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February 2012
www.BDCnetwork.com
Febr b uary 201 011222
www.BDCnetwork.com
Founders Hall
George Mason University
Arlington, Virginia
FUSION
FACILITIES
When One Building
Is Better Than Two
18
REPLACEMENT WINDOWS
39
AIA/CES COURSE:
REROOFING PRIMER
43
www.BDCuniversity.com
comfort loves energy bills
Why should the fear of utility costs make us shiver and sweat? Advanced building
envelope solutions improve energy efciency and comfort for building occupants
in every climate. Get comfortable with your energy bill.
At BASF we create chemistry.
www.basf.us/construction

Circle 751
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 3
Fusing multiple functions into a single building can make it greater than the sum of its parts.
The rst in a series of articles on the design and construction of university facilities.
28 CHAPMAN CONSTRUCTION/
DESIGN: SUSTAINABILITY IS
PART OF EVERYTHING WE DO
32 WINNING BACK A
COMMUNITYS TRUST
An abandoned hospital is reenvisioned
as one-of-a-kind apartments in San
Franciscos national park.
37 MODERN-DAY
RECONSTRUCTION PLAYS OUT
A savvy Building Team reconstructs
a Boston landmark into a multiuse
masterpiece for Suffolk University.
39 REPLACEMENT WINDOWS
ELIMINATE WEAK LINK IN THE
BUILDING ENVELOPE
Replacement or retrofit can help
keep energy costs from going out
the window.
51 NEW WAYS TO
WORK WITH WOOD
New products like cross-laminated
timber are spurring interest in wood as
a structural material.
54 AUGMENTED REALITY COMES
TO THE JOB SITE
A new software tool derived from
virtual reality is helping Building Teams
use the power of BIM more effectively.
AIA CONTINUING
EDUCATION
43 REROOFING PRIMER: IN-DEPTH
ADVICE FROM THE EXPERTS
Earn 1.0 AIA/CES learning units by
passing the exam for this course, from
experts at Hoffmann Architects.
FEATURES
18
FUSION FACILITIES
VOLUME 53, NO. 02
FEBRUARY
ON THE COVER
Founders Hall, George Mason University, Arlington, Va., an academic fusion facility linking disparate
uses and departments in one building instead of multiple structures. Other such facilities can combine
recreation, athletics, nursing, kinesiology, or student life programs under one roof.
PHOTO: MAXWELL MACKENZIE
8 reasons to consolidate
multiple functions under one roof
Cause: Providing essential solutions that
inspire Building Teams to design and
construct great places for people.
CALL FOR ENTRIES: 2012 BUILDING TEAM AWARDS
DEADLINE: MARCH 2, 2012
Building Design+Construction is looking for your best newly built projects for our 15th annual
Building Team Awards.
This program recognizes the collaboration of the entire Building Team: owners, architects,
engineers, and contractors who worked together to create buildings that exhibit design and
construction excellence as well as benet to occupants and the community.
For all entry information and helpful tips, go to: www.bdcnetwork.com/building-
teamawards/2012.
GENSLERS NEXTGEN LEADERSHIP LESSONS
Katie Mesia, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, and Jared Krieger, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, werent sure
they were going to get into Genslers NextGen leadership development program. The six-
month program is designed to develop up-and-coming young talent.
View their video interviews at:
www.bdcnetwork.com/KatieMesia and www.bdcnetwork.com/JaredKrieger.
SUSTAINABILITY WHITE PAPERS RESOURCE
Building Design+Construction will publish how and why High-Performance Reconstructed
Buildings are different from new construction. Our 9th annual White Paper on Green Build-
ing will run in the May issue of BD+C.
Meanwhile, check out our eight previous White Papers, including Zero and Net-Zero
Energy Buildings + Homes, Green Buildings + Water Performance, Green Buildings +
Climate Change, and Green Buildings and the Bottom Line. www.bdcnetwork.com/
whitepapers.
LIKE BD+C
ON FACEBOOK
Visit www.bdcnetwork.com and click on the Facebook logo, or visit our Facebook page at
www.facebook.com/BDCnetwork.
07 EDITORIAL
The threat to smaller rms: Will the big
just keep getting bigger?
09 NEWS
Increase notched in construction
jobs, but unemployment rate still at
16%; USGBCs Best Green Schools
of 2011; Wignall named president of
HDR Architecture; SOM opens new
design studio.
14 ON THE DRAWING BOARD
Designs for Syracuse Law School cen-
ter; Arizona State University business
school expansion; San Francisco wa-
terfront project; data center in Chicago;
Scotlands City Garden Project.
56 NEW PROJECTS PORTFOLIO
Bank renovations in New Jersey;
University of Florida Innovation Hub;
volcanic spa destination in China; town
hall renovations in Babylon, N.Y.
61 PRODUCTS AT WORK
Aluminum curtain wall at Michigan
college; roof and wall panel coating
system; fabric duct system in California
library; metals panels added to St.
Louis Science Center.
65 ADVERTISER INDEX
66 BY THE NUMBERS
20,000 construction jobs to be created
by Cornells $2 billion campus in New
York City; $1.02 billion, total cost of new
football stadium.
DEPARTMENTS
Circle 752
e-Contents
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www.BDCnetwork.com
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Circle 753
Circle 754
THE THREAT TO SMALLER FIRMS
will the big just keep getting bigger?
S
teve Gido, a principal with nancial advi-
sory rm Rusk OBrien Gido+Partners, in
Maynard, Mass., wonders if mid-size A/E
rms (and, I would add, mid-size construction
rms) may be going the way of the dodo.
In The Vanishing Mid-Size A/E Firm (http://
www.rog-partners.com/Perspectives_11_10_11.
htm), he quotes Peter Moriarty, then CEO of
600-employee architecture rm Burt Hill, on why
his board sold the company to Stantec: Were
too big to be little, and were too little to be big.
Thats been the case for a number of mid-size
A/E rms, with RBF Consulting (540 employees)
and LPA Group (475) going to Michael Baker; L.
Robert Kimball (550) to CDI Corp.; and Anshen
+ Allen (200) to Stantec.
Even quite large rms have given up the ght
for independence. Halcrow (6,000 employees)
was bought up by CH2M Hill; PBS&J (3,900)
was acquired by Atkins. Many mergers involv-
ing smaller AEC rms have quietly taken place in
the last two years.
The root cause is obvious: the economic
downturn, coupled with diminishing marginal
returns, has forced principals at mid-size and
smaller rms to nd a way to cash out, or face
much more dire consequences. Gido also points
to the trend among top-tier clients for the kind of
one-stop shopping that they believe only large
AEC rms can deliver.
Gido is not entirely pessimistic as to the future
of smaller A/E rms. He points to mid-size rms
that have formed regional combinations to
defend their turf; for example, engineering rms
Pennoni & Associates (950 staff) and Patton
Harris Rust & Associates (450) joining forces to
protect their stronghold in the Mid-Atlantic.
Some rms are intentionally shrinking to
become leaner and meaner, according to Gido.
Still others are looking at new ownership mecha-
nisms, such as employee stock ownership or
employee stock purchase plans, as a way to
motivate the troops in the battle against the
Goliaths of the AEC industry.
Its a rough road, especially when you con-
sider that the top 10 rms in any building cat-
egoryhospitals, higher ed, K-12, government
buildingsin our BD+C Giants 300 rankings
control half or more of the total market share.
The remaining rms on each list are slugging it
out for a piece of the minority share of business
in that category, while smaller rms that dont
even make the cut are scrounging for crumbs.
Which brings me to Scott Simpsons Creat-
ing Value in the Current Economy (http://www.
di.net/articles/archive/creating_value_in_current_
economy). Ironically, Simpson headed the Stub-
bins Group when it was aquired by Kling, which,
as Kling/Stubbins, was acquired by Jacobs the
day after his article appeared last November.
He argues that design rms need to adjust
their game plans because todays economic
reality simply demands that more be done with
less. Clients want ever more creative solutions
to their problems, but they also value predicabil-
ity: They want to know what they are getting,
by when, and how much things will cost.
If you can deliver on that promise, your rm
may be one of the lucky ones to emerge victori-
ous through these painful times.
Lets not get overly Pollyannaish, but a few recent
signs, notably an uptick in the AIA Architectural Bill-
ings Index, offer some hope for a modestvery mod-
estrecovery for commercial construction this year.
At the same time, other reports present a worrisome
picture for small and medium-size AEC rms.
editorial
3030 W. Salt Creek Lane, Suite 201
Arlington Heights, IL 60005-5025
847.391.1000 Fax: 847.390.0408
STAFF
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR
Robert Cassidy
847.391.1040; rcassidy@sgcmail.com
SENIOR EDITOR
Tim Gregorski
847.954.7941; tgregorski@sgcmail.com
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Leslie Streicher
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS
Susan Bady
Peter Fabris
Barbara Horwitz-Bennett
C.C. Sullivan
Jerry Yudelson, PE, LEED Faculty
DESIGNER
Elena Mengarelli
WEB DESIGNER
Agnes Smolen
EDITORIAL ADVISERS
David P. Callan, PE, CEM, LEED AP, HBDP
SVP, Environmental Systems Design
Peter Davoren
CEO, Turner Construction Company
John E. Kemper
Chairman and CEO, KLMK Group
Laurin McCracken, AIA
Marketing Consultant, Jacobs
Philip Tobey, FAIA, FACHA
Senior Vice President, SmithGroupJJR
Randolph Tucker, PE
Associate Principal, ccrd
Peter Weingarten, AIA, LEED AP
Director of the Architectural Practice, Gensler
GROUP DIRECTOR - PRINCIPAL
Tony Mancini
610.688.5553; tmancini@sgcmail.com
EVENTS MANAGER
Judy Brociek
847.954.7943; jbrociek@sgcmail.com
DIRECTOR OF AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT
Doug Riemer
DIRECTOR OF CREATIVE
SERVICES & PROMOTION
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SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES
Circulation Department
Building Design+Construction
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CORPORATE
Chairman Emeritus (1922-2003)
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Chairperson
K.A. Gillette
President/CEO
E.S. Gillette
Senior Vice President
Ann ONeill
Senior Vice President/CFO
David Shreiner
Senior Vice President
Rick Schwer
Vice President of Custom Media
and Content Management
Diane Vojcanin
Vice President of Events
Harry Urban
For advertising contacts, see page 65.
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 7
The formidable RSA Tower soars 745 feet into Mobiles skyline and is recognized as the tallest
building in Alabama. It takes a solid foundation to support such a grand structure and reliable
technical expertise to ensure long-term success. Thats why you need the right mix and the
right partner.
GranCem Slag Cement, part of the Envirocore family of eco-efcient products, was a
main component in two critical concrete classes for the project mass concrete in the mat
foundation, high-strength columns and shear walls in the lower building oors. GranCem was
also proportioned to be used in numerous other applications throughout the RSA Tower.
Minimum strength requirements in both mixture classes were exceeded throughout the
project. The mass foundation placement was smooth and completed in less than 23 hours,
the internal temperatures in the 76 thick mat were within the specied limits, strength and
performance criteria were accomplished.
To start your next project on a solid foundation, visit www.holcim.us
Holcim. Perfecting Progress 888.646.5246
Solid footing. Solid foundation.
Amazing results.
Perfecting Progress

Circle 755
Gilbane Building Company Providence, R.I.,
reports that the construction industry is
still behind the recovery curve. In its recent
Construction Economics Market Condi-
tions in Construction analysis. The giant
construction management rm projects that
the recovery of the construction market will
lag behind the overall economic recovery.
The company based its projects on a wide
array of economic data, construction starts,
and material cost trends.
Nevertheless, some critical indicators may
INCREASE NOTCHED IN CONSTRUCTION JOBS,
BUT UNEMPLOYMENT RATE STILL AT 16%
OFFICE 2-4 STORIES OFFICE 5-10 STORIES OFFICE 11-20 STORIES MEDICAL OFFICE
11 10 % chg. 11 10 % chg. 11 10 % chg. 11 10 % chg.
Atlanta 163.33 153.60 6.3 156.16 148.23 5.3 152.80 132.55 na 202.80 193.56 4.8
Baltimore 172.19 161.45 6.7 164.63 155.80 5.7 161.08 139.32 na 213.80 203.44 5.1
Boston 216.85 205.21 5.7 207.33 198.03 4.7 202.86 177.08 na 269.25 258.59 4.1
Chicago 215.19 204.34 5.3 205.74 197.19 4.3 201.31 176.33 na 267.19 257.49 3.8
Cleveland 182.15 173.83 4.8 174.16 167.75 3.8 170.41 150.00 na 226.17 219.04 3.3
Dallas 156.87 148.89 5.4 149.98 143.69 4.4 146.75 128.48 na 194.78 187.62 3.8
Denver 173.85 163.89 6.1 166.22 158.16 5.1 162.64 141.42 na 215.86 206.52 4.5
Detroit 190.09 179.23 6.1 181.74 172.96 5.1 177.83 154.66 na 236.02 225.85 4.5
Houston 159.08 151.34 5.1 152.10 146.04 4.1 148.82 130.59 na 197.53 190.70 3.6
Kansas City, Mo. 191.19 179.06 6.8 182.80 172.79 5.8 178.87 154.51 na 237.40 225.63 5.2
Los Angeles 197.28 186.90 5.6 188.63 180.36 4.6 184.56 161.28 na 244.96 235.52 4.0
Miami 165.36 156.39 5.7 158.10 150.92 4.8 154.69 134.95 na 205.32 197.07 4.2
Minneapolis 205.40 196.14 4.7 196.39 189.28 3.8 192.16 169.26 na 255.04 247.16 3.2
New Orleans 162.96 152.21 7.1 155.81 146.88 6.1 152.45 131.34 na 202.34 191.80 5.5
New York City 243.98 231.89 5.2 233.27 223.77 4.2 228.24 200.10 na 302.94 292.20 3.7
Philadelphia 209.65 199.28 5.2 200.45 192.31 4.2 196.13 171.96 na 260.31 251.12 3.7
Phoenix 163.33 154.30 5.9 156.16 148.90 4.9 152.80 133.15 na 202.80 194.43 4.3
Pittsburgh 187.32 175.92 6.5 179.10 169.76 5.5 175.24 151.80 na 232.59 221.68 4.9
Portland, Ore. 183.63 174.18 5.4 175.57 168.08 4.5 171.79 150.30 na 228.00 219.48 3.9
St. Louis 189.16 178.88 5.7 180.86 172.62 4.8 176.97 154.36 na 234.88 225.41 4.2
San Diego 190.09 181.32 4.8 181.74 174.98 3.9 177.83 156.47 na 236.02 228.49 3.3
San Francisco 227.73 215.50 5.7 217.74 207.96 4.7 213.05 185.96 na 282.77 271.55 4.1
Seattle 192.30 183.07 5.0 183.86 176.66 4.1 179.90 157.97 na 238.77 230.69 3.5
Washington, D.C. 181.23 170.69 6.2 173.27 164.72 5.2 169.54 147.29 na 225.03 215.09 4.6
Winston-Salem, N.C. 140.07 131.81 6.3 133.93 127.20 5.3 131.04 113.74 na 173.92 166.09 4.7
RSMEANS COSTS COMPARISONS: Ofce buildings, medical ofces
ACCORDING TO RSMEANS, THE OFFICE 11-20 STORIES MODEL HAS BEEN SUBSTANTIALLY REVISED; THE PERCENTAGE DOES NOT REFLECT A TRUE ESCALATION RATE.
COSTS IN DOLLARS PER SQUARE FOOT FOR MORE DATA, VISIT RSMEANS AT WWW.RSMEANS.COM, OR CALL (800) 448-8182.
BY TIM GREGORSKI, SENIOR EDITOR
news
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 9
C
onstruction employment increased in
December 2011 by 17,000, driven by
gains in nonresidential construction
employment, according the Associated Gen-
eral Contractors of America, Washington, D.C.
AGC ofcials said that construction em-
ployment likely beneted from unseasonably
warm weather across much of the country
that extended the building season.
Nonresidential construction is clearly driv-
ing [Decembers] employment gains, said
Ken Simonson, AGC chief economist. But it
is too early to tell whether those gains came
because the weather was good enough for
crews to keep working well into December
or because demand is truly rebounding.
Total construction employment now stands
at 5,544,000, or 0.3% higher than a month
earlier and 46,000 (0.8%) higher than Decem-
ber 2010, Simonson said. He added that the
latest employment gures continue a months-
long trend of slight gains followed by slight
declines in construction employment, and
that overall construction employment is still far
below its peak level of 7,726,000 in April 2006.
Despite the employment increase in December
2011, the industrys unemployment rose in De-
cember to 16%, up from 13.1% in November.
Simonson said nonresidential specialty
trade contractors added 20,200 positions,
while heavy and civil engineering construc-
tion rms that perform the majority of
publicly funded construction work shed 300
jobs. Nonresidential building contractors
shed 2,700 jobs in December. Residential
construction lost 400 total jobs, as the
residential specialty trade contractors shed
2,900 jobs and residential builders added
only 2,500 positions in December.
ECONOMIC REPORT FORESEES ONGOING INDUSTRY CHALLENGES
USGBCS BEST GREEN SCHOOLS OF 2011
The USGBCs Center for Green Schools,
with founding sponsor United Technolo-
gies Corp., released the inaugural Best of
Green Schools 2011 list recognizing school
administrators and government leaders in 10
categories for their efforts to create sustain-
able learning environments.
Recipient schools and regions from across
the nationfrom K-12 to higher education
were recognized for a variety of sustainable,
cost-cutting measures, including energy con-
servation, record numbers of LEED certied
buildings, and collaborative platforms and
policies to green U.S. school infrastructure.
See the full list at www.bdcnetwork.com/
usgbc/bestgreenschools/2011.
