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32 THE DAILY

A LITERAL TRANSLATION OF THE HEBREW


OF DAN. 8:9-14; 11:31; 12:11
9. And from the one of them came forth one horn, a littie thing,
and it became great exceedingly towards the south a 1)(1 towards the
east and towards the beauty (land).
10. And it waxed great even to (the) host of the heaven, and it
cast down (to the) ground (some) of the host and of the stars and
trampled upon them.
11. And unto (the) prince of the host it magnified (itself), and by
it was taken away the contillUance, and ,,' as cast do'wn (the) place of
his sanctuary.
12. And (an) host was given (it) against the continuance in trans-
gression, and it cast down truth (to the) ground anci it worked and it
prospered.
13. And I heard one saint speaking, and said one saint to the cer-
tain one, the (one) speaking; how long the vision (concerning) the
continuance and the transgression of desolation to give both (the) sanc-
tuary and (the) host to be trodden down .
14. And he said nnto me, unto evening (and) morning" two thou-
sand and three hundred, then shall be justified (the) sanctuary.
11:31 And arms by him shall stand and pollute the sanctuary, the
fortress, and take away the continuance, and set up the ahomination,
the desolator.
12:11 And from (the) time the continuanc(;' is taken a way to the set-
ting up (of the) abomination making clesolate ( there shall be) days
thousand two hundred and ninety. .
\ \v 'e.
O. A. Johnson.
Col1ege Place, \Vash,
PRICE, TEN CENTS
I
,, / 5 If
famphlets
UTHE DAIL ytt
IS IT PAGANISM?
A Brief Review and Critical Examination
OF
HT IHE DAILyn
IN
Daniel 8:11, 12,13; 11:31; 12:11
INTRODUCTION
1. From the first we find that the standard writers and lead-
ing speakers of the Seventh-day Adventist denomination
have been quite unanimous in their interpretation of "the
daily" of Dan. 8:11, 12) 13; 11:31; 12:11. They have
thought there were sufficient reasons for explaining "the
daily') in the above texts to mean paganism. Of late)
however, some objections have been urged against this
interpretation of "the daily." But as similar objections
were, by able opponents, urged against those who first ex-
plained "the daily," in the texts in question, to mean pa-
ganism, it seems therefore proper to give a brief historical
view of this of "the daily" in Dan. 8:11
etc., to see if we can find the truth, the true interpretation
of this subject; for nothing but the truth will please God.
JAMES VI 1. :1:"
AND U ';'VEf SITY
HERITAGE ROOM
,

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2 THE DAILY
"DAILY" MEANING PAGANISM
2. Touching the interpretation of "the daily" we find the
following published in 1851 in "Christian Experience and
Views," by Mrs. Ellen G. White, on page 61:
3. "Then I saw in relation to the 'daily' (Dan. 8:12),that
the word 'sacrifice' was supplied by man's wisdom, and
does not belong to the textj and" that the Lord gave the
correct view of it to those who gave the judgment hour
cry. When union existed, before 1844, nearly all were
united on the correct view of the 'daily;' but since 1844
in the confusion, other views have been embraced, and,
darkness and confusion have followedj" See also "Early
Writings," p. 64, Second edition, 1882.
4. In this quotation we note the following, 1st: The word
"sacrifice" does not belong to the text. Dan. 8:11, 12,
etc. 2d.' 'The Lord gave a correct view of it [the text]
to those who gave the judgment hour cry." 3d. "Before
1844, nearly all were united on the correct view of the
'daily.) "
5. Now they "who gave the judgment hour cry" were
Wm. Miller and his associate ministers. "Thousands
were led to embrace the truth preached by Wm. Miller.;
and servants of God were raised up in the spirit and power
of Elias to proclaim the message. " "And as the Spirit
of God rested upon them, they helped to sound the cry,
'Fear God, and give glory to him; for the hour of his judg-
ment is come.'" "Early Writings," same edition,p. 97,98.
6. In "The Midnight Cry" for June 22,1843,p.126wefind
the following from the pen of J. Litch. Afterhaving
quoted Rev. 14:6, 7, he says: "That this angel has flown,
and his voice is yet echoing through heaven, I am fully
IS IT PAGANISM
'The hour of his judgment is come' is the cry."
7. In "The Morning Watch" (a periodical succeeding
"The Midnight Cry" and published by J. V. Himes) for
April 17, 1845, p. 126 we find an article on "Thoughts on
Revelation 14,:' wherein the following statement is made:
"'The 14th of Revelation is a history of the Advent
cause,' and that chapter, from the 6th verse, has had a
clear fulfilment in the Advent movement."
8. From the above quotations we learn that William Mil-
ler and his associates were the ones' 'who gave the judg-
ment hour cry," viz, preached the first angel's message,
of Rev. 14:6, 7, "the hour of his judgment has come."
9. We learn that' 'with interest he studied the books of
Daniel and the Revelation." "Angels of heaven were
guiding his mind, and opening to his understanding proph-
ecies which had ever been dark to God's people. Link
after link of the chain of truth rewarded his efforts; step
by step he traced down the great lines of prophecy, until.
he reached the solemn conclusion that in a few years the
Son of God would come the second time, in power and
glory." "Spirit of Prophecy," Vol. 4, p. 206, edition of
1844. See also "Early Writings," pp. $)4-96, edition of
1882.
10. "SACRIFICE.' '-It will next be in order to ascertain
what those who gave "the judgment hour cry" had to say
in reference to the supplied word "sacrificej" for it is said
that "the Lord gave them" "the correct view of it." See
par. 3. "The phrase [daily sacrifice] occurs, as a proper
name, only in the book of Daniel; and in each of the five
places in which it is found, the word 'sacrifice' is in italics,
implying that the original would not authorize its inser-
tion, but that the translators introduced it to express what

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4 THE DAILY
they supposed to be the sense of the passage." " Signs of
the Times" for 1843,N o. 12, p. 95. "'The daily sacrifice'
is the present reading of the English text. But no such
thing as sacrifice is found in the original. This is ac-
knowledged 011 all hands. It is a gloss or construction put
on it by the translators." "Prophetic Exposition," by Josiah
Litch, Vol. I, p. 127; quoted in the "Sanctuary and the
Twenty-three Hundred Days," by J. N. Andrews, p. 33,
edition i872. Nothing more is necessary to prove that
this is "the correct view" of sacrifice tn the text in ques-
tion.
11. "THE DAILY' '-' Those who preached the first angel's
message were not only right in rejecting the supplied word
"sacrifice" from Dan. 8:11, 12, 13; 11:31; 12:11; but
they also had "the correct view of the daily." See p. 3.
"I read on," says Wm. Miner, "and could find no other '
case in which it (the daily) was found, but in Daniel, I
then (by the aid of a concordance) took th6se wotds which
stood in connection with it 'take away;' he shall take r
away the daily; from the time the daily shali be taken
away, etc. I read on and thought I should find no light on
the text; finally I came to 2 Thess. 2:7, 8, 'For the mys-
tery of iniquity doth already work; only he who now let-'
teth will let, until he be taken out of the way, ani then
shall that wicked be i-evealed,' etc. And when I had come
to that text, oh! how clear and glorious the truthappeared!'
There it is! That is the daily!' Well, now what does
Paul mean by 'he who now letteth,' orhindereth? By 'the
man of sin,' and the 'wicked,' popery is meant. Well,
what is that which hinders popery from beirig revealed? ;
Why, it is . paganism; well, then 'the daily' must mean
paganism.' '-"Second Advent Manual, "p. 66, quoted by J, '
IS IT PAGANISM
5
N. Andrews in "Sanctuary and the 2300 Days," p. 34,
edition of 1872; see also "The Midnight Cry" for 1843,
Vol. 5, p. 53. The Advent literature of Miller's day con-
cedes that he was the first to teach that' 'the daily" of
Daniel 8:11, etc. meant paganism, and those who united
with him in proclaiming the first angel's message accepted
this explanation of "the daily" and taught it.
12. THE Two DESOLATIONS.-Josiah Litch, a leading
minister in the Advent Movement, wrote as follows on the
two desolations: "The true reading is, 'the daily and the
transgression of desolation,' daily and transgression being
connected too-ether by 'and;' the 'daily desolation' and the
, 0
'transo-ression of desolation.' They are two desolatmg
0' .
powers, which are to desolate the sanctuary and the host."
-"Prophetic Expositions," Vol. 1, p. 127, quoted by J.
N. Andrews in "The Sanctuary and the 2300 Days," p.
33. "It has often enough been shown that the 'daily,'
spoken of by Daniel, is not the Jewish sacrifices, but that
it is the pagan, or continual abomination, and relates to a
desolating power that should desolate the people and church
of God till it should be 'taken away,' and then should
come up in its place another power called the 'transgression
of desolation' [Dan. 8:13] and 'the abomination that mak-
eth desolate,' [Chapters 11:31; 12:11J. Though they
were both desolating powers, they were distinguished by
different names, as we have seen.' '_I 'The Signs of the
Times," for 1843, No. 16, p. 126.
13. THE Two SANCTUARIES.-Those who interpreted
"the daily" to mean the pagan abomination also taught
that it had a sanctuary of its own. The testimony in
favor of this will be found in paragraphs No. 83-85.

