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Teachers Guide

Module 1
Lesson 1
___________________________________________________________________
RECOGNIZING ROLES IN LIFE
YOUR JOURNEY


Introduce the lesson by asking the learners to read the entries in YOUR
JOURNEY phase. Let them reflect on the importance of recogniing and
performing roles in life. In!ite them to ask "uestions about it.
Emphasie to them the importance of the entries in the YOUR
O#JE$%I&E' phase like(
? share prior kno)ledge about the topic
? process information mentioned in the te*t listened to
? perform tasks by follo)ing instructions
? infer thoughts+ feelings and intentions in the material !ie)ed
? pro!ide )ords or e*pressions appropriate to a gi!en situation
? analyse literature as a means of disco!ering the self
? point out the distinguishing features of a poem
? determine the features of an informati!e )riting
? use the appropriate stress in deli!ering lines of poetry and prose
? use capitaliation and punctuations correctly
? present a )ell prepared $ommunity 'er!ices #rochure


%hey are to present+ at the end+ a Community er!ices "rochure as
a ma,or e!idence of their understanding. Inform them of the criteria for
assessment )ill be( -ocus+ $ontent+ Organiation+ 'upports+ &isuals+ $larity
and Language .echanics.


/a!e them perform the Three Minutes Letter Search Riddle Game as their
first task in YOUR #N#T#$L T$% phase. %hey are to read each
statement closely and search for the missing letter as suggested by each
statement.


1. I am the first letter of right.
2. You0ll find me in boar but not in bear.
3. I0m in the middle of ceiling.
4. You0ll find me in ore but not in our.
5. I ha!e the sound of sea.
? 1ut the letters together to come up )ith the ans)er to this riddle.
2hat is it in life that I ha!e to perform3

444 444 444 444 444
? $onsider the first one to gi!e the correct ans)er as the )inner.




-or Task 2 All For the EST! instruct the learners to do the follo)ing(


? -orm small groups of fi!e+ and take turns in ans)ering these
"uestions.
1. 2hat kind of role in life
a. interests you most3
b. helps put you into a happy mood3
c. You prefer5 en,oy doing3 You
like best3
2. 2hat are your talents or things you can do )ell3
6i!e reasons for your choices.
? .ake a list of all of them in the table as sho)n.
? 'hare and compare your lists )ith other groups.
? 7dd items from others0 lists to yours.
? 8eep your list for future use.
6i!e comments.
for Task " INS#IRATIONS! reiterate to them that they can find people
)hom they admire primarily because of the roles they perform in making a
difference not only in their li!es+ but also in others0 li!es. %hey inspire
people because they ha!e achie!ed something special in the field that
interest s them also&
.ake them pair up+ and reflect on these "uestions(
- 2ho do you consider as a person )ho inspires you
because he5she is !ery effecti!e in performing his5her role in
life3
- 2hat do you think are his5her "ualities that lead
him5her to become successful in performing his5her role in
life3

/a!e the recall the name of the person 9 you kno) personally or through
reading or through )atching a mo!ie: )ho has been successful in performing
an important role in his5her life.

.o!e them to

List the "ualities this person share )ith them and others.
? 'hare their list )ith classmates.
6i!e feedback.
In!ite them to do task $ EFFECTI%E& #ARTIALL'(INEFFECTI%E&
2here they )ill


? Inter!ie) at least fi!e classmates + and find out ho) they perform their
roles in life.
? Note their responses.
? $opy the chart + and plot it )ith entries called for.
? 'hare their findings )ith the class.
6i!e feedback.


-or Task ) LOO*ING AC* ! they ha!e to
? look back at the roles they played before+ and ero in on the most
important one for them.
? think of ho) it differs from the role they are playing no).
? plot )hat )ere the roles they played before+ )hat role they are playing
no) and )hat they hope to play in the future.
? specify ho) they feel about it and ho) they fare in performing it.
? look back at the ideas they listed in $ll 'or The "ET phase. -ind
out )hich of them they0ll change or add to the ones in the chart.
? share and compare your ideas )ith a partner.
? report back to the class.
6i!e feedback.
.ake them do Task + FOC,S -,ESTIONS )here they )ill gi!e tentati!e
answes to the r the FOCUS (BIG ) Questions:


.hat roles can I /er0orm that 1ill make a di00erence
in m2 li0e&
.h2 is it im/ortant to reco3ni4e m2 roles in li0e&
5o1 can I /er0orm m2 roles in li0e e00ecti6el2&
? Remind them about these "uestions as they )ork on the phases of this
lesson. 7llo) them to set+ )rite and share their e*pectations on this
lesson. %ell them that they can add 5 ans)er the "uestions and consider
ho) the tasks )ill not only help them understand the language and
literary concepts+ but also help them shape their li!es.