WIGNALL NAMED
PRESIDENT OF
HDR ARCHITECTURE
Doug Wignall, AIA,
RAIC, LEED AP, has
been named president
of HDR Architecture Inc.,
succeeding Merle Bach-
man, AIA, who retired at
the end of 2011. Wig-
nall, a 20-year veteran of
HDR, served previously
as senior vice president
and international director
of the rms healthcare program.
HDR Architecture Inc. is primarily known
for designs in urban environments, campus-
es, and buildings in the healthcare, science
and technology, civic, justice, and higher
education markets.
TOP 10 MOST EFFICIENT SOLAR PV MODULES
The table below shows the Top 10 commercially available polycrystalline silicon solar PV
modules with the highest module efciency, according to research conducted by SolarPlaza,
an independent global platform serving the PV industry.
This information has been collated from public sources such as product datasheets online
and was complied by SolarPlaza in December 2011.
indicate a positive trend. New construc-
tion starts have been strong four of the last
ve months, construction spending has
improved throughout the year, and industrial
production related to construction materials
is up ve months in a row, says Ed Zaren-
ski, the reports author and a 40-year veteran
of the construction industry.
Among the topics covered in this compre-
hensive report are:
Construction starts, spending, and costs
Material price movement
Trends and costs for structural steel,
recycling steel, and copper
Architectural Billings Index
Current ination forecast
The free report is available at http://www.
gilbaneco.com/construction-economics.
10 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
news
Doug Wignall
has been named
president of HDR
Architecture Inc.
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MANUFACTURER MODULE EFFICIENCY MODULE TYPE
1. Solland Solar 16.00% Sunweb
2. Siliken 15.70% SLK72P6L-305
3. LDK Solar 15.67% LDK-200P-24(s)
4. Vikram 15.63% Eldora 280 (300)
5. Wiosun 15.54% E300P
6. A2peak 15.50% P3-235-60 (250)
7. CNPV solar 15.40% CNPV-300P
8. Latitude Solar 15.30% Latitude P6-60/6 (250)
9. JA Solar 15.29% JAP6-60-250
10. China Sunergy 15.24% CSUN295-72P
The St. Louis Council of Construction
Consumers recognized continuing efforts by
Paric, the St. Louis general contractor and
construction management rm, to promote
diversity in the construction industry.
Paric was selected as the Organization
of the Year by the Construction Consumers
group, which noted Parics continuing efforts
to utilize minority- and woman-owned busi-
nesses and to promote the employment of
women and minorities in the workforce.
The Construction Consumers group
stressed Parics efforts to break projects
into smaller sizes that are more realistic and
manageable for less experienced minority
contractors and Parics collaboration with
community-based organizations and techni-
cal schools.
PARIC DIVERSITY PROGRAM EARNS RECOGNITION
The University of Texas at Dallass new LEED
Platinum Student Services Building, which was
the recipient of a 2011 Innovation in Green
Building Award, was designed to improve
departmental efciency and interaction. Terra
cotta shades on the buildings exterior provide
a unique energy-efcient shading strategy. The
project came in $1.1 million under budget.
From reducing greenhouse gas emissions and energy costs,
to achieving LEED certification or meeting US ENERGY STAR
criteria, TALONs scalable approach helps you achieve it all. So
you can precisely monitor and control systems, measure real
results, lower operating costs, and remain on the cutting edge
of energy efficiency. Implementation of your sustainability
strategies is seamless and simple with TALON.

Answers for infrastructure.
usa.siemens.com/talon
Whether you are operating a small facility, large facility, or
multi-site campus, TALON remains a comprehensive and
affordable solution that expands and grows as your needs
change. As new technologies emerge, TALON ensures a smooth
migration, preserving your initial investment and keeping your
facility up-to-date. Contact a local Siemens Solution Partner to
get started today.
From rigid to flexible.
The TALON Building Automation System advances your buildings
performance and makes it more sustainable.
Circle 756
THORNTON TOMASETTI acquired FORE
SOLUTIONS, a green building consulting
rm. The acquisition allows Thornton Toma-
setti to expand its sustainability consulting
services and integrate green objectives
across all its practices.
www.bdcnetwork.com/thorntontomasetti/
foresolutions
The BUILDING COMMISSIONING AS-
SOCIATION released its New Construction
Building Commissioning Best Practices. This
publicly available document is applicable to
most building types and distills the long list
of guidelines, and longer list of tasks, into
easy-to-navigate activities that represent the
ideal commissioning process.
www.bdcnetwork.com/bca/bestpractices
The 87-story
AQUA TOWER
in Chicago was
named both
regional and inter-
national winner of
the International
Property Award as
Best Residential
High-Rise Devel-
opment. The build-
ing was designed
by an architec-
tural team led by 2011 MacArthur Fellow
JEANNE GANG, principal of STUDIO/
GANG ARCHITECTS.
www.bdcnetwork.com/aqua/designaward
AIA CHICAGO and the AIA CHICAGO
FOUNDATION named TRISTAN DESTREE
STERK, AIA, winner of the 2011 Dubin Family
Young Architect Award. Sterk is a principal at
the Ofce for Robotic Architectural Media &
Bureau for Responsive Architecture and an
assistant professor at the School of the Art
Institute of Chicago. The Dubin Family Young
Architect Award recognizes excellence in abil-
ity and exceptional contributions by a Chicago
architect between the ages of 25 and 39.
www.bdcnetwork.com/aiachicago/
dubinaward
12 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
news
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GET YOUR 2012 GIANTS 300
SURVEY TODAY!
DUE DATE: APRIL 13, 2012
Building Design+Constructions annual
GIANTS 300 REPORT ranks the top
AEC rms in commercial construction, by
revenue. Youll want to be sure your rm is
on the Giants 300 list, as potential clients
look to these rank-
ings for prospective
rms to design and
construct their proj-
ects. The GIANTS
300 rankings will
be published in our
JULY 2012 ISSUE.
Download the survey at www.bdcnet-
work.com/giants300/2012surveyform
HDR was selected to design Humber Rivers
new 1.7-million-sf hospital in Toronto, the
rst in North America to automate all of its
operational processes. According to HDR,
the all-digital facility is scheduled to open in
late 2015.
www.bdcnetwork.com/hdr/
humberriverhospital
SIEMENS INDUSTRY INC. completed the
acquisition of PACE GLOBAL ENERGY SER-
VICES, LLC in Fairfax, Va. The acquisition
enhances Siemens portfolio with new energy
consulting and management services.
www.bdcnetwork.com/siemens/paceglobal
SHAWMUT DESIGN AND CONSTRUC-
TION has been awarded a renovation
contract involving three dormitory buildings
at Brown University, Providence, R.I. The
contract includes total renovation of An-
drew, Metcalf, and Miller Halls, which will be
converted into double-occupancy bedrooms.
The connection between Metcalf and Miller
Halls to Andrews Hall will also be removed,
creating three independent structures.
www.bdcnetwork.com/shawmut/brown
The partners of SKIDMORE, OWINGS &
MERRILL LLP are launching a new design
studio in Los Angeles as part of their West
Coast practice. Leading the new studio are
three former SOM architects: MICHAEL
MANN, FAIA; PAUL DANNA, AIA; and
JOSE LUIS PALACIOS, AIA.
www.bdcnetwork.com/som/
westcoaststudio
FXFOWLE has formed of a joint venture
with CO ARCHITECTS, an academic,
research lab, and healthcare planning and
design rm based in Los Angeles.
www.bdcnetwork.com/fxfowle/coarchitects
VDK ARCHITECTS, an architecture rm
specializing in science and technology,
merged with HARLEY ELLIS DEVEREAUX,
an architecture and engineering practice.
www.bdcnetwork.com/vdk/hed/merge
Architecture and design rm CALLISON
acquired BARTELUCE ARCHITECTS &
ASSOCIATES. The acquisition will grow Cal-
lisons New York team to over 75 architects.
www.bdcnetwork.com/callison/barteluce
SKANSKA USA acquired the construction
company INDUSTRIAL CONTRACTORS
INC. and its afliated companies, based in
Evansville, Ind., for $135 million. Industrial
Contractors Inc. serves the commercial, in-
dustrial, and power markets of the Midwest.
www.bdcnetwork.com/skanska/
industrialcontractors
FGM ARCHITECTS acquired SRBL ARCHI-
TECTS. All SRBL staff members joined FGM
Architects Inc. effective last month.
www.bdcnetwork.com/fgm/srbl
The Cooper Union for the Advancement of
Science and Art, New York, N.Y.
INSPIRING THE BUILDING TEAM
07.11
www.BDCnetwork.com
GIANTS
300
Modular Building
Innovations
22
AIA/CES Course:
High-Performance
Windows + Doors
30
41
How the AEC Industry
Leaders Stack Up
F I R E R A T E D G L A Z I N G S O L U T I O N S S I N C E 1 9 8 1
MADE IN
USA W W W . S A F T I . C O M 8 8 8 . 6 5 3 . 3 3 3 3
Circle 757
BY LESLIE STREICHER, ASSOCIATE EDITOR
1
SYRACUSE LAW SCHOOL CENTER GEARED TO
MEET UNIVERSITYS ENVIRONMENTAL GOALS
New York City-based rm Gluckman Mayner Architects has
completed designs for the new 200,000-sf Dineen Hall at
Syracuse Universitys College of Law. The ve-story facility meets
exacting needs associated with legal study today, reecting
an organizational clarity and professional sophistication that
anticipates the user experience of students, faculty, and visitors.
A central atrium links the main level to the library, celebratory
space, and ceremonial courtroom. A green roof caps the atrium,
creating a seasonal outdoor terrace space with natural light
exposure. Classrooms, ofces, and cafes are arranged with casual
spaces for informal meetings. The facility, designed to meet the
universitys environmental goals, will seek LEED Gold certication.
2
ADAPTIVE REUSE TRANSFORMS 114-YEAR-OLD
WAREHOUSE INTO LOFT APARTMENTS
Originally built by General Electric more than a century ago, a six-
story, 365,000-sf warehouse in Bloomeld, N.J., is being turned
into the Parkway Lofts, a multifamily adaptive reuse housing
361 loft apartments. The 14.5-acre site will be transformed
into a high-density residential village also featuring 150 for-sale
townhomes and a clubhouse. Inside the apartments, 17-feet
ceiling heights and heavy oor loads will allow the Building Team
to add a new intermediate second oor and a penthouse level.
Prism Capital Partners owns the property.
ON THE
drawing board
1
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14 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
3
NEW BASE FOR ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITYS
GROWING SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Arizona State Universitys new McCord Hall at the W.P. Carey
School of Business will accommodate more than 10,000
business students when it opens in the summer of 2013. Kohn
Pedersen Fox Associates and RSP Architects of Tempe, Ariz.,
have designed what will be a 129,000-sf facility. Instructional
spaces, technologically advanced team study rooms, a career
center, outdoor assembly areas, and world-class conference
facilities round out the planned design. The building will be
home to graduate, MBA, and executive education programs as
well as an expanding undergraduate cohort. Green target: LEED
Silver certication.
4
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH PLANS NEW
NIAID HEADQUARTERS IN ROCKVILLE, MD.
JBC Companies and James G. Davis Construction are building
a new home for 2,000 employees of the National Institutes of
Healths National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
near other NIAID laboratories in Rockville, Md. Designed by
the Washington, D.C.-ofce of architect HOK, the 490,998-
sf, 10-story building will feature two wings of 25,000 sf each,
an atrium entry lobby, precast and glass exterior, and ve-
story parking garage. A new hiker/biker path will connect the
Twinbrook Metro Station to the Rock Creek Park network of trails.
444444444444444444
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 15
5
EXPANSIVE PUBLIC SPACE PLANNED
FOR SAN FRANCISCOS
NORTHEAST WATERFRONT
To help reinvigorate San Franciscos downtown, 30,000
sf of public space is planned for the citys waterfront
area. Architect Craig W. Hartman of Skidmore, Owings &
Merrill and Peter Walker of PWP Landscape Architecture
are designing the parks, community recreation areas,
street-level retail, and restaurant areas for the historically
underutilized northeast waterfront. The project, which is
being coordinated by San Francisco Waterfront Partners,
will create both public space and parks as well as 40,000
sf of private recreational areas within a new tness and
outdoor aquatic center.
6
CHICAGO DATA CENTER EMERGES IN
COMPETITIVE IT MARKET
Chicago-based Facility Gateway Corporations new data
center, envisioned by Environmental Systems Design (ESD),
will provide 100,000 sf with an additional 24,000 sf of raised
oor within a 60% leased facility. The building will help the
company serve carrier-type clients, support processing in
the city, and provide employees with a secure, move-in-
ready environment. ESDs design scales elements into the
base build, enabling the company to facilitate growth and
customization over time.
7
VERDANT CITY CENTER TO FRAME
SCOTLANDS HISTORIC ARCHITECTURE
IN ABERDEEN
The team of Diller Scodio & Renfro, Keppie Design, and
landscape architects Olin Studio has won the international
design competition for the City Garden Project, which will
transform the center of Aberdeen, Scotland, into a 70,000-
sf greenspace. Eight distinct gardens, a cultural and arts
center, and two plazas will be set within the context of the
city centers existing architecture. The design reinterprets
the topography of the city and provides signicantly more
usable space for the city to promote its historic bridged
streets, arches, vaults, and balustrades.
8
$13 MILLION STUDENT HOUSING FACILITY
TO OPEN AT WILEY COLLEGE IN TEXAS
Florida-based SIKON Construction has broken ground
on the $13 million, 500-bed Wiley Hall Student Housing
Facility at Wiley College in Marshall, Texas, on behalf of
Student Suites of Independence, Mo. Designed by Randall
Scott Architects of Dallas, the three-story housing facility is
slated to open in time for the fall term.
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16 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
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Circle 758
BY DAVID MILLS, AIA, AND
MICHAEL MEDICI, AIA
8 REASONS
TO CONSOLIDATE MULTIPLE
FUNCTIONS UNDER ONE ROOF
fusion
facilities
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first in a series
ON THE DESIGN AND
CONSTRUCTION OF
UNIVERSITY FACILITIES
Fusing multiple functions into a single building
can make it greater than the sum of its parts.
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 19
college and university buildings
EIGHT SIGNIFICANT BENEFITS
of fusion facilities
Fusion facilities can offer colleges and
universities at least eight key benefits:
1. Elimination of redundant space
2. Increased utilization of the facility
3. Highly leveraged integrated technology
4. More flexibility to meet changing space demands
5. New revenue sources
6. Creative funding options
7. Student buy-in on fee referenda
8. Enhanced student recruitment and retention
Texas A&M UniversityCorpus Christis fusion facility combines
academic departmentsnursing (above) and kinesiologywith
recreation and athletics programs, saving an estimated 7% on initial
construction costs. The indoor running track (left) is used by all pro-
grams. Building Team: SmithGroupJJR (architect); Jaster-Quintanilla
Dallas, LLC (civil/SE); Shah Smith & Associates, Inc. (MEP); Michael
Kendall (landscape architect); and Fulton Construction (GC).
A
n emerging design paradigm is
having a major impact on the
world of university campus plan-
ning and designfusion facilities.
As the name implies, fusion facilities bring
together two or more campus programs
previously housed in separate buildings into
a single location. Some pair recreation pro-
grams with student life services. Others add
wellness programs to the mix. One unusual
combination fused a recreation program
with nursing and kinesiology departments.
However they are congured, these fusion
facilities offer a new model and a new
perspective on design to the nations 4,495
Title IV-eligible, degree-granting institutions.
The most practical consideration fueling
this nascent movement is initial cost. We
estimateand this can vary, depending
on project assumptionsthat building a
single large-scale facility rather than mul-
tiple structures can save 10-15% on total
construction costs: perhaps 5-10% from
MEP savings, and another 5% from shared
classrooms, conference rooms, and com-
mon spaces.
But there is a much more overriding
factor than cost savings at work here
although your client wont mind saving
$3-4 million on a typical $30 million
project. As universities extend their reach to
embody the entire student learning experi-
encemental, physical, and emotional
broadening the scope of their facilities to
respond to that agenda makes perfect
sense. Through the incorporation of fusion
facilities, Building Teams and their univer-
sity clients can take the long view and look
at facility models from a broader vantage
point, beyond immediate programming
demands to a consideration of the diverse
needs of todays students.
Consider the case of George Ma-
son University, in Arlington, Va. Its new
256,000-sf Founders Hall takes in the
School of Public Policy, a 300-seat audi-
torium, a 6,000-sf multipurpose room, a
lounge, caf, campus bookstore, 160,000
sf of parking, and a multistory campus
library, as well as classroom space that
it shares with the previously completed
140,000-sf law school.
Then theres Mesa (Ariz.) Community
College. Two separate departments, nurs-
ing and exercise science, were bursting at
the seams in inadequate facilities. When
a couple of vacated buildings on campus
became available, instead of putting each
program in its own building, the college
on the advice of the faculty of both depart-
mentsopted for a fused interior tout,
renovation, and 11,000-sf addition. The
Mesa Community College Health-Wellness
Building is now helping to generate syner-
gies between two previously disparate
academic departments.
FUSING RECREATION AND
STUDENT LIFE
One trend that is gaining momentum is the
fusion between recreation and student life.
Both are critical components of the student
experience in that they provide activities to
engage students beyond academic study;
thus, their synthesis into one facility creates
new opportunities for planned and sponta-
neous student interaction.
Combining such programs creates more
shared space, reduces redundant program
areas, and promotes cross-pollination
between student life and recreation depart-
ments, encouraging students who arrive at
the facility for one reason to stay and use it
for another.
A related trend is the integration of rec-
reation and wellness programs in a single
facility. There is growing awareness of and
concern for wellness and the mind-body
connection at the nations colleges and
universities. As a result, higher education
institutions have strengthened their commit-
ment to providing students with wellness-
focused programs to promote student
health, disease prevention, and support for
mental health efforts. Since one of the best
ways to improve student education is to
focus on the total student experience, pay-
ing close attention to these wellness factors
is essential.
