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Mastering SAP NetWeaver

XIProgramming
Marcus Banner, Halil-Cem Grsoy, Heinzpeter Klein
Contents
Introduction ................................................ 3
Content of This Book ............................ 4
Acknowledgments ................................ 4
1 Architecture of SAP NetWeaver
Exchange Infrastructure ......................... 5
1.1 SAP NetWeaver .................................... 5
1.2 Process Integration Using
SAP NetWeaver XI ................................ 6
1.3 Architecture of SAP NetWeaver XI ...... 6
1.4 SAP NetWeaver XI Landscape
Topology ............................................... 7
2 SAP NetWeaver Development
InfrastructureBasic Principles .......... 9
2.1 Architecture of the SAP NetWeaver
Development Infrastructure ................. 9
Design of NWDI ................................... 10
Components of NWDI ......................... 11
Component Model ............................... 12
Development Process in SAP NetWeaver
Developer Studio .................................. 13
2.2 Tips for Installing SAP NetWeaver
Developer Studio .................................. 13
2.3 Environment for Adapter Develop-
ment ..................................................... 15
Eclipse ................................................... 15
Subversion ........................................... 16
Subclipse ............................................... 16
Apache Ant ........................................... 16
Java Development Kit ........................... 17
3 Programming Mappings in
SAP NetWeaver XI .................................... 19
3.1 ABAP Mapping ..................................... 19
Scenario to Be Mapped ........................ 19
Activating the ABAP Mapping Function
in SAP NetWeaver XI ............................ 21
Creating an ABAP Mapping Class ......... 23
ABAP Mapping Using the iXML Library ... 24
Integrating the ABAP Mapping in the
XI Repository ........................................ 27
Customizing the XI Directory ............... 29
3.2 Java Mapping ........................................ 33
Implementing the Java Mapping
Class ...................................................... 33
Testing the Mapping Class .................... 37
3.3 Graphical Mapping Editor .................... 39
4 Developing an Adapter .......................... 45
4.1 Theoretical Basics .................................. 45
XI Adapter Framework ......................... 45
J2EE Connector Architecture ............... 46
Special Features of SAP NetWeaver XI ... 47
4.2 Preparing the Partner Connectivity Kit ... 48
User Permissions ................................... 48
aii.properties ......................................... 49
Enabling the CPA Cache ....................... 49
Adaptations in the XI Adapter .............. 50
4.3 Preparing the Development Environ-
ment ..................................................... 50
Integrating XI Libraries ......................... 51
Integrating Muse Libraries in Eclipse .... 51
Jabber Server and Client ....................... 52
Apache Ant ........................................... 53
2 Galileo Press 2007. All rights reserved.
Contents
Ant Task for SDA Creation .................... 53
Remote Deployment Using the
SDM API ............................................... 53
4.4 Deployment of the Muse Libraries in
SAP NetWeaver AS ............................... 54
4.5 Creating a New Eclipse Project ............ 56
4.6 Versioning the Project .......................... 58
4.7 Adapter Skeleton of SAP ...................... 59
4.8 Refactoring of Source Code and
Descriptors ............................................ 60
4.9 Implementing Jabber
Communication .................................... 61
4.10 Integration of Communication in
the Adapter ........................................... 69
Implementation of javax.resource.cci.
Connection Factory ............................... 70
ConnectionManager ............................. 71
ManagedConnectionFactory ................ 71
ManagedConnection ............................ 73
Connection Object ............................... 75
Interaction ............................................ 75
More Adaptations to the
Source Files ........................................... 76
4.11 Deployment Descriptors ...................... 76
connector-j2ee-engine.xml .................. 76
log-conguration.xml (RAR) ................. 77
ra.xml .................................................... 77
application.xml ..................................... 78
application-j2ee-engine.xml ................. 78
[Package Name]-dd.xml ....................... 79
log-conguration.xml (SDA) ................. 80
CPA Cache Metale .............................. 80
4.12 Build and Deployment of the
Adapter ................................................. 81
4.13 Uploading CPA Cache Metadata .......... 82
4.14 Testing in the Partner Connectivity
Kit ......................................................... 83
4.15 Adapter Module ................................... 86
Implementation .................................... 86
Testing the Adapter Module ................. 89
Application Options of a Module ......... 90
5 SLD API ......................................................... 91
5.1 Conguring the Java Integrated
Development Environment (IDE) ......... 91
5.2 Implementing the CIM Client .............. 93
5.3 Testing the CIM Client .......................... 94
6 Debugging XI Applications ................... 97
6.1 Debugging ABAP Components ............ 97
6.2 Debugging Java Components ............... 99
7 List of Abbreviations ............................... 103
Index .............................................................. 105
www.sap-press.com 3
Introduction
This SAP PRESS Essentials guide, Mastering SAP
NetWeaver XIProgramming, is intended to complement
and enhance the topics that were not discussed in further
detail in the book Mastering SAP XIAdministration,
1

since that book focused on other areas. This Essentials
guide can be regarded both as a practical guide to pro-
gramming and as an ideal addition to the aforementioned
book. This time, our focus is on development. As in the
practical guide for administration, we will make extensive
use of a real-life example that you can reproduce yourself
with relatively little effort in a minimal installation.