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6 ' THE: DAILY ::: ;
14. 508 A.D., 1290 AND 1335 DAys;"";'A.D, 508.' , Wm:
Miller and his associate ministers' that pagaliism
had been hindering or standirig' in the way of the develop-
ment of the papacy tillabout ' 508 when ' "paganism had
so far declined, .and I far relatively in-
creased in strength, that the Catholic church for the first
time waged a successful" war . fot the ' removal and erad..;
ication of pagan, -:\,rian and powers and heresies.
. l' '
15. ,1290 AND 1335 lDA ys.-Those who preached the
first angel's message till the endofthe 2,300 days in -18.44,
were also united in teaching that the 1290 and 1335 days
of Dan. 12:11, 12 'began in '508 whenpagartism was prac:..
tically succeeded by the ' papaey in the Roman
"The 129{) and 1335 days cif Dan. 12 began with the abol-
ishing of paganism in A.D. 508, when also. the aboniina-
tion of desolation was set up: " . "The midnight: Cry, "
Vol. 4, No. 22, p.175 . . The. '1290ellded in 1798' and the
1335 in 1844. Various charts were published at that time
illustrating prophetic symbols and, ' periods, : and , in' these
charts we find that they. irivariably dated the -1290 and
1335 days from 508, A. D. See "Signs of the Times, " Vol.
V, No; 12, p. 92, No. 15, p. 115; "The Midnight :Cry,"
Vol. II, Nos. 5 and 6. Art "A Clue to the Times;" Nos.
7 and 8,. Art "Chronological Chart of the Worldj"Nos; 9
and 10, Art "Diagram of Daniel's Vision;" VoL IV, No.
12 and 13, p. 99 j No. 22, p. 175. . The prophetic chart
used in public lectures at that time also stated that the
1290 and 1335 days dated from 508. Various, other charts
of that day teach the same.
IS IT PAGANISM 7
OBJECTIONS AND ANSWERS
16. Various objections were raised against Miller's Jnter-
preting "the daily" to etc., but
jections were . fully
17. PAGANISM DlDNOT FALL IN 508.--....:ProfessorWeeks,
one of Wm. Miller's bitterest opponents, denied that pa-
panisw fell in 508. In No. 6 of his . of Miller-
Ism he begins as follows,:
18. "l1'lmy last number' I pointed out some of the
takes of Mr. Miller in relation to the downfall of pagan-
ism in the Roman empire. To ' make his prophetic periods
end' in 1843, it is necessary that paganism should fall iu
i508. But I showed by extracts from historians of undis-
puted authority, that paganism fell in the Roman empire,
long before that time, there being no pagan emperor after
Julian, who died in 363, and an the emperors who fol-
lowed him being professed Christians. After the govern- .
ing power of the empire ceased to support paganism, and
used its influence to support Christianity, the Roman em-
pire was no longer pagan."
19. In the same article he has given it as Mr. Miller' s
140th mistake that paganism did not cease tilllollg after
508. He says: "But the greatest mistake in relation to
this matter is to affirm that ceased in 508. The
Saxons in Britain, . whom all reckon one of the ten
kingdoms, had the Gospel flrst 'introduced among them in
the year 597, and did not cease to have pagan kings till
about 666. The Lombards in Italy were pagans till
585, and the Gospel did not prevail in Hungary before
989. "

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8 THE DAILY
20. "1st, Pagan ism could not have ceased in 508 be-
cause it ceased long before that. 2d. Another mistake,
paganism did not cease in 508 because it existed long af-
ter that .. Such is the logic that grave and reverend doc-
tors of divinity are obliged to use to disprove that the com-
ing of the Lord dra weth nigh. ' , , 'Signs of theTimes" for
]843, Vol. V, No. 18, p. 141.
21. OBJECTION ANSWERED.-We find, however, a full
answer to this objection against Miller's interpretation of
"the daily" in "The Midnight Cry," for 1843, Vol.IV,No.
3, p. 21, of which the following is a copy:
22. We do n"t design to enter into the uetail of his (H.ev. Dr. Weeks)
objections but shall state a few facts in relation to the supremacy of
catholicism.
23. The date of the taking away of the "daily," and setting up of
"the abomination that maketh desolate," Dan. 11: 31, and Ii: 11, is given
by Mr. Miller as being in 508. daily he call,;; pag:tn abominations,
and the abomination that maketh de!:lolate p<1pal or Catholic abomina-
tions. Dan 12: 11 sa,ys, "And from the time the daily shall be taken
away, and the abomination that maketh desolate set up, a thousand
three hundred and five and thirty days." It does not follow that the one
must be taken away just at the point where the other begins. It must
be taken away before it begins ; but a p:)riod may elapse after one is
taken away, before the other is set up.
24. Did Catholicism as a Roman power, gain supremacy for the first
time in Rome in 508 '1
25. The imperial power in Borne expin'cl in 476, when the Heruli
established their kingdom in that city. Bnt still th(; Roman government
existed in the form of the consuhu anu seu;ttol'ial power. The supreme
Roman power was transferred by the Senav2 to tllC E:1 st, and vested in
the emperor of Constantinople. So that the Roman and barbarian king-
ly power both existed at the same time.
26. The barbarian kings were in process of time converted to the
Christian faith, some embracing the Arian, others the Orthodox or
Catholic faith. Clovis, the king of France, who was convert ed in 49o,
was the first to embrace the Catholic faith, "which gave rise to the
custom of addressing the French monarch with the titles of most
Christian Majesty, and eldest son of the Church." "Mosheim," Vol. 1,
p. .
27. The conversion and subsequent history of Clovis is thus stated,
in "Gifford's History of France," pages 32 and 39. '
28. "The court of Burgundy, fearful of offending a young prince whose
arms were everywhere victorious, granted his request, and the princess
IS IT PAGANISM 9
Clotilda was acocrdingly espoused to him. The death of their first son,
who with the king's consent received baptism, notwithstanding the
earnest remonstrances and soothing persuations of his wife, inspired
him with aversion to the Christian religion. His conversion took pb,ce
496. Between that time and 50S, 'by alliances,' 'capitulations,' and 'con-
qnests,' 'the Asboriei' the 'Roman garrisons . in the west! Brittany, the
Burgundians and the Visigoths were brought into subjection. A. D. 508.
It was on his return from this (last) expedition that he received at
the city of Tours, the ambassadors of Anast asius, emperor of the East,
who sent him the title and insignia of patrician and consul, and con-
ferred on him the dignified appelation of August. The new patrician,
after dismissing thc ambassadors, returned to Paris, which he made
the capital of his empire. Success had hitherto attended all the plans
of Clovis; and allowing for the ferocious and martial spirit which then
prevailed, he had preserved his fame from any material pollution; but
his good fortune and his heroism appear to have forsaken him at the
same time. It was probably to wipe out the infamy incurred by the
commission of so many erimes, that he founded a great number of
churches and monasteries. It was probably from simila.r motives that
he assembled a council of ;33 bishops in the town of Orleans, A. D. 511.
Vve learn from history that it was not only assembled by his orders,
hut that he fixed on the topirs of discussion. The assemhling of the
council of Orleans was the last remarkable event in the life of Clovis,
who died the same yea r, at the age of fort y- five, and was huried in the
church of St. Peter and St. Paul, which he had caused to be built."
29. From this extract we gather the following facts :
30. 1. That Clovis from the time of his conversion became the great
champion of the Catholic faith and prosecuted his wars for the exten-
sion of the faith.
31. 2. That his last great victory, his conquest of the Visigoths, was
gained in 508.
32. 3. That on his return from the war, he received in a formal and
legal manner, the titles and insignia of Patrician and Consul.
33. The question comes up, "Did Clovis fi x his government as Patrician
and Consul at Rome?" We answer, he did not ; nor did the eastern
emperor, in whom those offices were vested by the Senate in 476. But
neither of them any the less possessed those powers on that account.
34. If it be objected that "the emperors who held .the consular dig-
nity, hefore 508 were Christians :" it is granted; but they .were also
strong antagonists to the supremacy of the Roman Cathohc church.
In 499, such was the hostility existing between the eastern emperor
and the Pope of Rome, that the Pope in connection with
excommunicated the emperor from the church, and defended hImself III
his proceedings, in a long letter to the emperor.-See "DuPin," Vol. 1,
p.526.
35. The contest thus commenced, was increased to a fl ame by the
fa.mous quarrel on the Trisagion, on which occasion the emperor and the
Catholic chmch were brought into open collision. The facts are thus
stated by Gibbon:-