Beyond this obvious benet, many
college recreation programs are often
intertwined with academic wellness
programs like athletic training, exercise sci-
ence, and biomechanics research. Fused
recreation and wellness facilities are ideal
Mesa (Ariz.) Community College Health-Wellness Building lab. Building Team: SmithGroupJJR (ar-
chitect/MEP), Paragon Structural Design (SE), CMX LLC (CE), and McGough Construction (GC).
20 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
for joint programming such as educational
seminars, wellness fairs, group exercise
classes, and medical testing. On-site com-
mercial retail ventures like pharmacies and
tness retail are natural ts. Rice Universi-
tys Barbara & David Gibbs Recreation and
Wellness Center houses both massage
therapy and acupuncture services.
The benets of these hybrid facilities
extend far beyond a simple combination of
building programs.
1. ELIMINATION OF
REDUNDANT SPACE
Fusion facilities allow multiple departments
or activities to share typical service spac-
es like lobbies, lockers, foodservice, and
lounges, eliminating the need for redundant
areas in multiple neighboring buildings.
Combined facilities also facilitate the cre-
ation of additional program areas that one
department on its own might not be able to
justify or afford for its own separate facility.
This phenomenon was recently borne
out at Texas A&M UniversityCorpus
Christis new fusion facility. Originally slated
only to house recreation, this 148,000-sf
facility now supports recreation, athletics,
nursing, and kinesiology. We estimate that
combining these uses trimmed the amount
of redundant program space roughly 7%:
4,000 sf in lobby space, 3,000 in joint
instructional space, 2,000 in circulation
space, 1,000 in MEP space, and 400 in
walls and columns10,400 sf, about 7% of
this 148,000-sf facility.
But fusing these departments under one
roof did more than just increase efcien-
cies: It actually made the whole greater
than the sum of its parts. For example,
due to budget and physical constraints,
the original design for the single-use rec
center did not allow for a running track for
the recreation department. Adding the ki-
nesiology department to the project meant
that a running track and gymnasium had to
be included in the budget, since kinesiol-
ogy needed these facilities for its lab work,
although it only utilized them half the time.
With the fused program, the recreation
department gained access to the running
track plus an additional gym and multipur-
pose rooms (when not in use by the aca-
demic departments). The result: valuable
additional space for the recreation depart-
ment at no added cost.
2. INCREASED UTILIZATION
OF THE FACILITY
It may come as something of a surprise to
learn that some college and university rec-
reation centers struggle to attract students
after traditional class hours, or lose critical
mass at various points during the day. This
was true for Pomona College, in Claremont,
Calif. Its student center, originally built in
1999, was seen as dignied but unattract-
ive to students; in fact, they literally walked
around it to avoid walking through it.
A high-impact renovation transformed
Smith Campus Center into a more youth-
oriented space without abandoning
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www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 21
Pomona Colleges Smith Campus Center, a major renovation of an 1999 facility that students eschewed as overly traditional and uninviting. More youth-
oriented features in the upgraded fusion facility include a caf (left) and nightclub with light wall (right). Building Team: SmithGroupJJR (architect), S&K
Engineers (MEP), Nabih Youssef & Associates (SE), Halladay Mimmack (CE), EPT Design (landscape architect), and Hamilton Construction (GC).
college and university buildings
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sophistication or compromising its symbolic
importance. Its multifaceted program in-
cluded study rooms, a writing center, dining
areas, a pub, a nightclub, and an outdoor
amphitheater, making it a locus for student
activity at all hours of the day.
The Pomona College case illustrates
how a fusion environment can be alive and
vibrant throughout the day. From breakfast
in the dining room to a lunch study session
in the lounge; from an afternoon workout to
dinner with friends at poolside, then on to
an evening at the campus nightclub, fusion
facilities can literally provide a one-stop
venue for enhancing student life.
3. HIGHLY LEVERAGED
INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGY
The current crop of undergrads and gradu-
ate students expect technology, accessibil-
ity, online interaction, and social networking
at all levels. Fusion facilities provide the
perfect environment for this virtual interac-
tion to occur. WiFi and Internet connections
and group meeting rooms make the space
optimal for studying. Exercise equipment
that charges an iPod or iPhone or has
built-in monitors facilitates multi-tasking.
Lounges with at screen TVs offer students
a cozy place to relax. Gaming spaces allow
students to participate in exergaming or
University of Texas-Austins Gregory Gym, by
SmithGroupJJR (architect), Charles Gojer &
Associates (SE), Campos Engineering (MEP),
Mesa Design (LA), Emerson Construction (GC).
22 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
At the Central Michigan University Events Center, in Mount Pleasant, spaces were designed
with multiple functions in mind to encourage utilization by athletics, recreation, student affairs,
and public groups.
The 72,560-sf venue features retractable seating on the lower level to allow the event floor
to be expanded to accommodate additional guests or to modify the court layout to suit differ-
ent sports or activities. Practice facilities located next to the arena can be booked by club, ath-
letic, and recreation groups. The 15,200-sf concourse and lobby doubles as a banquet space.
CMU officials agree that the key element in the facilitys success is the flexibility it offers through
shared activity space and support areas.
The multipurpose nature of the facility was a top priority. The Events Center currently sup-
ports concerts, speaking engagements, events, educational courses, recreation activities, sum-
mer camp programs, and graduations. It also serves as the primary practice and competition
venue for mens and womens basketball, wrestling, volleyball, and gymnastics.
Since its opening in November 2010, more than 100,000 fans have attended athletic events
there, and more than 5,000 prospective students utilized the facility in last summers camp pro-
gram. Thousands of students and community members have participated in programs in the
past year or so.
Central Michigan Universitys Events Center, which opened in late 2010, has hosted events for
more than 275 campus organizations, thanks to the facilitys exible design. SmithGroupJJR
served as architect, MEP/SE, and landscape architect, with Clark Construction as GC/CM.
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college and university buildings
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FLEXIBILITY
its the key at Central Michigans Events Center
multiplayer tournaments that foster student
interaction and camaraderie.
At the University of TexasAustins Greg-
ory Gym, students requested more outlets
for charging laptops in addition to wireless
Internet access. With the shift in academ-
ics from individual to group projects, gym
staff has seen a growing number of student
groups utilizing these spaces for study ses-
sions, not just for exercise.
4. MORE FLEXIBILITY
TO MEET CHANGING
SPACE DEMANDS
Combining multiple services into a single
facility can give user groups greater ex-
ibility in the kinds of programs they can
hold. Fusions can also enable the admin-
istration to accommodate ever-changing
demand. Recreation facilities typically have
large gyms or multipurpose spaces that can
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Circle 759
easily be adapted for other event functions,
such as camps, commencement exercises,
or concerts.
Designing these facilities with exible
multipurpose spaces as well as back-of-the-
house preparation areas makes fusion facili-
ties desirable to a whole new set of user
groups. Therefore, the facility design must
be able to readily accommodate changes in
activities, groups, and settings. Creating this
adaptability is critical to ensuring that the
facility will be utilized to its fullest.
Having this kind of exibility can have
enormous payoff for the institution. For
example, the University of TexasAus-
tins Gregory Gym started the 2010-2011
academic year with a speaking engage-
ment by President Obama and concluded
it by hosting 25,000 family and friends
for various commencement activities. In
between those bookends, there were 5,500
reservations in the facility by 275 differ-
ent on-campus organizations, very few
of which dealt with recreation, said Tom
Dison, Associate Vice President for Student
Affairs and Director of Recreational Sports
at UTAustin. Built-in space exibility was
critical in making these events possible.
5. NEW SOURCES
OF REVENUE
Though campus groups are typically not
charged for facility use, outside users have
to pay a fee. Non-university-sponsored
events, such as private summer camps or
community-initiated programs, can gener-
ate revenue for fusion facilities. For ex-
ample, Rice Universitys recreation/wellness
fusion center generates about one-sixth
of its annual program budget from sum-
mer camps. Integration of events like these
optimizes facility usage, especially during
non-peak seasons like the summer, and
creates additional sources of revenue.
6. CREATIVE FUNDING
OPTIONS
Because some fusion facilities support
various combinations of recreation, student
Water volleyball in the leisure pool at Rice Universitys Barbara and David Gibbs Recreation and
Wellness Center (above), which also offers group tness, massage therapy, acupuncture, and a
3,000-sf wellness suite. The Building Team included SmithGroupJJR (AOR), Lake Flato Architects
(associate architect), and Counsilman-Hunsaker (aquatic design engineer). Texas A&MCorpus
Christi fusion facility (below) combines recreation, kinesiology, nursing, and athletics.
24 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
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www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 25
Madonna Universitys Franciscan Center for Science and Media takes
fusion to the nth degree. The 65,000-sf LEED Gold center, which
opened in October 2009, combines two fast-growing but seemingly
unrelated curriculascience and broadcast media/cinema artsnei-
ther of which could have afforded a new facility on its own.
The comprehensive science program takes in biology, microbiol-
ogy, genetics, organic and physical chemistry, quantum physics, and
astronomy, with instrumental and computational research labs, class-
rooms, and seminar rooms. The broadcast media and cinema arts
portion of the $20 million facility houses digital radio and TV studios
along with a video editing suite and a 150-seat lecture hall.
MADONNA UNIVERSITY fusion facility melds science and media
life, and academic programs, they may be
able to take advantage of creative fund-
ing options that might not be available for
single-use buildings.
As noted above, Texas A&M University
Corpus Christi originally planned to build
a new 70,000-sf standalone recreation
center. Shortly after beginning the design
process, the university introduced a second
phase of 150,000 sf for the nursing and
kinesiology programs. At that time, Phase II
was in its infancy with no scheduled start or
completion date.
Funding for Phase I was to be provided
through a student referendum; with the
addition of the Phase II academic compo-
nent, however, the university was required
to issue bonds to nance the project. A
struggling economy, along with increased
difculty in passing bonds, led the admin-
istration to package the Phase I recreation
center with the Phase
II academic building
under one bond. Fus-
ing the programs into
one facility enabled
the university to ob-
tain funding to move
ahead with the design
and construction of
all programs under
one roof.
7. STUDENT BUY-IN
ON FEE REFERENDA
Fees to fund these kinds of facilities often
come from fee increases approved through
student referenda. Hybrid facilities typically
garner greater student support than single-
use facilities because they appeal to more
constituencies. It is important to advise your
collegiate clients to keep in mind the diverse
needs of current students in order to rally
more widespread support for fusion facilities.
8. ENHANCED RECRUITMENT
AND RETENTION
Many institutions of higher learning have be-
gun to develop comprehensive recruitment
and retention plans focused on the mental,
physical, and emotional development of
High-tech science labs (above right) will enable students and
faculty to conduct research in collaboration with area businesses
and industry. The Franciscan Center, the rst new building on
Madonnas Livonia, Mich., campus in 40 years, supports the
universitys mission to help the Michigan economy diversify and
compete globally.
Linking with the science department in the Franciscan Center made
new studio facilities (below right) nancially feasible. Due to rapid
growth, the broadcast media/cinema arts program at Madonna
University needed more space but could not afford to build a new
facility on its own.
college and university buildings
Fusion facilities provide colleges and
universities with a competitive edge
by generating extra revenue and pro-
moting social interaction and cohesion
on campus. They may well become
the focal point of campus life.
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students. The plans go beyond the boundar-
ies of standard textbook learning and seek
to engage students more fully in campus life
and thereby improve their overall satisfaction
with the university experience.
For years, recreation professionals have
struggled to develop outcome-based
metrics to quantify the impact that campus
recreation and student life facilities have on
recruitment and retention. A 2006 APPA
study by David Cain, PhD, and Gary L.
Reynolds of nearly 16,000 students from
46 institutions across the U.S. and Canada
showed that 32.3% of students rated
recreation facilities as extremely or very im-
portant in the university selection process.
Another 35.6% rated exercise facilities and
14.8% rated intramural sports facilities as
extremely or very important. While facilities
for [ones] major (73.6%), the institutions
library (53.6%), classrooms (49.6%), and
residence halls (42.2%) were deemed more
important by prospective students, recre-
ation and student life facilities were seen by
many as signicant factors in their selection
of a college or university.
Students at Stephen F. Austin State
University in Nacogdoches, Texas, certainly
made that point clear to administrators.
According Steve Westbrook, Vice Presi-
dent for University Affairs, Students feel
that recreation facilities are important to
attracting prospective students to SFA in
the future.
This was a major reason the university
moved ahead with the construction of a
new 78,000-sf fusion facility, which, with its
new Indoor and outdoor facilitiesincluding
basketball and racquetball courts, a three-
lane track, climbing wall and bouldering
cave, exercise and weight rooms, pool, div-
ing well, and loungehave made it a hub of
student activity on campus.
FUSION BUILDINGS
AS CENTERPIECES
OF CAMPUS LIFE
Because they respond directly to con-
temporary student expectations, fusion
buildings may provide institutions with
a competitive advantage. The buildings
respond positively to todays students call
for the latest technology and on-demand
services, while also helping the administra-
tion generate much-needed revenue and
promote social interaction and cohesion
on campus.
Nearly a decade ago, Roy V. Viklund and
David L. Damon, two designers at Sasaki
Associates, predicted that combining col-
legiate facilities for student life and recre-
ation may be the wave of the future. They
noted that many students make up their
minds about a college within the rst 15
minutes of a campus tour, and suggested
that the combined student life/recreation
center would be a good place to start and
end such tours.
Today, many campus tours still start at
the institutions recreation center or student
union. In the future, the best place to start
might be the campuss new fusion facility. +
David Mills (david.mills@smithgroupjjr.
com) is a Principal and Senior Architect at
SmithGroupJJR. A member of the National
Intramural-Recreational Sports Association,
he holds both BArch and MArch degrees
from the University of Texas at Arlington.
Michael Medici (mike.medici@smith-
groupjjr.com) is SmithGroupJJRs Senior
Vice President and Learning Practice
Leader. He has directed the rms Phoe-
nix ofce since 1989. A member of the
Society for College and University Planning,
he holds a BArch degree from Lawrence
Technological University, which granted him
its Distinguished Alumni Award.
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Rock climbing wall at Stephen F. Austin State Universitys 78,000-sf fusion facility, by architect F&S
Partners Inc. (now part of SmithGroupJJR), Friberg Associates (MEP), Jaster-Quintanilla (SE), Bar-
Win Consultants (CE), Counsilman-Hunsaker (aquatic design), and Kendall Landscape Architecture.
26 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 27
Although the benefits of fusion facilities can be
substantial, you should consider three potential
pitfallsscheduling conflicts, security concerns,
and utility allocationsbefore advising your
university clients to embark on such a project.
Scheduling multiple groups. The hybrid
nature of fusion facilities can lead to significant
conflict over space sharing and scheduling. This
is especially true when your building houses
multiple departments like recreation, athletics,
and academic affairs, each of which may have
unique space needs and schedules. Plans must
be developed to avoid scheduling conflicts.
It took the staff at Central Michigan Univer-
sitys Events Center a while to realize that the
change to a fusion facility might necessitate a
change in organizational structure to accommo-
date scheduling difficulties. When the building
first opened in late 2010, athletics, recreation,
club sports, and event leaders were allowed to
schedule the facility on their own. That proved
chaotic, and now the departments must book
the facility through a central office.
The new approach enables all user groups,
including club sports, to have equitable access
to the facility. We would not have been suc-
cessful had we not made this change in the
way we operate, says Stan Shingles, CMUs
Assistant Vice President
for University Recreation,
Events, and Conferences.
Dealing with security
concerns. Security is a
major concern on college
campuses, but it becomes
even more critical when
institutions have facilities
that are open late or that
stay open 24 hours a day.
Design considerations
like lighting and building
access become critical in
making fusion facilities
safe for students at all
hours of the day.
To address security
concerns raised by having multiple access
points at the Texas A&M UniversityCorpus
Christi fusion facility, the university installed
controlled-access points between the recreation
and academic programs. These access points
close after a certain hour to force student traffic
into the front entrance of the recreation facility.
Managing utility charges. Because certain
components of fusion facilitiesnotably recre-
ationmust pay their own way through student
fees, the complex should be appropriately
metered and its electricity use carefully moni-
tored so that energy costs for pay-as-you-go
components can be separated from the facilitys
total billings.
At Texas A&M UniversityCorpus Christi,
electricity metering made it possible for the
recreation components bill to be calculated
separately from those of the nursing and kine-
siology programs.
Rec Centers Centers of Attention, Roy V. Viklund and David L. Damon,
Athletic Business, November 2002. http://athleticbusiness.com/articles/
article.aspx?articleid=386&zoneid=26.
Educating the Whole Student: The Growing Importance of Student
Affairs, Arthur Sandeen, Change, May-June 2004, v36 no. 3, 28-33.
The Impact of Facilities on Recruitment and Retention of Students,
David Cain and Gary L. Reynolds, Facilities Manager, March/April 2006,
v22 no. 2, 54-60.
Fusion Building: New Trend with Some Old Roots, Craig Hamilton, Plan-
ning for Higher Education, January-March, 2009, v37 no. 2, 44-51. http://
www1.scup.org/phe/FMPro?-db=PubItems.fp5&-lay=ART&-format=read_
full.htm&-error=error.htm&ID_pub=PUB-DWPkJe1BbJR5yFkPZN&t_Pub_
PgNum=44&-SortField=t_Pub_PgNum&-Find.
Student Health, Student Rec Compatible Under One Campus-Wellness
Roof, Jack Patton, Athletic Business, Nov 2009. http://athleticbusiness.
com/articles/article.aspx?articleid=2822&zoneid=8.
Recreating Retention, Jill Moffitt, Recreational Sports Journal, 2010,
v34 no. 1, 24-33. Abstract: http://library.uvm.edu/dissertations/index.
php?search_type=item&bid=1728334.
Hybrid Student Centers House Multiple Campus Functions, Paul Stein-
bach, Athletic Business, April 2010. http://athleticbusiness.com/articles/
article.aspx?articleid=3513&zoneid=15.
