, and limited safe water sources. Old cement
water tanks in the compound were cracked and dirty and the existing toilet block
did not have enough constant water to function.

The MWH project implemented a series of WASH (Water Awareness, Sanitation and
Health) awareness lessons for the primary school students through a series of
activities delivered by volunteers throughout the year.

The MWH team repaired the 10,000 Rainwater tank attached to the student dorms
and made sure that the system was clean and functional. The volunteers trained
school teachers on tank upkeep and put a system in place for checking the tanks on
a regular basis.

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With water being an ongoing issue the decision was made to construct and trial
composting toilets at the school to reduce reliance on flush toilets and pilot an idea
which could potentially be implemented on a large scale in the drought prone areas
of the Yasawas if managed correctly. The composting toilets, constructed in June
2013, are in full use and a system in place for the upkeep and maintenance. For the
first time in over 5 years this school has clean and reliable access to toilets for its
students.




















Figure 6: Composting Toilet Block constructed at Ratu Meli
Memorial School

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Navunisea Primary School, Silana Village, Dawasamu



The Navunisea District Primary (NDPS) is located in Silana Vilage, Dawasamu and is
run by a community committee. There are currently 143 students enrolled at
NDPS, both boys and girls, from class 1 to class 8 (age 5-15). The students are day
scholars from Silana Village, and the
surrounding settlements. There are six
teachers at the school and class sizes
vary from 15 to 35. As part of the MWH
Water Security Project and the Blue
Schools program volunteers at this
location focused on waste Management
due to its potential impacts to health
and hygiene. The schools toilets and
drinking water taps are fed by a fresh
water dam located in the hills behind
the school. Though water has run out
during extreme dry weather, generally
this school has access to running potable
water. However due to the amount of
standing water, ongoing burning of plastic and garbage, and resulting sanitation
issues the school environment demonstrated the need for a waste management
program.


Figure 7- Example of Poor Waste Management at
Navunisea School

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At the end of the school day the children sweep out the
classrooms and the mixed rubbish is either burned or buried in
the school compound.

The current waste management system was not sustainable
and burning rubbish caused the emission of black smoke and
the release of harmful toxins on the school grounds. However,
the school does compost its organic kitchen waste or feed it to
the pigs. This has been encouraged and Navunisea School staff
agreed to aim for all organic waste will be disposed of in this
way. The GVI/MWH team worked on designing a long term and
sustainable waste management system, which could be
managed by the school. Teachers were introduced to the Clean
School Programme during a professional development session
led by the GVI Primary Education Project Leader, who discussed
the opportunity to start a sustainable waste management
programme in school. To date, volunteers have been delivering
lessons and activities which promote environmental awareness
based around the 3Rs (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle). The children,
with the support of GVI/MWH volunteers, have made rubbish
separation and recycling bins, and promotional posters for each
class. The staff at Navunisea School have established an Eco
Council and selected Eco Warriors from each class, who
monitor the use of the separation bins. The bins have been used
to great effect. Any paper or card collected will be turned into
mulch for composting and flower beds. The wrappers collected
will be given to the Silana Womens Group, to support their
income generation project. And all non-recyclables are
collected for arts & crafts or up-cycling lessons led by
volunteers.

Figure 8- Navunisea School
Eco Warriors

Our aim is
establish the
Clean School
Programme for
the long term and
work towards a
zero burning
policy. Thus
ensuring
Navunisea School
is a healthy and
beautiful
environment for
the children of
Silana to learn
in.


Eleanor Hanson,
GVI Education Project
Leader.


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Dawasamu Secondary School, Dawasamu
District

The Dawasamu Secondary School is located two and half
hours north of Suva City down a rough coastal road. Around
170 students from the fifteen villages and three settlements
that make up the Dawasamu District and the remote
Nakorotubu district attend this secondary school daily. As
the only secondary school in the immediate region, there is
ongoing pressure on the facilities of the school compound.
The school facilities and teachers quarters rely on a nearby
dam as their water source. This dam is in poor condition
and is an unreliable and unprotected water source. During
heavy rain, dirt and residue from the surrounding hill sides
rush into the dam contaminating the source. During an
initial visit to assess the water situation, the MWH water
project team found that all the taps in the compound were
producing thick brown water. The teachers of the school
reported that many of the students had become sick and
that no one was drinking the water and that most of the 200
students and teachers in the compound either drank very

Over the years, the
Ministry through its Assets
Monitoring Unit and donor
partners like the European
Union, have facilitated
schools request for water
tanks.