-or YOUR TE(T phase+ tell them that
This phase will crystallize their knowle!e an unerstanin! o" their tar!et
concepts an skills throu!h eeper e#ploration o" the poe$ in "ocus%
&ou'tlessly( ytheoknow that appreciatin! a poe$ is like appreciatin! a
picture( photo( illustration or rawin!%
/a!e them do the Task 7 Ten minutes IMAGE Talk8 Emphasie to them
that


)lthou!h it is ne*er state( they as reaers+ *iewers can in"er thou!hts(
"eelin!s an intention 'ase on the etails o" in"or$ation presente
in the photo + picture or rawin!% & They can "ocus on the lines( an!les( colors(
e*en shapes o" the o',ects+ i$a!es presente an relate the$ to real li"e
e#periences "or the$ to unerstan its $essa!e+ $eanin!%


.ake them do the follo)ing(
? 1air up+ and look closely at the dra)ing of a teen;ager is looking
intently at the giant incoming ship full of people )earing different
costumes< these smiling people are )a!ing to the teen;ager as if
they0re beckoning him5her to ,oin them
? %alk about 5 discuss )hat it communicates to you.
? Use the follo)ing guide "uestions.
.
? 2hat do you think the dra)ing )ants5 intends you to belie!e3
? =oes it suggest5 ans)er the "uestion ( .hat roles can I
/er0orm that 1ill make a di00erence in m2 li0e&
? /o) closely do you think5 belie!e do the dra)ing match your
mental image of recogniing and performing roles in life 3
1ro!e your point.
? 2hat details of the dra)ing tell you about recogniing and
performing roles in life 3
? /o) )ell+ do you think5 belie!e the dra)ings5 illustrations fit the
!alue of recogniing and performing roles in life 3
? /o) does the picture make you feel about recogniing and
performing roles in life 3
? 7fter >? minutes+ con!ene and share your responses.
? -ind common grounds about your ideas.
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.

In!ite them to do Task 9 For SIGNIFICANT 5,MAN E:#ERIENCES8
7sk them to mull on the follo)ing points.
-eain! a poe$ pa*es the way to $akin! $eanin! in li"e & It allows
you to share certain e#periences% O"tenti$es( you "in you share
so$ethin! in co$$on to that e#perience that $akes the poe$ $eanin!"ul%
This is when you think 'ack an recall a ti$e when you ha*e $uch in
co$$on with the sa$e e#perience than what you ori!inally thou!ht% The
poe$ speaks to you as you e#plore hu$an conition%
.oti!ate them to find out ho) the poem @ The E)EN $GE O' M$N A
from the comedy @ $ YOU L#%E #T A by 2illiam 'hakespeare pro!ides
cherished pieces of information about human condition. .ake them listen
to you read the poem and do the follo)ing
? 7s you listen to your teacher reads the poem+ read it silently and )atch
out for )ords )hich are difficult for you to understand. List them in
your !ocabulary notebook and ha!e them as entries in your )ord
bank.



T*E E)EN $GE O' M$N
("ro$: .)S /OU 0I12 IT3 ) 'y: 4illia$ Shakespeare


7ll the )orld0s a stage+
7nd all the men and )omen are merely players<
%hey ha!e their e*its and entrances+
7nd one man in his time plays many parts
5
/is acts being se!en ages. 7t first the infant+ .e)ling and
puking in the nurse0s arms< 7nd then the )hining school boy+
)ith his satchel 7nd shining morning face+ creeping like snail
Un)illingly to school. 7nd then the lo!er+
>?
'ighing like furnace+ )ith a )oeful ballad .ade to his
mistress0 eyebro). %hen a soldier -ull of strange oaths+ and
bearded like a pard+ Jealous in honor+ sudden and "uick in
"uarrel+ 'eeking the bubble reputation
>B
E!en in the cannon0s mouth. 7nd then the
,ustice+
In fair round belly )ith good caper lined+
2ith eyes se!ere and beard of formal cut+
-ull of )hite sa)s and modern instances<
7nd so he plays his part. %he si*th age shifts
C?
Into the lean and +slippered pantaloons+
2ith spectacles on nose and pouch on side<
/is youthful hose )ell sa!ed+ a )orld too )ide
-or his shrunk shank< and his big manly
!oice+ %urning again to)ard childish treble+
pipes
CB
7nd )histles in his sound. Last scene of all+ %hat ends this
strange e!entful history+
Is second childishness and mere obli!ion+ 'ans teeth+ sans eyes+
sans taste+ sans e!erything.