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES on fusion buildings
Central Michigan Universitys Events Center had to reorganize its pro-
cedures to avoid scheduling conicts between user groups. Security
and utility billing practices are additional concerns for fusion facilities.
college and university buildings
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A FEW WORDS OF CAUTION about fusion facilities
I
nspiration. It can occur in the strangest of places and often when
its least expected. For John C. Hall, the 55-year-old CEO of Chap-
man Construction/Design, Newton, Mass., inspiration struck him
atop a ladder, nearly 30 years ago.
In 1982, his business, then known as John C. Hall Construction,
was purely a means for Hall to pay living expenses and tuition as
he studied for his BArch in the night program at what is now the
Boston Architectural College. Ultimately, his goal was to grow the
company into a successful design-build rm that specialized in
sustainable construction.
I remember being up on a ladder that day and thinking that if I
ever grew this company in the way I envisioned, I wouldnt want it to
be directly associated with me by name, says Hall.
By 1984, Halls ladder-top inspiration had come to fruition as
Chapman Construction/Design, which is based on Halls middle
name. Nearly 28 years later, the company has grown to more than
50 employees and completed hundreds of construction projects.
More to the point, Chapman has become one of the nations leading
sustainable construction rms, which is one of many reasons why
Building Design+Construction has recognized Chapman as a Best
AEC Firm to Work For.
COMMITTED TO SUSTAINABLE
CONSTRUCTION PRACTICES
In the early years, Chapman grew its client base by word of mouth,
repeat business, and a reputation for excellence. Hall wanted the
business to grow by pursuing the kind of projects that t the busi-
ness model. He took a pass on opportunities for growth that were
simply for the sake of growth.
In the intervening years, the company has built a solid client base:
70% of the rms work consists of commercial interior work for
corporate, educational, and medical/biotech clients; 20% supports
BY TIM GREGORSKI, SENIOR EDITOR
28 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
CHAPMAN CONSTRUCTION/DESIGN
sustainability is part of
Chapman Construction/Design builds a
working culture around sustainability
for its clients, and for its employees.
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 29
everything we do
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area nonprot organizations and institutional clients; and the remain-
ing 10% involves consulting clients in the LEED rating system, build-
ing performance, and renewable energy.
Led by Hall and vice presidents John Ferreira, Bob DAmico,
and Rich Elliott, the rms 55 employees, from the president to site
supervisors to ofce staff, are committed to implementing the most
advanced environmental sustainable construction practices in the
AEC industry. Operating under a team approach is a philosophy that
Hall says guides the rms dedication to sustainability at all stages
of the construction process. Sustainability isnt something you can
just dabble in, says Richard Elliott, a Chapman vice president. To
be successful, it has to become a mindset that everyone on the
team shares. Were lucky to have a staff here that not only under-
stands that but is enthusiastic about it, making sustainability part of
everything we do.
In 2009 Chapman renovated its own two-story, 17,000-sf head-
quarters, which received the U.S. Green Building Councils LEED-CI
Platinum rating. We use the building as a teaching tool with our
clients and other industry partners, as well as students and the local
community, says Hall.
INTEGRATING PROFESSIONAL GROWTH,
DEDICATION, AND DEVELOPMENT
An integral part of Chapmans success has been the professional
development and continuing education of employees. The rm
provides quarterly industry-specic seminars on building science,
innovative methods and materials, and LEED training.
Chapman Construction/Design, based in Newton, Mass., takes pride in
its close-knit, team-oriented culture. CEO John Hall (in blue shirt, center
opposite and above left) says the rms success can be attributed to
dedicated employees that are committed to sustainable construction
practices. Nearly 50% of Chapman employees are LEED accredited.
The dedication of our employees and
our companywide commitment to sustain-
ability has been a major differentiator from
the competition, says Hall.
Currently, 26 of the 55 Chapman staff
members have earned LEED accreditation.
Its an exciting, progressive place to work
with a close-knit culture, says Hall. Every
Chapman employee has the opportunity for
personal and professional growth. Chap-
mans key business ideas and initiatives are
driven by nine Working Groups and focus on:
Building Science and Education
Client Relations
Corporate Management
Field Operations and Safety
Human Resources
Marketing
Project Management Process
Subcontractor Development
Technology
The Working Groups, which range in size
from ve to 10 members, consist of a diverse
cross section of staff, including senior man-
agement, eld staff, and new employees. The
goal is to encourage the employees sense
of ownership so they can see their ideas
develop from conception to implementation.
The Working Groups have been a
win-win for Chapman and its employees,
says John Ferreira, senior vice president of
construction. The groups provide a venue
for everyone to share ideas, and the com-
pany benets from having so many people
thinking about how to improve our business,
whether by streamlining an existing process
or developing a new program.
It is from these Working Groups that
many of the employee benet programs
have evolved.
SUBCONTRACTORS
SUBJECTED TO
CHAPMANS STANDARDS
Chapmans relationship with its subcontrac-
tors is providing positive results on the job
site. An increasing number of clients are
seeing the value in having a construction
manager involved early in the process, as
well as the benets of transparency and
true collaboration among the team mem-
bers, says Hall.
In order to work for Chapman, sub-
contractors are subject to a detailed
application process. Subcontractors that
exceed Chapmans expectations qualify
for inclusion in Chapmans Subcontractor
Phonebook, which currently lists more than
2,000 subs.
Once the job is completed, Chapman
puts the subcontractors through a rigorous
review and evaluation. The goal is two-fold:
rst, to give Chapmans project managers
detailed information on the subcontractors
for reference on future contracts; and, sec-
ond, to provide the subs critical information
they can use to operate their companies
more efciently.
We have many dedicated and respected
subs that we work with again and again,
says Hall. We even have a Working Group-
focused entirely on our relationships with
our subs, constantly evaluating them and
providing constructive feedback.
The Subcontractor Phonebook record so
far: less than 1% turnover, and many sub-
contractors have been used repeatedly.
WORKING FOR CHAPMAN
ON THE JOB SITE
For every project, Chapman recommends
sustainable alternatives to meet or exceed
LEED standards. Chapman selects and
utilizes materials that are high in recycled
content, including drywall and acoustic
ceiling tiles. Specied paints, sealants, and
adhesives contain low or no volatile organic
compounds. Chapman also explores every
avenue and opportunity for rebates, grants,
and tax incentives associated with efcien-
cy upgrades incorporated into the work.
Safety is of critical importance to
Chapman. The rm recently submitted its
Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses sum-
mary to OSHA on the heels of more than
117,000 man-hours in 2011. We had zero
recordable incidents or illnesses for the
year, says Hall. We attribute this success
to our comprehensive safety program and
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In 2010, Chapman Construction/Design self-performed the renovation of its 17,000-sf headquarters
in Newton, Mass. Employees Mick Wallace and Eric Churchill install the photovoltaic panels.
30 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
Sampling Chapmans benefits
$250 annual allowance for work clothing for
all employees
$500 annual tool allowance for eld staff
The Battle Buddy mentor program, in which
a senior staffer is assigned to a younger
eld-based employee to offer personal
guidance and professional development
Vehicle reimbursement and priority parking
at the Chapman ofces for employees using
hybrid vehicles
Personal Growth Sabbatical for
employees who have been at the company
more than 10 yearssome have used this
time for volunteer work in Africa and Hawaii.
More than half of Chapmans 55 employees have
been with the company for more than 10 years.
CHAPMANS CLIENTS
appreciate the firms
team-first approach
(http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=3oh-02fQRCI)
our outstanding employees, who go above
and beyond to ensure that safety is the top
priority on all job sites.
CHAPMAN AWAY
FROM THE OFFICE
Life outside the ofce is important to Chap-
man employees. The close-knit Chapman
employees spend time together away from
the ofce several times a year for team
building and social activities.
An employee favorite is the Bill Rich
Memorial Challenge. The annual summer
shing trip and picnic honors the late Bill
Rich, a much-loved Chapman supervi-
sor who passed away in 2009. Other
team-building events include the Ode to
Summer cookout every September at the
Chapman ofces.
Chapman is also dedicated to sup-
porting the next generation of engineers
and construction professionals. The rm
awards a $2,000 annual scholarship to a
student at Bostons Wentworth Institute of
Technology and the Minuteman Career &
Technical High School, Lexington, Mass.
Our partnership with Chapman is truly
a model for collaboration between higher
education and industry, says Wentworth
president Dr. Zorica Pantic. The Chapman
Construction/Design Sustainability Scholar-
ship Program will make a difference in the
lives of students and help to further the
studies of sustainability.
CONSTRUCTION
INDUSTRY REACHING
FOR THE NEXT RUNG
As for the future of the construction indus-
try, Hall says he believes it will progress well
beyond the sustainable practices currently
employed by the industry. I think were
already seeing that green thinking and sus-
tainable practices are becoming more and
more expected, says Hall. Over the next
decade, they will become standard prac-
tice, and new approaches and technologies
are going to make construction exponen-
tially more efcient than it is today. +
CHAPMANS OFFICE
a showcase of sustainable strategies
In 2010, Chapman Construction/
Design self-performed the LEED-CI
Platinum renovation of its two-
story, 17,000-sf headquarters in
Newton, Mass.at the time, only
the third LEED Platinum project
in Massachusetts. Chapman CEO
John Hall envisioned the ofce
reconstruction as a showcase of
cost-effective sustainable strate-
gies that the rm uses to educate
clients and partners.
Guy Compagnone, Chapmans
director of sustainable practices,
says implementing green strate-
gies in the rms own ofces gives
Chapman the opportunity to show clients a wide range of products. It gives them a
real sense of how different strategies might work in their own spaces, and it allows us
to zero in on the most practical and cost-effective measures, he says.
A 47-kW photovoltaic system satises more than 90% of the companys electrical
demands. Other factors contributing to the LEED Platinum status:
Improved building envelope
Window lming to reduce cooling load
Overhanging solar array that doubles as a shade awning, cutting solar heat gain
White roof with vegetated sections to reduce cooling load
Gas-powered furnace and high-efficiency condenser to replace inefficient
HVAC system
Solar thermal system that provides domestic hot water
Tubular skylights to increase daylighting
High-efciency plumbing and lighting
xtures to reduce water and energy
consumption
They cut the number of light xtures by
40%. The remaining xtures were replaced
with high-efciency lamps and ballasts,
bringing the ofce lighting load to 35%
below ASHRAE standards. Water con-
sumption has been reduced to 60% below
ASHRAE standards.
Chapman estimates the rm is saving as
much as $20,000 a year on electricity. The
total retrot investment is expected to be
paid back within ve years.
The Massachusetts Department of En-
ergy Resources has recognized Chapmans
ofce building as the rst near-net-zero
commercial building in the Commonwealth.
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 31
Chapman headquarters is a proving ground for sus-
tainability. The products and strategies incorporated
in the facility are used to educate clients.
Low-emitting products, nishes, and furniture are
features of Chapmans LEED Platinum ofce. P
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An abandoned hospital is reenvisioned as one-of-a-
kind apartments in San Franciscos national park.
32 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
A COMMUNITYS TRUST
winning back
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W
hen Perkins+Will was selected to rehabilitate and
adaptively reuse San Franciscos historic Presidio
Landmark in 2004, it never occurred to Andrew
Wolfram, AIA, LEED AP, that it would take another six
years for the project to be completed.
As architects, we are always willing to keep going no matter
what, said Wolfram, the San Francisco-based preservation and re-
use global leader for the rm, said. But I was impressed the owner
didnt show more frustration. The project was rst established in
2002, so I was surprised they had the staying power.
Presidio Trust and Forest City Development own the site, located
in a 36-acre revitalized district in a national park. When the project
was rst awarded to the public-private partnership almost a decade
ago, area residents were not shy about showing their disapproval.
Built in 1932 as a public health research hospital (above right),
the Presidio Landmark in San Francisco (opposite and top)
now is one of the nations rst LEED-certied Neighborhood
Developments at the heart of a National Historic Landmark
District. Although the community rst objected to the project,
the Building Team found that redeveloping the abandoned
facility into an apartment complex would restore the buildings
grandeur and beauty.
BY LESLIE STREICHER, ASSOCIATE EDITOR
gold award
28TH ANNUAL RECONSTRUCTION AWARDS
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 33
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The neighbors living next to the building
were opposed to the project from the very
beginning, said Presidio Trusts Chandler
McCoy. Because the building had been va-
cant for 25 years, they were used to having
no trafc on their streets. Rehabilitating the
building into marketable apartments would
obviously create more trafc.
Originally built in 1932 by U.S Treasury
architect James Wetmore, the six-story
Colonial-revival facility served as a Public
Health Service hospital, hosting research on
plague diseases, sanitation, water supply,
and sewage disposal. In the 1950s, two
six-story, stylistically incompatible wings
were added to the existing complex. The
building was shuttered in 1981 and sat
vacant until the early millennium.
There were a lot of vagrants living there
and a lot of grafti on the walls, Wol-
fram said. A lot of the infrastructure was
damaged. Despite public concern about
increased trafc, the developer made the
case that local residents would actually
benet from project.
The public meetings helped us under-
stand the nature of the
opposition, McCoy said.
Public feedback led to
demolition of the unsightly
1950s additions. The re-
moval of the wings made
the project less protable
by removing square foot-
age, so to compensate,
we were allowed to build three additional
stories on the back of the existing building
and a new freestanding building.
Through a series of public workshops,
the Building Team, which also included
Nabih Youssef + Associates (structural
engineer), Donald F. Dickerson Associates
(MEP engineer), and Plant Construction
(GC), worked with the neighboring residents
to establish an appropriate design plan for
the building and site, which included trails
and park access, and convincing them that
the project would be a boon in the long run.
RESPECTING SIMPLICITY
Double-loaded corridors, too many doors,
large window spacesthese and other rel-
ics of the buildings past made for a difcult
design process when conguring the build-
ing for apartments.
Because the building is shaped like an
anchor, we ended up with really narrow
hallways, Wolfram said. To deal with the
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Nestled on 36 acres of a revitalized district in a national park, the Presidio Landmark reconstruction evolved into a true collaboration between the Build-
ing Team and local residents. Working with the community made this a better project, Forest City Vice President Alexa Arena said. Hallways damaged
by grafti (bottom right) were restored, and a glass crossway (left) between the historical structure and a new addition ushers the building into a new era.
34 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
This was a solid project. It met strin-
gent city and commission rules while
overcoming community opposition.
- BD+C Reconstruction Awards Judge Martha Bell, FAIA
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www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 35
section head
SECTION SUBHEAD
odd shape and space, we had to go with
32 different layouts for the apartments.
Each room gures like a piece of a
puzzle, some wide and square, others
long and narrow. This became a selling
point to prospective tenants, Wolfram
said. Since every part of the building has
a different layout, a person living in one
end of the building doesnt have the same
layout as someone living at the other end.
Wood oors, contemporary light xtures, a
rehabilitated entry lobby and front desk, a
new lounge and replace, a tness center,
a wine cellar, and a yoga room gave the
building a much-needed facelift.
Since the building was designed as a
public hospital, it never had a fancy lobby
or high-end nishes, McCoy said. The
architects respected this simplicity and
created a beautiful, restrained design that
retains much of the historic feeling.
Exterior brick, terra cotta, and limestone
faades also were restored, and seismic
and structural upgrades were administered
to make the building sound. We wanted
seismic systems located in places between
apartments to make them unnoticeable to
residents, Wolfram said. We didnt want to
divide the building up in an awkward way.
The Building Team planned for a natural
inltration system to handle the sites
groundwater, but the discovery of an unex-
pected seasonal stream nearly halted the
project for good.
We had to divert the stream, Wolfram
said, noting that quick thinking led the team
to infrastructure already feeding into San
Franciscos citywide water and wastewa-
ter system. It was just too much water to
follow through with original plans, so we
had to change how our drainage would
be solved. We had to do a lot of discovery
as we went along. We dug holes, repaired
damaged pipes, and reworked a lot of the
infrastructure that went into the city.
PRESERVING HABITATS
Great care was taken to respect the natural
environment during construction, and since
the building is located in a national park,
respecting the native ora and fauna was a
strict requirement. Following environmen-
tal regulations, the Building Team halted
construction during bird nesting season
and mitigated disturbance to a native quail
population in the park.
Natural areas were restored.
Courtyards, hiking and biking
trails, and a scenic overlook
were landscaped to encourage
residents to interact with the
environment around them.
We really reestablished an
expansive parklike setting, Forest
City Vice President Alexa Arena
said. We also preserved the
nightscape with outdoor lighting at
ground levels, creating a wonder-
ful balance between environmental
preservation and functionality for
residents and neighbors.
In addition to LEED Gold
certication, the project also won a California
Preservation Foundations 2011 Preservation
Design Award, AIA San Franciscos 2011
Honor Award, and the National Association
of Home Builders 2011 Developer Award
for best adaptive reuseand, now, a Gold in
the BD+C Reconstruction Awards.
Building reuse is the ultimate form of
recycling, said Arena. This project made
for an exciting challenge, which promoted
the projects overall values of sustainability
and restoration.
Wolfram insists that the true value is see-
ing a derelict, underused building repurposed
to serve future generations of San Francis-
cans. Its one of those projects that is just
an incredible story of transformation and
reinvention, he said. Its so delightful to see
it so grand and elegant and simple again. +
PROJECT SUMMARY
Presidio Landmark, San Francisco, Calif.
BUILDING TEAM
Owner/developer: Presidio Trust, Forest City Development
Architect: Perkins+Will (submitting firm)
Interior architect: Shopworks
Structural engineer: Nabih Youssef + Associates
MEP engineer: Donald F. Dickerson Associates
General contractor: Plant Construction Company
GENERAL INFORMATION
Size: 220,000 gsf
Construction cost: Confidential at owners request
Construction period: October 2008 to September 2010
Delivery method: Negotiated contract
Long, double-loaded corridors, wide staircases, and a panoply of doors are noticeable remnants of the buildings past. We wanted the new residential space to
function well and be attractive, Presidio Trusts Chandler McCoy said. But we also wanted the historic building to retain its most character-dening features.
gold award
28TH ANNUAL RECONSTRUCTION AWARDS
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www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 37
The reconstruction of the Modern Theatre
revived a city landmark. The project has helped
reinvigorate Bostons Downtown Crossing area
by bringing new use to the site while honoring
and maintaining the buildings period look.