For developers, a minimal installation consists of SAP
NetWeaver Developer Studio (NWDS), which is based
on the development environment Eclipse; SAP Partner
Connectivity Kit (PCK) for the development of adapt-
ers; Subversion and Subclipse for version management
2
;
and Apache Ant as an indispensable aid that acts in the
background. For each of the development tools speci-
ed above, this book contains an extensive and com-
prehensible description of their functions as well as the
Web addresses you need to download the tools free of
charge.
The SAP PRESS Essentials guide Mastering SAP XI
Administration was published in January 2006. At that
time, we explained in the foreword that, compared with
Version 2.0, SAP NetWeaver Exchange Infrastructure
(XI) 3.0 had been substantially improved and that with
increasing support package (SP) levels it would have the
potential of becoming a strong competitor to existing
Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) vendors. After a
year that saw some good (and not-so-good) SP updates,
our prediction proved to be true.
1 Marcus Banner and Heinzpeter Klein, Mastering SAP XI
Administration, SAP PRESS Essentials 11 (Bonn: Galileo Press,
2006).
2 Alternatively, you can also use Concurrent Versions System
(CVS) or SAP Design Time Repository (DTR).
Today, SAP NetWeaver XI 3.0 with SP 16 is denitely a
product that must be considered as a serious competitor
to the established range of EAI products such as SeeBe-
yond, which recently was acquired by Sun Microsystems,
or IBM WebSphere.
And yet, larger companies that had already decided on
another EAI tool prior to the release of SAP NetWeaver
XI 3.0 are very reluctant to consider changing to SAP
NetWeaver XI. Here, concerns about asset and invest-
ment protection play a considerable role. For companies
that otherwise extensively employ SAP products, these
considerations often represent the biggest obstacle.
Meanwhile, from a technical point of view, these compa-
nies for the most part can nd no plausible reason against
the use of SAP NetWeaver XI 3.0 and in favor of using a
third-party software product in the EAI environment.
With this in mind, our intent in this book is to provide
you with some valuable tips and tricks along the way for
development in SAP NetWeaver XI.
One of the focuses of this book is on developing your
own XI adapters. Because the documentation that is of-
cially (and unofcially) available for this topic is very lim-
ited and insufcient, one of our primary concerns was to
integrate this subject in this book. Our own experience
has shown that many SAP consultants who deal with SAP
NetWeaver XI and even want to do their own develop-
ment with it originally have come from an ABAP envi-
ronment. Because of this, they often encounter prob-
lems when working in the Java world and when using its
development environments and tools. We have tried to
take these issues into account and to formulate examples
in such a way that anyone with a basic knowledge of Java
can understand them. Readers who are experienced Java
developers should skip the rather comprehensive descrip-
tions of processes in the development environments and
4 Galileo Press 2007. All rights reserved.
Introduction
also the Java code, which has deliberately been kept as
simple as possible.
We hope that this book inspires the development of
some new XI adapters and that we will soon have the
pleasure of meeting some developers on the Web! You
can download the source code for the sample adapter
from the websites that accompany this book: www.sap-
press.com and www.sap-hefte.de/1478.
Content of This Book
This book describes the basic principles of structuring and
performing the development of SAP adapters using Java
as well as different options for mapping and debugging.
Chapter 1 provides a brief and concise description of
SAP NetWeaver XI, while Chapter 2 deals with the archi-
tecture and infrastructure of SAP NetWeaver Develop-
ment Infrastructure (NWDI). In addition, Chapter 2 also
describes the SAP client installation for SAP NetWeaver
Developer Studio (NWDS). At this stage, we kept the
descriptions of Change Management Services (CMS)
and the Design Time Repository (DTR) relatively short,
as we used different development tools. These tools
comply with standard SAP requirements. Nevertheless,
we didnt want to completely deprive you of the inte-
grated SAP solution with CMS and DTR. Chapter 2 closes
with a detailed description of the set of tools used in the
adapter development environment (Eclipse, Subclipse,
Apache Ant, Java Development Kit).