.ake them read the part that states(
Consiera'ly( you are aware that poetry is a personal type o" writin!
where wors "low an carry you alon! the real$s o" 'eauti"ul thou!ht
4hat really contri'ute to the poe$5s $eanin!6 &ou'tlessly( you know that
the orchestration o" souns( story( sense an "or$ 'rin!s a'out . li"e3 in a
poe$ you rea% That a'solutely ri*es you to ."eel3 li"e in it%
So$e poe$s are "ull o" wors that are "un to say alou% /ou can e#press
the $eanin! o" the wors 'y reain! the$ alou an you can use your
*oice to e#press their $eanin!%
7sk them to form small groups of fi!e+ and read the poem ( ;The
E)EN $GE O' M$N A from the comedy @ $ YOU L#%E #T A by
2illiam 'hakespeare aloud. %hen+ do the follo)ing
? =ecide )ho )ill be the first+ second+ third+ fourth and fifth readers.
? %ry to make the meaning of the )ords come ali!e through using
good e*pressions.
? Remember to produce the correct critical consonant sounds in )ords
like( in 5s5 ; s+ + sh+ or h.
e.g sooth ; 5s5 oo ; 55 shoe;5sh5 sure 5h5
? 2atch out for )ords in the poem that ha!e the same sounds%
? %hink back also on the importance of using appropriate stress to
)ords you0ll read to con!ey meaning.
e.g. S2*en 1L7Yers .E2lin! IN"ant(
17Ntaloons


a6E' s1E$tacles o'0I*ion
? Remember that the parts in capital letters recei!e the primary stress 5 +
5. 'tress the )ords properly.
? Read the poem aloud again. Use appropriate stress and produce
the correct sounds of the letters that make up the )ords.
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.
-or Tas, 1- G./ 0 mall Grou1 .i22erentiated /or,s34 instruct them to
form eight 9D: small groups+ and perform your assigned tasks.
'or Grou1 1 Loo,in5 2or Rhymes4 emphasie that
rhy$e is part o" what we $ean when we say poetry is $usical% 4hen
the enin! souns o" wors are repeate( we call it as rhy$e% -hy$in!
wors o not appear only at the en o" the lines ( en rhy$e) in poe$s(
'ut they $ay appear within the line ( internal rhy$e)%
e%!% . I think that I shall ne!er see
7 poem as lo!ely as a tree. 6 7 see8tree9888 end rhyme
the cro:s in
bou5hs thro:s endless bra:lsA ;; internal
rhyme
So$e poe$s rhy$e7 others on5t% But one thin! is sure( each poe$
captures $o$ents in ti$e ( "eelin!( thou!hts an e#periences%
Thou!h this poe$ is a sa$ple o" LAN* %ERSE ( poetry with an
unrhy$e ia$'ic penta$eter lines) that was wiely use 'y
Shakespeare( it contains internal rhy$e%
/a!e them do the follo)ing(
? Read the poem once more and spot for )ords that rhyme.
? .ake a list of these rhyming )ords+ and determine )hich are
e*amples of internal rhyme and end rhyme.
? $opy and fill out the table )ith appropriate entries.
? .'hare their findings )ith the other groups.
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.



For Grou/ 2 The est CL,E! tell them that the poet uses )ords
that suggest sounds at the same time describe actions being made.
ONOM$TO;OE#$ is a sound de!ice use by poets to suggest actions+
mo!ements and meanings.
e%!% The hissin3 o0 the snake $ae $e shoo it away%
The <u<<lin3 <rook 'reaks
In!ite the learners to read the poem aloud once more+ and )atch out for
)ords that suggest sounds of mo!ements+ actions and meaning. %hen+
? find e*amples of onomatopoeia in the poem .
? picture each )ord in your mind+ and try to bring each image in clear
focus.
? use the follo)ing "uestions to guide you.
? 2hat does it look like3
? 2hat kind of sounds does it make3
? /o) does it mo!e3
? list them in the table.
? .'hare your findings )ith the other groups.
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.

For Grou/ " A 2 = C > ALLITERATION! ASSONANCE
and CONSONANCE?!
Emphasie to them that another interestin! "eatures o" a poe$ that $akes it
$usical is the presence o" soun e*ices like alliteration( assonance an
consonance%
ALLITERATION is the repetition o" consonant souns at the
'e!innin! o"
the wors like: dou'tin!( drearin! drea$s no $ortal
enter dare to drea$ 'e"ore%
888 2!ar )llan 9oe( "ro$ .The -a*en3
while ASSONANCE calls "or the repetition o" *owel souns within
wors7
e.g. alon! the winow sill( the lipstick sta's
!littere in their steel shells. E -ita &o*e( "ro$ .)olescence
III3
CONSONANCE is the repetition o" consonant souns within an at the
ens
o" the wors%
e%!% So$e late *isitor entreatin! entrance at
$y cha$'er oor 888 2%)% 9oe( "ro$ .The -a*en3
/a!e them do the follo)ing(
? Read the poem again+ and look out for )ords or lines that sound
like they are e*amples of alliteration+ assonance and consonance.
? List all of them + and chart them on the space pro!ided belo).
? 'hare your findings )ith the other groups.
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.