I
n the fall of 2008, Bostons Modern
Theatre looked anything but modern.
Listed on the National Register of Historic
Places, the landmark structure, located in
the citys Downtown Crossing area, was on
the brink of collapse when Suffolk University
invested $30 million to reconstruct it.
Suffolk University purchased the building
from the city of Boston in 2008 in order to
enable it to meet the growing needs of its
theater program and provide a new student
residence hall, according to Gordon B.
King, the universitys senior director of facili-
ties planning and management. The reuse
of the property t well into Suffolks master
plan, which called for the addition of new
housing for 197 students, he said.
HISTORICAL THEATER
EXPERIENCES BOOM,
THEN SUFFERS NEGLECT
Designed in 1876 by architect Levi New-
comb, the building originally housed two
cast iron storefronts and a carpet storage
warehouse. In 1913, the building under-
went its first reconstruction. Architect
Clarence Blackall was hired to convert the
building into a theater for showing silent
motion pictures. Blackall incorporated a
marble addition into the main faade and
inserted a narrow 800-seat auditorium
into the basement and first three stories
of the structure.
By the late 1920s, the theater was a
trailblazer for talkie lms. But it didnt take
long before the Modern was struggling
to compete with larger, more up-to-date
theaters throughout Boston. The owners
struggled to ll the seats, but the long, slow
decline of the theater was set in motion.
The 1970s saw a brief effort to reha-
bilitate the theater, but that failed and the
structure was sold in the early 1980s. It sat
largely untouched, rapidly deteriorating for
more than 20 years until Suffolk University
acquired it four years ago.
DEVELOPING A TRULY
MODERN THEATRE
FROM THE GROUND UP
When Suffolk University acquired the build-
ing, the interior was in such disrepair it
was no more than a decaying shellonly
the faade could be saved. A few original
items were preserved, including a 26-foot-
wide painted screen tapestry from the early
1900s Modern Theatre, along with some
paneling, wall coverings, and cornices.
The existing building was in very poor
structural condition and was condemned
by the city, says Adam McCarthy, PE,
a principal with McNamara/Salvia Inc.,
Boston. However, the Building Team was
committed to designing a new theater that
would invoke contemporary standards of
BY TIM GREGORSKI, SENIOR EDITOR
A savvy Building Team reconstructs a Boston landmark
into a multiuse masterpiece for Suffolk University.
MODERN-DAY
RECONSTRUCTION
plays out
silver award
28TH ANNUAL RECONSTRUCTION AWARDS
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comfort and technology, while echoing the
form and feeling of the buildings past. In
addition, a 10-story residence hall built atop
the theater would serve as Suffolk Univer-
sitys newest dormitory.
STRUCTURAL PROBLEMS
BETWEEN RESIDENCE
HALL AND FAADE
Because the original auditorium was very
deep but extremely narrow, reconstruc-
tion of the Modern Theatre posed difcult
structural design problems.
We had many challenges with reincor-
porating the historic faade back in the
project, with a major one being how the
building movements from the new resi-
dential building could be accommodated
by or isolated from the historic faade,
says McCarthy. This led to a great deal of
structural modeling and detailing to achieve
the acquired goals.
The narrow building design would make
the tall, thin residential hall portion of the
structure act like a sail in the wind. The
structural engineers had to deal with the
complexities associated with the soften-
ing of the transfer members created in the
lateral force resisting system.
Transfer members carry the load from the
residential oors above and spread it over
the top of the performance space. With
a mostly moment-frame reinforced steel
structure, the tower deects signicantly
more than the historic stone and masonry
faade is able to accommodate.
This required a carefully detailed and
exactingly constructed set of slotted struc-
tural connections and expansion joints, as
the stone faade still relies on the tower for
lateral bracing in its weak axis, says Adrian
LeBuffe, senior associate and project archi-
tect with CBT Architects, Boston.
The Building Team next turned their at-
tention to ensuring the original
faade would fit seamlessly
on the new structure.
Prior to tearing down the
original structure, the Building
Team spent two months study-
ing, planning, and preparing for
the removal of the faade and
the restoration process.
As the Building Team de-
constructed the white Vermont
marble and sandstone
exterior, each piece
was individually cleaned
and catalogued prior to
reassembly. Total laser
scanning was utilized to
obtain exact proles of
each stone, and BIM was
used to load the data into
a 3D model. This enabled
the Building Team to
identify dimensional
problems with the faade
and eliminate conicts
due to the redesign of the
new structure, including
the faades interaction
with structural steel. This allowed for the
arrangement of special off-site fabrication
to avoid any conicts. As a result, masons
were able to install the faade smoothly
and efciently.
Despite the difculty of faade de-
construction on a very tight site, a variety
of difcult stone restoration issues, and
the demands of faade reconstruction to
modern code and programmatic require-
ments, the project went quite smoothly,
says LeBuffe.
The reconstruction of the Modern The-
atre resulted in a unique venue in Boston.
The Building Team revived a city landmark
and included design elements that modern-
ized the distinctive features of the original
1900s theater while preserving the build-
ings historic faade.
The citys vision for restoration and his-
toric preservation in the Lower Washington
Street area and [the Building Teams] vision
for this project were one and the same,
said King. The restoration of the Modern
Theatreone of the areas three landmark
theatres, along with surrounding residential
and commercial buildings, has brought
beauty, vibrancy, and economic vitality
back to the neighborhood. +
silver award
28TH ANNUAL RECONSTRUCTION AWARDS
38 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
PROJECT SUMMARY
Modern Theatre, Suffolk University, Boston
BUILDING TEAM
Owner/developer: Suffolk University
Architect: CBT Architects (co-submitter)
MEP engineer: Zade Associates
Structural engineers: McNamara/Salvia and Structures North
Consulting Engineers Inc.
General contractor: Suffolk Construction Co. (co-submitter)
GENERAL INFORMATION
Size: 70,000 sf
Construction cost: $30 million
Construction period: November 2008 to October 2010
Delivery method: Design-bid-build
The Building Team was required to reincorporate the historic faade as part of the reconstruc-
tion job. The marble and sandstone exterior was deconstructed block by block, numbered, laser
scanned, and restored before reassembly. A 10-story, 197-unit student residence hall was added.
The restoration of the Modern
Theatre has brought beauty,
vibrancy, and economic vitality
back to the neighborhood
Gordon B. King, Suffolk University
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onventional windows have long been considered the
weak link in the building envelope. According to the U.S.
Department of Energys Building Technologies Program
Multi-Year Program Plan 2011-2015, approximately 4.4
quadrillion Btu of energy in the U.S. is lost through windows in the
form of heating and air-conditioning loads.
The DOE plan suggests that regardless of orientation or climate,
window systems have the potential to outperform the best-insulated
wall or roof in terms of annual energy performance, peak demand
reduction, and cost.
UNIVERSITY FINDS A SOLUTION
TO INEFFICIENT WINDOWS
The University of Minnesotas Folwell Hall, a xture on the National
Register of Historic Places, recently underwent three years of exten-
sive renovation.
Before the renovation, students, staff, and faculty who met in Fol-
well Hall were at the mercy of wildly uctuating temperatures caused
by outdated, inefcient windows, and an antiquated HVAC system.
The Building Team of Miller Dunwiddie Architects and construc-
tion manager McGough Construction, both of Minneapolis, set out to
remedy this problem by replacing 400 existing windows with energy-
efcient units. In order to meet state sustainability guidelines, window
distributor National Window Associates Inc., Rogers, Minn., recom-
mended Kolbes Ultra Series Sterling double-hung units with standard
BY TIM GREGORSKI, SENIOR EDITOR
Replacement or retrot can help keep energy
costs from going out the window.
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 39
ELIMINATE WEAK LINK IN THE BUILDING ENVELOPE
replacement
windows
Nearly 400 traditionally styled, high-performance, low-maintenance win-
dows with double-pane insulating glass were installed in the University
of Minnesotas Folwell Hall. In addition to meeting state sustainability
guidelines, the windows preserve Folwell Halls historic signicance.
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-270 double-pane insulating glass.
Two of the main goals for Folwell Hall were
to protect its historic signicance and improve
its energy efciency, says Denita Lemmon,
AIA, project manager with Miller Dunwiddie.
The window system met both the aesthetic
and performance specications.
In the 1980s, Folwell Halls century-old
wood windows had been replaced with a
basic aluminum system, which hid some
of the historic architectural details. The
replacement window system integrated
aluminum-clad windows with custom
aluminum panning to replicate the original
architectural vision.
To retain as much of the historical nature
of the window openings, the interior trim was
left in place, says Tim Mahanna, project
superintendent with McGough Construction.
The renovation of Folwell Hall was com-
pleted in August 2011. In addition to the
new windows, the buildings HVAC system
was updated to create an energy-efcient,
temperature-controlled environment year-
round. According to University of Minnesota
ofcials, the indoor environment in Folwell
Hall has been dramatically improved in
terms of the HVAC, acoustics, and comfort.
COMMERCIAL RETROFIT
KEEPS NOISE, ENERGY
LOSS LOW
The 400 Market Street building in Philadel-
phia is an example of one of the countless
buildings in the U.S. that are 30-60 years
old where reglazing for aesthetic, environ-
mental, or practical reasons is called for.
Constructed in 1972, the 12-story
building is owned and managed by local
property rm Kaiserman Co. As energy
costs rose, along with tenant complaints
regarding street noise, Kaiserman opted to
install the Renovate by Berkowitz window
retrot system.
Glass fabricator J.E. Berkowitz manu-
factures an on-site window retrot system
that converts existing single-pane windows
into energy-saving, triple-glazed insulating
glass units. The retrot system costs about
50% less than ripping out and replacing
old windows.
Carolyn Pfeiffer, property manager of 400
Market Street, says the investment in the
retrot system is already paying dividends
beyond cost and energy savings.
Even without the energy savings, weve
received positive feedback from our ten-
ants, who are pleased with how much qui-
eter and more comfortable the building is,
says Pfeiffer. The installation team worked
with the tenants to minimize disruption to
their workplace. This not only made the
tenants happy, but saved time and the cost
of relocating them as well, she says.
The retrot took about 50 working days.
In comparison, a traditional rip-out/replace
project can take between 100-150 days for
a similar 12-story structure.
AESTHETICS, THERMAL
PERFORMANCE APPEAL
TO MIDDLE SCHOOL
Beaty-Warren Middle School in Warren, Pa.,
recently completed an extensive renovation
to update the 80-year-old facility. In addi-
tion to numerous structural and aesthetic
updates, more than 300 high-performance,
energy-efcient windows were installed.
Contractor Architectural Windows Con-
cepts, Export, Pa., was given a six-month
schedule to remove the existing windows and
replace them with windows manufactured by
Wausau Windows and Wall Systems.
Originally designed in 1930, the school
experienced three building expansions to
accommodate a growing student population.
During each reconstruction phase, the win-
dows were replaced on an as-needed basis,
resulting is dissimilar styles and performance.
In 2010, the Warren County School Dis-
trict voted to replace the schools windows
and selected Hallgren, Restifo, Loop &
Coughlin Architects, Erie, Pa., to design the
reconstruction project.
Our goal was to bring back the origi-
nal intent and character of the buildings
design, says Chris Coughlin, lead archi-
tect. We knew the windows would be an
important piece to anchor the original design
aesthetic and tie together the buildings
many additions.
Among the difculties was creating pro-
les for more than 65 different window sizes
and replicating the original shapes and
colors of the window frames.
Mimicking the look of the schools
original windows, Wausaus INvent Series
units were fabricated for Beaty-Warren with
a beveled face, muntin grids, and custom
panning. Offset glass panes replicate the
historic double-hung sash while offer-
ing easy operation, weatherability, and
performance. The windows triple-glazed,
high thermal performance contributes to
both the environmental and nancial goals
of the school. Following installation, interior
temperatures at the school increased an
average of 4-5 degrees Fahrenheit in the
classrooms during the winter heating sea-
son. In the warmer months, the windows
can be opened for natural ventilation.
To manage daylight, the windows were in-
stalled with one-inch, between-glass blinds.
This allows staff to control glare, which may
be evident on computer screens.
Our ofce is very pleased with the design
aesthetic, says Coughlin. The windows re-
ect the aesthetics that would be expected
on a school from this particular era, yet add
the performance we expect today. +
40 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
400 Market Street in Philadelphia is the rst
major building in the city to use an on-site
window retrotting system that converts exist-
ing single-pane windows into energy-saving,
triple-glazed insulating glass units.
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THE
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reroo ng primer
N
o building owner wants to be caught unprepared by
catastrophic roof failure. Emergency roof replacements
tend to be more expensive than planned ones, and
damage to interiors may mean unrecovered costs and detri-
mental downtime. On the other hand, no one wants to shell out
for a new roof when its not needed. So how can design and
construction professionals know when its time to advise clients
to replace their roofs?
Occasional roof leaks, especially after major storms, may
be resolved with an isolated repair. But when leaks become
recurrent and pervasive and the roof approaches the end of
the warranty period, its probably time to consider roof replace-
ment. As preventive maintenance ceases to keep pace with
BY DEBORAH J. COSTANTINI, AIA, AND
MICHAEL S. PEREIRA, ASSOC. AIA
HOFFMANN ARCHITECTS, INC., HAMDEN, CONN.
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Based on the information presented in this course, you should be
able to:
+ IDENTIFY roof design considerations and explain how these
factors influence roof system selection and installation to optimize
building sustainability and improve occupant health and welfare.
+ EVALUATE reroofing costs in terms of ownership objectives,
upkeep, and occupancy demands to determine an appropriate
scope of work that meets budget needs and long-term facility
goals.
+ APPLY code requirements for energy conservation, fire protection,
wind uplift, environmental contaminants, and historic and
landmark preservation to roof repair and replacement projects.
+ COMPARE traditional ballasted roof assemblies with newer cool
roof technologies in terms of heat gain and energy performance,
beyond consideration of solar reflectance index (SRI) alone.
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
IN-DEPTH ADVICE FROM THE EXPERTS
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 43
Building owners and operators need to plan ahead for roof replacement in order to avoid the unexpected expense of emergency leak remediation.
failures, leaks can damage inventory, equipment, and interior nishes,
leading to business interruption and closures as repairs are made.
Hospitals, laboratories, data centers, libraries, and museums contain
sensitive spaces particularly susceptible to water damage. For criti-
cal facilities, it therefore may be prudent to replace an aging roof as
it approaches the end of its anticipated service life, before problems
are observed.
Even for the typical industrial, commercial, or institutional building,
planning for roof replacement is likely a better option than waiting
for a major failure before taking action. Not only can early, preven-
tive replacement protect the structural deck and exterior walls from
water damage, planned reroong may also realize cost savings. For
example, re-covering an existing roof with a new membrane offers
a less expensive alternative to full tear-off and replacement, but it is
only possible if the roof assembly is stable and dry. Planning ahead
for roof replacement also allows facility dollars to be spent on those
areas that need them most. Its generally easier to budget for a
phased roof replacement program than it is to nd funds for unex-
pected replacement of a failed roof.
START WITH A ROOF INVESTIGATION
For many building owners and managers, the rst step in a reroof-
ing project is to obtain proposals from roong contractors. But
proposals for what? Given technological developments in the roong
industry and changes in building codes over the past 20 years, re-
placement in kind might not be the best optionor even a possible
option. Without a set of specications and drawings, contractors will
often opt for the cheapest possible assembly to make their bottom
line more appealing. A better strategy is to get a detailed picture of
existing conditions rst, then use that information to select the right
roong system for the job.
If the client is planning to replace the roof anyway, it may seem
superuous to conduct a roof investigation. However, without an
understanding of the existing roof system and deck conditions,
building owners and managers may inadvertently select incompati-
ble systems, neglect to resolve underlying problems, or even replace
a roof when it isnt necessary to do so.
Particularly for roof areas installed at different times or exposed
to different conditions, a professional investigation can help decide
which roofs need maintenance (good general condition), restoration
or repair (salvageable condition), or full replacement (poor condi-
tion). Evaluating roof conditions assists in prioritizing roof areas for
replacement, which allows for accurate budgeting and long-term
capital improvement planning.
In addition, a comprehensive investigation aids in establishing code
compliance and identifying deciencies at parapet walls, copings,
penthouses/bulkheads, and transitions, so that these repairs can be
completed concurrently, saving on set-up and construction costs and
preventing damage to the newly installed roof system.
A condition survey is also important to evaluate proposed roof
replacement systems for compatibility with the existing structure.
During the investigation, the design professional will determine the
construction type and condition of the roof deck, as well as the ad-
equacy of the existing drainage system. The design professional will
also consider potentially difcult ashing conditions, such as a large
number of roof penetrations, and the structural and waterproong in-
tegrity of roof intersections and terminations. Recommendations for
remedial action can then be based on actual roof conditions, rather
than on hypotheticals, assumptions, or generalizations.
ROOF DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
Selecting a roof assembly for replacement isnt necessarily as simple
as reinstalling the same system, nor is it sufcient to select a promising
product seen at a conference or used on the building next door. While
Reroong projects in urban areas, such as this setback roof replacement in New York City, demand
consideration of roof access as an important component of the design process.
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44 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
Roof replacement at a suburban or rural loca-
tion may involve the use of a crane to facilitate
delivery of materials.
these strategies can sometimes yield ne results, more often than not
choosing the right system for the job requires consideration of a num-
ber of factors. The top ve: 1) building characteristics; 2) logistics; 3)
roof conguration; 4) climate and exposure; and 5) energy conservation.