After this discussion of basic principles, Chapter 3
deals with XI mapping for ABAP and for Java. These two
options are comprehensively described using numerous
real-life examples.
Chapter 4 focuses on how you can develop an adapter
using the PCK. In this chapter we provide you with a
description of the most common problems that can
occur during development, offer possible solutions, and
delve deeply into functionality. For those of you who
are experienced ABAP and Java developers, it will take
only a short period of time to familiarize yourselves with
everything you need to be able to implement customer
requirements in your own applications.
Other special topics such as the System Landscape
Directory (SLD) application programming interface (API)
(integrating Java classes into the XI environment) and
debugging in SAP NetWeaver XI are described in detail in
Chapter 5 and Chapter 6.
Acknowledgments
Marcus Banner would like to thank his family for the
understanding they showed during the time this book
was being written: You both mean the world to me!
Heinzpeter Klein would like to express his thanks to
his friends and family for the tolerance and understand-
ing they showed during all those days and nights when
he was absent: They havent seen me in a long time.
Dr. Halil-Cem Grsoy would like to thank his family for
all their patience and support as well as say thanks to CDI
AG and its employees for their support by providing the
infrastructure and food for thought.
We, the authors, hope you will have a lot of fun read-
ing this book. Hopefully, the topics discussed in this book
will spare you much tedious trial and error.
48 Galileo Press 2007. All rights reserved.
4 Developing an Adapter
deployment of a Resource Adapter Archive (RAR ) is sup-
ported, an Enterprise Application Archive (EAR ) is notin
contrast to the JCA specication. The reason for this is that
the JCA specication in this case stipulates a bundling with
an application (that is also contained in the EAR), where
the adapter may only be visible to this application (see JCA
1.0, Section 10.2). In SAP NetWeaver XI, however, we do
not deploy any applications; that is, the application that
accesses the adapter is the AF. This would mean that in
such a case, the adapter would have to be deployed in an
EAR bundled with the AF. Instead, you can use the SAP-
specic format Software Delivery Archive (SDA ), which
apart from the RAR contains additional information about
the adapter. This SDA can then be deployed as usual via
the Software Deployment Manager (SDM). SAP recom-
mends this method, and we will use an SDA in our exam-
ple as well.
4.2 Preparing the Partner Connectivity Kit
After all this theory, we will now get practical and develop
our own adapter. We will not reinvent the wheel but
rather follow SAPs recommendation and use the sam-
ple adapter, which is included in every installation of the
Partner Connectivity Kit (PCK), as a starting point and
modify it according to our needs.
The development will be performed using the PCK.
On the one hand, the PCK is used for integrating sys-
tem landscapes in XI without having to install a full SAP
NetWeaver XI on them (partner scenario). On the other
hand, it serves as a development environment for adapt-
ers. We therefore assume that you have access to an SAP
NetWeaver system with a PCK (we use Version 3.0 SP
14).
User Permissions
First, you must set up, or congure, the user roles for
adapter development in the J2EE server. Open the J2EE
Engine Visual Administrator . On Windows systems, you
will nd it under <j2eeDir>\admin, where <j2eeDir> is the
directory of the J2EE container (for example, C:\usr\sap\
J2E\JC00\j2ee).
As soon as you execute the go.bat batch le, Visual
Administrator starts and welcomes you with a login
prompt (see Figure 4.3).
Figure 4.3 Login Screen of the J2EE Engine Visual Administrator
After you have connected to the system, you can imme-
diately go to the user permission management area to
give the user who is to develop the adapters the neces-
sary permissions. In the left navigation menu, select Ser-
vices Security Provider Policy Congurations.
Then you can select the appropriate component in the
center area as well as the Security Roles tab to assign
your user the proper permissions (see Figure 4.4). Table
4.1 shows the permissions to be assigned.