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10 THE DAILY
:36. "(A. D. 50S-318.) III the fever of the times, the sense, or rather
the sound of a syllable, was sufficient to disturb tl>e peace of an empire.
The Trisagion, (thrice holy); 'Holy, holy, holy, Lord God of hosts!' is
supposed, by the Greeks, to he the identical hymn which the angels
and cherubim eternally repeat before the throne of God, and which,
about the middle of the fifth century, was miraculo\lsly revealed to the
ehurch of Constantinople. The deyotion of Antioch soon added, 'who
was crucified for us!'
:37. "The Trisagion, with :tnd without this obnoxious tradition, was
('han ted in the eathedral by two adverse choirs, and when their lungs
were exhausted, they had re('ourse to the more solid arguments of
sticks and stones; the aggressors were punished by the emperor, and
defended by the patriarch ,; and the crown and mitre were staked on
the event of this momentous quarrel. The streets were instantly
crowded with innumerable swarms of men, women and children; the
legions of monks. in regular array, marched and shouted, and fought
n,t their head. 'Christians ! this is the day of martyrdom; let us not
desert our spiritmtl father; anathema to the manichaean tyrant! He
is unworthy to reign.' Such was the Catholic cry; and the galleys of
Anastasius lay upon their oars befol'e the palace, till the patriarch had
pardoned his penitent, and hushed the waves of the troubled multitude.
3S. "The statues of the emperor were broken, and his person was
concealed in a suburb till, at the end of three days, he dared to implore
the mercy of his subjects. 'iVithout his diadem, and in the posture of
a suppliant, Anastasius appeared on the throne of the circus. The
Catholics, before his face, rehearsed the genuine Trisagion; they
exulted in the offer, which he procla.imed hy the voice of a herald, of
abdicating the purple; they listened to the admonition, that, since all
eould not reign, they should previously agree on the choice of a sov-
ereign; and they accepted the blood of two unpopular ministers, whom
their master without hesitation, condemned to the lions. These furious
but transient seditions were encouraged by the success of Vitalian, who,
with an army of Huns and Bulgarians. for the most part idolaters,
declared himself the champion of the Catholic faith. In this pious
rebellion, he depopulated Thrace, beseiged ConstantinopIe, exterminated
65,000 of his fellow Christians, till he obtained the recatl of the bishops,
the satisfaction of the Pope, and the establishment of the council of
Chalcedon, an orthodox treaty, reluctantly signed by the dying Anas-
tasius, and more faithfully performed by the uncle of Justinian. And
such was the event of the first of the religious wars, which have been
waged in the name, and by the disciples of the God of peace."
39. From the foregoing, we learn, 1. That before and after 50S, the
imperial power was hostile to ,the Catholic church.
40. 2. The emperor was compelled by Vitali an to submit to the Pope,
and grant the Catholics what they demanded.
41. :3. That the successor of Anastasius, and uncle of Justinian,
more faithfully performed the conditions of the reconciliation. And
Justinian himself, as is well known, became the great champion of
the Catholic faith, and gave supremacy to the Roman pontiff in Rome
itself_
IS IT PAGANISM
11
42. From these facts, it is clear that Clovis. kiner of France, was the
first Catholic power that ever possessed Romanauthoritv:
and that he. receive? it .from .the emperor in 50S. The 1290 years
on, an? theIr wItne.ssed the abolition of the papal govern-
ment 111 Rome. CatholICIsm gamed supremaey in 50S; and popery in
?3S; when the Ostrogothic empire ceased, and the pope was set up in
. Its place.
43. "The continual mediation of Jesus Christ" in "His
sanctnary," was urged by some as the true interpretation
of "the daily sacrifice"against Miller's view of this subject.
This objection and the reply will be found in "The Mid-
night Cry," Vol. V, No.7, pp. 52, 53. The following
are quotations from this article:
44, VIEWS OF THE OBJECTOR. 'i,\That is the dailv sacrifice? I
answer-yet not I-but John, 1 :29, "Behold the Lamb of God Wilich
taketh away sins of the world;" also, Isaiah 53:10, "It plea'sed the
Lord to make hIS soul an o'ffering for sin;" also, Rev. 5: 6. "I beheld,
and 10 a lamb as it had been slain." This constantly efficacious atone-
lTI(;nt was shadowed by the daily manna.
45. The great doctrine of his atonement is this: the blood ofJ esus
cleanseth from all sin. We need the daily application of that
sacrIfice; we need to be purified renewedly every moment. Even the
Paschal Lamb, showed that Christ our Passover was slain for us; also
Dan. 8: 11 describes the adjective daily, without its appellative or noun;
also, 2 Thess .. 2: 6. And now ye know what withholdeth, that is, pre- -
venteth, or hmdereth, the approach of papacy. That is, he, the medi-
ator, who now letteth, will let until "the daily sacrifice" be "taken"
out of the "way,". but when "the daily sacrifice" was "taken away,"
then (was) that WIcked revealed, and came up in his place.
46. The very heart of the gospel was removed when the little horn
took away the daily-or continual mediation of Jesus Christ, and cast
down the place of his gospel sanctuary and made it a den of thieves.-
lie cast down the sacraments and gospel truth to the around and "prac.
the mystery of iniquity and prospered in his
b
sacrilegious per.
versIOns.
47. Dan. S: l1, decides whose sanctuary it was. It is HIS sanctuarv.
Only two personages have been introduced to whom the word HIS c;n
possibly apply. One was the Pope, the other was Jesus Christ, the
Prince.-None will say it wa.s the Pope's-the man of sin. Therefore it
was the sanctuary of the Lord Jesus Christ. Now take two passaeres
perfectly parallel. One is, his sanctuary was cast down; the other b is.
the truth (was) cast down. .
4S: us first examine the phrase under
conSIderatIOn :where It. WIll certamly be least obscure-in the angel's
explanatory dIscourse m the llth chapter, verse 31. "And arms shall