1. BUILDING CHARACTERISTICS
A good reroong option for a one-story, 100,000-sf warehouse might
be a poor choice for a 50-story skyscraper with multiple roof set-
backs. Building height is a major factor in roof system design, particu-
larly as it relates to wind uplift. Siting, too, is key, in that exposure to
wind, rain, snow, and sunlight varies depending upon the roof orienta-
tion and its relationship to building intersections and exterior walls. A
roof laden with mechanical equipment and numerous penetrations
demands a very different type of roof system than does one with
wide-open areas unencumbered by vents, hot stacks, or fan curbs.
Skylights and penthouses also play a role. Of critical importance
is the deck construction type and load capacity, which can impact
re-cover/replace decisions, as well as the selection of insulation,
adhesives, and fasteners.
2. LOGISTICS
Practical considerations for installation can make the difference
between a successful reroong project and one that is fraught with
problems. Urban settings, for example, may preclude the use of
a crane for lifting materials onto the roof. The size and capacity of
service elevators then becomes vital to roof system selection, in
that the elevators might not accommodate large membrane rolls or
insulation boards. Debris removal can likewise face similar obstacles.
Coordination of site access and material storage should be consid-
ered well before the contractors arrival on site.
Suburban locations have their own challenges, particularly when
it comes to roof areas of excessive width. Sprawling buildings may
require a large crane for delivering materials. Hot-applied products
may not maintain the correct temperature by the time crews reach the
middle of the roof.
For rural areas, material selection can be driven by availability.
Choosing a system thats not supplied locally may mean that con-
tractors dont have support from the manufacturers technical repre-
sentative, or that materials arent in stock and must be pre-ordered
prior to installation.
3. ROOF CONFIGURATION
Heres where a detailed roof investigation really helps: identifying
deciencies in drainage, deck slope, ashing details, and intersec-
tions before beginning a reroong project allows these problems to
be corrected in the design phase. Installing a roof membrane without
rst addressing insufcient drainage or problematic details may leave
the owner with a new roof that still leaks.
Roof conguration can also impact choice of assembly. Multiple,
interconnected roof areas with changes in roof level or slope can
mean that bulkier assemblies, which dont readily accommodate
irregular angles or tight spaces, may fall short as a reroong option.
Tying different types of roong materials together at intersections
is also a consideration for these complex roofs. A wide, even roof
expanse with few penetrations is less likely to encounter these
same problems, but without shade from other building areas, it
faces greater sun exposure, requiring a system that resists ultravio-
let damage.
4. CLIMATE AND EXPOSURE
Roof conguration also plays a role in the weather damage to which
a given roof area is subjected. Temperature uctuations can be more
or less dramatic, depending upon whether a roof area is protected
by surrounding building facades or exposed continuously to the ele-
ments. Snowdrifts can build up at roof areas where prevailing winds
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 45
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REROOFING FINANCIAL BASICS:
Calculating Costs, Developing a Budget
When selecting a roof system for replacement, consider ownership objec-
tives. A resilient roof system with a substantial warranty period is a good
investment, but only if the client plans to hold on to the building long-term.
For a quick sell, a new roof that doesnt leak and meets minimum quality
criteria may be sufficient to the clients needs.
Other factors to consider when selecting a roof assembly are future
upkeep costs, downtime during the reroofing project, and energy cost sav-
ings that might be realized from the new system. The additional expenses
that might be incurred by closing the top floor of a hotel or relocating large
quantities of inventory could mean that a roof system that can be installed
in a few days may be preferable to one that disrupts operations for weeks.
A roof area that is difficult to access, such as a waterproofing system
buried below a rooftop terrace or garden, demands a more resilient,
puncture-proof system than does an assembly thats in the open. Where
resolving leaks would prove cost-prohibitive, a waterproofing membrane
that is initially more expensive might be well worth the investment.
During the investigation phase, the architect or engineer can evaluate
these and other cost considerations when preparing recommendations for
repair or replacement. Discuss any concerns regarding logistics, mainte-
nance, or performance during design development to avoid any unpleas-
ant surprises. Detailed contract documents enable contractors to provide
accurate bids for the full project scope, including any enhanced details
necessary to meet warranty, code, or insurance requirements. With the
complete scope of services at hand, contractor bids can then be compared
on an apples-to-apples basis.
channel storm precipitation; roof assemblies at these areas should
accommodate the long-term presence of moisture and increased
loading created by such weather events.
Where maintenance staff frequently access rooftop equipment or
use snow removal tools in winter, membrane selection should consid-
er durability and puncture resistance as high priorities. For steep-slope
roofs, ice dams at eaves may be a concern. In snowstorm-prone
locations, an ice and water shield should be incorporated into the
roof system.
Many roong products have constraints on temperature ranges for
installation. Sealant, caulk, mortar, and adhesives cannot be applied
in very cold temperatures, while rubber roong can soften in high
heat. Materials selection and construction scheduling should there-
fore consider heat and cold tolerance of roong materials, as well as
the buildings climate zone.
5. ENERGY CONSERVATION
Installing a new roof system is an opportunity to improve the energy
efciency of the building envelope. Many building owners and man-
agers are now opting for roof systems with a high solar reectance
index (SRI), which help reduce cooling demands on mechanical
equipment by reecting a majority of solar heat. Adding insulation
can improve a roofs R-value; however, the additional depth of the
assembly may necessitate adjustments in ashings, terminations,
and parapet heights, so plan accordingly. Although ecological roof-
ing products may cost more than traditional systems, the higher
upfront cost may be defrayed through long-term energy savings.
In addition to thermal performance, exposure, building orientation,
construction type, and logistics, design professionals may consider
a number of other factors when making a product selection. Experi-
ence with a given product, proven performance, and owners prefer-
ence might play a role, as can anticipated maintenance demands
and roof system life expectancy.
GETTING CODE REQUIREMENTS
UNDER CONTROL
Depending upon the jurisdiction, even a partial reroong can trigger
compliance with current codes. Researching relevant codes and
standards can prevent costly delays and change orders during or
after a reroong project.
Energy requirements. Thermal performance is not only a design
consideration; in many locations, its a code requirement. Most
states and many municipalities have adopted a version of the
International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), developed by the
International Code Council, as part of their building codes. The IECC
species minimum thermal performance values for building envelope
components, including the roof.
Fire and wind considerations. Building code requirements, often
derived from the International Building Code, commonly regulate re
and wind uplift ratings of roof assemblies. Other codes, including the
National Fire Protection Associations NFPA 101 Life Safety Code
and the International Fire Code, may also be applicable.
In collaboration with the American National Standards Institute
(ANSI), FM Global has developed procedures for testing and ap-
proving roong products for wind uplift and re resistance that may
be more stringent than those set by local code. FM Global wind-
storm classications require a 2:1 safety factor, with designations
dependent upon building height, location, and roof area dimensions,
among other criteria.
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Recent and forthcoming
ecological building standards, including the 2012 International Green
Construction Code (IgCC), have tightened requirements on environ-
mentally harmful chemicals. Some projects, particularly at hospitals
and schools, cannot tolerate even low VOC levels. However, longer
drying times and higher minimum application temperatures for
water-based products may impact project schedule. Material selec-
tion should therefore aim to balance performance with the needs of
building occupants and the demands of local building codes.
Caution: Be aware that no VOC does not necessarily mean no
odor. If chemical smells are a concern, check with the manufacturer
to determine the appropriateness of products under consideration.
Contractors should take precautions to work downwind of air
intakes and to keep operable windows closed during application to
protect indoor air quality.
Schools often require roong products that are free of volatile organic
compounds (VOCs) to protect indoor air quality for students, teachers,
and other building occupants. The same caution applies to hospitals.
46 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
Incorporating a light-colored cap sheet with a high SRI into a traditional
modied bitumen roof system can improve energy performance.
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Historic and landmark ordinances. If the building is a national
or local landmark, or if it is listed on the National Register of Historic
Places, additional stipulations for reroong may apply. Replacement
in kind is generally the most acceptable option, but it can also be
the most expensive one. Some historic commissions may accept
aesthetically compatible alternatives if they resolve a design aw
inherent to the original material.
For example, at a college preparatory school library constructed
in the 1920s, persistent water inltration at a wood- and metal-
clad dome was resolved with a liquid-applied roong product. The
school wanted to improve water-tightness and reduce maintenance
demands, and the nished look of the dome was consistent with its
original appearance.
Caution: Historic preservation and landmark requirements can
vary widely from one municipality or commission to another. Re-
placement of historical materials with contemporary products may
not always gain regulatory approval.
ENGAGING A QUALIFIED CONTRACTOR
Even a system that seems ideally suited to a particular application
may not be a viable option if there is no qualied roong contractor
or general contractor in the area to install it. As part of the roof se-
lection process, the architect or engineer should contact manufac-
turers to identify certied contractors and to determine the training
requirements for contractors wishing to become certied installers.
Specifying a product without hiring a contractor certied by the
manufacturer may preclude issuance of a warranty.
If the nearest experienced contractor for a given assembly is a
signicant distance from the site, the additional costs of transporta-
tion will need to be considered in the project budget. If the building
is located in a busy urban area and the contractor is accustomed to
working in suburban locationsor vice versaproblems may arise
in construction for which the contractor is not prepared. At best, an
inexperienced contractors efforts can incur additional expenses for
time and materials; at worst, the roof system might be incorrectly
installed, leading to premature failure.
The construction team also needs to be well versed in the basics
of roof replacement procedures. One all too common practice is to
pile heavy materials in one area of the roof, thereby risking structural
damage or even roof collapse. Thats why a eld representative, gen-
erally the architect or engineer, should be on hand to oversee instal-
lation. Too often, experienced construction teams adopt practices
theyve used in the past in lieu of following the design specications,
even when their methods are inappropriate for the situation or, in
some cases, patently unsafe.
GETTING DESIGN DETAILS RIGHT
Design professionals may enhance manufacturers design details
to customize the roof assembly to accommodate situation-specic
conditions. Unfortunately, contractors often ignore such deviations
from standard specications and install the roof as per their usual
methods. The danger in this approach lies in its inability to account
for site conditions that demand special consideration, such as
unusual congurations of penetrations or strong wind uplift. The eld
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 47
Plenty. According to a 2008 study by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Carlyle
SynTec, and the Single Ply Roofing Industry (SPRI), a ballasted system can
reduce peak membrane temperatures and mitigate heat transfer into the
building just as well as can a white reflective membrane. (See Evaluating
the Energy Performance of Ballasted Roof Systems, ORNL Report Number
UF-04-396, at: http://www.spri.org/pdf/Thermal%20Performance%20of%20
Ballast%20Study%20Final%20Report%2005%2008%20.pdf.)
Typical cool roofs use a high-albedo membrane or cap sheet to reflect
sunlight and radiate absorbed solar heat. Traditional ballasted assemblies,
commonly dismissed as dinosaurs of the roofing industry where energy
performance is concerned, were tested alongside cool roof membranes over
a three-year period. It turns out that roof membranes covered by at least
10 lb/sf of 1-inch-diameter stone ballast performed as well asor better
thanlight-colored membranes. The mass of the stones acted as a heat
sink, reducing membrane temperatures and delaying heat flow into the build-
ing until the cooler evening hours.
As a result of the study, standards by the American Society of Heat-
ing, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and others are
undergoing revision to include ballasted systems as a cool roof option. The
Environmental Protection Agency is also reconsidering the use of SRI values
as the sole metric for heat gain in roof assemblies. When selecting a roof
system, building owners may want to talk to their architects about ballasted
assemblies as yet another option to improve energy performance.
Note: The size and distribution of stone in this study was selected for heat
gain consideration, and does not necessarily reflect requirements for wind
uplift as determined by building characteristics.
WHATS SO COOL about ballasted roofs?
A ballasted roof can serve as a heat sink, lowering the peak temperatures
of the roof membrane, according to a study by Oak Ridge National Labo-
ratory, CarlyleSynTec, and the Single Ply Roong Industry.
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representative should therefore impress upon the construction team
the importance of adhering strictly to the contract documents, even
where they deviate from the manufacturers standard details or from
the contractors personal experience.
In cases where the contractor believes that the roof cannot be
installed as designed, or where the design is inconsistent with ob-
served site conditions, the contractor should meet with the architect
or engineer to discuss the perceived inconsistencies. By keeping
channels of communication open, the project team will be more
likely to achieve the desired outcome.
Details count when it comes to warranty coverage, too. A 10-
year and a 20-year warranty may cover the same assembly, but
the manufacturer may require more redundancy at ashings, closer
spacing between fasteners, or additional leak protection at termina-
tions in order to support the longer warranty period.
To upgrade from a membrane-only warranty to a full system
warranty, enhanced details may also be required. A roof system war-
ranty covers the entire assembly; in the event of a leak, no matter
which part of the roof fails, the manufacturer agrees to resolve the
problem. Membrane warranties, by contrast, do not cover failures
at ashings, intersections, insulation, or fasteners; only damage to
the membrane itself is compensated. Although membrane warran-
ties usually come at a cheaper price and dont require the enhanced
details of a full-system warranty, they tend to prove disappointingly
irrelevant in the event of a failure.
MAKING THE TOUGH DECISION
ON REROOFING
Of all the major building envelope elements, the roof usually has the
shortest expected service life. On the advice of design and construc-
tion professionals, building owners and managers must consider
whether they intend to be proactive or reactive when it comes to
roong distress and failure: in short, to chase after problems or an-
ticipate and prevent them. Put in those terms, the response seems
clear. But given the expense and disruption of a reroong project,
many owners and managers would just as soon put off such a job
as long as possible.
While thats not an unreasonable approach, most building own-
ers and facility professionals will nd that planning ahead for roof
maintenance and replacement, and responding promptly to signs
of deterioration, actually saves money and reduces downtime. By
the time a leak is detected at the building interior, water has likely
saturated insulation and damaged structural elements, framing,
and drywall, to the point that repairing water damage can be more
expensive than xing the leak.
Replacing an aging roof assembly before problems arise might
seem an extravagance, but its actually scally responsible. Advance
planning allows the prudent building owner or manager time to
reect on the available options, in order to make the best choice for
the available budget and for the buildings needs. Emergency reroof-
ing rarely affords that luxury. +
Deborah J. Costantini is Project Architect with Hoffmann Architects,
leading project teams in diagnosing and resolving roong distress
and developing roof maintenance protocols. Michael S. Pereira,
Project Coordinator with Hoffmann Architects, provides design
documents and specications for a wide range of roong systems.
The roong contractor for this project piled materials and equipment in
one spot on the roof, a practice that could potentially overload and dam-
age the roof structure.
48 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
Roof replacement at this corporate headquarters building needed to accommodate changes in roof slope and
deck type while maintaining watertight tie-ins with historic building elements.
> EDITORS NOTE
This completes the read-
ing for this course.
To earn 1.0 AIA/CES
learning units, study the
article carefully and take
the exam posted at
www.BDCnetwork.com/
ReroofingPrimer.
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A
lthough wood is commonly used as a nish material in
nonresidential buildings, more and more Building Teams
are specifying wood as a structural material to accompany
steel or concreteor sometimes to be used entirely on its
own. Recent studies show that wood offers such benets as speed
of construction, cost effectiveness, durability, and sustainability (see
box, page 53). Structural wood products such as cross-laminated
timber (CLT) and parallel strand lumber (PSL) are attracting the atten-
tion of architects, structural engineers, and contractors.
Research by the National Science Foundation and other partners
on the performance of wood buildings during seismic eventsthe
so-called NEESWood Capstone tests (http://www.nsf.gov/news/
newsmedia/neeswood/index.jsp)is yielding promising results.
BY SUSAN BADY, CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
New products like cross-laminated timber are
spurring interest in wood as a structural material.
building technology
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 51
NEW WAYS TO
work with wood
APPLICATIONS
for structural wood expand
Architects and engineers are substituting wood framing
for steel and concrete as a cost-saving measure.
Manufacturers are adding steel straps to glulam beams to
help carry loads over long spans.
Cross-laminated timber is making its debut in the U.S.
as an innovative framing material for buildings up to 10
stories in height.
Heavy-timber construction showcases the versatility, strength,
and beauty of wood and can help keep projects on budget.
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Wood columns made of parallel strand lumber support
the steel roof and glass curtain wall of Arena Stage in
Washington, D.C. The elliptically turned PSL columns,
which are 45 to 63 feet tall, t into ductile iron castings
that bring the 400,000-lb roof loads down to a single
pin. The glazing hangs from spring-loaded cables sup-
ported by PSL muntins and support arms.
52 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
For example, Japanese researchers built a
seven-story wood-frame residential struc-
ture on a shake table and subjected it to
Kobe-level earthquake conditions6.9 on
the Richter scale (see http://www.apawood.
org/level_b.cfm?content=srv_newsinfo_34).
There was virtually no damage to the build-
ing, says Dwight Yochim, national director
of WoodWorks, an alliance of North Ameri-
can wood associations, headquartered in
Vancouver, B.C.
Yochim says that one of the concerns
with building with concrete or steel is the
temptation to overbuild to compensate
for the mass of the material itself. Wood
has many redundant connections and its
light, he says, so when an earthquake
hits, it doesnt have the same impact on
the building as it would with a steel or
concrete structure.
Yochim says some glulam manufactur-
ers are adding steel straps to their beams
to help carry the load over long spans. The
Richmond Olympic Oval, built for the 2010
Winter Olympics in Vancouver, B.C., has a
wood roof with a clear span of more than
300 feet. Part of the roof is constructed of
double Douglas-r glulam beams reinforced
with steel straps.
Wood is a viable building product and a
good alternative to conventional construc-
tion, says Blakely C. Dunn, AIA, NCARB,
principal of CADM Architecture, El Dorado,
Ark. Its easy to erect, and its easy to cor-
rect something thats incorrect. He notes
that wood usually has a shorter lead time
for delivery compared to other structural
materials: You dont have to wait weeks for
it to show up at the job site.
