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SNV Ghana Agriculture


SNV SUPPORTING SHEA SECTOR
DEVELOPMENT IN NORTHERN GHANA
OVERVIEW OF RESULTS ACHIEVED 2012-2013













































April 4
th
, 2014


521 VSLAs
established
GH1,415,846
mobilized in
savings through
VSLAs
(US $525,849)
2,121 advisory
days in partnership
with LCBs
GH 933,232
mobilized from shea
nut and butter sales
(US $346,605)
473mt of
shea
butter sold
1,108mt
of shea
nuts sold
9,704 women with increased
incomes
10
Unions
36
storage
facilities
built
452
men with
increased
incomes
Shea parkland
conservation-
350
seedlings
transplanted
421
Coop Societies
213
beehives
constructed
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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Acknowledgements


This report is an overview of the results of SNV advisory practice in Northern Ghanas Shea sector. The
document is based on the analysis of selected documents that prepared during 2012 and 2013. The
editor would like to express sincere thanks to the following people and organizations for providing and
preparing the documents for review.

Local Capacity Builders (LCBs)
1. CBFP - Joseph Wuni, Program Coordinator
2. CARD - Alhassan Hudi, Program Coordinator
3. A2N - Adissah Lansah Yakubu, Program Coordinator
4. ROWFAD - Yanaa Yahaya, Program Coordinator
5. PRUDA - Nuotoo Amatus, Project Coordinator
6. SAVE GHANA - Kingsley Kanton, Project Coordinator
7. ORGIIS - Julius Awaregya, Project Coordinator
8. IASUDO - Augustine Anbotima, Project Coordinator
9. JAKSALLY - Jeremaiah Seidu, Project Coordinator
10. CODAC - BUKARI ISSAHAKU, Programme Manager
11. SIRDA - Alima Sagito, Project Coordinator
12. NECIDA - Abdulai Sulemana, Project Coordinator
13. YARO
14. RIDE-Rose Amoyaw, Project Coordinator
15. EMAC - Theophile Bama, Project Coordinator
16. TUDRIDEP - James Duma, Project Coordinator
17. TUWODEP
18. CIKOD - Daniel Banuoko, Project Coordinator
Consultants
19. Seidu Al-Hassan (Dr)
SNV Advisors
20. Jalil Zakaria, Christopher Bakaweri for the Introduction, Eric Banye, Isaahaku Zakaria and
Priscilla Ahele (General Support Officer).

Many thanks to Quirin Laumans, Sector Leader Agriculture (SNV Ghana) for his practical advice and
valuable insights and making this document possible.

And all others who helped.

Kofi O Boafo
SNV Ghana, Jr Business Development Advisor, Agriculture
Editor

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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Contents
Page

List of Acronyms and Abbreviations............................................................ 4
Introduction............................................................................................... 5
SNV support in the shea sector................................................................... 6-7
Documents Reviewed................................................................................. 8
Factsheet of Documents Reviewed............................................................. 9-30
Other Documents........................................................................................ 31
Glossary of Terms....................................................................................... 32


















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SNV Ghana Agriculture
List of Acronyms and Abbreviations


AAK International Shea nut trader, exporter and processor
A2N - Africa 2000 Network
CARD Community Aid for Rural Development
CBFP - Chira Biisi Fare Project
CODAC - Community Development and Advocacy Centre
Coop - Cooperative
EMAC - Education for Market Access and Certification
IIAS Impact Investment Advisory Services
ICEIR - Institute for Continuing Education and Interdisciplinary Research
IASUDO - Integrated Action for Sustainable Development Organisation
LCB Local Capacity Builder
Mt Metric Tonnes
NGO Non Governmental Organization
NECIDA - North Eastern Corridor Integrated Development Agency
ORGIIS - Organization for Indigenous Initiatives and Sustainability
PRUDA - Partnerships for Rural Development Action
RE Renewable Energy
RIDE - Rural Interventions for Development and Employment
ROWFAD - Rural Organisation of Women Farmers and Agro-Processing Development
SAVE GHANA - Sustainable Aid through Voluntary Establishment
SEKAF Senyo Kpelly and Kafui Bulla
SEND GHANA - Social Enterprise Development Foundation
SIRDA - Savannah Integrated Rural Development Aid
SNV Netherlands Development Organization
Tons - Tonnes
TUDRIDEP - Tumu Deanery Rural Integrated Development Programme-TUDRIDEP
TUWODEP - Tuna Women Development Programme
UDS University of Development Studies
VCD - Value Chain Development
VSLA - Village Savings and Loans Associations
WIDO - Women Integrated Development Organisation
YARO - Youth Advocacy on Rights and Opportunities



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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Introduction

SNV is one of the few significant shea sector support organisations in 2007 who championed the
development and commercialisation of the shea sector. SNV was the only one who took a bold long
term approach to programming in the shea sector: ultimately developing and implementing the most
sustained, geographically extensive, shea programme with the widest beneficiary outreach in Ghana
over the past 7 years starting from 2007. SNV and other VCD promoters like KIT saw this as a bold
initiative because VCD is a process of experimental and experiential learning, sometimes of trial and
error, within a context of fragmented markets where VC actors still think along traditional lines. As a
pioneer in this field, SNV Ghana was aware it had to pave the road while walking it. The terrain was
challenging and uncertain, a highly atomised market with few structures, little trust, little knowledge
requiring ground breaking innovations and the application of multipronged, flexible learning
approaches. We think that this bold pioneering role has encouraged more involvement of more
actors/stakeholders in the sector in a more structured way, and produced tremendous impacts through
joint multi-stakeholder actions. In our modest estimation, this collective effort is largely accountable
for the over 600% industry growth over the period in terms of investments and trade. Experiences
have been gained. Knowledge has been generated. Lessons have been learnt. Thanks to our
localisation policy, SNVs local partners and clients have been involved in the knowledge generation and
learning experiences.