For Grou/ $ IMAGERIES! reiterate to them that through the )ords used
by the poet+ as e*pressed by the @ personaA 5 speaker + the !i!id images+ clear
sounds+ e*act feelings are clearly con!eyed . %he descriptions help in making
sense of the poem. .ake them do the follo)ing(
? Read the poem silently+ and think of the images the )ords
created in your mind.
? 1icture them in your mind+ and try to bring them in clear focus.
? List these )ords that create clear pictures in your mind.
? 'hare the feeling each image e!okes.
? 1oint out the real life e*perience or obser!ation in life that
each image suggests.
? $opy the chart sho)n belo)+ and fill it out )ith entries called for.
? 'hare your findings )ith the other groups.
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.
'or Grou1 < /OR. "an,4 tell them that one )ay to enlarge your
!ocabulary is to build /ord "an,. 7 /ord "an, is a collection of )ords that
you can use for special purpose5 appreciate for a gi!en situation. %hen+ make
them
? read the poem silently+ and look out for )ords in the poem that fits
each description belo).
1. 7 lyric poem
that tells a story. 444444444444
2. 7 fat
chicken 444444444444
3. crying
444444444444
4. promises or
pledges to accomplish 444444444444
5. display
unconsciousness or nothingness 444444444444
6. thro)ing up
or !omiting due to sickness 444444444444
7. a school bag
444444444444
8. refers to
stem or branch 444444444444
9.
produce high sharp sound 444444444444
10. unhappy or
sorro)ful sound 444444444444