CROSS-LAMINATED TIMBER
CROSSES THE POND
Cross-laminated timber has been widely
used in Europe since the 1980s but is not
well known in North America. CLT panels
are manufactured by stacking multiple lay-
ers of wood, each about 20 to 38 millime-
ters in thickness, at right angles and gluing
them together in a press. Typical widths are
0.6, 1.2, and 2.95 meters (up to 4 meters),
in lengths up to 24 meters.
The cross-lamination process minimizes
swelling and shrinkage and increases
resistance. CLT panels are used for oor,
wall, and roof systems. Pre-assembled wall
sections can be lifted into place with cranes
and attached to each other with screws or
steel brackets.
CLT competes head-to-head with
concrete buildings up to six stories, says
Yochim. So far, the tallest CLT structure
built in Europe is nine stories. Researchers
in Austria are testing something called the
life cycle tower, a combination of glulam
beams, CLT, and concrete slabs that could
go much higher. Theyre all prefabricated
assemblies, says Yochim. Once youve
got your foundation down, the rest of the
building just bolts together.
The rst nonresidential CLT building to be
constructed in the U.S., a 78-foot church
bell tower, was completed in December
2010 in Gastonia, N.C. The tower has a
12x12-foot base and wood panels of vary-
ing lengths, which provide the strength and
stability of concrete but are much lighter,
says Michael DeVere, principal of MDS10
Architects, Asheville, N.C. The foundation is
three feet deep.
To better analyze the stresses inicted
by wind and seismic loading and swinging
bells, Medlock & Associates Engineering,
Asheville, N.C., modeled the tower using
RISA-3D design software. This enabled
the engineers to keep the project within its
$450,000 budget. For ease of assembly,
they used a panelized system and kept
connection variations to a minimum.
The panels were prefabricated in Austria,
reducing the amount of on-site labor and
virtually eliminating job-site waste. Tim
Richards, vice president of general contrac-
tor M-Y Construction of Tryon, N.C., says
a comparable steel structure would have
taken three to four weeks to complete.
With CLT, it took ve-and-a-half days.
DeVere points out that CLT is also a
green material, accounting for significantly
less greenhouse gas emissions than
concrete or steel. He also likes its creative
nature. It can free you from many of the
constrictions of conventional construc-
tion, he says. Depending on the design,
you can eliminate lintels and headers
as well as columns and deep horizontal
framing members. Exterior wall panels
distribute the bearing load evenly across
the entire length, so most point loads can
be dispersed, avoiding piers and pad foot-
ings and reducing the amount of concrete
in the foundation.
Some have described CLT as Legos
on steroids, says DeVere. We see it as a
game changer for the construction indus-
try. He and his business partner, Crawford
Murphy, hope to open a CLT manufacturing
facility in the U.S.
HEAVY TIMBER PLAYS
LEAD ROLE IN THEATER
In British Columbia, the use of heavy timber
in nonresidential projects is commonplace.
But the concept raised eyebrows when rst
proposed for Arena Stage at the Mead Cen-
ter for American Theater, in Washington, D.C.
This 78-foot bell tower was the rst non-
residential building in the United States to be
constructed with cross-laminated timber.
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www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 53
The local building authorities were
skeptical at rst about the use of timber for
large institutional assembly buildings, says
Michael Heeney, MAIBC, FRAIC, LEED AP,
principal of Bing Thom Architects, Van-
couver, B.C. They were concerned about
ammability. The rm and its re engineers,
LMDG, presented a re report and char
analysis which showed that the effects of
a re on the structure would be minimal. In
fact, charring on the outside of the wood
columns would actually protect the interior
of the wood.
One of the project goals was to double
the space of Arena Stage and the adjacent
Kreeger Theater. There was no money in
the budget for nishes, yet the structure
had to be beautiful, so wood made perfect
sense as both a structural and nish mate-
rial. The architects wrapped the two the-
aters with an insulated glass wall, providing
acoustic separation from nearby Reagan
National Airport and highway trafc.
StructureCraft Builders, a specialty
timber-frame design/builder based in Delta,
B.C., crafted 18 giant columns out of paral-
lel strand lumber (PSL) for the perimeter of
the Arena Stage faade. The columns are
unreinforced, solid engineered wood that
use no internal steel support. Bing Thom
Architects designed the kinds of connec-
tions used in a steel-frame building so that
local steelworkers could install them.
Wood is a very versatile material, but
you need to spend time making the con-
nections economical by encouraging as
much repetition as possible, says Heeney.
The PSL columns at Arena Stage connect
to specially designed iron castings that
would have been prohibitively expensive
had we made only one.
WOOD FRAMING SAVES
$2.7 MILLION FOR SCHOOL
When the El Dorado (Ark.) School Dis-
trict needed a new high school for 1,600
students, the Building Team compared the
cost of structural steel, precast concrete,
and wood as a framing system.
Blake Dunn of CADM Architecture says
the schools construction budget was
$134.78/sf. Had it been built with steel and
masonry, the cost would have been $50/sf
too high. Wood framing saved $2.7 million.
The original design intentto use
wood for exposed areas inside the build-
ingwas extended to concealed areas
such as columns, beams, demising walls,
ofce partitions, exterior walls, oors and
roof systems. The structural components
are predominately Southern yellow pine.
Interior doors are maple; the paneling and
trim are red oak. The auditorium has large
acoustical deectors on the side walls that
are made out of maple plywood, he says.
Theyre angled in such a way as to tune
the space. +
MORE ON THE BENEFITS
of structural wood
Science Supporting the Economic and Environmental Benefits of Using Wood and
Wood Products in Green Building Construction, Michael A. Ritter, Kenneth Skog, and
Richard Bergman, USDA Forest Service, http://fs.fed.us/news/2011/releases/09/green-
building-report.pdf.
Wood Products Used on the Construction of Low-Rise Nonresidential Buildings in the
United States, 2008, David B. McKeever, USDA Forest Service, http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/
documnts/pdf2010/fpl_2010_mckeever001.pdf.
Maximizing Forest Contributions to Carbon Mitigation (CORRIM Fact Sheet, March
2009), www.corrim.org/pubs/factsheets/fs_05.pdf.
Product and Process Environmental Improvement Analysis for Buildings (Carbon Life
Cycle Assessment) (CORRIM Fact Sheet, December 2009), http://www.corrim.org/
pubs/factsheets.asp.
building technology
The barrel-vaulted roof of the El Dorado (Ark.) high schools new basketball arena features single-
span, 165-foot glulam bowstring trusses with exposed connection plates.
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ver the past several years, as
building information model-
ing has gained widespread
acceptance in the design and
construction sector, Building Teams have
become increasingly adept at representing
buildings as data-rich 3D models, sometimes
to the point of being able to integrate sched-
ule (4D), cost (5D), and operations and main-
tenance information (6D) into their models.
BIM data is intended to be utilized in a
continuum throughout the life cycle of a build-
ing: in design, to support visualization and
development of construction documentation;
through construction, for coordination and
planning; and into facilities maintenance and
operation, for the working life of the building.
Despite the tremendous investment in
BIM by design and construction rms in the
last few years, the industry has not capital-
ized on the use of BIM at the project site,
where its direct access by eld personnel
could potentially have the greatest benet
on construction schedules and costs.
Most contractors use of BIM is limited
to a project ofce adjacent to the actual job
site where the building is being assembled;
meanwhile, eld personnel are still relying
on abstract 2D drawings to perform all
manner of critical tasks. In other words,
BIM stops at the trailer door, and the rich-
ness of the information is lost to those who
need it most. From layout to quality control,
we should be leveraging BIM as the primary
source of information on the project site.
MAKING THE LEAP OVER
THE LAST 100 FEET
To address this problem, the industry has
been developing several tools and tech-
niques over the last decade to assist in bring-
ing BIM data the last 100 feet, from the
project trailer to the project site. These tools
and processes to bring BIM to the eld can
lead to direct, measurable benets related to
cost, schedule, and quality of construction.
These include:
3D design models of construction details
and assemblies
Customized eld drawings extracted
from a coordinated BIM
Automated survey layout directly from
BIM geometry
Ruggedized eld tablets with BIM viewers
Augmented reality technology to
overlay BIM geometry onto the physical
construction site
Of all the new technologies seeking to
exploit BIM data out in the eld, perhaps the
most exciting is augmented reality, which
enables the co-location of digital and physical
data in a single medium. In the last decade,
AR has become popular in gaming and media
entertainment and on mobile devices. For the
most part, though, its development for practi-
cal application in design and construction has
lagged behind its adoption in other industries.
That situation is starting to change. Using
hand-held projectors or ruggedized eld
tablets with special software to assist in
tracking and registration, AR now enables
the overlay of detailed, 3D BIM information
onto the physical project site in real time
and at full scale. With AR, eld crews can
now see the model in context without need-
ing special skills to operate a computer or
sophisticated BIM software.
In recent years, BNBuilders has been
active in developing and applying AR tools
in the construction industry; specically, we
are exploring how AR can successfully sup-
port common eld tasks such as:
Intuitive visualization of design models
in context
Layout and installation
Quality control and inspections
Illustrating the location of concealed work
Commissioning and facilities operations
and maintenance
THE CASE OF THE
COMPLEX STAIR DESIGN
Working with our Building Team partner,
architecture rm Perkins+Will, BNBuilders
recently made use of augmented reality on
the construction site in the design visualiza-
tion, trade sequencing, and quality control
of a set of architectural feature stairs in a
laboratory tenant improvement for the Insti-
tute for Systems Biology, Seattle.
Using the design model we received
from the architect as a background, we
BY DACE CAMPBELL, AIA, LEED AP, BNBUILDERS
54 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
comes to the
AUGMENTED REALITY
building information modeling
A crew member uses a ruggedized
tablet equipped with augmented reality
software to visualize the BIM geometry
of a complex staircase design in real
time, without resorting to 2D drawings.
A new software tool derived from virtual
reality is helping Building Teams use the
power of BIM models more effectively.
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 55
job site
coordinated the complex detailing of the
stairs by integrating models from the struc-
tural steel (MKE Detailing), glass (Herzog
Glass), and railing detailers, along with
models from the MEP subcontractors Hol-
aday-Parks, Auburn Mechanical, and VECA
Electric & Technologiesand our own self-
perform carpentry and layout information.
The complex nature of the stairs and its
immediate context required unorthodox
sequencing, in which eld welds had to take
place directly adjacent to already-installed
feature glass. This led to intense study of the
means and methods to solve the problem.
We used 4D visualization and augmented
reality tools to plan and communicate the
work with the labor crews. While the 4D vi-
sualization enabled us to study sequencing,
the AR tools enabled the team to under-
stand the proposed work in context, intui-
tively and at full scale. Craft workers could
literally get their heads into a complex detail
by simply walking around with a ruggedized
tablet that overlaid co-located BIM geometry
in real time, rather than being hampered by
a mouse-and-keyboard interface to navigate
a model at a desk remote from the site.
The value of AR to the project team
was immediate. Thanks to AR technology,
everyone involved with the projectthe
owner, the architect, the project engineers,
the superintendent, the detailers, and the
craft workerswas able to quickly grasp
the proposed design intent and thereby
gain the condence and understanding
needed to perform the work. In a complex
project, where even the slightest layout or
installation error could prove costly, the
Building Team mitigated the risk and ex-
ecuted awlessly using AR as a tool to get
the richest set of BIM data in the hands of
the people who needed it most.
NEXT STEPS FOR
AUGMENTED REALITY
BNBuilders is one of a handful of forward-
thinking AEC rms currently soliciting
the assistance of software and hardware
developers to improve the ease of use and
practical application of AR on construction
project sites, as well as lobbying those who
develop BIM applications to integrate AR
into their standard offerings.
For example, Vela Systems is working
to put AR within the reach of eld super-
intendents to enable simple eld planning
and verication of design. Field crews will
be able to bring up the model of a specic
location on an iPad; then, using the Field
BIM Interactive module, they will be able to
quickly conrm how design matches reality
by orienting themselves so that the virtual
world is superimposed on the physical one.
Rather than using off-the-shelf software,
McCarthy Building Companies is press-
ing ahead with tools they have developed
themselves. According to Connor Christian,
the rms BIM manager, McCarthy expects
to begin eld testing its own internally
developed AR tool later this year. This ex-
citing innovation will assist the construction
and facilities crews in locating themselves
within the building information model in real
time and space, says Christian.
Today, augmented reality is still largely
experimental in construction, and prototype
systems are not yet robust enough to allow
widespread adoption on all project sites.
But by continuing to develop, improve, and
apply AR tools on pilot projects, this rapidly
evolving technology can be made to work
for the benet of our entire industry.
It is possible that the next generation of
augmented reality could completely revolu-
tionize the way we construct our built en-
vironment, eliminating tape measures and
paper plans. Eventually, AR could provide
facility managers with the ultimate stud
nder to leverage the BIM model in on-site
facility operations and maintenance. +
Dace Campbell (dace.campbell@bnbuilders.
com) is the Director of Innovation with BNBuild-
ers, Seattle, where he manages IPD, BIM, and
Lean across several ofces. He has applied BIM
to projects totaling $500 million, including two
that have won AIA BIM awards. A member of
the advisory board of the Lean Construction
Institute, Cascadia Chapter, and the board of
directors of the BuildingSMARTalliance and the
Seattle BIM Forum, he was named a member of
BD+Cs 40 Under 40 in 2011.
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BY LESLIE STREICHER, ASSOCIATE EDITOR
PORTFOLIO
new projects
1
NEW CENTER AT NORTHERN KENTUCKY
UNIVERSITY PROMOTES DIGITAL RESEARCH
The new Grifn Hall Center for Informatics at Northern Kentucky
University in Highland Heights engages researchers in the
emerging integration of digital and information technology while
promoting the universitys green initiative. The sustainable building,
costing about $255/sf, features innovative materials and intelligent
building systems to meet environmental goals. At the heart of the
building is the two-story George and Ellen Rieveschl Digitorium,
which houses reception space, technology classrooms, a digital
movie theater, a recital hall, a computer simulation center, and
a distance learning center. The Building Team included Boston
architecture rm Goody Clancy, McGill Smith Punshon Inc., Turner
Construction, and KLH Engineers.
2
NEW JERSEY BANKS CHOOSE RENOVATION
TO REINFORCE UNIVERSAL BRAND
DMR Architects has completed renovation of eight Provident
Bank branches located throughout New Jersey. Each
branch was approximately 3,000 to 3,500 sf. Architectural
and engineering services included adapting to an already
established corporate prototype, such as replacing teller
stations, banking and investment platforms, lighting, nishes,
and the addition of new furniture. Renovations were intended
to give the bank a common brand and design theme to provide
customers with a cohesive banking experience.
1
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3
56 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
PHOTO: TERRY WIECKERT/ABSTRACT PHOTOGRAPHY INC.
3
FOLLOWING A DEVASTATING TORNADO,
GEORGIA COMMUNITY WELCOMES
ITS NEW HOSPITAL
The new Phoebe Sumter Medical Center in Americus, Ga.,
designed by Gresham Smith & Partners, is now open. A
long-awaited addition to a community still recovering from a
devastating 2007 tornado, the hospital brings much-needed
medical attention to an area that not long ago performed medical
services out of tents donated by FEMA and GEMA. The New
Replacement Hospital Campus is located on a 282-acre site
with three specialty clinic buildings totaling 52,000 sf. A 76-bed
hospital encompasses 183,000 sf and features private rooms with
new equipment and technology. Building Team members include
KLMK Group and construction manager Braseld & Gorrie.
4
INNOVATION HUB AT UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CULTIVATES THE FUTURE OF BUSINESS
Under an $11 million design-build contract with the University of
Florida, Charles Perry Partners has completed construction of
the new Florida Innovation Hub at the Gainesville campus. The
46,000-sf business incubator, designed by Ponikvar & Associates
to achieved LEED Gold certication, houses the universitys
Ofce of Technology Licensing, Tech Connect, and more than
30 startup technology tenants. Also featured: a lobby, atrium,
conference rooms, coffee bar, kitchen, and lunchroom. This is the
rst building located in the Innovation Square urban research park
and offers proximity to the university, shared facilities, all-inclusive
leases, and laboratories.
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 57
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TRAINING FACILITY OPENS FOR COASTAL
CAROLINA UNIVERSITY ATHLETES
Coastal Carolina University, in Conway, S.C., has opened its new
61,944-sf training facility, which abuts the football stadium and
provides an additional 1,700 seats for fans. The Athletic Training
Center was designed by Stubb, Muldrow & Herin Architects
and built by Mashburn Construction. Clad in brick veneer, the
building has achieved LEED Gold certication and houses a
weight room, showers, locker room, and equipment room for
the universitys football team. Classrooms and a cardiovascular
area are on the second oor, while the top oor holds coaching
ofces, meeting rooms, a catering kitchen, and an alumni area.
555555555555555555555
58 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
8
HISTORIC HOUSTON LIBRARY REJUVENATED
AS A VIBRANT COMMUNITY RESOURCE
The Julia Ideson Library in Houston, home of the Houston
Metropolitan Research Center and part of the citys public
library system, has undergone a comprehensive restoration and
expansion. A public-private effort, the project was spearheaded
by architecture rm Gensler, construction management rm
Balfour Beatty Construction, and landscape architects TBG
Partners. Originally built by Boston architect Ralph Adams Cram
in 1926, the library was expanded with a 21,500-sf wing, which
includes research and reading areas and two-and-a-half oors of
archives. A new exhibit hall and grand public reading room have
been restored in the historic 66,000-sf interior.
7
EXTENSIVE RENOVATIONS TRANSFORM
HISTORIC TOWN HALL IN BABYLON, N.Y.
Originally built in 1917, the old Babylon (N.Y.) Town Hall recently
underwent extensive renovations and expansions. The project,
led by Stalco Construction as general contractor, converted the
landmark into the Town of Babylon History Museum at Old Town
Hall. A two-story, 800-sf addition houses a lobby and hydraulic
elevator, while interior restorations were carried out within the
original historic structure. A 1,800-sf surface parking lot above a
newly installed drainage system controls stormwater runoff. Marble
oors and millwork chair rails are featured throughout the interior.