Given the dynamism in the sector and steepness of the learning curve, SNV finds it appropriate to
pause to capture the sector changes/evolutions, and share the experiences and lessons as SNV Ghana
continues to innovate and experiment with new approaches in Inclusive Business, value chain
financing, climate smart agriculture, and to deepen our co-operative business development and
coaching interventions. SNV and its partners consider their knowledge and learning experiences useful
for improving the positioning and interventions of existing and new actors in the shea sector, especially
for improving their understanding of how the local context should inform/guide adaptation and
application of VCD principles and methodology.

SNV therefore desires to capitalise (document and share) this knowledge. Capitalisation of knowledge
and experiences in shea is essential for a number of reasons including:
Internal organisation of shea knowledge for quick reference
Capturing business development opportunities.
External sharing and SNV profiling
Serve as a resource to agencies in shea or interested in entering shea.

The following process is envisaged:
1. Cataloguing of all documents studies, movie, reports, tools, LCB reports, training guides etc
2. Prepare/summarise cases/topics/knowledge products including:
a. Value chain analysis of nut and butter, description of the shea nut/butter industry
(baselines + current dynamics)
b. Description of various value chain development actions:
c. The SNV VCD approach:
d. Way forward
3. Package knowledge products such as fliers/brochures/pamphlets.
4. Prepare a concise document about shea value chain development and its impact on
small holders in Ghana
5. Share knowledge: Organise a knowledge sharing event series of seminars, workshops etc.

This is the first attempt to catalogue the key documents produced and major results achieved by SNV
working with major local implementing partner organisations. We trust that our readers will find value
in it and be inspired by it. We pride in being a learning organisation, and will stay open and committed
to a feeding your comments into our continuous improvement plan.
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SNV Ghana Agriculture
SNV support in the shea sector

SNV started its support to the shea sector in 2006. As at December 2013 SNV has strengthened a
network of over 2,000 groups (60,000 women) in 27 districts in the Savannah Regions in northern
Ghana. Over 50% of these have been registered with the Department of Co-operatives as co-operative
societies, and further into co-operative unions. All these women are involved in the picking, processing
and sale of shea nuts and shea butter.

The Shea Value Chain

A Value Chain includes all those groups involved at different levels of producing a single product. When
considering Shea, the actors in a value chain are as follows:





















SNVs interventions in the shea value chain have been numerous. SNV has sought to increase returns
to those at the end of the value chain, the pickers, by providing training on nut processing, organising
pickers and linking pickers with exporters. SNVs support in the shea value chain is described below.

Level In Chain SNVs Intervention
Producer Conservation of Shea parklands

Pickers/Primary Processors Training- quality nuts processing
Storage and handling
Group strengthening
Formation of cooperative societies
VSLA establishment
Market linkages

Butter makers/Secondary Processors Training and processing
Provision of equipments
Group strengthening

Wholesalers and Exporters Market Linkages


Local market
Local butter
processors
Export consolidators
Buyers for in-
country processing
Local nut
traders/bulkers
Agents buying for
export
Home processing for
consumption
Nuts processed and
stored
Nuts collected from
the field
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SNV Ghana Agriculture
SNVs work in Shea highlights two important mechanisms that promote participation of poor small
holders (women) in shea value chains:
Ensuring well organised and registered groups which help overcome issues of small scale and
quality control.
Value chain development by linking producer groups to buyers. These relationships are
strengthened by buyers investments in productive and social infrastructure, pre-finance
arrangements, end of season premiums, and simple transparent contracts.

SNV advisors work in partnership with Local Capacity Builders (LCBs). These organizations are of
crucial importance to achieve results, not only because of their knowledge in the shea sector, but also
because of their familiarity with local languages and networks. They also guarantee the sustainability
of the results.


