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13 True Ways Playtest File:

Commander & Monk

A fantasy roleplaying supplement for 13 th Age by Rob Heinsoo & Jonathan Tweet

Edited by Cal Moore

© 2013 Fire Opal Media. All rights reserved

Published by Pelgrane Press Ltd under license from Fire Opal Media

The commander borrowed some of its talents from a class design by Ryven Cedrylle. The monk benefitted from comments by ASH Law, Wade Rockett and many playtesters. Playtester credits will appear in final drafts.

Product Identity: The following items are hereby identified as Product Identity, as defined in the Open Game License version 1.0a, Section 1(e), and are not Open Content: All trademarks, registered trademarks, proper names (characters, icons, place names, new deities, etc.), dialogue, banter and comments from Jonathan and Rob, plots, story elements, locations, characters, artwork, and trade dress. (Elements that have previously been designated as Open Game Content are not included in this declaration.)

Open Content: Except for material designated as Product Identity (see above), the game mechanics of this Fire Opal Media game product are Open Game Content, as defined in the Open Gaming License version 1.0a Section 1(d). No portion of this work other than the material designated as Open Game Content may be reproduced in any form without written permission.

13 True Ways and 13 th Age are published by Pelgrane Press under the Open Game License version 1.0a Copyright 2000 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. 13 True Ways and 13 th Age are trademarks of Fire Opal Media. ©2013 Fire Opal Media. All rights reserved. www.fireopalmedia.com and www.pelgranepress.com.

Playtest Note

Greetings to all of you who bought the Escalation Edition, contributed to the 13 True Ways Kickstarter, or have pre-ordered the 13 th Age Bestiary. We hope you have fun playing with the two classes attached.

If you have playtest feedback, send it to 13thAgePlaytest@gmail.com. As usual, we’re more interested in feedback based on play sessions rather than read-and-critique messages. On the other hand, I admit we’ve had a few extremely helpful read-and-critique responses, so if that’s all you have time for it’s not like we’ll kick your mail out of the box. It’s easiest for sorting purposes (and for giving you credit) if you use the subject line of the mail to indicate what you’re giving playtest feedback on, monk, commander, or both monk and commander. If you have questions and doubts about how to handle something while you’re playing, I’d suggest not waiting for a response. Choose the interpretation that seems right to you, or that makes sense, play with it, and report on the experience. That’s useful feedback.

Commander We called this class the battle captain during the 13 True Ways Kickstarter. As you’ll see, there’s a trace of the original battle captain name in the current class talents. I have some hunches about how the class is going to change slightly in the future but I should keep quiet and see whether playtest responses lean the same way.

Monk This is the third serious iteration of the monk to go out to playtesting. It’s not going to please all the people all the time but it should be a touch simpler than the previous versions without sacrificing fun. There should also be more worthwhile talents that compete for the monk’s attention and form choices that aren’t as easily broken.

If you played the previous versions, the big change you’ll see right away is that the monk is now a class that uses three ability scores:

Dexterity, Strength, and Wisdom. Dexterity is the main stat for attack bonuses, Strength determines damage, and Wisdom is for ki and all the other stuff. This may sound like a raw deal, but we’ve also increased monks’ base damage and revised the ki system to enhance combat effectiveness instead of option-overload. There have been a ton of changes to the monk. The structure of the forms as an opening, flow attack, and finishing attack has not changed. Other stuff may have shifted. Here’s a short summary of major changes:

The damage structure is now called JAB/PUNCH/KICK

The ki system has been entirely revised

The daily options for the forms have been eliminated

Feats are revised

All three of the damage-increasing talents are now arguably worthwhile

The choices of the weapons for your monastic tradition have been opened up so that you can model the style/variety of martial arts you’d like instead of being constrained to tonfa and nunchaku In fact, the first playtest with the new system featured a heaven’s arrow monk whose monastic weapon was a steel ballhe was one of the champions of the deadly version of dodgeball played in the Axis arenas! Yes, this was another salvo in my business partner Jay’s efforts to get me to watch the Dodgeball movie, but it suggests that monastic traditions in the half-designed worlds of 13 th Age can take many forms. You can stick to what we know of martial arts from reality and d20 fantasy or spin up something new for your campaign.

Thanks to all of you for supporting the game with your pre-orders, Kickstarter contributions, and wonderful home campaigns. We’re having a

great time creating 13 True Ways and we look forward to sharing more classes soon.

Rob Heinsoo Lead Designer, Fire Opal Media November 25, 2013

COMMANDER

Some people are born to fight. Others like giving orders. Put these two types of people together and you’ve got a commander.

Overview

Play style: Commanders tell other characters what to do. A commander who isn’t a team player is a lonely warrior who needs to get over it and rejoin their warband or adventuring party in order to do what they best: dole out commands. The commander aims to tell other player characters what to do without interfering too often in the turn-by-turn structure of the round. That’s why commands take effect on the turn of an ally who is already taking their turn. Tactics can be used anytime, but they’re limited in how many times they can be used each day. Choosing how and when you’ll spend command points to help your allies may be challenging for a novice player. Actually, that’s not entirely right. The challenge-level may not be so bad. But straightforward characters usually work best for novice players and the commander’s options are laced with subtleties, starting with how you’ll choose between commands and tactics as you create your character. Races: Half-orcs and half-elves both excel as commanders, especially in the service of the Emperor. Humans and high-elves share an aptitude and a taste for command. Although they lack the advantages other races possess as commanders, dwarves are drawn to the class anyway—it’s a cultural thing. If the optional races show up in your campaign, dragonics are commanders supreme. Ability scores: Strength and Charisma are the two most important ability scores for commanders. Strength is the ability score used for the commander’s favored melee attacks. Charisma helps commanders give effective commands and orders to their allies. Commanders gain a +2 class bonus to Strength or Charisma, as long as it is the same ability you increase with your +2 racial bonus.

Backgrounds: Commanders have backgrounds similar to fighters and some paladins and rangers. Sample backgrounds include Frost Range mercenary, historical re- enactor, sergeant of the city guard, street gang survivor, ex-gladiator, wilderness scout, cobbler, bouncer, exotic dancer, Queen’s Wood patroller, Axis wargame veteran, Imperial squad leader, reformed drunk, and officer of the Crusader’s Guard. Icons: The Emperor and the Dwarf King are the icons most associated with commanders, largely as a function of their positions as the masters of large standing armies. Soldiers devoted to the Great Gold Wyrm may find that the path of the commander gives them even more influence over their comrades than the moral example of the paladin. Similarly, the Crusader appreciates underlings who can give orders that will be obeyed. In recent years, orc sub-commanders represent one of the most dangerous examples of the Orc Lord’s growing influence on the hordes. Few of the Elf Queen’s followers master the skills of battle in times of peace, but these are not peaceful times and warriors know they may find service in the grace of the Queen.

Gear

At 1 st level, commanders start with a trusty melee weapon or two, a ranged weapon, a shield, light armor of some type (or heavy armor if they chose the Armor Skills talent), and other minor odds-and-ends suggested by their backgrounds. Commanders who have been taking it easy start with 25 gp. Commanders flush with battlefield plunder or back from a gambling expedition start with 1d6 x 10 gp.

Armor

Commanders split their focus between commanding fellow warriors and striking their own blows. Unless they choose the Armor Skills talent, commanders are at home in light armor such as leather armor, studded leather, courbolli, and light chain.

Commander Armor and AC

Type

Base AC

Atk Penalty

None

10

Light

12

Heavy

14

2

Shield

+1

Weapons

Unless they improve their combat ability using the Martial Training talent, commanders fight better with light weapons.