The Building Team included Historic Construction Management
Corp., Laura Casale, AIA (architect), and SDG Engineering.
6
VOLCANIC SPA DESTINATION IN CHINA
OFFERS VISITORS RELAXING GETAWAY
San Francisco-based SB Architects and the Mission Hills
Group have completed the Mission Hills Volcanic Mineral
Springs and Spa, one of the worlds largest spa destinations.
Located on the northern coast of Chinas Hainan Island,
the spa and volcanic minerals spring join the Mission Hills
Haikou ve-star resort, offering wellness, leisure, recreation,
entertainment, and dining to its guests. The entire land
area for the facility measures 950,000 sf and is home to the
largest natural springs reserve in the nation. The spa itself is
surrounded by 473,000 sf of landscaped gardens and more
than 150 springs and water features. About 29 spa villas
provide a private and exclusive sanctuary for visitors.
6
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Sustainable Sports Floors: Selection Considerations

After completing this course, you will be able to describe
what the MFMA Accredited Installers (AI) Program is, and
how it will help you, as an architect.
To view this course, visit:
www.bdcnetwork.com/SustainableSportsFloors
BD+C university offers architects, engineers, contractors, and building owners/developers
who specialize in the commercial, industrial, and institutional markets a convenient
educational platform available online 24/7 from anywhere in the world.
Visit BDCuniversity.com for a complete listing of courses.
+ Featured Courses:
PVC Single-Plies as Sustainable Roong Systems
Learn about PVC single-ply roofng and how it aids with
high-performance design.
To view this course, visit:
www.bdcnetwork.com/PVCSinglePlies
Construction Process Improvement Through Progressive
Steel Joist and Metal Decking Design
Total Steel Project Performance: Construction Process
Improvement Through Progressive Steel Joist and Metal
Decking Design
To view this course, visit:
www.bdcnetwork.com/ConstructionProcessImprovement
Designing with Fire Rated Glass

Designing with Fire Rated Glass by SAFTI FIRST is a must-
have for all design professionals. This program empowers you
to choose the correct code compliant glazing product for every
fre-rated application.
To view this course, visit:
www.bdcnetwork.com/FireRatedGlass
Throughout the year, the staff of Building Design+
Construction collects books, dvds, snacks and personal
care items to send thank you packages to our troops.
If you have someone near and dear serving overseas,
please send us their name and shipping information,
and we will send a package to them from their
appreciative fans at BD+C.
E-mail the soldiers name and shipping address to
Sandi Stevenson at sstevenson@sgcmail.com. Please
include your name and contact information.
Saginaw Valley State Universitys Pioneer Hall is the rst LEED
Silver certied building on the Kochville Township, Mich.,
campus. Led by architectural rm Wigen Tincknell Meyer &
Associates, the Building Team designed the $16 million proj-
ect to accommodate a rapidly growing student body. About
30,000 sf of laboratories, ofces, and gathering spaces were
added to the building, while the existing 46,000 sf of space was
renovated. Tubelites 400 series curtain wall was used for the
project, installed by glazing contractor Calvin & Co., Flint, Mich.
The products aluminum framing uses EcoLuminum, a recycled-
content aluminum billet composition with environmentally friendly
nishes, improving the buildings energy efciency.
Tubelite
CIRCLE NO. 801 ON READER SERVICE CARD
ALUMINUM CURTAIN WALL SPECIFIED IN
FIRST LEED SILVER FOR MICHIGAN COLLEGE
For the new Hilton Garden Inn in Oklahoma City, Okla., owner/developer
Jim Thompson of local developer New Century Investments Hotels and
Restaurants wanted a dazzling attraction that would create a unique
contemporary atmosphere. Architect Jon Crowdus of JC Architects (Tul-
sa, Okla., and Tucson, Ariz.) and local contractor All Service Sheet Metal
obliged with metal column covers and room dividers from Mz Designs
in the reception area and as bar and buffet dies in the grill and breakfast
room. The metal products, made from 80% post-industrial recycled alumi-
num, contributed to LEED 2.0 MR credits for recycled content.
Mz Designs
CIRCLE NO. 800 ON READER SERVICE CARD
RECYCLED METAL ARCHITECTURAL PRODUCTS
GIVE HOTEL OWNER A DAZZLING INTERIOR
Valspars Flurothane Coastal coating system, a polyvinylidene
uoride system developed for use in extreme coastal environ-
ments, uses a thick-lm primer application, which allows it
to be used in the harshest climates. The coating also resists
ultraviolet rays to retain color, according to the manufacturer.
The system can be applied to hot-dip galvanized and alumi-
num substrates for use with metal roofs and wall panels.
Valspar Corp.
CIRCLE NO. 802 ON READER SERVICE CARD
COATING SYSTEM CAN WITHSTAND
HARSH COASTAL ENVIRONMENTS
www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 61
nora

flooring on
the go mobile apps
Follow us @noraflooring
www.nora.com/us/apps35
Circle 764
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62 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
Fabric ductwork has helped the $15 million Highland
Sam J. Racadio Library and Environmental Learning
Center, in San Bernardino County, Calif., earn LEED
Gold and improve its acoustics. Led by T-Squared Pro-
fessional Engineers, Vista, Calif., and STK Architecture,
Temecula, Calif., the 30,000-sf facility uses a fabric
air dispersion system from DuctSox Corp. to reduce
energy consumption and noise. Theres a big differ-
ence in noise between the rooms using fabric duct and
the room using metal duct, library branch manager
Jessica Sutorus said. The fabric system distributes
air through more orices than the metal duct system;
it also absorbs vibrations, reducing equipment noise
throughout the building.
DuctSox Corp.
CIRCLE NO. 803 ON READER SERVICE CARD
SHHH!!! FABRIC DUCT SYSTEM PROVES
CALIFORNIA LIBRARIANS DREAM
Levitt Pavilion SteelStacks is a new civic band shelter in the Steel-
Stacks arts and cultural complex in Bethlehem, Pa., where long-
defunct 22-story blast furnaces loom over the landscape. The pavilions
canopyabout 100 feet long, 45 feet wide, and 40 feet tallis
shrouded in a galvanized, powder-coated wire mesh screen made
from 240 panels in the McNichols Designer Metal series. We looked
at heavier steel plate products, but selected a lighter weight high-grade
stainless that would resist pitting and rust, said Ken Duerholz, VP of
Boyle Construction (CM), Allentown, Pa. Other Building Team mem-
bers: Wallace Roberts & Todd (architect), Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
(SE), Bracy Contracting (GC), Lehigh Valley Engineering (MEP), and
Levan Associates (steel fabricator).
McNichols Company
CIRCLE NO. 804 ON READER SERVICE CARD
PERFORATED METAL PANELS OFFER
LIGHTWEIGHT SOLUTION FOR
CANTILEVERED PAVILION ROOFTOP
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www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 63
A recently completed addition to the St. Louis
Science Center uses 20,000 sf of Citadel Envelope
Rout & Return System metal composite material
panels. The 13,000-sf metal-clad addition replaces
an air-supported exhibit dome, making the building
a permanent home for traveling exhibitions and
major displays. Kuenz Heating & Sheet Metal, St.
Charles, Mo., installed the panels. The job was
fairly straightforward, said project manager Ron
Bradley. We did all of the eld measurements and
supplied a fab sheet for each panel to the fabrica-
tor. The job really turned out nicely.
Citadel Architectural Products Inc.
CIRCLE NO. 805 ON READER SERVICE CARD
ST. LOUIS SCIENCE CENTER
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www.BDCuniversity.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION FEBRUARY 2012 65
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BASF Corporation .............................................................. C2 .............................. 751
Belden Brick Company ...................................................... 36 .............................. 760
Bluebeam Software ............................................................. 6 ............................... 754
CENTRIA ........................................................................... 23 .............................. 759
Delta Faucet Company ........................................................ 5 ............................... 753
Duro-Last Roong Inc ........................................................ 41 .............................. 761
Holcim (US) Inc. .................................................................. 8 ............................... 755
Johnsonite ......................................................................... C4 .............................. 767
National Frame Building Assoc ........................................... 42 .............................. 762
NCFI Polyurethanes ............................................................ 4 ............................... 752
nora systems inc. ........................................................... 17, 61 ...................... 758, 764
SAFTIFIRST ....................................................................... 13 .............................. 757
Salsbury Industries ............................................................. 62 .............................. 765
Siemens Building Technologies .......................................... 11 ............................. 756
Stadium Savers ................................................................. 50 ............................. 763
Valspar Corporation ........................................................... C3 .............................. 766
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AIA ................................................. 66
AIA Chicago .................................... 12
All Service Sheet Metal ................... 61
American Concrete Institute............. 66
American Institute of Steel
Construction ................................... 66
ANSI .............................................. 44
Architectural Windows Concepts ...... 40
Arizona State University ................... 15
ASHRAE ......................................... 45
Associated General Contractors of
America ..................................... 9, 66
Auburn Mechanical ........................ 55
Balfour Beatty Construction ............. 58
Bar-Win Consultants ....................... 26
Barteluce Architects & Associates .... 12
Bing Thom Architects ...................... 53
BNBuilders ..................................... 54
Boston Architectural College ............ 28
Boyle Construction .......................... 62
Bracy Contracting ........................... 62
Brashfield & Gorrie .......................... 57
Building Commissioning Association 12
CADM Architecture ......................... 52
Callison .......................................... 12
Calvin & Co. ................................... 61
Campos Engineering ....................... 22
CBT Architects ................................ 38
Central Michigan University ............. 22
Chapman Construction/Design ......... 28
Charles Gojer & Associates .............. 22
Charles Perry Partners .................... 57
Clark Construction .......................... 22
CMX LLC ........................................ 20
CO Architects ................................. 12
Coastal Carolina University .............. 58
Counsilman-Hunsaker .................... 24
Cornell University ............................ 66
Diller Scofido & Renfro .................... 16
DMR Architects ............................... 56
Donald F. Dickerson Associates ........ 34
Emerson Construction ..................... 22
Environmental Systems Design ........ 16
EPT Design ..................................... 21
FGM Architects ............................... 12
Fore Solutions ................................. 12
Friberg Associates........................... 26
Fulton Construction ......................... 19
FXFOWLE ....................................... 12
Gensler .......................................... 58
George Mason University ................. 20
Georgia Institute of Technology ........ 66
Gluckman Mayner Architects ........... 14
Goody Clancy ................................. 56
Gresham Smith & Partners .............. 57
Halladay Mimmack.......................... 21
Hallgren, Restifo, Loop & Coughlin
Architects ....................................... 40
Hamilton Construction ..................... 21
Harley Ellis Devereaux ..................... 12
HDR ......................................... 10, 12
Herzog Glass .................................. 55
Historic Construction Management
Corp. ............................................. 58
Hoffman Architects.......................... 41
HOK ............................................... 15
Holaday-Parks ................................ 55
Industrial Contractors Inc. ................ 12
International Code Council ............... 44
James G. Davis Construction ........... 15
JasterQuintanilla Dallas LLC ............ 19
JBC Companies .............................. 15
JC Architects .................................. 61
Kaiserman Co. ................................ 40
Kendall Landscaping Architects ....... 26
Keppie Design ................................ 16
KLMK Group ................................... 57
Kohn Pederson Fox Associates ........ 15
Kuenz Heating & Sheet Metal .......... 63
Lake Flato Architects ....................... 24
Lehigh Valley Engineering ................ 62
Leven Associates ............................ 62
Madonna University ......................... 25
Mashburn Construction ................... 58
McCarthy Building Companies ......... 55
McGill Smith Punshon Inc. ............... 56
McGough Construction .................... 20
McNamara/Salvia ............................ 37
MDS10 Architects ........................... 52
Medlock & Associates Engineering ... 52
Mesa (Ariz.) Community College ...... 20
Mesa Design .................................. 22
McGough Construction .................... 39
Michael Kendall Landscape ............. 19
Miller Dunwiddie Architects ............. 39
MKE Detailing ................................. 55
M-Y Construction ............................ 52
Nabih Youssef & Associates ....... 21, 34
National Fire Protection Association . 44
NIST ............................................... 66
Northern Kentucky University ........... 56
Oak Ridge National Laboratory......... 45
Olin Studio...................................... 16
Paragon Structural Design ............... 20
Paric .............................................. 10
Perkins+Will ............................. 33, 54
Plant Construction........................... 34
Ponivakar & Associates ................... 57
Ponoma College.............................. 21
Precast/Prestressed Concrete
Institute .......................................... 66
PWP Landscape Architecture ........... 16
Randall Scott Architects................... 16
Rice University ................................ 21
RSP Architects ................................ 15
S&K Engineers ................................ 21
Saginaw Valley State University ........ 61
Sasaki Associates ........................... 26
SB Architects .................................. 58
SDG Engineering ............................. 58
Shah Smith & Associates ................ 19
Shawmut Design and Construction .. 12
Shopworks ..................................... 35
SIKON Construction ......................... 16
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger ............ 62
Skanska USA .................................. 12
Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP 12, 16
SmithGroupJJR ............................... 19
SRBL Architects .............................. 12
St. Louis Council of Construction
Consumers ..................................... 10
Stalco Construction ......................... 58
Stephen F. Austin State University .... 26
STK Architecture ............................. 62
StructureCraft Builders .................... 53
Structures North Consulting
Engineers Inc. ................................ 38
Stubb, Muldrow & Herin Architects ... 58
Studio/Gang Architects .................... 12
Suffolk University ............................ 37
Syracuse University ......................... 14
TBG Partners .................................. 58
Texas A&M University
Corpus Christi ................................. 19
Thornton Tomasetti ......................... 12
Turner Construction ......................... 56
T-Squared Professional Engineers .... 62
University of Florida ......................... 57
University of Minnesota ................... 39
University of Texas, Austin ............... 22
University of Texas, Dallas ............... 10
U.S. Department of Energy .............. 39
USGBC ........................................... 10
VDK Architects ................................ 12
VECA Electric & Technologies .......... 55
Wallace Roberts & Todd .................. 62
Wigen Tincknell Meyer & Associates 61
Wiley College .................................. 16
WoodWorks .................................... 52
Zade Associates.............................. 38
FIRM/ASSOCIATION INDEX
2,600,000
Approximate NUMBER OF DOLLARS the
Dayton, Ohio, public school district is saving
on utility bills in new schools that are built
according to LEED standards. DAYTONS
NEW GREEN SCHOOLS each save an
average of $100,000 A YEAR in operating
costs, including energy and water savings.
52.0
The AIAs ARCHITECTURAL
BILLINGS INDEX FOR
NOVEMBER 2011, following
a score of 49.4 in October. An
ABI score above 50 indicates
an increase in billings. The
new projects inquiry index was
65.0, UP FROM A READING
OF 57.3 in October.

TONS OF TRAVERTINE
GRANITE AND MARBLE
INSTALLED by hotel
and renovation company
Nova HRC at the new $60
MILLION MECCA COS
CONFERENCE AND
TRAINING FACILITY
in Clearwater, Fla. The
granite and marble in the
450,000-sf facility includes
Jerusalem gold, Persian white onyx,
honey onyx, and Shanxi black granite.
Stone pieces were cut by water-jet to
create large custom stone oor inlays and
a 24-foot mosaic medallion.
15,800,000,000
According to a NIST report, the
DOLLAR AMOUNT LOST every year
due to DEFICIENT DATA EXCHANGE
IN CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS. A
collaboration among Georgia Techs Digital
Building Lab, American Concrete Institute,
American Institute of Steel Construction, and
the Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute
aims to reduce that gure by DEVELOPING
GLOBAL STANDARDS for transportation
of 3D digital models among fabricators and
AEC rms.
eighty-three
PERCENTAGE OF RECYCLED
MATERIALS in the demolished KC
Apartments in Casper, Wyo. Crushed
concrete was used for ll material for
two new apartment complexes; exterior
bricks were made part of a new park near
the complex. According to demolition
contractor Pete Peterson, only half of
the construction materials from a typical
residential demolition can be reused.
1.02 BILLION
The approximate cost of the NEW
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS FOOTBALL
STADIUM, to be built in Santa Clara,
Calif. The 68,500-seat stadium is BEING
FUNDED primarily by $850 MILLION IN
LOANS to the city and the team, to be
paid off in 25 years.
70
Percentage that SAN DIEGO
COUNTYS COMMERCIAL
CONSTRUCTION PERMITS ROSE in
the rst 10 months of 2011 compared
to the same time period in 2010. Total
construction dollars REPRESENTED
MORE THAN $913 MILLION, due
largely to a 62% jump in renovation and
expansion projects.
25
Total number of states
and the District of
Columbia that ADDED
CONSTRUCTION JOBS from
December 2010 to November 2011.
According the Associated General
Contractors of America, there
have been improvements in private
nonresidential employment, multifamily
construction, and home building in
these states.
21,500,000,000
TOTAL COST in Canadian
dollars of the TOP
25 CONSTRUCTION
PROJECTS IN CANADA.
Of these, 12 are in
healthcare, seven involve
public buildings, five are
transportation projects.
At $8.1 BILLION (CAN)
the Eglinton-Scarborough
CROSSTOWN LIGHT
RAIL LINE is currently
Canadas most expensive
construction project.
To read more By the Numbers,
visit www.bdcnetwork.com
BY THE
numbers
20,000
Number of construction jobs to be created by the construction of
CORNELL UNIVERSITYS $2 BILLION technical campus. Built on a
10-acre site at Roosevelt Island, N.Y., THE PROJECT WILL PROVIDE
MORE THAN TWO MILLION SQUARE FEET for over 2,000 students.
66 FEBRUARY 2012 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
4
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Submit your By the Numbers item
to: Tim Gregorski, Senior Editor,
tgregorski@sgcmail.com. You must
include documentation showing
the source of your entry. Readers
whose items are chosen will receive
credit in the magazine and a $10
Amazon gift certicate. Decision of
the editors of BD+C is nal.
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