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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Documents Reviewed

1. Shea Program Report. Prepared by A2N (2013)
2. Final and Reflection Report. Prepared by CARD (2012)
3. Capacity Building Progress Report on Shea Nut/Butter. Prepared by CBFP (2012)
4. Shea Value Chain Strengthening. Project Prepared by CODAC (2013)
5. End of Activity Report. Prepared by EMAC (2013)
6. Report on Shea Value Chain Development and Establishment of Cooperatives and VSLAs. Prepared
by IASUDO (2013)
7. Inclusive Business Shea Butter Project. Prepared by Jalil Zakaria, SNV (2013,or 2014)
8. Development of VLSAs into Cooperatives Societies and linking them to Market. Prepared by
JAKSALLY (2013)
9. Implementation of Women Crops Window Commodity Business Plan (Shea). Prepared by NECIDA
(2013)
10. End of Contract Report. Prepared by ORGIIS (2013)
11. End of Contract Report. Prepared by PRUDA (2013)
12. End of Contract Report. Prepared by RIDE (2013)
13. End of Contract Report. Prepared by ROWFAD (2012)
14. End of Contract Report. Prepared by SAVE Ghana (2012)
15. Assignment Completion Report. Prepared by SIRDA (2013)
16. Baseline Study and Profiling Report-Shea Butter Processing Enterprises in Shea Producing Areas of
Ghana. Prepared by Seidu,AL-hassan,(Dr).ICEIR,UDS (2013)
17. Final and Reflection Report. Prepared by TUDRIDEP (2013)
18. IB-Shea Butter End of Contract Report. Prepared by TUWODEP (2013)
19. Final Report on Value Chain Development. Prepared by WIDO (2013)
20. Shea Value Chain Development focussed on the Establishment of Cooperatives and VSLAs.
Prepared by YARO (2013)



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SNV Ghana Agriculture



Fact Sheets of Documents Reviewed


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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 1

Shea Program Report Africa 2000 Network
(A2N)
July 2012 March 2013

Location: Tamale, Northern Region

Input
110 advisory days


Output
Capacity strengthening and training of local Shea Nut Pickers and Shea Butter Processors.


Outcomes
Productivity
60 tons of nuts sold by co-op societies
20 tons of Shea butter sold by co-op societies
95% of butter sold met buyer expectations

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
Value of financial resources raised for VC financing activities (including credits, VSLA, grants
etc) = GH64,000

Organization and Governance
45 VSLAs formed
20 cooperative societies formed

Infrastructural Development
3 storage and warehouse identified
3 processing facilities used by co-op societies

Natural Resource Management
Forest and fire management plans established to protect and develop the Shea industry.



Impact/Outreach
Improved incomes and livelihood for 1,249 women and 11 men in Wa municipal area.










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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 2

Final and Reflection Report Community Aid for Rural Development (CARD)
4th quarter, 2012

Location: Lambussie-Karni and Jirapa District, Upper West Region



Output
Capacity strengthening for 30 Shea pickers/butter groups into registered cooperative societies and
unions in Lambussie-Karni and Jirapa District.


Outcomes
Production
70 tons of nuts stockpiled by societies
95% of total volume of nuts produced meet buyer expectations
170 bags of nuts mobilized and supplied to AAK

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
GH130,000 mobilized through VSLA

Organization and Governance
30 groups registered as cooperative societies
2 unions registered
2 existing unions strengthened
1 community Shea stakeholder forum held
450 women trained in Shea quality improvement processing


Infrastructural Development
9 storage structures identified
Refurbished 4 warehouses for nuts stockpiling
20 beehives incorporated to Shea parklands



Impact/Outreach
Increased food security, Shea incomes and employment for 1,600 producers in four districts in the
upper west region.









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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 3

Capacity Building Progress Report on Shea Nut/Butter Chira Biisi Fare Project
(CBFP)
June, 2012 to December 2012

Location: West Mamprusi district, Tamale, Northern Region



Input
219 advisory days



Output
Capacity strengthening of 23 Women groups in West Mamprusi district.


Outcomes
Production
6 tons of Shea butter sold in Open Market

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
Women have operational savings account with Bangmarigu Community Bank Ltd
Revenue from Shea nuts sales =GH11,140

Organization and Governance
23 women groups formed to undertake quality Shea, VSLA and Beekeeping activities in the
stated number of communities.
20 women groups prepared and readied for co-op registration

Natural Resource Management
1 fire volunteer group formed to prevent bushfires and conserve Shea trees




Impact/Outreach
Improved livelihoods and incomes for 210 women in West Mamprusi district.

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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 4

Shea Value Chain Strengthening Project Community, Development and Advocacy Centre
(CODAC)
June 2012 to February 2013


Location: Navrongo East, Upper East Region


Input
2 full time staff


Output
Capacity strengthening of Shea Women groups in Navrongo East.


Outcomes
Production
168 bags of nuts stockpiled and
3 Shea product developed for the local market

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
17 groups are now operating bank accounts with Naara Rural Bank and BUCOBANK
16 groups given financial growth strategy training
GH10,982 mobilized by 19 VSLA groups

Organization and Governance
19 VSLAs formed
18 certifies cooperative societies
19 groups trained on quality nuts and butter production
19 group constitutions validated

Natural Resource Management
5 community fire and forest management plan


Impact/Outreach
Improved Livelihoods and food security for Association of House Wifes and Youth in Agriculture
(AHWYA) in the Navrongo East and Friends of Widows Foundation (FOWF) in Builsa.



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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 5

End of Activity Report Education for Market Access and Certification
(EMAC)
July 2012 to March 2013

Location: West Gonja, Yendi, Saboba and Chereponi areas, Northern Region


Input
195 Advisory Days


Output
Capacity strengthening of 2,249(58 men, 2,191 women) shea nut collectors and butter processors.