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stand on his part, and they -::- -::- -::- shall take away the daily, and
shall place the abomination that maketh desolate." If we had nothmg
but the language here to guide us, we should naturally apply the word
DAILY to an abomination that is ta ken out of the way to make room
for the abomination that maketh desolate. It is a v<;>ry plain rule
thn t where a word is to be supplied ill one part of a sentence, that
word should be chosen which -will best correspond with the rest of the
sentence, and the connection. For instance, I am speaking of traveling,
and I say: "The daily having been discontinued, ,:e have a s.tage
twice a. week." vVho could doubt that I was speakll1g of a dal ly st age!
The translators have acted on this rule in a multitude of cases. See
Ps.70: 1.
49. "(Make haste) 0 God, to deliver me; make haste to help me,. 0
Lord." "Onto thee, 0 God. do we give thanks, (unto thee) do we gr,:e
thanks."-Ps. 75: 1. "Bless the Lord, 0 my soul! And all that IS
,vithin me (bless) his holy name."-Ps. 103: 1. "How often would !;
have gathered thy children together, as a hen (doth gather) her brood.
-Luke 13:34.
50. It is not necessary to multiply examples. Let us apply the
principle. "They shall take away the daily (abomination) and place
the abomination that maketh desolate." In the same way, we nat-
urally read the verse (Dan. 12: 11) which refers to the above. "And
from the time the dailv (abomination) shall be taken away, to set up
the abomination that aesolate, there shall be a thousand two
hundred ana ninety days." (See margin.) .
51. Our opponent agrees with Bro. Miller in ?nderstandmg that
which hindered in Paul's epistle, to be the same whICh was to be taken
away in Daniel's propllecy. Let us, inquire wh.at Paul referred to.
On this point, we are happily favored WIth light. It ;vas some-
thin"" about which Paul could speak freely m the a,ssembhes of the
at Thessalonica; but when he writes them a letter on
purpose to explain the points ',:,ith. the same subject m?re
fully he seems to he under a restralllt, whICh IS very unusual for hIm,
See' 2 Thess. 2:5, 6, "Do ye not remember, that when was ,:ith
you, 1 told you these things? And ye I told It yO?
what now restraineth him, in order to hIS bemg revealed m hIS own
scason."-Macknight's Trans. It is natural to suppose that the subject
on which he did not think proper to write more freely, was connected
with the imperial government. If he h.ad f.oretold, in plain words,
the Roman Empire was to be broken III pIeces, he mIght have excIted
those heathen emperors against Christianity, when was need
of it, for, having explained the subject to. the Thessalon!ans .once, It
only necessary to allude to it, to b:ing It !resh to WhIle
we may be sure that the church whICh receIved such p.rophe-
cies from the mouth of the apostle, would never forget them, )t )S also
manifest that the same predictions would spread among all the other
churches. vVe know of no reason why Paul should not speak on the
subject as freely at Corinth, Athens, or as he did
at Thessalonica. Be that as it may; the ePlstle was CIrculated among
other churches, and these unexplained allusions would of course excite
IS IT PAGANISM 13
inquiry, and the intercourse was so constant between the brethren,
that .these inquiries would be answered. The testimony of early
Christians, therefore as to the meaning of this Scripture, is scarcely
;t shade less decisive than if we had it in the writings of Paul himself.
N"ow. we do not know of a Christian writer. in the first five centuries.
who' applies this to anything but Pagan Rome; while
have the writings of at least eight, who agree in that application. They
are Tertullian, in the second century, Origen. the ablest and most
learned writer of the third, Lactantius, Cyril, Ambrose, Jerome, Austin,
and ChrysostOll1, of the fourth, or beginning of the fifth. vVe give two
"l)P(illlens.
52. Tertullian, expounding the words, "Only he who now letteth will
let," etc., says: "vVho can this be but the Roman State, the division
whirh into ten kingdoms will bring on Antichrist, and then the
\Vic-ked Olle. the LITTLE HORN, shall be revealed."
;):3. In hi" apology, he assigns it as a particular reason why the
Christians prayed for the Roman Empire, because they knew the
greatest calamity hanging over the world was retarded by the con-
t.inllanee of the pagan Empire of Rome. In arcordance with this, we
!live ;lll extrad, from Fleming-, a learned writer on the prophecies, in
the 17th century: "The mystery of iniquity, even in the times of the
apostles, did begin to work. and what then. for a, time, withheld his
('oming. the HEATHEN EMPIRE OF ROME. hath long since been
taken out of the way, which raused some Christians in those days,
to wi"h the standing ana continuance of that Empire, from the terror
they had of that adversary, who, according to the word, THEY KNEW
'VAS TO FILL HIS ROOM."
54. It must have been a strong conviction of the terrors of the "Man
of Sin." which ('ould make the Christians of the se('ond century pray
for the continuanre of an anti-Christian power, under which they
tom bv beasts. tormented. beheaded, burned. or crucified.
;5f). C)'ril, 'of .Jerusalem. in fourth century. says: "The predicted
A nti"hrist shall rome when the times of the Roman (Pagan) Empire
shaH he fulfilled. and the consummation of the world approach. Ten
kings of the Romans shall arise together, in different places indeed, but
tlw:v shall reign at the same time. Among these. the eleventh is Anti-
dlli"t. who, by magiral and wicked artifire, shall "eize the Romall
power." We do not see how it is possible to set aside snch testimony.
and we certainly have no occasion to do it in order to harmonize the
book of Daniel.
f)6. The simple qnestion of the angel, in Dan. 8: 13; is this: How long
the vision to give both the sanctuary and the host to be trodden under
foot? This treading under foot had been hinted at in Daniel 2 :40.
"As iron breaketh in pieces and subdueth all things. ,,0 shall it (the
fourth kingdom) break in pieces and BRUISE." Still plainer is the
language in Dan. 7:7; "I SAW A FOURTH BEAST, exceeding dread-
ful, which devoured, brake in pieces, and STAMPED the residue with
its feet.". In the interpretation, the angel say" of the fourth kingdom:
"Tt sb3.ll devour the whole earth, and TREAD IT DOWN and break it in
pieces." In the 8th chapter we have the same power, and are told: "It

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14
THE DAILY
c'ast do\vn ;some of the host. and of the stars to the "'round and
stamped upon them," But wliile all this is to be done hv Rome' itis
also said: "For the overspreading of ABOMINATIONS he shall' make
it desolate, even nntil the consummation," There are two abomina-
tiOllS then, under which the people of God are to he trodden down,
)l"ow, when Rome is the subject of prophecy, it is perfectly natura'I,
to say: "From him the daily (abolllination) shall he taken a.way, "
and it \vas equally' natlll'al for the a.ngel in inquiring how 10'ng tht
' Lreading down should continue, to mention the powers, 01' a.bomina.tions ,
nnder which it sllOuld be done, as "the daily, and the transO"ressiolls uf
desolation." to .
. 57: W'hen we consider til!' frequency and tremendous emphasis with
which God ca.lls idola,try :In abomination, (Deut, 13:14; and , 17;4:
a.nda host of other passages), we see a peculiar propriety in styling
paganism the CONTINUAL abomination, and we believe this appHca-
tion is the only one which harmonizes all the Scriptures and all the
facts, and is therefore TRUE. .
58. The above is in brief what those ministers; who
preached the first angel's message, taught with reference to
"the daily sacrifice" in Daniel.
VIEWS OF THE SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTISTS I.
59. It will now be in place to ascertain what the leading
Seventh-q.ay Adventist writers have taught and what they
still teach in their standard works on this subject.
.60. URIAH SMIl'H.-We will first let Uriah Smith
speak for himself by quoting from his comments on Dan.
11 :31, in his "Thoughts on Daniel and the Revelation,"
a book approved by the denomination and of which many
editions have been sold in this and other English-speaking
countries. The same book has also been translated into
several foreign languages by the recommendation of the
Seventh-day Adventist denomination.
61. "And they shall ta,ke away the daily sacrifice," It was shown, on
Dan. 8: 13, that sacrifice is a word erroneously snpplied j that it should
be desolation; and that the expression denotes a desolating power, of
which the abomination of desolation is but the counterpart, . and to
IS PAGANISM
which it succeeds in point of time. The daily desolation was paganism,
the alJomination of desolation is the p,tpa<.:y. But it may be asked.
how this can be the papacy, since' Christ spoke of it ill connection with
the destruction of Jerusalem. And the answer is, Christ evidently
refcrn:d to the ninth of Daniel, which is a precli<.:tion of the destruction
of Jerusalem, and not to this verse of the eleventh, which does not
refer to that event. Daniel, in the ninth clmpter, speaks of desola-
tions and abolll inations, plural. More than one abomination, therefore,
treads down the church: that is. so far a.s the churt'h is concerned.
both paganililll and the l;a.pacy are abolllinations. But <IS distinguished
frOll! each other the language is restrided, ancl one is the daily deso-
lation, a lid the other is pre-eminently the tmnsgression or abomination
of desolation.
G2. How was the daily, or paganislll, taken away? this is spoken
of in connection with the placing or sett ing up of the abomination of
llesolation, or the papaer, it IIlllSt denote, not merely the nominal change
of the religion of the empire from p<lganism to Christianity, as on the
conversion, so-C'alled, of Constantine, but sl ich an eradi('ation of . pagan-
iSIll f rom all the elements of the empire, that the way would be all
oppn for the pa.pal abomination to arise and asserts its arrogant
da.ims. Such a revolution as this, pla.inl y defined, was accomplished;
hut not for nearly two huudred years after the de/lth of Constantine.
A;:; we approach the year A. D. ;308. we behold a gra,nd crisis
ripening between C<ltholicislll and the pagan influences still existing in
tlw empire, Up to the time of the conversion of Clovis, king of }<'ran<.:e,
.\, D, 496,. the French and other nations of vVcstern Rome were
pa.gan; but subsequent ly to that event, the efforts to eonvert idolators
to Christ were crowned with great success. The conversion of Clovis
is said to have the occasion of bestowing upon the French mon3:,rch
the of "Most Christian lVlajesty," and "Eldest Ron of the chureh."
Between that time and A, D. 508, by allial1l'cs, <.:apitulations, and
('onql1eRts, the Arborid. the Roman garrisons in the 'Vest, Brittany,
the Burgundians, and the Visigoths were brought into sub.iection.
64, From the time when these Sllc<.:esses were fully accomplished,
namely, 508, the papacy was triumphant so far ns paga,nism was con-
('erned; for though the latter doubtl ess retarded the progress of the
Catholic faith, yet it had not the power, if it had the disposition, to
suppress the faith, and hinder the of the Roman
pontiff. When the prominent powers of Europe gave up their attach-
ment to paganism it was only to perpetuate its allominations in an
other form; for Christianity, as exhibited in the Catholic Church, was,
and is. only paganism baptized,
65, In England, Arthur, the first Christian king, founded the Chris-
tian worship on the ruins of the pagan. Hapin (b, 2, p, 124), who
claims to be exact in the chronology of rvents, states that he was
elected monarch of Britain in 508.
66. The condition of the see of Rome was also peculiar at this time.
Tn 498 .. Symmachus ascended the pontifica.1 throne as a recent convert
from paganism, He reigned to A. D. 514, He found his way to the
papal ('hair, says Du Pin, by striving with his <'ompetitor even unto