Component Role
sap.com/com.sap.af.
app*AdapterFramework
Xi_af_adapter_monitor
sap.com/com.sap.af.app*CPACache Xi_af_cpa_invalidate
sap.com/com.sap.af.app*CPACache Xi_af_cpa_monitor
sap.com/com.sap.af.app*CPACache Xi_af_cpa_schemaupload
sap.com/com.sap.af.ms.
app*MessagingSystem
Xi_af_receive
sap.com/com.sap.af.soapadapter*
XISOAPAdapter
Xi_adapter_soap_message
sap.com/com.sap.sap.xi.mdt*mdt display
sap.com/com.sap.sap.xi.mdt*mdt modify
sap.com/com.sap.sap.xi.mdt*mdt payload
sap.com/com.sap.sap.xi.pck*aii_
ib_sbeans.jar
administer
sap.com/com.sap.sap.xi.pck*pck singlesignon
sap.com/com.sap.sap.xi.pck*pck support
Table 4.1 Roles to Be Assigned to the PCK User
If several persons are going to participate in the develop-
ment, its recommended that you rst create a user group
(e.g., SAP_XI_PCK_ADMIN) and assign the users to this
group. After that, its completely ne to assign the per-
www.sap-press.com 49
missions to the group. Dont close the application yet:
You will need the administration interface again as we
proceed further.
More details regarding the required rights can be
found in the SAP Notes 746328 and 792456.
aii.properties
Now you need to create the le aii.properties and copy it
to the <serverDir> directory. <serverDir> can be the direc-
tory /usr/sap/J2E/JC00/j2ee/cluster/server0, for example.
Listing 4.1 shows an example. Note that you need to
adapt the computer name and the ports.
Enabling the CPA Cache
Now you need to enable the CPA cache. This is done
using the J2EE Engine Visual Administrator. In the Admin-
istrator, go to the SAP XI AF CPA Cache service and adapt
the parameters as shown in Table 4.2.
Figure 4.4 Conguration of the Roles for the PCK User via the J2EE Engine Visual Administrator
com.sap.aii.ib.client.properties = com.sap.aii.ib.client.*,com.sap.aii.connect.*,com.sap.aii.
ib.server.*,com.sap.aii.docu.*,com.sap.aii.pck.*
### Connections
com.sap.aii.connect.directory.contextroot = pck
com.sap.aii.connect.directory.name = was-xp-hguvm1
com.sap.aii.connect.directory.httpport = 50000
com.sap.aii.connect.directory.rmiport = 50004
### Appl name
com.sap.aii.ib.client.applicationname.directory = sap.com/com.sap.xi.pck/
com.sap.aii.ib.client.login.languages = EN,DE
Listing 4.1 Example of the aii.properties File (cont.)
4.2 Preparing the Partner Connectivity Kit
50 Galileo Press 2007. All rights reserved.
4 Developing an Adapter
Parameters Value
cacheType PCK
SLDAccess False
Table 4.2 Enabling the CPA Cache
Figure 4.5 shows the changes of the parameters for the
CPA cache. Changes to the default settings are presented
in italics.
Adaptations in the XI Adapter
Some parameters in the conguration of the XI adapter
must be adjusted as well. As described previously, go to
the J2EE Engine Visual Administrator and select the SAP
XI Adapter XI service. Adjust the parameters as shown in
Table 4.3.
Parameters Value
xiadapter.internal devModePCK
xiadapter.isconfig.url http://[Server name]:[J2EE
Engine Port]/MessagingSystem/
receive/AFW/XI
xiadapter.isconfig.user [User Name]
xiadapter.isconfig.
password
[User Password]
Table 4.3 Adjusting the XI Adapter Parameters
4.3 Preparing the Development Environment
The components we suggest for developing an adapter
have already been described in detail in Section 2.3. We
assume that you have installed a Java Development Kit
### No locking for PCK
com.sap.aii.ib.server.lockauth.activation = false
com.sap.aii.pck.server.compiler. classpath_resolverServiceName = classpath_resolver
com.sap.aii.docu.url = http://was-xp-hguvm1:50000/pck/docOnline/DOCU
com.sap.aii.docu.languages = EN,DE
Listing 4.1 Example of the aii.properties File (cont.)
Figure 4.5 Changes to the Parameters for the CPA Cache
www.sap-press.com 51
(JDK) as well as Eclipse on your development system. To
be on the safe side (e.g., in order to be able to access an
older version), you should also use a versioning system.