Outcomes
Production
40 tons of shea butter sold

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
GH90,000 raised (Value of financial resources raised for VC activities including
credits,VSLA,grants,etc)

Organization and Governance
40 VSLA formed (1,200 members)
40 cooperatives (47 men,1213 women) in 40 communities certified from dept. of cooperatives
2 interim unions formed in the Saboba and Yendi districts
1 interim association formed with Yendi and Saboba
30 cooperatives supported Necida
30 VSLA supported Necida
15 processors trained for quality and organic/fair trade Shea butter production
42 bee keeping
84 collectors trained in 3 communities for quality and organic /fair trade Shea butter production


Impact /Outreach
Improved capacity of producer organizations with over 2,000 women members in effective
management, technical and financial services, and business development.



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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 6

Report on Shea Value Chain Development and Establishment of Cooperatives and VSLAs
Integrated Action for Sustainable Development Organisation
(IASUDO)
March 2013

Location: Nadowli, Jirapa, WA East and Lawra Districts, Upper West Region


Input
Local Partner Integrated Action for Sustainable Development Organisation (IASUDO), March 2013

Output
Capacity strengthening for 1,600 producers in 4 districts in the Upper West Region.


Outcomes
Production
160 tons of nuts
90 bags of nut stockpiled and supplied to AAK

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
GH115,000 in savings mobilized through VSLAs
Currently, cash at bank for the Nadowli, Jirapa and Lawra Unions is GH37,463, GH1,635,
GH1,280.The capital reserve is also GH48,166,GH1,467,GH1,526 respectively


Organization and Governance
47 certified cooperative societies formed
81 VSLAs formed
15 societies selected and trained on quality nut processing
35 cooperatives have been affiliated to 3 Unions


Infrastructural Development
7 warehouses identified,5 owned by cooperatives,2 rented
41 beehives constructed


Impact/Outreach
1,033 women and 139 men legally registered with the Department of Cooperatives and accorded
certificates as corporate business entities.
Ssustainable food security and increased incomes for over 1,600 producers in 4 Districts in the upper
west region.




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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 7

Inclusive Business Shea Butter Project Jalil Zakaria, SNV
Ghana
February 2014

Location: Tamale, Northern Region


Output

Promoting sustainable production and marketing of Shea butter and Shea butter based products,
promoting adoption of RE solutions, capacity strengthening of unions and enhancing business
development services to Shea butter producers.


Outcomes
Production
378 mt of Shea butter produced and sold
5 Shea based products developed.
100% of Shea butter meet buyer expectation


Governance and Organization
591 producers engage in the production of Shea butter as an employment
The capacity of 1 association built to create enabling environment for business
9 Shea butter producer organizations engaged
591 women benefit
6 Shea butter co-ops have joined unions


Infrastructural Development
1 improve cook stove mounted
2 Shea butter characterisation processors conducted
2 energy efficient technologies identified and used
91 producer adopting efficient energy technology for producing butter

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
GH767,719 worth of Shea butter produced and sold


Impact/Outreach
Total of 618 beneficiaries all women were trained in Shea butter quality improvement.



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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 8

Development of VLSAs into Cooperatives Societies and linking them to Market
JAKSALLY
September 2012 to January 2013

Location: Bole, West Gonja, Northern Region


Input
5 months of advisory services


Output
Capacity strengthening of 54 women groups with 1,620 members.


Outcomes
Production

260 tons of Shea nuts sold to Naasakle and other buyers
20 tons of Shea butter sold
90% of Producer organizations applying improved business skills
80% of nuts sold by coops meet buyer quality standards
3 societies have developed Shea products (soap, glass washing liquid, etc.)
4 products sold on local market (Wind Screen soap, Shea liquid soap, pomade, and Shea hand
soap)
86 tons of organic fair trade nuts sold,25 tons of organic Fairtrade butter sold

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
GH540,000 raised by old and new VSLAs

Organization and Governance
54 VSLAs formed and registered as cooperative societies
1 union formed out of four societies.
54 coop societies are part of the Shea network Ghana
4 out of 54 coops have received their certificates from coop department


Infrastructural Development
2 warehouse built in Busunu Tuteiya and Damongo Naasakle
2 improved processing facilities used by coop societies in Busunu and Damongo
1 tree nursery established Daboya and producing seeds


Impact/Outreach
Increase in food security, Shea incomes and employment for over 1,500 Producers in West Gonja in
the Northern Region
About 200 small scale employments in the rural settings have been created. Employments including
drivers of vehicles bought by groups, operators of grinding mills of the groups, additional hands to man
shops, additional hands on farms, additional hands on nuts mobilization from the groups and loading of
trucks for PBC. The increases in business from goats selling to cattle dealership have created some
rural jobs in the project area.




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SNV Ghana Agriculture

Document 9

Implementation of Women Crops Window Commodity Business Plan (Shea)
North Eastern Corridor Integrated Development Agency
(NECIDA)
July 2012 to March 2013

Location: Tamale, Northern Region

Input
9 months advisory services

Output
Capacity Building for 1,894 Shea nut collectors into 30 groups as cooperative Societies and VSLAs.
Capacity building for women groups in bee keeping.