Commander Melee Weapons

 
 

One-Handed

Two-Handed

 

Small

1d4 dagger

1d6 club

 

Light or Simple

1d6 mace, shortsword

1d8 spear

 

Heavy or Martial

(-2 attack) 1d8 longsword, warhammer

(-2 attack) 1d10 greatsword

Commander Ranged Weapons

 
 

Thrown

Crossbow

Bow

 

Small

1d4 dagger, star

1d4 hand crossbow

 

Light or Simple

1d6 javelin

1d6 light crossbow

1d6 shortbow

 

Heavy Martial

(-2 attack) 1d8 heavy crossbow

(-2 attack) 1d8 longbow

Commander Level Progression

Comma

Total Hit Points

 

Class

Commands

Pool

Level-

Damage

nder

Talents

& Tactics

available

up

bonus from

Level

Total # Feats

 

Ability

ability score

 

(7 + CON mod) x

1

adventurer

3

4

1 st level

 

ability

Level 1

3

 

modifier

 

(7 + CON mod) x

2

adventurer

3

5

 

1 st level

 

ability

Level 2

4

 

modifier

 

(7 + CON mod) x

3

adventurer

3

6

 

3 rd level

   

ability

Level 3

5

 

modifier

 

(7 + CON mod) x

4

adventurer

3

7

 

3 rd level

+1 to 3 abilities

ability

Level 4

6

 

modifier

 

(7 + CON mod) x

4

adventurer

4

 

7

5 th level

   

2

x ability

Level 5

8

1

champion

modifier

Level 6

(7 + CON mod) x

4

adventurer

4

8

 

5 th level

 

2

x ability

10

2

champion

modifier

Level 7

(7 + CON mod) x

4

adventurer

4

8

7 th level

 

+1 to 3 abilities

2

x ability

12

3

champion

modifier

Level 8

(7 + CON mod) x

4

adventurer

4

9

 

7 th level

 

3

x ability

16

3

champion

modifier

1

epic

Level 9

(7 + CON mod) x

4

adventurer

4

9

9 th level

   

3

x ability

20

3

champion

modifier

2

epic

Level 10

(7 + CON mod) x

4

adventurer

4

10

 

9 th level

+1 to 3 abilities

3

x ability

24

3

champion

modifier

3

epic

 

Commander Stats

Initiative, AC, PD, MD, Hit Points, Recovery Dice, Feats, and some Talents are level dependent.

Ability Bonus

+2 Strength or Charisma (different from racial bonus)

Initiative

Dex mod + Level

Armor Class (light armor)

12

+ middle mod of Con/Dex/Wis + level

Physical Defense

10

+ middle mod of Str/Con/Dex + level

Mental Defense

12

+ middle mod of Int/Wis/Cha + level

Hit Points

(7 + Con mod) x Level modifier (see level progression chart)

Recoveries

(probably) 8

Recovery Dice

(1d8 x Level) + Con mod

Backgrounds

8

points, max 5 in any one background

Icon Relationships

3

points

Talents

3

Feats

1

per Level

Commander Basic Attacks

Melee attack

At-Will Target: One enemy Attack: Strength + Level vs. AC Hit: WEAPON + Strength damage Miss: Damage equal to your level

Ranged attack

At-Will Target: One enemy Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: WEAPON + Dexterity damage Miss:

Class Features

All commanders share class features associated with Commands and Tactics.

Commands & Command Points

Most of the times you’ll help your allies fight better, you’ll be making commands as interrupt actions on an ally’s turn. Unless otherwise specified, the targets of your commands must be conscious allies. Line of sight isn’t required, because commanders can cry out to allies. If you think it’s cool to complicate matters by deafening characters and giving them problems receiving commands, go ahead, but that should be the exception or you’re screwing the commander out of its fun. Most commanders will want to choose two of the 1 st level commands, Try Again and Rally Now, but we’ve left the choice open. If you have a cunning plan that does not include those extremely useful commands, carry on. Although we aren’t writing it out on each command, all the commands are at-will powers. Instead of being limited by the number of times you can use them in a battle or day, they’re limited by counting as interrupt actions, so that you normally can only use one command a round, and by requiring you to spend command points to use them. Using a command costs a specified number of command points as indicated in the command’s write-up. You start each battle with 1 command point (unless you’ve taken talents that improve your situation) and can gain more command points during each battle. There are two standard ways of gaining command points: the Front-line class feature (that asks you to make melee attacks on your turn), and the Command Decision action. The essential question you face during each of your turns is whether you’ll attack in melee, hoping to hit and gain command points, or whether you’ll hold back, make a Command Decision, and automatically gain command points. (Also see the Outmaneuver tactic that’s available at 1 st level, which may gain you a command point if you have none left.)

Front-line

When you hit with a melee attack on your turn, gain 1d3 command points.

Adventurer Feat: You now gain 1d4 command points when you hit with a melee attack on your turn instead of 1d3.

Champion

gain

command points equal to your Charisma modifier instead of the result of your d4 roll.

Epic Feat: Gain 1d3 command points when you hit with an opportunity attack.

Feat:

Twice

per

day,

Command Decision

Standard action Effect: Gain 1d3 command points.

Adventurer Feat: Once per day, add your Charisma modifier to the number of command points you gain with command decision. Champion Feat: Once per battle when the escalation die is 3+ you can gain 1d3 command points as a quick action. Epic Feat: You now gain 1d4 command points instead of 1d3 when you use command decision.

Tactics

Your powers also include tactics that have immediate effect on your turn. Tactics are powerful and you don’t have to spend command points or wait around for an ally’s turn to use them, but tactics don’t always recharge after a battle. You’ll have to decide how you will split your power choices between tactics and commands (at 1 st level you get 4 total, not 4 of each). It’s possible you’ll opt to ignore one category entirely, though our experience suggests that the most effective commanders balance commands and tactics.

Talents

Choose three of the following class talents. You’ll get a fourth talent at 5 th level.

Armor Skills

You cannot take this talent if you have taken the Martial Training talent. Unlike other commanders, you take no attack penalties for fighting in heavy armor. (As indicated on your class chart, your base AC in heavy armor is 14.)

Adventurer Feat: Gain a command point whenever an enemy misses you with a natural 1
Adventurer
Feat:
Gain
a
command
point
whenever
an
enemy
misses
you
with
a
natural 1 or a natural 2 with a melee attack.
Champion Feat: Once per day as a free action,
when you are hit by an attack that targets
AC, you only take half damage from that
attack.
Epic Feat: One battle per day, you gain a
bonus to your AC equal to the escalation
die, up to a maximum of the number of icon
relationship points you have with the
Crusader, Dwarf King, Emperor, or Great
Gold Wyrm.

Battle Captain

Once per battle, if you still have command points left after giving a command, roll a d6. If you roll equal to or less than your current command points, you can use another interrupt action on another ally’s turn later this round.

Adventurer Feat: Use the ability twice per battle. Champion Feat: If the roll fails, gain
Adventurer Feat:
Use the ability twice per
battle.
Champion
Feat:
If
the
roll
fails,
gain
a
command point.
Epic Feat: One battle per day, roll two d6s for
this ability and use the lower result.

Combat Maneuver

Choose a fighter maneuver of your level or lower. You can use it like a fighter. Like a fighter, you can switch to a different maneuver when you level up.

Adventurer Feat: You gain the adventurer feat for the maneuver you chose.

Champion Feat: Choose a second fighter maneuver to use. This second maneuver can be no higher than 5 th level, even as you rise in level. Epic Feat: You gain another adventurer or champion tier feat for one of your fighter maneuvers.

Destined to Lead

Whenever you roll a 4, a 5, or a 6 with an icon relations die, note that result on your character sheet. Regardless of what transpires with that icon relations result in the larger story, the result earns you a free bonus command point you can use anytime that day. When you use one or more bonus command points, be sure to tell a little story about how something related to the icon (or icons!) is helping you be a better/luckier/destined commander. That may be tougher with some icons than others, and possibly tougher with negative relationships that other relationships, so have fun.

Adventurer Feat: A 4 or a 5 is now worth 1 bonus point that day, a 6 is now worth 2 bonus points that day. Champion Feat: When you roll all your icon relationship dice and come up with zero 5s or 6s, choose one die to reroll. Epic Feat: Whether or not you spent the bonus points, you can also add +1 to all your death saves for each 6 you got as an icon relationships result that day.

Forceful Command

Whenever you give a command that lets an ally roll a d20 (an attack, a save, etc.), you can spend additional command points before the roll. Each additional point spent adds +1 to the roll.

Adventurer Feat:

Start

each

battle

with

an

additional command point.

 

Champion

Feat:

Once

per

battle,

use

a

command on a far away ally. Epic Feat: Once per day, when an ally has wasted one or more of the extra command

points you’ve spent to aid their roll, they get to reroll. (Act disappointed, but supportive.)

Into the Fray

At the start of each battle before you and your allies roll initiative, choose whether you gain a +2 initiative bonus or all your allies gain a +1 initiative bonus.

Adventurer Feat: Bonuses increase to +4 for yourself or +2 for your allies. Champion Feat: Now you can wait until you see your allies’ initiative rolls before deciding where to apply the bonus. Epic Feat: Once per day, after rolling initiative, choose an ally. That ally may reroll their initiative with a bonus equal to your Charisma modifier and must abide by the reroll.

Martial Training

You cannot take this talent if you have taken the Armor Skills talent. Unlike other commanders, you don’t have a -2 attack penalty when fighting with martial weapons.