Integrating XI Libraries
The following Java libraries (JAR les) are required for
developing an adapter. Depending on your needs, there
might be more:
<serverDir>/bin/ext/com.sap.aii.af.lib/aii_af_trace.jar
<serverDir>/bin/ext/com.sap.aii.af.lib/aii_af_cci.jar
<serverDir>/bin/ext/com.sap.aii.af.lib/aii_af_mp.jar
<serverDir>/bin/ext/com.sap.aii.af.lib/aii_af_ms_api.jar
<serverDir>/bin/ext/com.sap.aii.af.lib/aii_af_ms_spi.jar
<serverDir>/bin/ext/com.sap.aii.util.misc/aii_util_misc.
jar
<serverDir>/bin/ext/com.sap.xi.util.misc/aii_utilxi_misc.
jar
<serverDir>/bin/ext/j2eeca/connector.jar
<serverDir>/bin/ext/com.sap.guid/guidgenerator.jar
<serverDir>/bin/services/com.sap.aii.adapter.xi.svc/aii_
adapter_xi_svc.jar
<serverDir>/bin/services/com.sap.aii.af.cpa.svc/aii_af_
cpa.jar
<serverDir>/bin/services/com.sap.aii.af.svc/aii_af_svc.
jar
all J2EE client libraries under <j2eeDir>/j2eeclient

These libraries must later be communicated to your


adapter project in Eclipse. To make your life easier, it is
recommended that you thematically bundle the libraries
under Eclipse in order to be able to completely assign
them to a project via a few mouse clicks. In Eclipse, open
the Windows Preferences menu, and in the left navi-
gation pane, select the Java Build Path User Libraries
entry (see Figure 4.6). By clicking on New you are pre-
sented with a dialog where you can enter the name of the
user library, in our case SAPXIAF, for the XI-AF-JAR les
as well as SAPJ2EECLIENT for the J2EE client libraries. If
you created these user libraries (which are empty at rst),
you can select them and then add JAR les via the Add
JARs button. Add the les listed above. These user librar-
ies can now be exposed to any project in your devel-
opment environment; otherwise, you would have to go
through a similar procedure for every adapter project.
Integrating Muse Libraries in Eclipse
To be able to send messages to a Jabber server via the
adapter, we need a library that implements the Jabber/
XMPP protocol. We recommend the Muse library, which
is fairly popular and stable (http://open.echomine.org/
conuence/display/MUSE/Muse+Home).
Figure 4.6 Bundling JAR Files to User Libraries
4.3 Preparing the Development Environment
52 Galileo Press 2007. All rights reserved.
4 Developing an Adapter
Download the current version from the Muse home page;
we used Version 0.81 for this book. Unzip the down-
loaded ZIP le to an appropriate folder.
Then integrate the required muse.jar le in a user
library in Eclipse, as described above.
Jabber Server and Client
In addition to the Muse libraries, we also need a Jabber
server and a Jabber client. There is a very large selection
of both commercial and free products. A comprehensive
overview can be found at www.jabber.org.
As a server, we recommend Wildre by Jive Soft-
ware , which is licensed under the GNU Public License
(see www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html). You can download
Wildre from the Jive home page (www.jivesoftware.org/
wildre/). We used Version 2.6.1 for our scenario. Install
Wildre by following the simple instructions in the docu-
mentation. After you have started Wildre for the rst
time, you should go to the administration interface (which
can be found by default at http://127.0.0.1:9090/) and
set up two users. In the administration interface, select
Users/Groups in the upper navigation and then Create
New User in the left pane (see Figure 4.7). These users
will be used for sending or receiving messages from the
adapter.
To make sure that messages to a currently ofine user
do not get lost, it is recommended you have them saved
by the server so that they can be delivered to the receiver
when he or she logs back in (ofine messages). To do this,
under Server Server Settings Ofine Messages, select
the Store and Always Store options.
As a Jabber client, we recommend (Psi ), which can
be found at http://psi-im.org/. is available not only for
Windows but also for many other platforms. After youve
downloaded , the installation is fairly simple: Just start
the installer and follow the specied steps.
After you start for the rst time, you need to set
up your users. First, a prole is set up that can accom-
modate several users. After the prole has been created,
you set up the Jabber accounts. To do this, use the two
users you just set up in the Wildre server. Note that
you need to attach @[ServerName] to the user name
to inform the client on which server the users are to be
found. Last, these users must be exposed to each other as
contacts. During this process, authorization messages are
exchanged. This procedure can be handled intuitively.
After these steps have been completed, your could
look like the one shown in Figure 4.8. The Jabber client
is active with two accounts, and the contacts are online
as well.