Outcomes
Production
136 mt of Shea nut was mobilized by the collectors within the period under review and sold to
companies like Sekaf Ltd, SATCO Ltd and some at open market.
An amount of GH1,008 was realised from 28 hives at the average of 6 litres per a hive and at
the cost of GH6.00 a litre from 7 cooperatives namely, Jakpa, Bumburiga, Zannori `B`,
Sambik, Tusunga, Gbalo and Lamaram.
1,600 max bags (136mt) of quality Shea nut was mobilized
Amount sold :Open market= (51.5mt), SATCO= (59.5mt), and Sekaf= (25mt)
168 litres of honey harvested

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
Through the VSLA, an amount of GH16,600 has been mobilized through groups weekly
savings and GH420 also mobilized as groups social funds as at March ending 2013
Value of financial resources raised by old and new VSLAs for VC financing activities(through
VSLA contributions)
Value of financial resources raised from other sources(credit, grants, share capital, dues)= GH
5,940
Amount raised from revolving fund = GH11,900

Organization and Governance
30 VSLAs formed and trained as cooperative societies (total membership of 830,810
females,20 males)
30 cooperative societies in the Shea zone strengthened and part of cooperative unions
Number of societies and unions which are members of the Shea Network Ghana = 30.

Infrastructural Development
Rehabilitation of 700 bags capacity warehouse and 3,500 bag capacity ware houses rented
(Yeteli, Tambong and Waku).
42 beehives and 8 accessories distributed to 15 beneficiaries from 15 communities in the Shea
Zones (given as a revolving fund loan at 10%)

Impact/Outreach
Improved Food Security, Increased Production, Incomes and Employment for 820 rural women and 20
rural men.

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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 10

End of Contract Report Organization for Indigenous Initiatives and Sustainability
(ORGIIS)
August 2013 - December 2013

Location: Upper East Region

Input
5 months of Advisory Services

Output
Capacity strengthening of two cooperative societies Navio and Nakolo in Shea butter processing,
butter quality, governance and entrepreneurship skills of the cooperatives.


Outcomes
Production
71.0mt of Shea butter sold to open market

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
GH52,257 mobilized from VSLAs
GH22,996 loaned out to VSLA members
GH7,500 profit earned from VSLAs

Organization and Governance
247 members part of cooperatives
235 members of coops supported




Impact/Outreach
Increased incomes, employment and enhanced food security for 1,200 shea nut collectors.













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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 11

End of Project Report Partnership for Development Action
(PRUDA)
April 2012 to December 2012

Location: Lambussie-Karni, Upper West Region


Input
9 months of advisory services

Output
Capacity strengthening for two Shea butter processing societies (Ekaweri and Amuna) in Samoa and
Naawie communities to facilitate their linkage to viable Shea butter markets.


Outcomes
Production
50mt of Shea butter sold
20% increase in Shea butter sales
75% of Shea butter met buyer expectation

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
GH93,300 worth of Shea butter sales
GH30,000 worth of VSLA money loaned to members to purchase and stockpile nuts at a
volume of 55mt

Organization and Governance
100 members of two cooperative societies
50% of co-ops applying knowledge in management and governance
2 co-op societies benefitting from IIAS (Impact Investment Advisory Services)
37 societies part of Shea Network Ghana


Infrastructural Development
50 Beehives established


Impact/Outreach
100 Shea butter producers capacities strengthened in marketing and production of Shea butter and
nut. 50 co-ops applying knowledge in management and governance.









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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 12

End of Contract Report Rural Interventions for Development and Employment
(RIDE)
2
nd
August 2012 to 16
th
March 2012

Location: Central Gonja and Kintampo Districts, Northern Region

Input
Eight months of advisory services

Output
Capacity strengthening of Shea collector groups in Central Gonja and Kintampo North Districts.

Outcomes
Production
12 tons of Shea nuts sold
123 tons Shea nuts mobilized and sold
90% of nuts produced meet buyer expectation

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
GH5,412 worth of nuts sold
GH61,182 worth of nuts sold to the Pure Company and open market

Organization and Governance
38 self-selected VSLA groups with total membership of 854 members
1 union formed and registered as member of the Shea Network Ghana
30 groups are members of the central Gonja Coop Union
6 coop societies trained in Shea butter soap making as an alternative income activity
Weekly Shea nut prices collected from 6 major markets in both central and Kintampo North
Districts

Infrastructural Development

2 storage structures identified and refurbished


Impact/Outreach
Improved livelihoods and food security for 854 Shea producers in Central Gonja and Kintampo Districts
of Northern and Brong Ahafo Regions.





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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 13

End of Contract Report
Rural Organisation of Women Farmers and Agro-Processing Development (ROWFAD)
April, 2012 to December, 2012

Location: Sissala East District, Wa, Upper West Region

Input
9 months of advisory services

Output
Capacity strengthening of 27 women groups into VSLAs, Shea producer organizations and Cooperative
Societies and unions.