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16 THE DAILY
blood. He received adulation as the successor of St. Peter, and struck
the key-note of papal assumption by presuming to exeommunicate the
emperor Anastasius. The most servile flatterers of the pope now began
to maintain that he was constituted judge in the place of God, and
that he was the vicegerent of the :Most High.
67. Such was the direction in which events were tending in the \Vest.
What posture did affairs at the same t.ime assume in the East? .A
strong papal party now existed in all parts of the empire. The ad-
herents of this cause in Constaninople, encouraged hy the success of
their brethren in the West, deemed it safe to commence open hostilities
in behalf of their master at Rome. In 508 their partisan zeal cuI
minated in a. whirlwind of fanaticism and civil war, which swept in
fire and blood through the streets of the eastern capital. Gibbon,
under the years :j08-518, speaking of the commotions in Constanti
11(1) Ie saYB:
68. "T'he statues of the emperor were broken, u.nd his person was
concealed in a suburb, till, at the end of three days, he dared to implore
the mercy of his SUbjects. Without his diadem, and in the posture of
a suppliant, Anastasius appeared on the throne of the circus. The
Catholics, before his face, rehearsed the genuine Trisagion; they ex-
ulted in the offer which he proclaimed by the voice of a herald of ab-
the purpl\'i they listened to the admonition that, since all
could not reign, they should previously agree in the choice of a sov-
ereign .: and they llCl'epted the blood of two unpopular ministers, whom
their master, without hesitation, condemned to the tions. These
furious but transient sC'ditions were encouraged by the success of
Vitalian who, with an army of Huns and Bulgarians, for the most
l1nrt iddlaters. deda reu himself the chanmion of the Catholic fa.ith.
In this pious rebellion he depopulated Tlmtce, beseiged Constantinople.
exterminated sixtvfive thousand of his fej,lowchristillns, till he obtained
the recall of the "bishops, the satisfaction of the pope, awl the estab-
lishment of the Couu(il of Chalcedon, an orthodox treaty, reluctantly
sicrned by the dyinO' Anastasius, and more faithfully performed by the
to to fi I I"
1m'.le of .Justinian. And sueh was the event of the rst of t 1e re IglOUS
wars which have been waged in the name, and by the discipl es, of the
Uoel of Peace."-' Dedine and Fall ," Vol. IV, p. 1)26.
69. Let it be marked that in this year, 508, paganism had so far
dCf.lined, a.nd Catholicism had so far relatively increased in strength
that, the Catholic Church for the first time waged a. successful war
aga.inst both the ('ivil authority of the empire and the of the
East, which had for the most part the Monophyslte doc-
trine. The extermination of 6;),000 heretICs was the result.
70. With the following extract we close the testimony on this point:
71. 'We now invite our modern Gamaliels to take a, position with us
in place of the sanctuary of paganism (since claimed as the patrimony
of St. Peter,) in 508. We look a few years into the past, and the
rude paganism of the northern barbarians is upon the
nominally Christian empire of 'Vestern Rome, tnumphmg everywhere
and its triumphs everywhere distinguished hy the most savage cruelty.
.,. <> " The empire falls, and is broken into fragments. One by one
J
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IS IT P AG ANISM 17
the lords and rulers of these fragments abandon their paganism, and
profess the Christian faith. In religion the conquerors are yielding to
the conquered. But still paganism is triumphant. Among its sup-
porters there is one stern and successful conqueror (Clovis); but
soon he also bows before the power of the new faith, and becomes its
champion. He is still triumphant, but as a hero and conqueror, reaches
the zenith at the point we occupy, A. D. 508.
72. "In or near the same year, the last important subdivision of the
fallen empire is publicly, and by the coronation of its triumphant
'monarch,' Christianized.
7:3. "The pontitl' for the period on which we stand is a recently
converted pagan. The bloody contest which placed him in the chair
was decided by the interposition of an Arian king. He is bowed to and
saluted as filling the place of God on earth. The senate is so far under
his power that on suspicion that the interests of the see of Rome
demands it, they excommunicate the emperor. * * " In 508 the mine
is sprung beneath the throne of the Eastern empire. The result of
the confusion and strife it, occasions is the humiliation of its rightful
lord. Now the question is, At what time was paganism so far sup-
pressed as to make room for its substitute and successor, the papal
n.uomination? When was this abomination placed in a position to
start on its career of blasphemy and blood? 1s there any other date
for its being 'placed,' or 'set up,' in the room of paganism but 508?
rf the mysterious enchantress has . not now brought all her victims
within her power, she has taken her position, and some have yielded to
the fascination. The others are at length subdued; 'and kings, and
peoples, and multitudes, and nations, and tongues' are brought under
the spell which prepares them, even while 'drunken with the blood of
the martyrs of Jesus,' to 'think they are doing God service,' and to
fancy themselves the exclusive favorites of Heaven while becoming an
easier and richer prey for the damnation of hell."-"Second Advent
Manual," pp. 7981.
74. From these evidences we think it clear that the
daily, or paganism, was taken away in A. D. 508. This
was preparatory to the setting up or establishment of the
papacy, which was a subsequent event. "Thoughts on
Daniel and the Revelation," pp. 261-265, Edition 1885.
75. ELDER J. N. ANDREWS was one of the most hon-
est, careful, and well-informed writers that the Seventh-
day Adventists ever had. He knew well what Wm. Miller
and his associate ministers taught with reference to "the
daily" as well as with the objections urged against that
VIew. His explanations about the two desolations, the

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two opposing sanctuaries, and the two hosts, are very clear
and convincing. The following is from his pen:
76. THERE ARE TWO "DESOLATIONS" IN DAN. 8.-This fact is
made :;0 plain by .Josiah Litch that we present his words:-
77. "'The daily SACRIFICE' is the present reading of the English
text. But no such thing as SACRIFICE is found in the original. This
is acknowledged on all hands. It is a gloss or construction put on it
by the translators. The true reading is, 'the daily and the transgres-
sion of desolation.' daily and transgression bPingconnected together
hv 'and' the DAILY DESOLATION Hnd the TRANSGRESSION OF
DESOLATION. They are two desolating powers, which were to deso-
late the sanctlHtry ,mu the host."-"Phrophetie Expositions," Vol. I,
page 127.
78, It is plain that the sanctuary and the host were to he troddell
under foot by the daily and the transgression of desolation. The careful
reading of verse 13 settles this point . And this fact establi shes another,
viz. that these two desolations are the TWO GRAIm FORMS under
which i:>atan has attempted to overthrow the worship and the cause
of J ehova.l!. Mr. Miller's remarks on the meaning of these two terms,
and the course pursued by himself in ascertaining that meaning, is
presented under the following head:-
79. THE TWO DESOLATIONS ARE PAGANISM AND PAPACY.-
"I read on, and eould find no other case in which it (the daily) was
found, but in Daniel. I (by the aid of a concoro,tnc'e) took thosE'
words which stood in connection with it, 'take away,' he shall TAKE
AWAY the daily; 'from the time the dail y shaH he TAKEN AWAY,'
etc. I read on, and thought I shoulcl find no light on the text; finally,
T came to 2 Thess. 2:7, 8. 'For the mystery of doth already
work; onl y he who now letteth will let, until he be TAKEN OUT OF
THE W AY, then shall that wicked be revealed,' etC'. And when I
had come to that text, oh! how clear and glorious the truth appeared!
There it is! ' That is ' the daily!' \Vell. now, what does Paul mea.n hy 'he
who now letteth, 01' hindereth? By 'the man of sin.' and the 'wicked,'
popery is meant. IVell, what is it which hinders popery from beIng
rE>vealed'l vVhy, it is paganism; weU, then. 'the uaily,' must mean
paganism."-"Second Advent Manual ," page 66.
80. It needs no argument to prove that the bvo grand forms of op-
position, by which Satan has desolat ed the church and trod under foot
the sanctuary of the living God, are none other than paganism and
popery. It is also a clear point that the C'hange from one of these
desolations to the other did occur under the Roman power. Paganism,
from the days of the kings of Assyria down to the period when it becam0
so far modified that it took the name of popery, had heen the daily
or, as Prof. renders it, "the continua I" desolation, by which
Satan had stood up against the cause of Jebovah. And indeed, in its
priests, its altars and its sacrifi ces, it bore res('mblanC' e to the Levitical
form of Jehovah's worship. the Christian form of worship took
the place of the Levitical, a change in Satan's form or opposition and
counterfeit worship, became necessary, if he would successfully oppose