Adventurer Feat: Gain a command point whenever you roll a natural 19 or 20 with a melee attack. Champion Feat: Twice per day as a free action (once per turn), reroll one of your melee attack rolls. Epic Feat: Twice per day, add 1d10 damage to one of your melee attacks that hit for every positive or conflicted icon relationship point you have with any or all of the Great Gold Wyrm, Crusader, Emperor, Dwarf King, or Orc Lord.

Moment of Glory

When you roll initiative, also roll a d4 and save the result. As a free action, you can add the result to a single attack roll made by one of your nearby allies later this battle. (It’s a free action, so you can wait and add the result after seeing the roll.)

Adventurer Feat: You can instead add the d4 result to a save or dicey-move roll made by an ally. Champion Feat: Roll a d6 instead of a d4. Epic Feat: One battle per day, roll a d6 and a d4. Use each result on a separate roll.

Strategist

You rely on planning, teamwork, and calm execution of orders as a commander instead of charismatic presence. Any time an element of the commander class refers to Charisma, you can replace that element with a reference to Intelligence. In addition, you start every battle with an additional command point.

Adventurer Feat: Gain an additional point in a background related to military history, strategy, command, or warfare. You can use this point to raise the background beyond the normal maximum of 5. Champion Feat: Whenever you roll a die to find out how many allies one of your commands or tactics affects, add +1 to the result. Epic Feat: Once per day, you gain a number of command points equal to your Intelligence modifier as a free action.

Sword of Victory

When your melee attack drops a non-mook enemy to 0 hp, or drops three mooks, you gain a command point.

Adventurer Feat: When your melee attack drops two or more mooks, roll a d20. If you roll 11+, gain a command point. Champion Feat: You gain 2 command points instead of 1 when you drop a non-mook enemy to 0 hp. Epic Feat: Once per day as a quick action, gain command points equal to the number of relationship points you have with any or all of the Crusader, Emperor, or the Great Gold Wyrm.

Tactician

You rely on perception, intuition, and common sense as a commander instead of charismatic presence. Any time an element of the commander class refers to Charisma, you can replace that element with a reference to Wisdom. In addition, one battle per day, you can reroll your initiative if you don’t like the first result.

Adventurer Feat: Gain an additional point in a background related to military history, strategy, command, or warfare. You can use this point to raise the background beyond the normal maximum of 5. Champion Feat: Once per day after a battle, add your Wisdom modifier to all the recharge rolls for Tactics you’re making after the battle. Epic Feat: Gain a command point when an ally you have given a command rolls a natural 20 with the action influenced by that command.

Commands & Tactics

Commands and tactics are broken into separate pools below to aid comparisons. Whenever you gain a new command or tactic, you can choose from either category. If you wish you can ignore tactics and choose only commands, though our experience suggests that it’s better to have some of both category. Ignoring commands entirely and choosing only tactics doesn’t work well, because the class has too many talents and feats and features that pivot on commands.

1 st Level Commands

Get Out of There!

Cost: 1 command point Interrupt action Target: One nearby ally on the ally’s turn. Effect: Target can use one quick action to make a disengage check this turn.

Adventurer Feat: Target gains a bonus on its disengage checks this turn equal to your Charisma modifier. Champion Feat: If the disengage check fails, target gains temporary hit points equal to twice your Charisma modifier. Epic Feat: If the target’s disengage roll is a natural even roll, this command doesn’t cost you a command point.

Rally Now

Cost: 1 command point

Interrupt action Target: One nearby ally on the ally’s turn.

an

unconscious ally. Effect: Target can use their rally action as a free action. (If it’s their second or subsequent rally, they still need to roll a save to get it to work.)

Special:

You

can

use

this

command

on

Adventurer Feat: If the target has to roll a save to use the rally, add your Charisma modifier to their save. Champion Feat: If the ally has to roll a save to use their rally action, you can add +2 to their save before they roll for each additional command point you spend on the command. Epic Feat: Add triple your Charisma modifier to the hit points regained by the ally.

<<insert Players Sidebar>> Note that the Rally Now command doesn’t help the commander rally or heal themselves. <<end Players Sidebar>>

Save Now!

Cost: 1 command point Interrupt action Target: One nearby ally on the ally’s turn. Effect: Target can roll a save against a save ends effect.

Adventurer Feat: Before your ally rolls the save, you can spend additional command points. For each additional point you spend, add +1 to the save.

Champion Feat: Target also gains temporary hit points equal to twice your Charisma modifier (triple your Charisma modifier at 8 th level). Epic Feat: Roll saves against two effects if the target is suffering from more than one. Any additional command points spent add to both saves.

<<insert Players Sidebar>> If you like, you can wait and see whether your ally succeeds with a save at the end of their turn, then use the Save Now! command to if they fail. <<end Players Sidebar>>

Try Again

Cost: 2 command points Interrupt action Target: One nearby ally who is making an attack on that ally’s turn. Effect: Target can reroll one attack roll but must use the re-rolled result.

If the escalation die is 3+,

your ally can add your Charisma modifier to the reroll. Champion Feat: If the rerolled attack scores a critical hit, gain 1 one command point Epic Feat: If the rerolled attack misses, gain 1 command point.

Adventurer Feat:

1 st Level Tactics

Basic Tactical Strike

Quick action Recharge 16+ Target: One nearby ally Effect: Your ally can make a basic attack as a free action. The basic attack only deals half damage.

Adventurer Feat: The attack now deals full damage.

Champion Feat: Attack

now has an attack

bonus equal to your Charisma modifier.

Epic Feat: Recharge roll becomes 11+

Enforce Clarity

Quick action Recharge 11+ Target: One nearby ally Effect: A dazed effect on the target ends (including an effect that doesn’t require a save). 3 rd level: Also works against weakened. 5 th level: Also works against confused. 7 th level: Target up to two nearby allies. 9 th level: Target 1d4+1 allies, including yourself.

<<insert Players Sidebar>> For now, let’s test this tactic as simply getting better as your level improves, instead of requiring feats to improve. It’s an example of a corner case effect that isn’t really worth spending feats on. <<end Players Sidebar>>

Just Stay Calm

Quick action, when the escalation die is 2+ Recharge 16+ Effect: Decrease the escalation die by 1. Then 1d3 of your nearby allies can heal using a recovery.

Adventurer Feat: Now affects 1d4 allies. Champion Feat: You can now target yourself with the effect. Epic Feat: Now affects 1d6 allies.

Outmaneuver

Quick action once per round but only when you have 0 command points At-Will Close attack Target: Nearby foe with the highest Mental Defense Attack: Charisma + Level vs. MD Hit: You gain 1 command point.

Adventurer Feat: If you are engaged with one or more enemies, you can target the highest MD enemy you are engaged with instead of the highest nearby MD enemy.

Champion Feat: Once per battle when you roll a natural even hit with Outmaneuver, gain two command points instead of one. Epic Feat: Once per battle as a free action when your outmaneuver attack hits, the target takes 1d10 psychic damage for each point of the escalation die.

3 rd Level Commands

Charge!

Cost: 1 command point Interrupt action Target: One nearby ally on the ally’s turn. Effect: Target gets to both move and attack as a standard action.

Adventurer Feat: Target can use a melee attack instead of only a basic attack. Champion Feat: Add your Charisma modifier as a bonus to the target’s melee attack. Epic Feat: If the target moves to attack an enemy you are also engaged with, the enemy is vulnerable to the attack.

Hit Harder

Cost: 1 command point Interrupt action Target: One nearby ally who has hit with an attack on the ally’s turn. Effect: Target can reroll its damage roll. It must use the rerolled result.

Adventurer Feat: Add the commander’s Charisma modifier to the rerolled damage. At 5 th level, add double the Charisma modifier instead, at 8 th level add triple.

Champion

Feat:

You

can

also

use

this

command

when

an

ally

makes

an

opportunity attack. Epic Feat: Use the higher of the two rolls rather than being forced to use the reroll.

You Are A Precious Snowflake!

Cost: 1 command point Interrupt action Target: One nearby non-human ally who is using a once-per-battle racial power. Effect: Roll a d20. On a 11+, the target does not expend the use of its racial power and can use it again later this battle.

3 rd Level Tactics

Finish this!

Quick action

Recharge 11+

when

escalation die is 4+ and there is only a single enemy left in the battle. Effect: Spend between 1 and 3 command points. Expand the crit range of all attacks against the remaining enemy by the number of command points you spent. This expanded crit range lasts until the start of your next turn.

Limited

Use:

Can

only

be

used

Can now be used when the

escalation die is 3+. Champion Feat: Can now be used when there are one or two enemies left in the battle. Epic Feat: You can now spend between 1 and 5 command points this way.