Outcomes
Production
60 tons of Shea nuts stockpiled exceeded target of 30 tons.
25 tons of Shea butter sold
95% of nuts sold met buyer quality expectations
3 local Shea products being sold on the market (Moringa soap, local 3 types of soap (BF, Key
soap and ball soap)

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
Total amount mobilized by 67 VSLAs is GH126,260
20 out of 67 VSLAs formed with a membership of 477 had done a share out. Total Savings =
GH52,829 with a total profit of GH6,683.
Value of financial resources raised by old and new VSLAs for VC financing activities (including
credits, VSLA, grants etc)

Organization and Governance
Training of 27 women producer organizations to stock pile nuts
27 VSLAs formed out of a target of 20 with a baseline of 67 VSLAs
25 cooperative societies are members of a cooperative union.
37 societies are part of the Shea Network Ghana


Infrastructural Development
85 beehives procured and distributed to 85 beneficiaries through bidding
3 storage houses refurbished for storage

Natural Resource Management
250 seedlings planted in Shea Parklands


Impact/Outreach
Improved livelihoods and incomes for over 600 women in Sissala East District.





23
SNV Ghana Agriculture

Document 14

End of Contract Report Sustainable Aid through Voluntary Establishment (SAVE
Ghana)
April to July 2012

Location: Sissala East and West Districts, Upper West Region

Output
Capacity strengthening for women groups in 8 communities.


Outcomes
Production
60 mt of Shea nut sold to AAK
100 mt of organic fair trade nuts sold


Revenue Generated and Financial Services
GH45,700 mobilized through VSLA

Organisation and Governance
20 coop/VSLA societies formed
30 groups strengthened
4 coops registered
110 members of societies part of Shea network Ghana


Impact /Outreach
Improved Livelihoods and increase in incomes for 500 women Sissala East and West Districts.






24
SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 15

Assignment Completion Report Savannah Integrated Rural Development Aid
(SIRDA)
March, 2013

Location: Tamale, Northern Region


Input
187 advisory days

Output
Capacity strengthening of Shea women groups in Tamale.

Outcomes
Production
79 tons of butter and Shea nuts sold to the market
17 tons of Shea nuts sold by coop societies
62 tons of Shea butter sold

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
GH23,232 mobilized from 20 VSLAs
GH116,219 gained from sales of Shea nuts and butter
12 groups out of the 13 coop groups have operational bank accounts


Organization and Governance
13 cooperative groups formed (9 groups are certified)
20 VSLA formed
538 members part of vslas (women 499,men 18)
541 members in unions,459 trained
425 members trained


Impact/Outreach
Improved incomes, production and employment for 400 women in 9 communities.











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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 16

Baseline Study and Profiling Report-Shea Butter Processing Enterprises in Shea Producing Areas
of Ghana
Seidu, Al-hassan (Dr). ICEIR,
UDS
September 2013

Location: Tamale, Northern Region

Input
50 consultancy days

Output
SNV Netherlands Development Organization (SNV) commissioned a baseline study of Shea butter
processors in July 2013 to profile viable Shea butter businesses in Northern Ghana. The study broadly
produced a comprehensive data on viable existing butter processor groups and enterprises in key
areas of production capacity, organisational structure, financing needs and location. The study was
carried out in 41 districts in Northern Region (23), Upper East Region (9) and Upper West Region (9) of
Ghana through firm level interviews and key informant interviews.

Outcomes
Production
Of the 179 groups that produced and sold during the 2012/13 production season, the average
output per group stood at 9 tons. About 28 bags of Shea nuts are processed per week by a
typical processing group.
Technology used for Shea butter production is largely traditional, which is mostly acquired
through learning by doing. More than half of the groups 55% use traditional method or
processing Shea butter.
All 215 Shea butter processing enterprises own one or two types of asset to aid Shea butter
processing. The common assets owned by most of the groups include buildings (premises),
roasting machines, kneaders, millers, crushers, pots (earthenware and aluminium), basins, poly
tanks and barrels
84% of the groups use fuel wood as their source of energy for Shea butter processing.

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
Shea butter production in the study area is viable and profitable. Aside the creation of job
opportunities for over 7,000 people
The analysis of revenue generation indicates that Shea butter production is profitable. Monthly
income for Grades A and B is estimated at GH48,000 and GH40,000, respectively. Thus,
Shea butter groups with the necessary support and market availability can earn annual income
levels of GH576,000 and GH480,000 for Grades a and b, respectively.
Financial support is recommended for all 69 cooperatives producing for commercial purposes
Results of discussions show that on average, each woman processor will need an amount of Ghc
500 to be in Shea butter processing business. With an average of 33 women belonging to a
group it means that 2,277 women processors will need financial support estimated to be
GH1,138,500. Thus, on average, each group belonging to this category of processors will
require GH16,500 to be in business

Governance and Organization
The educational levels of both executive and non-executive group members appear to be low.
About 38% of them had attained secondary education while 10% attained tertiary education
7,000 individuals are engaged in cooperative business in the Shea industry majority of whom
are women 97%. Groups are formed for two main reasons, profit only 32% and for domestic
consumption only 2%. Only a few (less than 1%) identified job creation as a motive for
operating cooperative business. The rest 64% produce for both profit and domestic reasons.
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SNV Ghana Agriculture
As many as 140 groups representing 61% operate group bank accounts.
73% of the groups interviewed said they collaborate with NGOs, District Assemblies, NBSSI
and individuals (mostly buyers) for various reasons including capacity development, advocacy,
entrepreneurship development, small loan management, business management and marketing.
There are two grades of Shea butter, namely, Grade A and B. Majority of the processors
produce the Grade A category which is sold at an average price of GH3 per kilo compare with
GH2.50 for Grade B. More than half 58% of the groups have received training in Shea butter
quality management and are applying the knowledge gained from the training.