Figure 4.7 Setting Up New Users via the Wildre Administration Interface
www.sap-press.com 53
Figure 4.8 Active Jabber Client with Two Accounts
As an alternative to your own Jabber server, you could
also use publicly accessible servers (a list can be found
at www.xmpp.net/) and set up your users there. For our
scenario, however, this possibly requires the congura-
tion of rewalls in your domain to enable communica-
tion. However, you can also use an HTTP proxy with .
Additionally, you can use any Jabber client instead of .
You will nd an overview of clients at www.jabber.org.
Apache Ant
We will use the free tool Apache Ant (see Chapter 3) to
compile the source codes, assemble the archive les, and
implement the deployment.
Download the most recent stable Ant release from the
Ant home page (http://ant.apache.org) under Download
Binary Distributions. Currently, this is Version 1.6.5, but
our project is compatible with any Ant 1.6 version. Once
you have unzipped the ZIP archive to a folder, custom-
ize some system environment variables in Windows XP
or 2000.
To adjust an environment variable in Windows 2000
or XP, go to Control Panel, select System, click on the
Advanced tab, and then select the Environment Vari-
ables button. By clicking on New under System Vari-
ables, you rst create the environment variable ANT_HOME
(see Figure 4.9).
Figure 4.9 Creating a System Environment Variable in
Windows XP and 2000
Now perform the same steps to adjust the system envi-
ronment variable Path to include the Ant bin directory in
the search path. You can use the ANT_HOME environment
variable you set previously: Just add %ANT_HOME%\bin
to the end of the existing denition.
You should now be able to start Ant. Verify this by
opening a Windows command prompt (Start Run, and
then enter cmd) and entering ant version. The out-
put should then appear as follows:
C:\>ant -version
Apache Ant version 1.6.5 compiled on June 2
2005
C:\>
Ant Task for SDA Creation
To create SDAs without NetWeaver Developer Studio
(NWDS) or the J2EE Engine Deploy Tool, we need an Ant
task that can perform this for us. A solution already exists
in NWDS in the form of the JarSAP task.
You can nd the required JAR le, jar4sap.jar, in the
NWDS installation in the plug-in com.sap.ide.eclipse.jar-
sap, which can normally be found under C:\Programs\
SAP\JDT\eclipse\plugins\com.sap.ide.eclipse.jarsap\lib.
You will later enter the location of this le in the build
script for Ant.
Remote Deployment Using the SDM API
Because we want to deploy the required archives without
delay on the J2EE server after weve compiled and assem-
bled them, a deployment via the SDM interface would be
rather cumbersome. Since we are implementing Ant any-
way, there is an elegant solution: David Beisert , a well-
known consultant in the NetWeaver environment, intro-
duced an Ant task in his SDN blog that can be used to
deploy from Ant via the SDM API (https://weblogs.sdn.
sap.com/pub/wlg/3138).
Follow the link Download SDM Deployment Task
and download the ZIP le. Then rename the downloaded
sdmAnt.zip le to sdmAnt.jar.
Another important note regarding the SDM: If you
encounter problems during the deployment later on
in the project and obtain the message Server <Server
name> did not accept login request as admin on port
<Server Port>, please take note of SAP Note 941150.
In this case youll need to install a current version of the
4.3 Preparing the Development Environment
54 Galileo Press 2007. All rights reserved.
4 Developing an Adapter
SDM, as the note recommends. Because a description
of an SDM installation would exceed the scope of this
book, please refer to SAP Note 860939, which discusses
an SDM installation, or an upgrade, in great detail.
4.4 Deployment of the Muse Libraries in
SAP NetWeaver AS
Up to now, weve set up our development environment
and made development preparations within the PCK.
Over the course of this process, we exposed the Muse
libraries to our development environment. Because the
adapter will run in the PCK during the development phase
and later in a full SAP NetWeaver XI, we must deploy the
libraries required by our adapter in the J2EE container.
You already downloaded the Muse libraries and stored
them in a separate directory. We will now add some of
these libraries to a library project , wrap this library project
in an SDA, and deploy it on the J2EE container.
To do this, well start the J2EE Engine Deploy Tool
(which can be found under <j2eeDir>/deploying) by click-
ing on the DeployTool.bat batch le.
As soon as the application is started, you can create
a new deployment project by clicking on Project New
Project (see Figure 4.10). We recommend you set up a
separate directory by clicking on the Create New Direc-
tory icon (see Figure 4.11).