I
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IS IT "PAGANISM 19
the worship of the gTeat God. And ' it is in the light of these facts that
we are able to understand our Lord's reference to the abomination of
desolation in 'Matt. 24: 15. It is evident that he there cites Dan. 9: 26,
27. Now, a.lthough we do not understand that paganism in the year 70
had given place to popery, we do understand that' that same power
which then appeared, modified somewhat in name and form, was the
very 'power that should, as the abomination of desoHl.tibn, wear out the
saints of the Most High.
R1. The langauge of Paul is to the point: "For the mystery of
iniql1it y (popery) DOTH ALREADY WORK; only he who now lettcth
wiJ] let , until he be taken out of the way. And then shall that 'Wicked
he revealed, whom the Lord shall consume with the Spirit of his mouth,
n nd shall destroy with the brightness of his coming." 2 Thess, 2: 7, 8.
That Paul refers to paganism and popery, none question. And here is
<lirect proof that popery, the abomination of desolation, had in Paul's
day already begun to work. Nor was it a very great change of char-
acter when Satan transformed his counterfeit worship from paganism to
popery. The same temples, altars, incense,' 'priests arid worshippers
\"ere ready, with little change,' to serve as the appendages of the papal
abomination. .
R2. The staute of Jupiter readily changed to that of Peter, the
prince of the apostles; a,na the Pantheon, which had been the temple
of all the gods, without difficulty became the sanctuary of aU the
saints. Thus the same abomination that desolated .Jerusalem, in a
degree changed and modified, became the wonderful desolater 'of the
saints and martyrs of Jesus. And in its so-ca:lled temple of God, it
set at naught and trod Hilder foot the true temple of Jehovah, and he
who is its minister, Jesus Christ. The change from 'paganism to popery
is clearly shown in John's view of the transfer of pow I' from the dragon
of Rev. 12, to the beast of Rev. 13. And that they are essentially the
same thing, is evident from the fact that both the dragon an.d the beast
are represented with the seven heads ; thus showing that, 'in a certaLI
sense, either may be understood to cover the whole time. And in the
same senSe we understand that either abomination covers all the period.
Christ1s reference to the abomination of desolation (Matt. 24: 15; Luke
21 :20) is an absolute demonstration that Rome is the little horn of
Dan 8:9-12. Having shown that there are two desolations, by which
t.he sanctuary and the host are trodden down, we now notice the fact
that there are
83 TWO OPPOSING SANCTUARIES IN DAN. 8.-To the careful
reader this fact will at once appeaT. They are as follows: First, the
sanctuary of the daily desolation. Verse 11;11 :31. Second, the sanc-
tuary which the daily and the transgression of desolation, were to
tread under foot. Verses 13, 14. The one is the sanctuary of Satan;
the other is the sanctuary of the Lord of hosts. The one is the dwelling
place of "all the gods;" the other is the habitation of the only living
and true God. If it be said that a sanctuary is never connected with
heathen and idolatrous worship, we cite the direct testimony of the
' Bible. Heathen Moab had a sanctuary. And that sa.nctllary was a
place of prayer and worship for that heathen nation. Isa. 16: 12. The

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20 THE DAILY
chapel erected by the king of Israel at Bethel, as a rival to the temple
of God at Jerusalem (1 Kings 12:27, 31-33) was called his sanctuary.
Amos .7:13, marg!n. And the places in which idolatrous Israel (the
ten trIbes) worshIped, are called sanctuaries. Amos 7 :H. The same is
true of idolatrous Tyre. Eze. 28: 18. Attention is called to the fol-
lowing from Apollos Hale:-
. 84. ''What can be meant by the 'sanctuary' of paganism? Pagall-
Ism, and en or of every kind, have their sanctuaries as well as truth.
These are the temples or asylums consecrated to their service. Some
particular and renowned temple of paganism may, then, be supposed
to be. here spol<en of. 'Which of its numerous distinguished temples
may It be? One of the most magnificent specimen!> of classic archi-
tecture is called the Pantheon. The name signifies 'the temple or
asylum of all the gods.' the 'place' of its location is Rome. The idols
of .the .nations conquered by the Romans were sacredly deposited in
some mche or apartment of this temple, and ill manv cases became
objects of worship by the Romans themselves. Could find a temple
paganism that was more strikingly 'his sanctuary?' 'Vas Rome, the
CIty or place of the Pantheon, 'cast down' by the authority of the
State? Read the following well-known and remarkable facts in his-
tory: 'The death of the last rival of Constantine had sealed the peace
of the empire. Rome was once more the undisputed queen of nations.
But, in the hour of elevation and splendor, she had been raised to
the edge of a precipice. Her next step was to he downward and irre-
coverable. The change of the government to Constantinople still per-
plexes the historian. Constantine ABANDONED ROME, the great cita-
del and throne of the Caesars, for an obscure cornel' of Thrace, and ex-
pended the remainder of his vigorous and ambitious life in the double
toil of raising a coJony into the capital of his empire, AND DEGRADING
THE CAPITAL INTO THE FEEBLE HONORS AND HUMILIATED
STRENGTH OF A COLONY."-"Second Advent Manual," page 68.
85. And not only did Satan possess himself of a riv,ll to the sanctuary
of Jehovah in the period of pagan worship, but, throtlO'hout the Chris-
tian dispensation, bas that arch fiend possessed a rival temple of God.
2 Thess. 2:4. Thus much for the rival sanctuarv of Satan. The sanc-
tuary of God remains to be noticed at length . Connected with these
two sanctuaries
86. THERE ARE TWO HOSTS IN DAN. 8:g-13.-The one is the host
was given to the little horn against the daily. when it had filled
Its measure of transgression; and by the aid of this host, the little
horn was able to cast down the truth. Verse 12. This host is men-
in 11: 31.. By this host, the sanctuary of the daily deso-
lation, and ItS servlCes, were transferred to the transO'ression or
abomination of desolation. This host is the forces of and it is
intimately associated with his sanctuary. The other host is "the host
of heaven." Verse 10. Michael is the Prince 'of this host. Dan. 10:21.
Against the Prince of this host, the little horn stands up. Verses 11,
25. (Prof. Whiting remarks that in the original , "Prince of the host"
. occurs in Josh. 5: 14). None dispute that the host. of whom Michael
(Christ) is Prince, is the church of the living God. Dan. 12: 1. This
IS IT PAGANISM
21
host, the true church, is fitly represented by a, green olive tree. J.er.
11:15-17. And when some of the branches (members of the JeWIsh
church) were broken off through unbelief, others were grafted in from
the Gentiles, and thus the host continues to exist. Rom. 11: 17 -20.
This host, or church, is the worshipers of God, and is intimately con
nected with his sanctua,ry.- "The Sanctuary and the 2300 Days," by
J. N. Andrews. Second edition, 1872, pp. 33-:39.
87. JAMES WHITE knew well what is said in "Early
Writings" (p. 46, Edition of 1882) and the explanation
given about' 'the' daily" in Daniel. His testimony ought
therefore to have some weight in this matter. He has ex-
pressed his views briefly as follows:
88. THE TWO DESOLATIONS.-The daily sacrifice and the trans-
o-ression of desolation represent Rome in its pa,gan and papal forms.
Leaving Ollt the supplied words, the text would read, "The daily, and
the transgression of desol ation." These a.re two desolating powers;
first, Paganism, then, Papacy. Of these, Paul, ill' 2 Thess. 2: 3-8, says:
"Let no' man deceive you by any means; for that day shall not come,
pxcept there come a fa.lIing away first, and that Man of Sin be reo
vealed, the son of perdition, who opposeth and exalteth himself ?-bove
all that is called God, or that is worshiped; so that he, as God, sltteth
in the temple of God, showing himself tha.t lle is God: Remember ye not
that when I was yet with you I told you these . now ye
know what withholdeth that he might be revealed III hIS tIme. For
the rnysteryof iniquity doth already work; only he who now
will let. until he be taken out of the way. And then shall that WIcked
be whom the Lord shall consume with the spirit of his mouth,
and shall destroy with the brightness of his corning." That which
withheld the manifestation of the Papacy in Paul's day was Paganism.
These are the two powers which have desolated the people of God, of
which the ano-el speaks in the vision of Dan. S.-"Our Faith and Hope,"
No.1, by White, pp. 116, 117. See also "The Redeemer and Re-
deemed," by James White, p. 127.
89. Those who wish to read what other Seventh-day
writers have said on this subject may read "Prophecies of
J eSHS" by Eld. J. G. Matteson, Chap. 9; "Daniel and
the Prophet" by Eld. S. N. Haskell; Comments on
Daniel 8:11-13; 11:31; 12:11; "The Sanctuary and the
2300 Days" by Eld. Uriah Smith, pp. 41, 42, Edition
1877; "Looking unto Jesus" by the same author, p. 160,
Edition 1897.
AOVENnST
HERITAGE CENTER
James White LIbrary
ANDREWS UNIVERSIlY