Impact/Outreach
7,000 individuals are engaged in cooperative business in the Shea industry majority of whom are
women 97%.


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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 17

Final and Reflection Report Tumu Deanery Rural Integrated Development Programme
(TUDRIDEP)
July 2012-April 2013

Location: Wa East, Upper West Region

Input
128 advisory days

Output
Capacity strengthening of 30 women groups.

Outcomes
Production
70 tons nuts stock piled
50 tons butter processed/sold
95 tons nut sold to AAK

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
GH120,000 in savings (30 groups)
GH14,580 in loans
45 VSLAs Operational


Organization and Governance
45 VSLAs trained as cooperatives
2 Unions established


Infrastructural Development
3 community based warehouse

Natural Resource Management
350 seedlings planted


Impact/Outreach
Improved Livelihoods and Food security for 1,600 women in 4 districts in Upper West Region.












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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 18

IB-Shea Butter End of Contract Report Tuna Women Development Programme
(TUWODEP)
July 2013 to December 2013

Location: Wa, Upper West Region


Input
141 advisory days

Output
Capacity Strengthening of the St John Women Society and the Dakompilaayiri Women Society.
Market Identification and Needs Assessments for Cooperatives.


Outcomes
Production
St John's Women Shea Butter Processing Cooperative Society
Volume of Butter Sales (total) = 4 tons
Cumulative value of butter sold = GH 10,573
Cumulative price per kg of butter sold =GH2.40
Dakompilaayiri Women Shea Butter Processing Cooperative Society
Volume of butter sales (total) = 2 tons
Cumulative value of butter sold = GH5,743
Cumulative price per kg of butter sold = GH 2.2

Infrastructural Development
Provision of Shea butter processing machines by Heifer International

Business Development Services
Financial Linkages :Women groups were linked to Agricultural Development Bank (ADB)
Each group has an account with ADB where payments to the groups are received and VSLA
contributions
St Johns women society mobilised GH4,320 for 2013, six women were given loans with the
project period members amounting to GH1,430. Amount left to be repaid by the loan takers is
GH210.
Dakompilariyir women group also contributed an amount of GH2,350 in 2013, From June to
November, they gave out loans to nine members amounting to GH1,470

Co-ordination, Policy and Enabling Environment
The union of Shea Business Association was initiated with 2 other societies to produce butter for
Star-Shea Limited

Impact/Outreach
82 women with increased knowledge in managing their own business.


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SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 19

Final Report on Value Chain Development Women Integrated Development Organisation
(WIDO)
May, 2012

Location: Kaleo, Wa, Upper East Region


Output
Capacity strengthening of 45 groups and up scaling of VSLA activities in the Nadowli District and to
conclude the registration of cooperative unions.


Outcomes
Production
165 women sold 700 bags (58 tons)of nuts to AAK
An additional 100tons which were earlier mobilized were sold to other buyers particularly PBC
50 tons of quality Shea butter produced and sold by societies by 5 processing societies
1200 women trained in quality nuts processing
WIDO conducted training for 40 communities in quality butter production, the activities carried
out included: selection of nut for butter, boiling of nuts, storage of nuts, drying of nuts and
steaming of Shea nuts.

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
VSLAs mobilized GH310,550 within contract period. GH100,200 was used in Pre-financing
Shea nut and butter activities
Ghc 210,350 disbursed from VSLA among 179 women

Organization and Governance
2 Unions registered
5 societies registered with Shea Networks as members
45 registered cooperatives societies in 35 communities
VSLA materials supplied to 75 groups in 45 communities
135 executives trained in advocacy, leadership skills, group dynamics and cooperative
governance


Infrastructural Development
5 warehouses identified used for nuts stockpiling
25 beehives supplied to chaang community


Impact/Outreach
Increased Production, Incomes and Employment for 179 rural women.





30
SNV Ghana Agriculture
Document 20

Shea Value Chain Development focussed on the Establishment of Cooperatives and VSLAs

Youth Advocacy on Rights and Opportunities
(YARO)
January, 2013

Location: Wa Municipal area, Upper West Region


Input
148 advisory days

Output
Capacity strengthening of Shea producer groups. (Adequate financial, technical and vocational
resource development).


Outcomes
Production
35,240kg of butter produced and sold
50 tons of nuts sold by coop societies
100% of butter produced meet buyer expectations
630 litres of honey harvested

Revenue Generated and Financial Services
GH 77,550 generated from processed butter sold
GH 229,876 mobilized from member savings,360 members have benefited by way of loans
with a total value GH90,000

Infrastructural Development
45 fully furnished VSLA kits distributed
3 improved equipments used by societies
45 beehives established

Organization and Governance
45 coops formed and registered
45 societies strengthened and are members of unions
15 societies part of Shea network Ghana


Impact /Outreach
1260 women, 11 men have been reached, with sustainable incomes and improved livelihoods.