Figure 4.10 Creating a New Deployment Project
Once you have created a new directory for the project,
named the project (Address eld), and conrmed every-
thing by clicking on OK, you can proceed. Now you
need to inform the Deploy Tool that you want to set up
a library. Go to the Server Components tab, in the menu
select the Server Components item, and in the pulldown
menu select the Add Library entry. An easier way of dis-
playing the window that now opens is to use the short-
cut Ctrl+L. Enter Muse as the name of the library, and
leave the other option as Create New. Then click again
on the Server Components menu option and on Create
Dispatcher. In the left area, an entry under Muse.jar and
SERVER is made automatically.
Figure 4.11 Create New Directory Icon
Now you can start entering the information for the
deployment. Click on SERVER, and enter the necessary
data as follows (see Figure 4.12): For the Provider Name,
select com.echomine (these libraries are, after all, from
Echomine), select muse for both Component Name
and Display Name, and for the version, enter the Muse
version you downloaded (in our example, 0.81). Use the
same procedure and data for the dispatcher.
Now you can add the required JAR les. Select the
Muse.jar entry. In the opening dialog, you can click on
the button to the right of the JAR eld to select the three
required les and add them to the list by clicking on the
Add button (see Figure 4.13). The following are the les:
commons-logging.jar (Apache Commons Logging)
jdom.jar (XML parser library)
muse.jar (the Muse application programming inter-
faceAPI)
Once you have selected and added the les, you should
see a picture similar to what Figure 4.13 shows.

www.sap-press.com 105
Index
A
ABAP/4 Debugger 97
ABAP/4 development environment 10
ABAP mapping 19, 97
Adapter engine 45
Adapter Framework 45, 69
Adapter Metadata Upload 82
Adapter module 86
Adapter skeleton 59
aii.properties 49
Ant 15, 16, 53, 81
call 81
Ant target 81
Ant task 53, 81
Apache Ant 16
application-j2ee-engine.xml 78, 88
application.xml 78
Audit log 85, 87
Audit messages 75
Automatic mapping 41
B
Beisert 53
Branches 58
Breakpoint 97, 100
Build 81
Build script 81
Build tool 16
Byte code 17
C
C# 9
C++ 9
Central information provider 7
Change history 61
Change Management Service (CMS) 12
Chatting 45
CIM client 93, 94, 95
CIM server 91
Class interfaces 24
Classloader 76, 85
Class names 77
com.echomine.jabber.Jabber 66
com.echomine.jabber.JabberContext 64
com.inqmy.lib.xml.StandardDOMWriter
36
com.sap.aii.af.monitor.api.AdapterMoni-
tor 71
com.sap.aii.af.mp.module.Module 86
com.sap.aii.af.mp.module.ModuleHome
87
com.sap.aii.af.mp.module.ModuleLo-
cal 87
com.sap.aii.af.mp.module.ModuleLocal-
Home 87
com.sap.aii.af.mp.module.ModuleRe-
mote 87
com.sap.aii.af.ra.cci.NWConnectionFac-
tory 70
com.sap.aii.af.service.auditlog.Audit 75
com.sap.aii.af.service.auditlog.AuditMes-
sageKey 75
com.sap.aii.af.service.trace.Trace 67
com.sap.aii.mapping.api.Streamtransfor-
mation 33
com.sap.aii.mapping.api.Streamtransfor-
mationConstant 34
com.sap.aii.mapping.api.StreamTransfor-
mationException 36
com.sap.engine.interfaces.connector.