Recently, schools in the
Yasawas and those who
also face water problems
have been requested to
submit their water tank
capacities to their nearest
District Education Office to
assist the office determine
the amount of water to be
carted to the school during
the dry spell.

Teachers are advised to
use their own discretion
during periods of water
shortage and ensure that
their respective District
Education Offices are well-
informed on ways in which
the school will recover lost
teaching time, he said.

The Minister for
Education, National
Heritage, Culture & Arts,
Youth & Sports, Labour,
Industrial Relations and
Employment, Filipe Bole


8/31/2010
www.fiji.gov.net


Figure 9: MWH/GVI Volunteers with Prime Minister of Fiji at the site of the new
MWH funded RWH system.

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little water or relied on surrounding villages and settlements for water. During the
third phase of the MWH project, the team constructed a new 5,300litre rainwater
harvesting system which is now collecting water from the new school roof. The
school now has a reliable drinking water source for both students and resident
teachers. MWH, GVI, and the Dawasamu Secondary school teachers have integrated
a program of water conservation and hygiene awareness into this years curriculum
in keeping with the standards and goals of the IRHA Blue Schools program.


Figure 10 - Children drink rainwater from a communal tank in Nacula Village

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Project Impact
Cumulative Project Impact







2
0
,
6
0
0
1
5
,
9
0
0
1
0
6
0
0
5
,
3
0
0
1
5
,
9
0
0
0
5
,
3
0
0
5
9
,
4
0
00
4
9
,
9
0
0
5
,
0
0
0
1
0
,
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
00
0
10,000
20,000
30,000
40,000
50,000
60,000
70,000
New Water Capacity Added(Litres)
Water capacity made available through repairs to existing infrasturcture (Litres)

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How the funds were spent


80%
82%
84%
86%
88%
90%
92%
94%
96%
98%
100%
Total Spend
Tanks: $12,600 Brackets: $318.8 Guttering Length: $308
Downpipe: $296.06 Timber: $151.86 Cement: $200.2
Expansion Head: $141.4 Black Visqueen Plastic: $21 Guttering joints: $55.95
Elbows: $95 Lockable Tap: $78.3 Rebar: 58.3
End Caps: $42.3

25

Impact by Project Phase
Project Phase 1

Project Phase 2


0
15,900
5,300 5,300
20,000
10,000
0
0
5,000
10,000
15,000
20,000
25,000
Vuaki Navotua Enedala Matacawalevu
New Storage (Litres)
Existing Water Storage Capacity Made Available Through Repairs/Improvements
15,300
5,300 5,300
0 0
5,300
38,000
5,000
0
17,200
10,000
0
5,000
10,000
15,000
20,000
25,000
30,000
35,000
40,000
Vuaki Naisisili Enedala Nacula RMMS Matacawalevu
New Storage
Existing Water Storage Capacity Made Available Through Repairs/Improvements

26


Project Phase 3























5,300 5,300
0
5,300
14,000
0
32,700
0
5,000
10,000
15,000
20,000
25,000
30,000
35,000
Vuaki Matacawalevu Nacula Dawasamu
New Storage (Litres)
Existing Water Storage Capacity Made Available Through Repairs/Improvements

27



Conclusion -Water for the
Future

Over the period of one year the MWH Water Security project has
focused on a strategic approach to improving water security in
some of Fijis most vulnerable communities through an
approach that has integrated a program of awareness with a
participatory approach to infrastructure improvements.


Figure 11- Volunteers and villagers work together to repair an old water tank

Access to drinking water is one of the basic human rights and
the approach of this project has been to encourage communities
to take a serious stance when it comes to conserving, collecting,
and storing drinking water. With the increasing frequency of
natural disasters and changing weather patterns in the Fiji
Islands, more regions of the country than ever before have been
experiencing problems ensuring year round water security.
With some communities suffering from more severe shortages
and more frequent problems with water quality, there is a
growing need for training and awareness in affected






I would like to
thank the MWH
Water Security
Project for
reaching out to
help communities
where they are
most vulnerable
and where it
matters most.