Adventurer Feat:

<<insert players sidebar>> So far, this is the one case in which you can spend command points as part of a tactic. <<end sidebar>>

Scramble

Quick action Recharge 16+ Target: You and 1d4 of your nearby allies Effect: Each target can use a move action as a free action, starting with you and proceeding in the order of your choice.

Adventurer

using this free action gain a +5 bonus. Champion Feat: The number of allied targets is now the result of the d4 or the escalation die, whichever is higher. Epic Feat: This tactic recharges on a roll of 11+ instead of 16+.

made

Feat:

Disengage checks

Swordwork

Effect: Target gets an extra standard action this turn. If it uses the action for an attack, the attack only deals half damage.

Champion

points instead of 4. Epic Feat: Target also gains 3d10 + triple your Charisma modifier temporary hit points.

command

Feat:

Cost

is

now

3

We’re on your side!

Free action, when the escalation die is 4+ Recharge 16+ Effect: You can make a basic melee attack as a quick action once each turn until the end of the battle. The basic melee attack deals only half damage, hit or miss.

Cost: 1 command point Interrupt action Target: One nearby confused ally on the ally’s turn. Effect: Roll a d20. 11+: Target ignores the effects of confusion this turn. 16+: End the confusion and target can take its turn normally.

 

Adventurer

Feat:

Now

usable

when

the

escalation die is 3+.

   

Champion Feat: Add dazed and weakened to the list of conditions the command can affect. Epic Feat: Add hampered and stunned to the list.

Champion

Feat:

Now

usable

when

the

escalation die is 2+. Epic Feat: If the escalation die reaches 6+, the recharge roll is 6+ instead of 16+.

5 th Level Commands

Hit ’Em From Here!

Cost: 1 command point Interrupt action Target: One nearby ally on the ally’s turn Effect: This turn, target can target one far away creature with a spell or power that normally targets or affects nearby creatures.

Champion

usually nearby targets can be far away now. Epic Feat: If you pay two command points instead of one, the effect lasts until the end of the target’s next turn.

power’s

Feat:

All

the

spell’s or

Make It Count!

Cost: 4 command points Interrupt action Target: One nearby ally on that ally’s turn.

5 th Level Tactics

Advanced Tactical Strike

Quick action Recharge 16+ Target: One nearby ally Effect: The target can make an at-will attack as a free action.

Champion Feat: You can use a command to influence the attack as if it was not your turn. Epic Feat: Recharge roll becomes 11+

Buck Up!

Quick action Recharge 16+ Targets: You and 1d4 nearby allies Effect: Target gains temporary hit points equal to the average number of hit points it gains when it heals using a recovery.

Champion Feat: The number of allied targets is now the result of the d4 or the escalation die, whichever is higher. Epic Feat: Choose one of the targets. That target also heals using a recovery.

7 th Level Commands

Strike Now!

Cost: 4 command points Interrupt action Target: One nearby ally on the ally’s turn. Effect: Target gets an extra standard action this turn.

7 th Level Tactics

Climactic Battle

Quick action Recharge 16+ Effect: This battle, the escalation die is a d8 instead of a d6. Then roll a d20. If you roll 11+, increase the escalation die by +1.

Champion Feat: If the d20 roll is 16+, increase the escalation die by 2 instead of 1. Epic Feat: When the escalation die hits 8, gain 1d6 command points and make recharge rolls for all your tactics.

On Your Feet, Maggots!

Quick action Recharge 16+ Target: One or two allies who are staggered or below 0 hit points. Effect: Targets can heal using a recovery. Each target is dazed until the end of its next turn.

Champion Feat: If the escalation die is 3+, there is no dazed effect. Epic Feat: Can now target up to three allies.

Saving Will

Quick action Target: One nearby ally Recharge 16+ Effect: Your ally gains a +5 bonus on all saves until the end of your next turn.

Champion

interrupt action. Epic Feat: The target can now be an ally who is far away.

an

Feat:

Can

now

be

used

as

9th Level Command

Natural Command

Cost: 2 command points Interrupt action Target: One nearby ally on the ally’s turn. Effect: A natural odd roll the ally has just made counts as natural even, or vice versa (without actually changing the numerical result).

Epic Feat: Command now costs 1 command point if the escalation die is 3+.

9th Level Tactics

Force A Conclusion

Quick action Recharge 16+ Effect: If escalation die is 3+, roll the escalation die and use the new result.

Epic Feat: Now usable when the escalation die is 2+.

Now, Not Later

Free action Recharge 16+ Target: Nearby ally who is using a recharge power

Effect: Target can make the recharge roll for that power immediately instead of after the battle.

Epic Feat: If the recharge roll fails, target can still roll for recharge after the battle.

Supreme Tactical Strike

Quick action Recharge 16+ Target: Nearby ally Effect: Your ally can make a standard action attack as a free action.

Epic Feat: The target can now be an ally who is far away.

MONK

Every monk that joins an adventuring party has a story about why they are not back at the monastery. Some chase a vision, while others have been driven out. For some, it’s a temporary step in their training. For others, it’s a permanent exile, for a few a hard- won escape.

Overview

Play style: Monks are great fun for experienced players who like juggling significant decisions within the flow of moment- by-moment roleplaying. You’ll make significant decisions when building your character out of interwoven options and fighting round-by- round using the diverse elements of the monk’s attack forms. Some inexperienced players can handle playing a monk, others can’t. Races: When betting on the race of the champion and runners-up in one of the grand monastic tournaments, you are safest betting on wood elf, halfling, and human. But if there’s a half-orc in the tournament who has mastered monastic discipline? Or a dwarf who has put away the axe? They are your dark horses. Ability scores: Dexterity is the most important ability score for monks, determining your attack bonus and also contributing to AC. Strength and Wisdom are the other ability scores that will matter to you. Strength is the score that affects how much damage you deal with most all your attacks. Wisdom determines how much ki you have and influences some talents and abilities. Monks have a +2 bonus to Dexterity or Wisdom or Strength, as long as it isn’t the ability score they have increased with their racial bonus.

<<insert RobSays sidebar>> The monk is one of the few 13 th Age classes that makes your character’s effectiveness hinge on three or more ability scores. Jonathan wanted us to preserve the monk’s d20-history as the PC who needs multiple good ability scores. As Jonathan puts it, he wants monks to have to be

strong as well as fast and wise. As you’ll see when you play a monk, their ki abilities and powerful talents can vault them beyond the apparent weakness of their ability score issues. <<end RobSays sidebar>>

Backgrounds: A few representative monk

backgrounds

sanctuary guardsman, traveling circus acrobat, river guide, Cathedral runner, spider cult assassin, tunnel vermin exterminator, bodyguard, tax collector, star pupil of the School of Unified Dragons. Icons: The six icons mostly likely to inspire monasteries or monastic traditions are the Great Gold Wyrm, Priestess, Crusader, High Druid, Elf Queen, and the Three. Disciplines devoted to the Lich King also persist, promising great power without necessarily requiring that the practitioner serve the King. There has been enough cross-pollination between schools that monks may easily be acquainted with martial traditions that were originally conceived by enemy icons. In ages past, an icon known as the Grandmaster of Flowers set the highest standards of monk discipline, but there has been no such grandmaster in the ages since the ogre mages utterly defeated the last one. Great Gold Wyrm: A time-honored path for those who serve the Wyrm without taking on the burdensome oaths and armor of the paladin. Priestess: The Cathedral holds many dojos and monasteries. Others carve themselves into the mountains. Crusader: Not all demons can be defeated with steel. The Crusader understands the power of discipline and tradition. The conviction that you are better than other people isn’t necessarily mistaken when you’re a warrior who can tear monsters apart with your bare hands. High Druid: Forest monasteries in the upper terraces, island monasteries in wild rivers, scattered masters teaching a few chosen disciples, all may follow the High Druid’s approach to fighting styles inspired by nature.

Temple acolyte, mountain

Elf Queen: The Queen herself has little personal connection to the perspectives required for monastic training. But many of her high elf and wood elf followers spend some portion of their lives in communal meditation, and those retreats have frequently grown into the elven equivalent of monasteries. The High Druid’s new monastic traditions owe a great deal to patterns set by the elves. The Three: The Black takes special pride in training the most dangerous monks as fearsome assassins. Lich King: Each generation of monks who serve the light promise to stamp out the forms associated with the Lich King. But in the end, they always find that the forms are too useful to lose. If they remain true to the light, they try to use the Lich King’s powers against him.