ManagedConnectionFactoryActiva-
tion 71
com.sap.sdm.ant.JarSAP 81
Common Client Interface 46
Component Build Service 12
Component model 10, 12
Configuration interface 80
Connection management 47
Connection pooling 69, 71, 83
connector-j2ee-engine.xml 76, 78
Constructor definition 64
CPA cache 49, 73, 76
CPA cache metadata 82
CPA cache metafile 80
CVS 15, 16
D
Database table 21
dd.xml 79
Debugging 97
Debugging in ABAP 97
Debugging in Java 99
Debugging mode 99
DeltaV 16
DeltaV specification 16
Deployment 53, 54, 81
Deployment descriptors 59, 60, 76
Deprecated 72
Design Time Repository (DTR) 11, 15, 16
Development Components (DC) 12
Development Objects (DO) 12
Direction OUTBOUND 76
DOM parser 34
E
Eclipse 15, 58
Eclipse Foundation Inc. 15
Eclipse project 34, 56
ejb-j2ee-engine.xml 87
EJB Module Project 86
Enterprise Application Archive 48, 78
Enterprise Application Project 88
Enterprise Java Bean (EJB) 86
Exchange Infrastructure landscape
topology 7
106 Galileo Press 2007. All rights reserved.
Index
F
File adapter 83
G
GNU Public License 52
Google 45
Google Talk 45
Gosling, James 9
Graphical Mapping Editor 39
Groovy 17
H
Hewlett-Packard 45
I
Inbound 80
Inbound processing 71
Inbox adapter 30
InputByteStream 34
Instant messaging system 45
Interaction 75
Interface mapping 28
iXML functions 24
iXML Library 24
J
J2EE 9, 15
J2EE application 56
J2EE Connector Architecture 45, 46
J2EE container 56
J2EE Engine Deploy Tool 54
J2EE Engine Visual Administrator 48
Jabber 45
Jabber client 52
Jabber communication 61
Jabber server 51, 52
JAR files 91
Java 9, 15
development environment 15
java.lang.ClassCastException 87
java.lang.Runnable 71
Java Community Process 46
Java Connector Architecture 9
Java debugger 99
Java Development Infrastructure (JDI) 15
Java Development Kit 57
Java Development Kit (JDK) 15, 17
Java IDE 91
Java interface 61
Java mapping 33
Java Naming and Directory Interface
(JNDI) 73, 80, 87, 89
Java Platform Debugger Architecture
(JDPA) 99
Java Specification Request 46
Java versions 9
Java Virtual Machine (JVM) 9
javax.resource.cci.Connection 47, 73,
74, 75
javax.resource.cci.ConnectionFactory 47,
69, 70
javax.resource.cci.ConnectionSpec 47
javax.resource.cci.Interaction 70, 75
javax.resource.ResourceException 64
javax.resource.spi.ConnectionEventLis-
tener 47
javax.resource.spi.ConnectionManager
69, 71
javax.resource.spi. LocalTransaction 47
javax.resource.spi.ManagedConnection
70, 71, 73
javax.resource.spi.ManagedConnection-
Factory 70, 71
JEE 9
Jive software 52
L
Library project 54
LocalTransaction 47
log-configuration.xml 77, 80, 88
Logging category 76
Log manager 77
Loose coupling 12
M
make 15, 16
makefile 16
ManagedConnection 47
Managed environment 47
Mapping class 34
Mapping routines 19
Mapping test 98
Metadata 76, 78
Microsoft 9
Module development 86
Muse libraries 51
N
Name Service 12
Namespace 76
Naming in Java 61
.Net 9
NetBeans 15
NoTransaction 47
O
Open source 15
Organize Imports 94
Outbound 80
Outbox adapter 31
P
Package Explorer 57, 63
Partner Connectivity Kit 45, 48, 83
Perforce 64
Programming mappings 19
Project versioning 58
Psi 52
Public parts 12
R
ra.xml 59, 77
Receiver agreement 84
Receiver determination 31, 32
Refactoring 60, 77
Reference 78
Reference implementation 59
Registration of the monitoring interface
72
Remote deployment 53
Resource Adapter Archive 48
RFC destinations 20
S
Sample adapter 59
SampleRa.xml 59
SAP NetWeaver 5
SAP NetWeaver Developer Studio
(NWDS) 13
SAP NetWeaver Development Infrastruc-
ture (NWDI) 9, 11
SAP XML Toolkit 33
SAX parser 34
SDA 16
www.sap-press.com 107
Index
SDA creation 53
SDM 16
SDM administrator 55
SDM API 53
SDM GUI 55
SDM installation 54
SDM repository 56
SDN blog 53
Security Roles 48
Sender agreement 32, 84
Sender interface 34
Sequence diagram 70
Serialization 36
Server Provider Interface 47
Service Programming Interface 46
SIGNATURE 65
SLD API 91
Software component (SC) 12
Software Delivery Archive (SDA) 48
Software Deployment Manager (SDM)
48
Stateless Session Bean 86
Subclipse 15, 16, 58
substring 43
Subversion 15, 16, 58
Subversion Book 58
Sun 15
System contracts 47
System Landscape Directory (SLD) 12, 91
T
Tags 58
TCP/IP connection 20
TRACE 64
Trace 77
Transaction management 47
Trunk 58
U
User permissions 48
V
VERSION_ID 64
Version management 16
Version management system 58
W
WebDAV 16
Wildfire 52
X
XI adapter 50
XI Adapter Framework (AF) 45
XI directory 29
XI libraries 51
XI repository 27
XMPP 45