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22 THE DAILY
90. From the above quotations from those who preached
ths first angel's message prior to 1844 and from the Sev-
enth-day Adventist writers since then it will be seen there
is a perfect harmony in their interpretations of the text in
question. We will now proceed to examine the text still
more critically.
A CRITICAL EXAMINATION OF THE
HEBREW WORD "TAH-MEED"
91. This Hebrew word occurs 1 04 times in the old Tes-
tament, and is translated as follows:
92. CONTINUALLY, 53 times.
Ex. 28:29 .. a memorial before the Lord continually.
Ex. 28:30. heart before the Lord continually.
Ex. 29: 38. of the first year day by day continually.
Lev. 24:2. to cause the lamps to burn continually.
Lev. 24:3. Morning before the Lord continually.
Lev. 24:4. Candlestick before the Lord continually.
Lev. 24:8. in order before the Lord continually.
2 Sam. 9: 7. eat bread at my table continually.
2 Sam. 9: 13. he did eat continually at the king's table.
1 Kings 10: 8. which stand continually before thee. .
2 Kings 4:9. which passeth by us continually.
2 Kings 25 :29. he did eat bread continually.
1 Chron. 16:6. with trumpets continually before the ark.
I Chron. 16: 11. Seek his face continually.
1 Chron.16:37. To minister before the ark continually.
1 Chron. 16 :40. altar of burnt offering continually.
1 Chron. 23: 31. continually before the . Lord. .
2 Chron. 9: 7. which stand continually before thee.
2Chron. 24: 14. in the house of the Lord continually.
Ps. 34: 1. his praise shall continually be in my mouth.
Ps. 35: 27. let them say continually.
Ps. 38: 17. my sorrow is continually before me.
Ps. 40: 11. thy truth continually preserve me.
Ps. 40: 16. say continually the Lord be magnified.
Ps.50:8. to have been continually before me.
Ps.69:23. make their loins continually to shake.
Ps. 70: 4. say continually let the Lord be magnified.
Ps. 71 : 3. w hereunto I may continually resort.
Ps. 71 : 6. my praise shall be continually of thee.
Ps. 7I: 14. But I will hope continually.
IS IT PAGANISM
Ps. 72: 15. shall be for him continually.
Ps. 73: 23. I am continually with thee.
1's.74:23. that rise up against thee increaseth continually.
Ps. 109: 15. let them be before the Lord continually.
Ps. 109: 19. girdle wherewith he is girded continually.
Ps. 119:44. so shall I keep thy law continually.
Ps.119:109. my soul is continually in thy hand ..
Ps. 119: 117; have respect unto thy statutes contmually.
Prov 6: 21. bind them continually upon thine heart.
Is. 21: 8. r. stand continually upon the watchtower.
Is. 49: 16. thy walls are continually before me.
Is. 51: 13. hast feared continually every day.
Is. 52: 5. and my name continually every day.
Is. 58: 11. the Lord shall guide thee continually.
Is. 60: 11. thy gates shall be open continually.
Is. 65: 3. that provoketh me to anger continually .
. Jer. 6:7. before me continually is grief.
Jer. 52: 33. he did continually eat bread.
Ez. 46: 14. meat offering continually.
Hos. 12: 6. wait on thy God continually.
Oba. 16. shall all the heaten drink continually.
Nah. 3:19. not thy wickedness passed continually.
Hab. 1: 19. and not to spare continually to slay.
93. CONTINUAL, 27 times.
Ex. 29: 42. a continual burnt offering;
Num. 4:7. the continual bread shall be thereon.
Num. 28: 3. for a continual burnt offering.
Num.28:6. It is a continual burnt offering.
Nnm. 28: 10, 15, 24. beside the continual burnt offering.
Num.28:23. which is for a continual burnt offering.
Num. 28: 31. beside the continual burnt offering.
Num. 29: 11. the continual burnt offering. ,
23
Num. 29: 16, 19, 22, 25, 28, 31, 34, 38. besides the continual burnt of-
fering.
2 Kings 25: 30. his allowance was a continual allowance.
2 Chron. 2:4. for the continUal shewbread. .
Ezra 3 :5. the continual burnt offernig.
Neh. 10:33. for the continual meat offering, and for the continual
burnt offering.
Pro. 15: 15. a merry beart hath a continual feast.
Jel' . 52:34. there was a continual diet given.
Ezek. 39: 14. sever out men of continual employment (margin con-
tinuance). .
Ezek. 46: 15. a continual burnt ' offering.
94. ALWAYS, 10 times.
Ex. 25:30. table of shewbread before me alway.
Ex. 27: 20. to cause the lamp to burn always.
Ex. 28:38. it shall be always upon his forehead..

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24 THE DAlLY
Num. 9: 16. So it was alway: the cloud covereLl.
Deut. 11: 12. eyes of the Lord thy Goel are always.
2 Sam. 9: 10. shall eat bread alway a t my table.
Ps. 16: 8. I have set the Lord always before me.
Provo 5: 19. be thou ravished always with her love.
Provo 28: 14. Happy is the man that feareth the Lord alway
Ezek. 38: 8. which have bllen always waste.
95. DAILY, 7 times.
Num. 4: 16. the daily meat offering.
Num.29:6. the daily (lit. continual) burnt offering.
Dan. 8: 11. by him the daily sacrifice was taken.
Dan. 8: 12. given him against the daily sacrifice.
Dan. 8: 13. the vision concerning the daily sacrifice.
Dan. 11: 31. shall take ,<,vay the daily sacrifice.
Dan. 12: II. the daily sacrifice shall be taken.
96. EVER, 4 times. .
Lev. 6: 13. The fire shall ever be burning.
Ps. 25: 15. Mine eyes are ever toward the Lord.
Ps. 51: 3. Mv sin is ever before me.
Is. 62: 6. shih never hold their peace (lit. not ever).
97. PERPETUAL, twice.
Ex. 30: 8. a perpetual incense.
Lev. 6: 20. for a meat offering perpetual.
98. EVERMORE, once.
Ps. 105 :4. seek his face evermore.
99. From the above it will be seen that "tah-meed" is,
in King James Version, translated continually fifty-three
times, continual twenty-seven times, alway or always ten
times, daily seven times, ever. four times, perpetual twice,
and evermore once. Total one hundred and four times.
100. "Tah-meed" is defined by Gesenius in his Hebrew .
and English Lexicon as follows: "continuance, perpetuity,
i. e. perpetual time as moving on without interruption,
daily, continually, ever, always."
101. The five times this word occurs in Daniel it is pre-
ceeded by the definite article "hat" "hat-tah-meed," indi-
cating that it is here used as a noun and may therefore be
IS IT PAGANISM 25
translated literally by continuance or perpetuity. In each
case where "hat-tah-meed" occurs in Daniel (See
Dan. 8:11, 12, 13; 11 :31 j 12:11) it is translated "the
daily'" the followinO' word "sacrifice" is printed in ital-
, I::> .
ics to indicate that it is not found in the Hebrew text.
"Tah-meed" is also used asanoun in Eze.39:13, where it is,
in King James Version, translated "continual employ-
ment," but more correctly continuance as in the margin.
In ev.ery other text where "tah-meed" occurs it is trans-
lated as an adjective or an adverb and from the context
one can readily see what it qualifies or modifies.
102. But in Daniel it seems to be used solely as a noun,
and we will have to determine from the context what is
really meant by "tah-meed." We will quote the five
verses in Daniel (omitting the supplied word sacrifice) in
which this word occurs. "Yea, he magnified himself even
to the prince of the host, and by him 'the daily' [hat-tah-
meed] was taken away, and the place of his sanctuary was
cast down." "And an host was given him against 'the
daily' [hat-tall-meed] by reason of transgression, and it
cast down the truth to theground,and itpracticed and pros-
pered. " "Then I heard one saint speaking, and another saint
said unto that certain saint which spake, How long shall
be the vision concerning 'the daily' [hat-tah-meed] and
transgression of desolation, to give both the sanctuary and
the host to be trodden under foot?" "And arms shall
stand on his part, and they shall pollute the sanctuary
of strength, and shall take away 'the daily' [hat-tah-
meed] and they shall place the abomination that maketh
desolate." "And from the time the daily [hat-tah.:meed]
shall be taken away, and the abomination that maketh