Gear

As a first level monk, you can opt to have next to nothing, no possessions to get in your way as you wander the earth. Or you can have one or two weapons from your school, a change or two of clothes, and perhaps even a missile weapon you use to hunt rabbits. If you have little concern for worldly things, start with 25 gp. If money flows in and out of your possession along with ki and fortune, start with 1d6 x 10 gp.

Armor

Monks don’t get much out of wearing light armor. The leather vests or ornate ceremonial garb a few monks wear, especially when they can get hold of magic versions of such items, qualifies as armor but doesn’t have an inherent advantage over whirling about in only a shirt, gi, or flowing robes. Heavy armor might protect from a few impacts the monk can’t normally avoid but it actively impedes the practice of monastic fighting arts. Same goes for shields.

Monk Armor and AC Type

Base AC

Atk Penalty

None

11

-

Light

11

-

Heavy

12

-4

Shield

+1

-2

Weapons

A monk’s very hands and feet are deadly weapons, as you’ll see in the discussion of damage dealt by JAB, PUNCH, and KICK attacks when we discuss monk attack forms below. Most monks fight with bare hands and feet, but not all. Some monastic traditions and martial arts schools are linked to specific weapons. Some traditions use swords, spears, and even axes. Other traditions that insist on mastering wooden weapons use nunchaku, sai, kama and tonfa. When you fight with weapons that match your school’s traditions, your soul and training determines your combat abilities rather than the weapon itself. Whether fighting with bare hands or with melee weapons from your own tradition, use JAB, PUNCH, and KICK damage instead of WEAPON damage. In other words, we’re not going to bother with a melee weapon chart for monks. We’ll assume that you normally try to use weapons from your tradition. When you try to fight with weapons that are not from your tradition, look at the fighter’s weapon chart but take a -2 attack.

Traditional Monk Weapons

The d20-roleplaying tradition that monks fight with weapons like the kama, mankugrikisari, tonfa, nunchaku, staff, and three-section staff makes perfect sense if that’s how you want to define your school. Those weapons come from martial arts traditions that aimed to hide weapons as farm tools. If that style of weapon doesn’t suit your monastery, go for whatever you like. Monks fighting with swords, spears and axes makes perfect sense, particularly if those weapons match the elven, Imperial, or crusading traditions you describe in your current campaign.

Ranged Weapons Monks can use a variety of light thrown weapons. They’re not as good with bows and crossbows, though the heaven’s arrow talent

Monk Ranged Weapons Thrown

Small Light or Simple Heavy Martial

1d4 dagger, star 1d6 javelin

models a monastic tradition that’s focused on the bow.

Crossbow 1d4 (-2 atk) hand crossbow 1d6 (-3 atk) light crossbow 1d8 (4 atk) heavy crossbow

Bow

1d6 (2 atk) shortbow 1d8 (3 atk) longbow

Monk Level Progression

 

Total Hit Points

 

Talents

   

Forms

Ki

 

Lev

Damage bonus

 

el-

from ability

up

score

Monk

Abil

Level

Total # Feats

 

ity

 

(7 + CON mod)

1

adventurer

3

adv

2

adv

2

+

 

Ability modifier

x

3

 

Wis

 

Level 1

 

mod

 

(7 + CON mod)

2

adventurer

3

adv

2

adv

3

+

   

Ability modifier

x

4

 

Wis

 

Level 2

 

mod

 

(7 + CON mod)

3

adventurer

3

adv

3

adv

 

3

+

 

Ability modifier

x

5

 

Wis

 

Level 3

 

mod

 

(7 + CON mod)

4

adventurer

3

adv

3

adv

4

+

 

+1

Ability modifier

x

6

 

Wis

 

to 3

 

mod

abili

Level 4

 

ties

 

(7 + CON mod)

4

adventurer

3

adv

3

adv,

 

4

+

 

2

x ability

x

8

1

champion

1

cha

Wis

 

modifier

Level 5

   

mod

Level 6

(7 + CON mod)

4

adventurer

3

adv, 1

 

3

adv,

4

+

 

2

x ability

x

10

2

champion

champ

 

1

cha

Wis

 

modifier

   

mod

Level 7

(7 + CON mod)

4

adventurer

3

adv

2

adv,

 

4

+

+1

2

x ability

x

12

3

champion

1

champ

2

cha

Wis

 

to 3

modifier

   

mod

abili

 

ties

Level 8

(7 + CON mod)

4

adventurer

3

adv

2

adv

 

5

+

   

3

x ability

x

16

3

champion

1

champ

2

cha

Wis

 

modifier

 

1

epic

1

epic

mod

Level 9

(7 + CON mod)

4

adventurer

3

adv

 

2

adv

5

+

 

3

x ability

x

20

3

champion

1

champ

 

2

cha

Wis

 

modifier

 

2

epic

1

epic

 

1

epic

mod

Level

(7 + CON mod)

4

adventurer

3

adv

2

adv

 

5

+

+1

3

x ability

10

x

24

3

champion

1

champ

2

cha

Wis

 

to 3

modifier

 

3

epic

1

epic

 

2

epic

mod

abili

 

ties

Monk Stats

Level modifiers are already added in to the stats in this table.

Ability Bonus

+2 Dexterity or Wisdom (different from racial bonus)

Initiative

Dex mod + Level

Armor Class (no/light armor)

11

+ middle mod of Con/Dex/Wis + Level

Physical Defense

11

+ middle mod of Str/Con/Dex + Level

Mental Defense

11

+ middle mod of Int/Wis/Cha + Level

Hit Points

(7 + Con mod) x Level modifier (see level progression chart)

Recoveries

(probably) 8

Recovery Dice

(1d8 x level) + Con mod

Backgrounds

8

points, max 5 in any one background

Icon Relationships

3

points

Adventurer-tier Talents

3

Adventurer-tier Forms

2

Feats

1

Monk Basic Attacks

Melee attack At-Will Target: One enemy Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength damage Miss: Damage equal to your level

Ranged attack At-Will Target: One enemy Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: WEAPON + Strength damage Miss: --

Features

All monks have attacks that deal unique styles of damage, use forms as the basis of their actions during each round, use ki points, and are considered to fight with two-weapons even when they’re just fighting with their fists and feet.

JAB, PUNCH & KICK Attacks

Under normal circumstances, melee weapons function like special effects for monks. Most monk attacks are rated as JAB, PUNCH, or KICK attacks, in the same sense that most fighter attacks are WEAPON attacks. JAB attacks deal 1d6 damage per level. PUNCH attacks deal 1d8 damage per level. KICK attacks deal 1d10 damage per level.

Monks don’t use weapon damage dice unless they are using a basic ranged attack that is not part of one of their monk forms. Instead, they use damage dice based on the monk power they are using, or FIST damage with a basic melee attack. (See the discussion of monk weapons earlier.) While using a magic weapon, monks add the weapon’s attack and damage bonus to their attacks, and they can use that weapon’s power. All monk attacks that use Dexterity as the attack stat use Strength as the ability score that determines damage.

<<insert Rob Says sidebar>> You don’t have to describe PUNCH attacks as punches and KICK attacks as kicks if it gets in the way of the story you want to tell and the style of fighting you picture your monk using. Start the story with our JAB/KICK designations if it helps. <<end RobSays sidebar>>

Forms

When you learn a monk form, you learn all three parts: an opening attack, flow attack, and finishing attack. All the elements of the forms require a standard action to use (although some

standard action elements of forms provide access to free or quick actions you may use or ignore). Using your Forms in Combat: Your first standard action attack after rolling initiative in a battle must be an opening. Your second attack can be a flow attack from any form you know or you can ‘go back’ and use another opening. After you use a flow attack, your next monk attack can be any finishing attack, or you can go back to another opening. You can’t use another flow attack. After a finishing attack you must start over with an opening on your next standard action. If you spend a turn without attacking for some reason, you must start your forms over with an opening on your next standard action. Mixing Forms: So long as you use the proper piece of the form (opening, flow, or finishing attack) you can use an opening, flow, or finishing attack from any of the forms you know. Part of the fun of playing a monk character is tracking which moves you have used and announcing the pieces of the form as they roll out across the rounds. Announce your action during your turn in your best Hong Kong action theater voice unless that conflicts with your character’s story. Defense bonus: When you use an element of a form, you gain an AC bonus until the start of your next turn. After using an opening attack you gain +1 to AC. After using a flow attack, you gain a +2 to AC. After using a finishing attack, you gain +3 to AC. If elven grace or some other ability lets you use multiple elements of your forms in a turn, the AC bonuses don’t stack but you do get to use whichever bonus is better. Ki feats: The feats associated with each form offer interesting and powerful ways of spending your ki. Keeping track of your forms: Your best choice each round will usually be between all the options of a single category of attack. If you’re writing out your forms, you’ll want track all your opening attacks together, all your flow

attacks in another spot, and all your finishing attacks together. Icon associations: Some forms work better if you have at least one icon relationship point with a specific icon. You’ll see the icon’s symbol near the form and find the advantage within the text. The relationship doesn’t have to be positive to gain this advantageif you know enough to be the enemy of an icon, you know enough to use their secrets against them.

