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Dear Parents,

This supplementary booklet is


designed for grade Six National to
help them understand units (9+10
and 11).

Thank you

Miss Fatima Al-Kawasmi

2013-2014






A homonym is a word that is spelled the
same and mostly sounds the same as
another word but has a different
meaning.




When the cat wants to get
inside, it will paw at the door.
see
Follow up



Homonym's Answer Key:


1.B
2.A
3.A
4.B
5.B
6.A
7.B
8.B

















Adjectives

An adjective is a word that describes a
person, a place or a thing.

Examples:

1. The grey cat saw the shaggy dog
sitting in the dark corner.

2. She stated digging in the hard
rocks under the shady tree.








Gender of Nouns

Grammatical gender is a system of
noun classification. A common gender
classification includes masculine and
feminine categories. Masculine nouns
are words for men, boys and male
animals. Feminine nouns are words for
women, girls and female animals.
















A relative pronoun is a pronoun that
introduces a relative clause. It is called
a "relative" pronoun because it
"relates" to the word that its relative
clause modifies.














Relative Pronouns (Usage)
We use the relative pronouns to link a
piece of information to a person or a
thing.
I bought a new car.
It is very fast.

I bought a new car that is very fast.

She lives in New
York.
She likes living in
New York.


She lives in New York, which
she likes.




Relative Pronouns

a. Who
Use who to refer to people.

The people who live on the
island are very friendly.
My sister, who I live with, knows
a lot about cars.


b. Which
Use which to refer to things or ideas.

I live in London, which has
some fantastic parks.
I really love the new Chinese
restaurant, which we went to
last night.




c. That
Use that to refer to people, things
and ideas.

I visited the city (that /
which) John comes from.
My sister met a girl (who /
that) I used to work with.














A compound sentence contains two
independent clauses joined by a
coordinating conjunction (and, but,
for, nor, or, so, yet).

For example:

Scott was playing soccor, and Lily was
watching TV.
















Headings and Subheadings

Headings are titles in a passage. Each
one is at the beginning of a major
section in the passage. It tells the topic
of the section.

Subheadings are titles of paragraphs
with details about the topic of a major
section of a passage.

Remember: Headings and
subheadings give you clues about a
passage. Skim a passage and look at
the headings. Now you will have a
good idea about the topic you will be
reading.









Second Conditional

The second conditional is like the first
conditional. We are still thinking about
the future. We are thinking about a
particular condition in the future, and
the result of this condition. But there is
not a real possibility that this condition
will happen. For example, you do not
have a lottery ticket. Is it possible to
win? No! If you do not buy a ticket,
you will not win whatsoever. But
maybe you will buy a lottery ticket in
the future. So you can think about
winning in the future, like a dream. It's
not real, but it's still possible.









Sometimes, we use should, could or
might instead of would, for example: If
I won a million dollars, I could stop
working.

IF condition result

Past Simple would + base verb
If
I won the
lottery
I would buy a car.
If
it snowed next
July
would you be
surprised?
If
it snowed next
July
what would you
do?




y
o
u

w
o
u
l
d

b
e

a
s
k

h
e
r

t
o

h
e
l
p

y
o
u

t
o
o
.





























The Present
Perfect
(Usage)
We use the Present Perfect to talk about the past
and the present together.
= we want a finished action with a result in the
present (focus on the result).




Example No. (1):
Ive lost my keys.

Example No. (2):
She's hurt her leg.
(so I cant get into my
house)
(so she can't play tennis
today)




























How to form a sentence ( Using the
Present Perfect Simple)
Passive voice
The key has been lost.
Sub. + has + been + Past Participle

Subject + Verb (have) + been + Past Participle

Plural +
+ been + Past Participle
Singular +
Affirmative
have
has





























(Active Voice)

Sarah has lost the key.



(Passive Voice)

The key has been lost by Sarah.




Modal Verbs

Modals are different from normal
verbs:

1: They don't use an 's' for the third
person singular.

2: They make questions by inversion
('she can go' becomes 'can she go?').

3: They are followed directly by the
infinitive of another verb (without 'to').









*It is not a modal verb, but it is used in the same way.



Ought to

We use it to give
an advice. It is not
commonly used.

Should

We use it to give
an advice. It is
commonly used.


Have to*

It is used to show
that something is
necessary to be
done. (law or rule)


Must

It is used to show
that something is
necessary to be
done. (opinion)

Can

We use 'can' and 'could' to talk about
a skill or ability.





Should: I told Kathy she should try to
get some rest.

Ought to: You ought to admit that you
made a mistake.

Must: I must remember to call my sister
tonight.

Have to: You have to drive in the right
side of the street.

Can: I can speak English.