31
SNV Ghana Agriculture
Other Documents available in SNV



Title Author Date
1
Capacity Development for SNV Clients in the Conversation
and Sustainable Use of Shea Parklands CIKOD April,2013
2
The Shea Butter Pilot Project: Implementation Plan:
Promoting Inclusive Shea Businesses for Smallholder
livelihoods and Incomes Through Innovations and
Renewable Energy
Richard Yeboah,MSc-
MDF August,2013
3
Shea Butter Buyers Assessment Form SNV
4
Inclusive Business Shea Butter Project -Quarter 1 Report SNV April,2013
5
SNV NUTS COSTING SURVEY SNV Advisor August,2010
6
Proposed SNV Shea Co-operative and Business Model-
ORGANISING COLLECTORS FOR DIRECT SUPPLY OF NUTS SNV Advisor
7
SHEA SECTOR BASELINE SURVEY REPORT Paul Adraki 2009
8
Small Business Report -Audit Report SNV,SEND 2005
9
SNV SHEA MARKET ASSESSMENT: PRO-POOR VALUE
CHAIN ANALYSIS John Addaquay June,2011
10
Shea Sub-Sector Study Ghana
SNV West Africa Shea
Team 31st March, 2006
11
Shea Commodity Business Plan SNV April,2012
12
The Shea Sub-Sector Study -Final Draft Charles K Sackey August,2011
13
Final Shea Butter Processing Report-AN Energy Analysis of
Shea Butter Report
Sachibu Mohammed,
Enno
Heijndermans,Suglo
Mboribuni Shea Butter
Processing Group June,2012
14
Shea Market Study Report-Annex to Final Report
15
Shea Butter Poster-Best Butter Processing Practices
16
Inception Report on IB-Shea Butter SNV April,2013
17 Report on leadership Skills and management Training For
Women Group Leaders TUWODEP July,2005
18
Monthly Report for IB-Shea Butter-JULY TUWODEP August,2013
19
Monthly Report for IB-Shea Butter-AUGUST TUWODEP September,2013
20
Monthly Report for IB-Shea Butter-SEPTEMBER TUWODEP October,2013
21
Monthly Report for IB-Shea Butter-OCTOBER TUWODEP November,2013
22
Monthly Report for IB-Shea Butter-NOVEMBER TUWODEP December,2013
23
Shea Value Chain Strengthening Project CODAC February,2013




32
SNV Ghana Agriculture
Glossary of Terms

Advisory Services: SNV's advisory services focus on creating effective solutions with local impact.
They form the core of our work and provide us with an in-depth knowledge of the local context and the
agendas of local actors, rooted in a long-standing presence in over 30 countries. Our Advisory
services are geared towards the development of organisational and leadership capacities, catalysing
market-based solutions and supporting enabling environments.

Inclusive Business: SNV advances economic development and socio-economic inclusion through
the Inclusive Business model. This innovative approach seeks to increase the income, production and
well-being of low-income groups, while at the same time, generating benefits for participating
companies.
Through developing Inclusive Business commercial models that involve low-income groups in the value
chain of a medium or large company as producers, distributors or consumers, SNV helps companies
improve their supply chains, strengthen their human resources and access new markets. Low-income
participants benefit by gaining reliable buyers and fair prices for their products, from new jobs and
from access to affordable, quality goods and services.
SNV has developed more than 140 Inclusive Business projects in Latin America, Asia and Africa
working with companies in sectors ranging from agribusiness to renewable energy to food products,
tourism, and commerce to construction, among others.

Impact Investment Advisory Services: SNVs Impact Investment Advisory Services (SNV
IIAS) has been established to target the 'missing middle' - those entrepreneurs in the developing world
who fall squarely between microfinance and conventional financing. Small and medium-sized
enterprises (SMEs) in the developing world can serve as catalysts for sustainable growth by driving
employment and supporting social inclusion. However, the potential of these companies often remains
untapped because they lack access to capital. SNV IIAS targets the 'missing middle' by assisting
partner funds and SMEs in raising investment capital and technical assistance funding, in addition to
providing investment advisory services.
SNV addresses the challenges of enterprises at the Bottom of the Pyramid, by helping impact investors
build quality investment portfolios and providing investment-readiness services to SMEs.

Value Chain Development: Value chains are systems of people, organisations and activities
needed to create process and deliver a product or service from supplier to customer. Inclusion in
agricultural value chains means that smallholders can sell more products at higher prices. This results
in increased incomes and long-term social benefits in rural areas. SNV assumes key roles in value
chain development as a mediator between stakeholders, as a knowledge broker, an advisor, and
most often, as a facilitator. Our goal is to strengthen links in value chains, so the systems can sustain
themselves. Our approach includes: Effective public policy management, group strengthening, value
chain financing, strengthening value chain service providers and market intelligence.