<<insert Rob Says sidebar>> Early in monk design I tried naming each of the elements of the forms using a rigid haiku structure. Each opening attack had five syllables, flow attacks had seven, and finishing attacks had five. Reading each combat round sequence as an attack haiku is fun, but the forced-poetry stunt hurt my head. Worse, it got in the way of doing good design, since there was a stage where I’d spent time polishing poor haiku instead of working out the proper forms. So the current forms are a compromise. You can read their elements as freeform poetry. If you squint. They may get closer to poetry as the draft advances. If you can improve on the verses, we’ll be happy to see your results. <<end RobSays sidebar>>

Ki

You have a number of ki points per day equal to your Wisdom modifier +2. (It increases a bit as you gain levels, see the level progression table.) All monks can spend ki to modify the natural results of one of their attack rolls, as explained below. Your talents, feats, and forms may give you other ways of spending ki. Spending ki to adjust your attack roll: After rolling an attack, you spend a point of ki as a free action to change your attack’s natural result by 1. The change can be positive or negative. For example, a natural roll of 19 could be turned into a natural 20, a natural roll of 1 or 3 could be turned into a natural 2, allowing you to reroll the attack thanks to two-weapon fighting.

Other uses of ki: Some talents, forms, and feats, particularly in the epic tier, provide surprising ways of spending ki. Spend only 1 ki per round: As a rule you can only spend 1 point of ki each round. Unless otherwise specified, spending a point of ki is a free action.

Adventurer Feat: Gain one point of ki. Champion Feat: You can spend as much ki as you like in a round, but still only one ki per turn. Epic Feat: You can spend up to two points of ki to change a roll’s natural result by two, once per turn.

Two-Weapon Fighting

Since monks are trained to strike with all their limbs, we’re happy say that they can always be considered to be fighting with two weapons, even when they’re barehanded. As indicated on page 168 of 13 th Age, the principal advantage of ‘two-weapon fighting’ is that you get to reroll a natural 2 you roll with your melee attacks, sticking with the reroll.

Monk Talents: Adventurer Tier

Choose three of the following class talents. You get an additional monk class talent at 6 th level and 9 th level. These additional talents are normally used to choose the champion tier and epic tier talents that appear in the next sections.

Child of Water

You gain a +1 bonus on all saves.

Adventurer Feat: You can spend ki on your saves, not just on your attacks. Champion Feat: Once per battle, you regain a point of ki when you roll a natural 20 with a save. Your ki can’t rise above its normal maximum. Epic Feat: Your child of water bonus on saves is either +1 or +2 if you used a flow attack with your last standard action, or +3 if you used a finishing attack with your last standard action.

Focus

You can go one round without using a monk attack form and maintain your place in the attack form hierarchy. For example, if you have made an opening attack but do not attack in the next round (or with your next standard action), you can still use a flow attack with your next standard action. In addition, whenever you become dazed or weakened, roll a normal save. If you succeed, end the dazed or weakened effect.

Adventurer Feat: Your focus save now also gives you a chance of ending the confused and hampered conditions. Champion Feat: Focus save now extends to the stunned condition. Epic Feat: When foe’s powers and attacks target staggered creatures or work better against staggered creatures, you never count as if you were staggered.

Flurry

You cannot take this talent if you have taken the Greeting Fist talent or the Temple Weapon Master talent. Once on each of your turns when the escalation die is 3+, you can make the following attack as a quick action.

Melee attack, quick action Target: One enemy Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: JAB + Strength damage Miss: --

Adventurer Feat: Your flurry now starts when the escalation die is 2+.

Champion

damage equal to your level on a miss. Epic Feat: When the escalation die is 5+, your flurry attack deals P UNCH + Strength damage.

deals

Feat:

Flurry

attack

now

<<insert player sidebar>>

Flurry is better than Greeting Fist and Temple Weapon Master because Flurry helps you more and more in the longest & toughest fights. <<end player sidebar>>

Greeting Fist

You cannot take this talent if you have taken the Flurry talent or the Temple Weapon Master talent. The first time you attack each enemy with a melee attack during a battle (including the first mook of a mob), deal +1d8 additional damage to that creature if you hit.

2 nd level monk

+2d6 damage.

4 th level monk

+2d8 damage.

6 th level monk

+4d6 damage.

8 th level monk

+4d10 damage.

10 th level monk +6d12 damage.

Adventurer Feat: Once per battle when you miss with an attack that qualifies for Greeting Fist, you can still attempt to use Greeting Fist against that enemy later in the fight.

Champion Feat: Once per battle, reroll your Greeting Fist damage dice and abide by the reroll. Epic Feat: Once per battle, reroll an attack that qualified for Greeting Fist.

<<insert player sidebar>> Greeting fist is better than flurry or temple weapon master because it combines well with forms that help you disengage and move, improves your otherwise weak opening attacks, and rewards you for having fun jumping around the battle to fight new enemies each round. <<end player sidebar>>

Heaven’s Arrow

Unlike other monks, you have no attack penalty with ranged weapons including thrown weapons, longbows, shortbows, and crossbows. Your basic ranged attacks also deal miss damage equal to your level.

Once per battle, you can use a ranged weapon attack in place of a melee attack in conjunction with an attack from one of your monk forms so long as you target nearby enemies. (In other words, use one of your normal monk forms but making ranged attacks instead of the usual melee attack.) This attack deals damage according to the JAB/PUNCH/KICK that’s part of the form rather than WEAPON damage like your basic attacks.

Adventurer Feat: You can now target enemies that are far away when you use the Heaven’s Arrow ability. The ranged weapon you are using might have an attack penalty attacking far away enemies but your attack otherwise functions as normal. Champion Feat: You can now use the heaven’s arrow ability twice per battle. Epic Feat: Spend a point of ki each additional time you want to use heaven’s arrow in a battle.

<<insert Player Sidebar>> Heaven’s Arrow allows normal ranged attacks. If you use it while engaged with enemies, they will make opportunity attacks against you. <<end Player Sidebar>>

Leaf on Wind

Once per battle when you use a move action, gain another move action as a free action.

Adventurer Feat: If you fall with a wall, tree, or other physical object alongside, you can slap it to slow your fall and suffer no falling damage. Fall freely for up to 30’per level. Champion Feat: When an enemy hits or misses you with an attack that has more than one target, you suffer only half damage. Epic Feat: Spend 1 ki on your turn to gain a move action.

Overworld Lineage

This talent portrays headstrong and flamboyant monks whose Wisdom is exceeded by their force of will and personality.

Use your Charisma ability score instead of your Wisdom ability score in all monk features, talents, and powers. In addition, after each battle in which you use at least one ki, roll a d6. If you roll equal or or higher than your current ki, regain one point of ki.

Adventurer Feat: You now regain two points of ki if you roll equal to your current ki. Champion Feat: Gain +1 MD. Epic Feat: Now you roll a d10 instead of a d6.

<<insert BlueSidebar>> Monk Class Elements, not AC: Wisdom is a useful ability score because it contributes to AC. Charisma doesn’t. The downside of choosing overworld lineage is that your AC may drop a bit. <<end BlueSidebar>>

Spinning Willow Style

When you are hit by a ranged attack against AC, use an interrupt action to roll a save to reduce the damage you suffer by half. The first save of each battle is an easy save, the second save is a normal save, and subsequent saves are hard saves.

Adventurer Feat: Spinning Willow Style now also affects ranged attacks against your PD. Champion Feat: The Spinning Willow Style save now requires a free action instead of an interrupt action, so it can now be used once per ranged Epic Feat: If your save is a natural 18+, reduce the damage to 0 and deflect one-quarter of the damage to a nearby foe.

<<insert Gamemaster-style Sidebar>> Generally it’s only damage that’s getting deflected but extraordinary story circumstances or icon relationship situations might result in some part of the enemy attack’s conditions getting ricocheted as well. <<end sidebar>>

Strength of Earth

Whenever you become staggered, you gain temporary hit points equal to your level + your Strength modifier (double your Strength modifier at 5 th level, triple it at 8 th level).