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26
.. THE PAIL);
desolate se.t ,up, there shall be thousand two hundred.
12:11. .
103. From.a reading of.the it be-
evident that ' 'the daily" '. or "hat-tah-meed" refers
toone aud the same , :what is will have to
be determined from the context
. 104. It will be n,hat'.'the daily" of Daniel 8 is
spoken of in cQnnection with ,the ', 'little horn which waxed
exceeding great," and whkh was "broken without h?-nd."
N ow there are valid reasons Jor regardillg this horn as a
symbol of ' Roman Empire from its rise till its final
overthrow at the end of time; hence the taking away of
"the daily" and the setting up of abomination that
maketh must take place ' during the supremacy
of this ' - . _ .
105. In: King James Version 9f Dan. 8:11 it reads, "He
magnified ' himself, "etc. In the revised version .it r:ad.s:
"It [the horn] magnified itself." This last IS
harmony with the Hebrew and certamly more m
harmony with the context. Lindberg's Danish transla-
tion reads thus: "It [the horn] waxed against the prince
of the host; the daily offering was taken,away by it, and
his holy dwelling cast down. " Another Norwegian trans-
lation printed in Norway a.nd still another printed in New
York read the same. It was the great hom-the Roman
power-that took away "the daily" and set up a desolat-
ing power in its place. Dan. 8:11,12; 11:31.
106. "By" (margin "FROM") HIM. WHICH IS COR-
RECT? "By him" comes from the Hebrew word "mim-
mennu,)) ("min" being reduplicated before a pronominal
suffix .. See "Harper's Elements of Hebrew," 48, note,
51, 5) and it may be translated from him or it. But as
I \
\
IS ITI PAGANISM 27
the "'little horn" is the "instrument" by \vhich "the daily
was 'takenaway and the place of his sanctuary was cast
down," "mimmennu" is therefore correctly translated "by
him" or it, as in the text6f' King James Version, and in
the -Danish Version 'quoted above and in theotherScandi,-
navianversions' referred to. For the definition of . :this
Hebrew preposition see Gesenius" Hebrew and :English
Lexicon, p. 585, . under d.
. 107. "HIS ; SANCTUARV; ,,-"The daily" " ;, [hat-tah:-
meed] had a sanctuary; "forth'e place of his sanctuary
was cast down;" hence the daily must denote some system
of -worship having a sanctuary. Of there can be no
question, but the character or nature 'of this ' religious sys-
tem' must be determined from other expressions in Daniel
where "'the daily" is used. '
108. IN an' host given
him against the daily [hat-tah ... meed] by reason of
transgression" etc. :, Dan. 8:12, : "By reason of transgres-
sion" is a phrase which qualifies "the daily" and reveals
the true character of "the daily" with its sanctuary. "By
reason of transgression comes from the Hebrew word 'be-
pha-shag, ' literally in: transgression,sin or rebellion."
"Be" is an inseparable preposition whose primary meaning.
is "in." See Gesenius' Hebrew and English Lexicon. "Pa-
shag," as a verb, is defined by Gesenius to mean' 'to break
with anyone, i. e., one's league, allegiance; hence to
fall away, to revolt, to rebel." "Specially to rebel against
God, to apostatize from him;" "to transgress, to sin."
U sed as a noun, the same word is defined by the same
lexicographer to mean "defection, rebellion, a fault, tres-
pass, especially transgression, sin against God." From
the above it is evident that "the daily" [hat-tah-meed]

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28
THE DAILY
with its sanctuary must denote a religious system, which
was in transgression or in rebellion against God. From
this conclusion there is no escape. And furthermore, in
"the daily" of Dan. 8:11, 12, 13;
12:11, it must be borne in mind, that in every case It
means the same thing or system of worship with its sanc-
tuary in rebellion against God.
109. NOT THE SANCTUARY OF ISRAEL.-"The daily"
[hat-tah-meed] of Daniel with its sanctuary could not
be the sanctuary service of Israel for the following reasons:
First, the sanctuary of Israel was ordained by God him-
self (See Exodus chapters 25-40), and could th:re-
fore be in truth or fact in transgression or rebellIon agamst
God. If Israel apostatized from God, as many of them
did it would not therefore cause the sanctuary with its
divinely appointed rites to be in rebellion against Go.d.
Second, the sanctuary of Israel was recognized by Chnst
as the "Father's house" and the "house.of prayer" for all
people till the great antitypical sacrifice-Christ-was of-
fered on the cross, at which time the service of this sanc-
tuary was to cease; for then the veil of the temple was
rent by divine agency to indicate, that then. the sanctuary
service of Israel was to cease forever. John 2:16; Mark
11:15-17; Matt. 27:50, 51. The taking away of "the
daily" its sanctuary has no reference then whatever
to the earthly sanctuary of God's people Israel. Third,
neither can the destruction of the temple of Israel, which
was destroyed by the Romans A. D. 70, after it was for-
saken of God, have any reference to the taking away of "the
daily" and overthrow of its sanctuary; for this occurred
about the time the papacy was coming into power and be-
gan to manifest its supremacy and persecuting power in the
IS IT PAGANISM 29
6th century after Christ. For the above reasons it IS eVI-
dent that' 'the daily" with its sanctuary service has no
reference to the daily service of the earthly sanctuary of
Israel.
110. NOT THE SANCTUARY OF HEAVEN. Nothing
could! be farther from the truth, than that "the daily,"
[hat-tah-meed] with its sanctuary in rebellion against
God, can.mean "the true divine service" of "the sanctu-
ary of God" in heaven. The service of the heavenly
sanctuary has never been interrupted since Christ became
our high priest, for "he ever liveth" and "maketh inter-
cession" for us. Heb. 7:25. Under the enforcement of
the most erroneous doctrines and during the fiercest perse-
cutions the faithful Christians have ever found access to
the throne of grace, and salvation through the mediation
of Christ in the sanctuary above. The service of that
sanctuary has never been taken away; and therefore the
taking away of "the daily" and the casting down of "his
sanctuary" can have no reference whatever to the "divine
service of the sanctuary of God" in heaven.
111. THE SANCTUARY OF PAGANISM.- It has al-
ready been proved that "the daily" [hat-tah-meed] of
Daniel must be a system of religious worship, since it has
a sanctuary of its own, and furthermore it is in "trans-
gression" or in rebellion against God. Now with these
facts before us it is not difficult to find out what this daily
is. The following facts will make it clear that this system
of worship must be paganism.
112. From Ezekiel 28:13-18 we learn that the fallen
angel, Satan, has established sanctuaries here on earth.
The places erected by Jeroboam for the worship of the
golden calves are called sanctuaries. Amos 7:9; 1 Kings

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30 THE DAILY
12:26-33. The man of sin is said to sit "in the temple
(sanctuary) of God." 2 The5S. 2 :4. History contains
abundant proof of the fact that paganism had its temple
and sanctuary service in every nation. In some of these
pagan sanctuaries we find two apartments. In the second
apartment was an ark containing tables of stone or sacred
books. Special days were dedicated to these gods, and
also a yearly day of atonement. They had a regular sys-
tem of sanctuary service including various kinds of sacri-
fices. Paganism had its' 'secret confession," priests who
"heard confessions" and who "purged" away the guilt,
the sacrifice of the mass with their' 'cakes" or "wafers,"
etc., etc. They had their temple universities, where all
the pagan worship,sanctuary or temple service was taught
in aU their perfection. See "Hislop's two Babylons," 8th
. edition, Leandon, chap. I and IV, sec. 3; Geikie's "Hours
with the Bible," Vol. II, pp. 50, 64, 65, 136, 165; Vol.
III, pp. 209, 210, 291, note 90; "Assyria, Its Princes,
Priests, and People," by A. H. Sayce, Chap. III,
pp. 73, 74.
113. It needs no argument to prove that paganism with
all its sanctuary service was in rebellion against God, for
that is the unanimous voice of the Bible and history.
With these facts before us no other just conclusion can be
drawn from what we have learned about' 'the daily" (hat-
tah-meed) in Daniel, than. that it represented nothing but
paganism, till it was overthrown and superseded by the
papacy.
114. As to how the papacy succeeded paganism and
when, I will only refer the reader to quotations from' 'The
Midnight Cry" and from other standard works quoted
above. However one short quotation from the "Catholic
IS IT PAGANISM 31
World;" of March, 18.94, page 809, will be given as it is
so directly to the point.
115. "The church took the pagan philosophy and made
it the buckler of faith against the heathen. She took the .
pagan Roman Pantheon, temple of all gods, and made it
sacred to all the martyrs; so it stands to this day. She
took the pagan Sunday and made it the Christian Sunday.
She took the pagan Easter and made it the feast we cele-
brate during this season. "
116. CONCLUSION. It seems unnecessary to say more in
reference to this subject, although much more could be
said. A brief summary may however be in place. We
have learned from "Early Writings" that those who
preached the first angel's message gave "the correct view
of 'the daily.' " They were all quite unanimous in inter-
preting "the daily" to mean "paganism." The same ex-
planation is given to "the daily" of Daniel by the leading
writers and speakers of the Seventh-day Adventist denom-
ination from the first. This can be seen by the quotations
from our standard works in this little tract. That the
Seventh-:day Adventist denomination still holds to this in-
terpretation of the texts in question is evident from the fact
that many of these books are recommended and sold by
the thousands to the public. .
117. I will close with the following quotation from Mrs.
E. G. White found in the "Gen. Conf. Bulletin" for 1903,
VoL 5, No.6, p. 88, first column: "The warning has
come; nothing is to be allowed to come in that will disturb
the foundation of the faith upon which we have been
building ever since the message came in 1842, 1843, and
1844. Do you think I could give up the light
God has given me? It is to be as the Rock of Ages."

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