Filipe Nainoca
Director General, Fiji
Red Cross Society



28

communities. In this first instance of the MWH water security
project a focus was made on the outer islands in the driest
region of the country, The Yasawas Islands. In the aftermath of
Cyclone Evan in 2012, many villages in this island chain had
severely damaged water infrastructure and further problems
due to land erosion and the resulting effect on natural water
catchment. In order to better ensure a lasting impact, the
project focused equally on infrastructure improvements and
awareness and training for both adults and children.

Over 207,900 litres of rainwater collection capacity were
made available through the combination of new system
installations and efficiency improvements and major repairs
to existing infrastructure.

In testament to the effectiveness of the awareness program
and participatory approach of the project, in the months
following the initial works in Nacula Village the village
committee decided to invest in a further 50,000 litres worth
of water tanks to ensure the village had further water
available to complement the recent improvements and
refurbishment of existing capacity. The village requested
support from the MWH/GVI team to return to the village in
order to help oversee the ongoing efforts to improve water
security. This move to build upon the provided support and
utilize the shared knowledge and awareness emphasized in
the interaction between project volunteers and local
community members has been indicative of the most
important element of the
project the promotion
community resilience
through empowerment
and awareness.














On behalf of the school
management, teachers,
parents and students of
Dawasamu Secondary
School, I would like to
extend my thanks to
MWH for providing us
with 5000L of rain
water capacity. This
will provide over 170
students and teachers
with clean, safe
drinking water. Before
your donation we were
experiencing a severe
water crisis at the
school as our local dam
was becoming
contaminated and
children were being
forced to drink unsafe
water. This new rain
water system has gone
a long way in helping
us overcome this
problem. We are very
grateful for your
wonderful support.

Vinaka vakalevu

Mr Sikeli Koro
School Manager
Dawasamu Secondary
School


29




MWH Globals Commitment to Building a Better World has
been emphasized in the grass roots approach of this Water
Security Project and has helped to ensure an ongoing
investment in community development.
















Figure 12- Vuake Village Headman Eddie and his wife Teca

Over
Christmas,
many people
who have
moved to the
mainland
return to the
village and
since they are
not used to
drinking water
from the spring
it is important
to have
rainwater for
them to drink so
they dont get
sick.

Meli Rainima
Matacawalevu
Village Headman


30




Next Steps Expanding Our Impact























The Yasawa Islands

According to the UNDPs standards multiplying the population of a village by 5 litres
of drinking water and multiplying that product by the number of days in the dry
season it would give the ideal number of liters of storage which would provide
adequate drinking water to that village. Thus, by using this equation, two of the
current project sites Naisisili and Vuake village each require nearly 100,000 litres of
further water holding capacity to ensure the needs of the population are met.
Additionally in the region directly north and immediately south of the initial project
sites there are multiple villages requiring support. All 2014 water operations in the
Yasawas will be focused in these areas.




31




Viti Levu

In 2014, GVI hopes to continue the partnership with MWH in an effort to expand the
impact of the Fiji Water Security Project. With significant support provided in the
Yasawas the next step will be expand the project to new locations. The initial
assessments that lead to the installation of rainwater harvesting system to ensure
safe drinking water at the Dawasamu Secondary school in the Tailevu province as
opened up a new focus area for support. The problems faced in the Tailevu province
of the central division of Fiji are much different to those found in the Yasawas.
Ground water is available throughout the year to some degree yet, water quality
from these sources varies considerably as heavy rain and run off frequently render
water sources undrinkable due to contamination. Without secure systems separated
from the open ground water source, it is impossible to manage water quality on a
month to month basis. As a result, more incidents of water related illness are being
recorded each year in this district and many schools are without reliable water
sources.

Reporting

Data on the improvements made possible by this project and the resulting situation
in each of the villages will be reported to the BA Provincial Council, the relevant
District Office, Fiji Water Authority, Fiji Ministry of Education, Fiji Ministry of Youth
and Sports, , and The International Rainwater Harvesting Alliance.





Vinaka Vaka Levu!










March 2014
Global Vision International Fiji
PO Box 4431, Nadi
fiji@gviworld.com