Adventurer Feat: You gain +1 PD. Champion Feat: So long as you are touching the ground, you gain a +2 bonus to death saves and last gasp saves. Epic Feat: Your recovery dice become d10s instead of d8s.

Temple-Weapon Master

You cannot take this talent if you have taken the Flurry talent or the Greeting Fist talent. So long as you are fighting with a weapon or weapons associated with your monastic tradition, you can reroll one missed attack against a humanoid foe each battle.

Adventurer Feat: So long as you are fighting with your monastic weapons, rolling a natural 2 not only lets you reroll the attack (because of Two-Weapon Fighting) but also gives your reroll a +4 bonus. Champion Feat: If your temple-weapon master reroll misses, you keep the ability to use it once later this battle. Epic Feat: So long as you are fighting with your tradition’s weapons, one battle per day you can spend ki to alter the natural result of a foe’s melee attack against you.

<<insert player sidebar>> Temple-weapon master is better than flurry and greeting fist because it shows the superiority of your style to all other warrior systems. <<end player sidebar>>

Wise Parry

Whenever a foe you are engaged with rolls a second or subsequent attack against you in the same turn, add your Wisdom modifier to all your defenses against that attack.

Adventurer Feat: Wise Parry also works against enemies that are not engaged with you.

Take half damage from any

attack that you resisted with wise parry. Epic Feat: Second and subsequent attacks against you in the same turn by a foe also miss if they are natural odd rolls

Champion Feat:

Zealous Student

Choose an additional adventurer tier monk form. You have an additional adventurer tier monk form all the way up your level progression.

Class Talents: Champion Tier

You get a champion tier talent at 6 th level. You can opt to take another adventurer tier talent, if you like, or select one of the four talents that follow.

Diamond Soul

You have resistance 12+ against attacks that target MD.

Champion Feat: The resistance increases to

16+.

Epic Feat: The resistance increases to 18+.

Evasive Harmony

Whenever you would take miss damage from a foe’s attack, roll a normal save. If you succeed, that miss damage is reduced to 0.

Champion Feat: If you roll a natural 19 or 20 with the save, gain a point of temporary ki you must use this battle or lose. Epic Feat: The save is now an easy save.

Improbable Stunt

Once per battle, as a quick action when the escalation die is 1+, you can pull off an outrageous improvisational stunt that no one else could manage, with the possible exception of a swashbuckling rogue! The stunt is not itself an attack but it might lead to one. The outrageous action of your stunt isn’t something you have to roll for, even if it would ordinarily require a skill check to pull off. As with the Swashbuckle talent of the rogue from

the core book, you’ll still have to roll for an attack that follows up your stunt. What’s possible with the talent? You’ll note that the talent isn’t called impossible stunt:

jumping from a crashing airship directly onto the wagon being driven by the villain seems perfectly appropriate, but magically changing to wind and wafting in to sit beside the villain is not what this talent is about, it’s an extension of your abilities as a monk rather than temporary access to a new set of magical powers.

Monk Talents: Epic Tier

You can take a new epic tier talent at 8 th level and 10 th level. As usual, you could use this as an opportunity to pick up a talent from a lower tier, but you’ll probably find that the epic tier options are pivots that can make the campaign turn.

Abundant Step

Once per battle when the escalation die is 1+, teleport somewhere nearby as a move action.

Epic Feat: The place you teleport can be far away, so long as it is in line of sight.

Champion of Three Worlds

Roll an additional d20 (usually two!) for all finishing attacks. Choose whichever result you like as your attack result.

Epic Feat: Once per battle, you can roll an additional d20 for all attacks made as part of a flow attack.

Disciple of the Hidden Path

When you gain this talent, choose a classcleric, sorcerer, or wizard. Each time you take a full rest, choose a new spell that is your level or lower from that class. You can cast this spell in place of using one of your flow attacks (if the spell is at-will) or in place of one of your finishing attacks (if the spell is limited use). Use your Wisdom as the ability

score that determines attack and damage with the spell. Spell Usage: If the spell is an at-will spell, congratulations, you have an at-will spell this full rest. If the spell is a daily or recharge spell, use those rules instead. You must choose a spell you have never used before after each full rest. If the story of your style or monastic tradition indicates that spells from another class such as bard or necromancer are appropriate, work that out with your GM.

Perfect Master

One battle per day, while you are not staggered, increase your JAB dice to d8s, your PUNCH dice to d10s, and your KICK dice to d12s.

Epic Feat: During that same battle, increase the size of your recovery dice to the next higher die size.

Procession of the Sun and Moon

Once per level, while meditating during a quick rest, you can decide that it is time for the start of a new day. You each of your willing allies can attempt a hard save. Characters who succeed regain spells, abilities, powers, hit points and recoveries as if you had taken a full rest and started a new day. The only character element that does not reset as if it was a new day are your icon relationship rolls and any icon relationships.

Epic Feat: Add your Charisma modifier to your own save with this talent.

Adventurer Tier Forms

Claws of the Panther

Form

Opening Attack: Panther spins free

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: JAB + Strength damage, and you can pop free from the target if you wish.

Miss: Damage equal to your level.

Flow Attack: Cat between hounds

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength damage Natural even hit: Deal 1d6 damage to each enemy you are engaged with (5 th level: 2d6, 8 th level: 4d6). Miss:

Finishing Attack: Twinned panther claw

Melee attack Target: Two attacks against different foes Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength damage Miss: Half damage.

Adventurer Feat:

Once

per

battle,

you can

reroll a missed melee attack against a mook.

Dance of the Mantis

Form

Opening: Springing mantis strike

Melee attack Special: So long as you start your turn free of enemy engagement, the standard action used for this attack lets you use a free move action before the attack roll. Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: JAB + Strength damage. Miss:

Flow Attack: Whirling mantis pincer

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength damage, or KICK + Strength damage vs. large or huge targets. Miss: Half damage.

Finishing Attack: Precise mantis kick

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + 2 + Level vs. AC Hit: KICK + Strength damage Miss: Half damage Effect: Hit or miss, if this attack drops a non-mook foe to 0 hp, you gain a point of ki that you must spend this battle (spend it or lose it).

Adventurer

Feat:

Once

per

battle,

you can

reroll a missed melee attack against a beast.

Dutiful Guardian Form

Form

Opening: One must be free

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: JAB + Strength damage, and one ally engaged with target can pop free. Miss: Damage equal to your level.

Flow Attack: Horse shakes its mane

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength damage, and choose one of the following two benefits: either move as a free action or until the end of your next turn, the first critical hit against you from a melee attack becomes a normal hit instead. Miss: Half damage.

Finishing Attack: Temple lion stands true

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: JAB + Strength damage, and you can rally as a free action (if you have already used your rally this battle you’ll have to succeed with a save to rally again, as usual). Miss: Half damage.

Adventurer Feat: Once per battle, you can reroll a missed melee attack against a demon.

Original Venom Form

Form

Opening: First deadly venom

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: JAB + Strength damage, and if target is now staggered, 5 ongoing poison damage. Miss: You take damage equal to your level.

Flow Attack: Second certain toxin

Melee attack Target: One foe with fewer hit points than you. Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: JAB + Strength ongoing poison damage Miss: You take damage equal to your level.

Finishing Attack: Third poisonous lesson

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: KICK + Strength damage Natural even hit: An additional 10 ongoing poison damage Natural odd hit: An additional 5 ongoing poison damage. Miss: You take damage equal to your level.

Adventurer Feat: You gain a +5 bonus to saves against ongoing poison damage.

Three Cunning Trickster Form

Form

Opening: Fox senses weakness

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: JAB + Strength damage Natural even miss: Half damage.

Flow Attack: Tumbling monkey

Melee attack Special: If you decide to use this flow attack on your turn, you can pop free of one enemy at some point this turn. Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength damage Miss: Half damage.

Finishing Attack: Crane summons carp

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: KICK + Strength damage Natural even hit: You can use an interrupt action when you are attacked by an engaged enemy before the start of your next turn to deal JAB + Strength damage to that enemy. Miss: Half damage.

Adventurer Feat (Feint and Lunge): You can spend ki to alter your natural disengage check rolls. When you do, each ki you spend alters your disengage checks by two.

<<insert Great Gold Wyrm symbol>>

Way of the Metallic Dragon

Form

Opening: Bronze thwarts an army

Melee attack Target: One foe, but you must be engaged with at least two foes Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: JAB + Strength damage Miss: Half damage.

Flow Attack: Silver warrior advances

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength damage, and the target’s attempts to disengage from you take a penalty equal to your Wisdom modifier. Miss: Half damage.

Finishing Attack: General slays the hordes

Melee attack Special: If you have at least one relationship point with the Great Gold Wyrm, this attack deals holy damage if you wish. Target: One or two separate foes First Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: KICK + Strength damage Miss: Damage equal to your level. Second attack, against a different target: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength damage Miss: Damage equal to your level.

Adventurer Feat (Devastating cascade): Once per battle when one of your Way of the Metallic Dragon attacks drops a non-mook foe to 0 hp, deal half the leftover damage to a nearby enemy.

Champion Tier Forms

<<insert Priestess symbol>>

Heaven’s Thunder

Form

Opening: Moon in a storming sky

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Wisdom + Level vs. PD Hit: JAB + Wisdom damage, and deal thunder damage equal to twice your level to each foe that attacks you before the start of your next turn. Miss:

Flow Attack: Thunder restores the balance

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength damage, and you can roll a save against a save ends effect. Natural even hit: The save has a bonus equal to your Wisdom modifier. Miss: Half damage.

Finishing Attack: This too was foreseen

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Wisdom + Level vs. AC Hit: KICK + Wisdom thunder damage Natural even hit: You can use a recovery as a free action. Natural odd hit: If you have at least one relationship point with the Priestess, gain 1d10 temporary hit points per point on the escalation die. Miss: Half damage.

Champion Feat: One battle per day, take only half damage from ongoing damage. Epic Feat (Cathedral’s Plainsong): One battle per day, heal 5d10 hp each time you spend a point of ki while staggered.

<<insert Crusader symbol>>

Iron Crusader Form

Form

Opening: No retreat

Melee attack Special: You can only use this opening if you or one of your allies has dropped to 0 hit points druing this battle

Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength damage Miss: Half damage.

Flow Attack: No mercy

Melee attack Special: This attack has a +4 bonus if it targets a staggered foe. Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength damage, Miss: Damage equal to your level.

Finishing Attack: No weakness

Melee attack Special: This attack has a +4 bonus if the target is taking ongoing damage. Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: KICK + Strength damage, Natural even hit: You gain resist damage 16+ until the start of your next turn. Miss: Damage equal to your level.

Champion Feat: You can now also use the opening attack if you are staggered. Epic Feat (Merciless Chant): Once per day, as a free action, gain ki equal to the roll of a d6 or the number of points of relationship you have with the Crusader, whichever is lower.

Rising Phoenix

Form

Opening: Remarkable phoenix fist

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: JAB + Strength fire damage Natural even miss: 5 ongoing fire damage.

Flow Attack: Become the pillar of flame

Melee Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength fire damage, and you gain Flight until the end of you next turn. Miss: Fire damage equal to your level.

Finishing Attack: Life burning fire fist

Melee attack Target: One higher level foe (cannot target a foe of equal or lower level) Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: KICK + Strength fire damage, Natural even hit: Heal using a recovery. Natural odd hit: Roll a save against a save ends condition effecting you. Miss: Half damage.

Champion Feat: Once per day, double the

a

recovery. Epic Feat: Once per day, reroll a failed death save with a bonus equal to your Wisdom modifier.

healing you get

when you

heal

using

<<insert symbol of The Three>>

Three Evil Dragons

Form

Opening: The burning shadow

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: JAB + Strength damage, and if the target is now staggered, choose whether you want to pop free of the target or deal ongoing acid damage to it equal to your level. Miss: Damage equal to your level.

Flow Attack: Blue lightning fist

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength damage Natural even hit: If you have at least one relationship point with the Three, you gain flight until the end of your next turn. Natural odd hit: Deal lightning damage equal to double your level to one random nearby foe. Miss: Half damage, and deal lightning damage equal to your level to one random nearby ally.

Finishing Attack: Red fury

Melee attack Target: One foe

Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: KICK + Strength damage, +1d6 fire damage for every point on the escalation die. Miss: Damage equal to your level.

Champion Feat: Dragons that attack you do not get to add the escalation die to their attack rolls, even if they normally have the escalator ability. Epic Feat (Inevitable Comeback): Once per day after one of your finishing attacks misses all its targets, you can use another finishing attack with your next standard action.

<<insert High Druid symbol>>

Tiger in Storm

Form

Opening: Stalking tiger

Melee attack Target: One foe that is not engaged with any of your allies. Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: JAB + Strength damage, Natural even hit: An additional 2d6 ongoing lightning damage. Natural odd hit: You take damage equal to your level. Miss: Both you and the target take damage equal to your level.

Flow Attack: Tiger follows blood

Melee attack Target: One foe that is not engaged with any of your allies. Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength damage, and you can pop free of the target. If you have at least one icon relationship point with the High Druid and you do pop free, you will automatically deal 10 damage to one other foe that you end your turn engaged with. Miss: Both you and the target take damage equal to your level.

Finishing Attack: Striped lightning roars

Melee attack Target: One foe that is not engaged with any of your allies. Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC

Hit: KICK + Strength damage Natural even hit: Deal lightning damage equal to double your level to 1d3 nearby enemies other than the target. Miss: Both you and the target take damage equal to your level.

Champion Feat (Storm’s Eye): Spend 1 ki when a foe misses you with an attack that deals lightning or thunder damage to heal using a recovery. Epic Feat: You gain resistance 16+ to both thunder and lightning.

Epic Tier Forms

<<insert Lich King symbol>>

Death’s Quivering Shadow

Form

Opening: Invoke the name

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. PD Hit: JAB + Strength damage Natural even hit IF you have at least one icon relationship point with the Lich King: Ongoing negative energy damage equal to twice the target’s level. Miss: You take half damage.

Flow Attack: Stunning fist

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength damage Natural even hit: If target has 180 hp or fewer after this hit, it is stunned until the end of your next turn. Miss: Damage equal to your level.

Finishing Attack: Ghostwalk of the fallen king

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: KICK + Strength damage, and 15 ongoing negative energy damage, and you gain flight and incorporeal (resist all damage 16+) until the end of your next turn.

Miss: Damage equal to your level.

Epic Feat: (Quivering Palm) Once per day, spend 1 ki when you hit a target with any of your finishing attacks. For the rest of the day, as a standard action, regardless of how far away the target is, you can spend a ki point to deal PUNCH + Wisdom damage to the target.

Feathered Serpent Form

Form

Opening: Shifting coils

Melee attack Target: Each foe engaged with you Attack: Wisdom + Level vs. AC Hit: JAB + Wisdom damage Miss: Damage equal to your level.

Flow Attack: Flying serpent kick

Melee attack Effect: Choose one when you decide to use this flow attack: either gain Flight until the end of your turn or pop free from one foe at any point during your turn. Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength damage Miss: Half damage.

Finishing Attack: Overworld poison maneuver

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: KICK + Strength holy damage Natural even hit: Target with 180 or fewer hit points is hampered until the end of your next turn, or 20 ongoing poison damage. Miss: Half damage.

Epic Feat (Coils on feathers on scales Once per day as a quick action, roll a difficult save against a save ends condition you are suffering from that was caused by a foe’s attack. If you succeed, you can transfer the condition to a foe you are engaged with.

Flagrant Blossoms

Form

Opening: The petals open

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: JAB + Strength damage, if this attack drops a non-mook to 0 hp, you can skip your flow attack and move to a finishing attack with your next standard action. Miss:

Flow Attack: Revealing impossible truths

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC Hit: PUNCH + Strength damage, and random nearby ally rolls an icon relationship die of your choice that can be used as a story-guide result later in the adventure; obviously they need a 5 or a 6 for the result to matter. Miss: Half damage.

Finishing Attack: Lotus dreams the world

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Wisdom + Level vs. MD Hit: KICK + Wisdom damage, and Natural 16+: You gain a point of ki. Natural even hit: You OR an ally of your choice gains a +2 save bonus until end of battle. Natural odd hit: Target has a -2 save penalty until end of battle. Miss: Half damage.

Epic Feat: Once per day when you use this finishing attack, a random ally heals using a free recovery and can roll a save against each save ends effect they are affected by.

<<insert Blue Sidebar>> The Flagrant Blossoms form is said to have been created by the last Grand Master of Flowers. If you’re not already an enemy of the ogre magi, you are as soon as you learn this form. <<end Blue Sidebar>>

<<insert Elf Queen symbol>>

Spiral Path

Form

Opening: Open the cycle

Melee attack Target: One foe Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. PD

Hit: JAB + Strength damage, then deal half damage to

a different nearby foe as force damage.

Miss: Lose 1 ki. If you don’t have ki to lose, spend 1

recovery. If you don’t have a recovery to lose, see page 169 in the core book.