? check if these )ords they ha!e unlocked are also found in in their list
of loaded5 hea!y )ords they made earlier.
? add those )ords )hich are unlocked in their 2ord #ank.
? copy the $hart and fill it out )ith their loaded 5 hea!y5difficult )ords
and their meanings.
? share their findings )ith the other groups.
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.
'or Grou1 = > ? Meanin52ul Encounter4 remind them that a poem is a
meaningful musical e*pression of significant human e*periences )here
po)erful )ords are used to signify the beauty and grandeur of life. %hese
po)erful )ords gi!e hue to important messages. /a!e them do the follo)ing(
? Read the poem silently to find its meaning.
? Reflect on and discuss the ans)er to each of the follo)ing "uestions.
2or Grou1 =
1. 2hat comprise the se!en ages of man or stages in life of man
according to the poem3
2. 2hat describe the school boy attitude to)ard school3 /o) do
you feel about these pictures of childhood3
3. 2hat is compared to theA stageA in the first t)o lines3 /o) are
the t)o related3
4. In Line >F G >H+ )hat is compared to @ reputation03
5. 2hat other comparison are used in the poem3 2hich are
e*amples of metaphor3 2hich are e*amples of simile3
6. 7ccording to the speaker or @personaA in the poem+ )hat
physical and mental changes take place as a man reaches the
si*th and se!en ages3
7. =o you agree )ith the persona0s description of old age3 2hy3
8. 2hat other acceptable descriptions of old age can you think
of3
9. In the last line of the poem+ the )ord '7N' is repeated. 2hat
do you think is the purpose of repeating it four times3
10. Re/etition is a central part o" poetry that as to the
en,oy$ent o" a poe$% 4ors( phrases or lines are repeate to
ser*e a purpose% 9oets o"ten $ake sure their wors stay in the
reaer5s $in%
=oes it help in the understanding of this poem0s meaning3
-ind other e*amples of RE;ET#T#ON in the poem. List them.
11. 2hat effect does it gi!e in the description of the last
stage of
man3
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.
'or Grou1 ?
12. /o) are the se!en ages of man described by the persona3
>F./o) do the roles of man differ based on the persona0s
description3
14. =o you think the persona has a great understanding of the
uni!ersal e*perience of man performing a role in each
stage3 E*plain.
15. 2hich lines describe the roles in life that man performs3
16. Under )hat circumstances it may be better to be young rather
than be old+ or !ice !ersa+ in performing roles in life3
17. /o) does the poem make you feel about the importance of
recogniing and performing a role in life effecti!ely3
18. 2hy is it acceptable5 better to recognie and perform your role
in life3
19. /o) does the poem make you think of the importance of
recogniing and performing a role in life effecti!ely3
20. 2hat are the ad!antages and disad!antages of not recogniing
and performing your roles in life3
21. 2hat )ould be the most effecti!e )ay of performing your role
in life3
? 'hare your responses )ith the other groups.
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.
For Group 8 Connect to Life
? 7ns)er the follo)ing guide "uestions
? 2hich part makes 5 dri!es you to think of someone5 something
in real life3
? 2hat kind of in life is con!eyed in the poem3
? 2hat line5s gi!e hint suggestion on ho) one can be effecti!e
in performing one0s role3
? Is the message of the poem )orth)hile3 1ro!e your point.
? /o) important is the poem0s message in your life3
? 'hare your responses )ith the other groups.
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.
In!ite them to do Task @@8 On ,sin3 EA/ressions A//ro/riate to
Situations
A. )here they )ill
? read the poem once more to ans)er this "uestion.
? =o you agree )ith the persona0s description of the last age of
man in the last t)o lines of the poem3 2hy3
? =o you agree )hen he says that the last stage is @second
childhood )ithout e!erythingA 3 1ro!e your point.
-e$e$'er that there are $any ways you can e#press a!ree$ent or
isa!ree$ent% There are special wors+ e#pressions that clearly inicate the
intention an their appropriateness to the situation% These wors +
e#pressions can 'e "or$al or in"or$al 'ut the situation ictates their speci"ic
"unctions%
e%!% Consier your possi'le responses to the a"ore$entione !uie
:uestions%
O0 course! I a3ree with the persona5s escription o" the last a!e o"
$an%
No( seriously( I 'elie*e otherwise%
? 2hich )ords e*press agreement3 =isagreement3
? $an you gi!e other e*amples of agreement 3 disagreement3
? read these sample mini dialogs aloud+ and spot the presence of
)ords5 e*pressions indicating agreement or disagreement.
1. 7ngelo( You0re the only person )ho kno)s )hat really
happened. .alee( %hat0s not "uite true+ 'am )as there too.
2. .ay( /ey+ that0s right. I remember he sol!ed the problem for
us. Joe( %hat0s good to kno). 2e00ll gi!e him a call.
3. Erick( 2e can play the game no).
7ndrei( Okay+ but I0m not good at it.
4. #am( %hat0s )hat they sayI
Rom( No+ seriously. I ha!en0t played !ery )ell at all.
5. $onnie( =o come. $an you stay for lunch3
&angie( I0m afraid not. )e ha!e to go some)here .
6. Rina( #ut you ha!e time for coffee+ don0t you3
%ess( %hat )ould be nice.
7. .ilette( %here0s something I ha!e to tell you
.ila ( $an0t it )ait3
.ilette( Not really. It0s pretty important.
8. Lucille( 'hould I forget it
all3 7nnie( No+ ,ust listen carefully.
9. 'onny( Okay+ I guess I0m
ready. Leif( 6ood. No)+
concentrate.


For 8 #OSITI%E ROLES! they )ill
? e read the poem @%he 'e!en 7ges of .anA and pair up.
? find lines that suggest man has to perform roles in life.
? specify )hich lines clearly point out positi!e sign of performing roles
in life.
talk about )hich of them they agree or disagree. E*plain.
? use )ords5 e*pressions indicating their purpose.
? share their ideas )ith the class.

1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.
For Task @2 On ,sin3 Ca/itali4ation and #unctuation Mark! clarify
that
4hen they rea poe$s( they on5t pause or stop at the en o" the lines( 'ut
you watch out "or co$$a or perio to !uie the$% They use punctuation
$arks to help you "in sensi'le $eanin! o" what theyre reain!% Clarity o"
e#pressions in poetry or prose co$position e#ists i" the sentences are
appropriately punctuate an the wors are properly capitalize%
-or Connect do the follo)ingB
? $onsider this sample informati!e article about punctuation.








? =iscuss your ans)er to the follo)ing "uestions.
? 2hat ha!e you obser!ed as unusual in the informati!e article3
? 2hat is it all about3
? 2hat punctuation marks are described in the article3
? 2hat problems in )riting and reading are caused by improper
use of capitaliation and punctuation marks3
? 7re these problems applicable e!en in today0s )orld3
? /o) do )e sol!e such problems3

1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.

-or Sensi<le Role #lan! they ha!e to do the follo)ing(
? Imagine yourself t)o to four years from no). 2hat kind of
career5 role do you think you might ha!e3 2ill computer or ne)
in!entions be part of your ,ob3
? Research for facts about it.
? 2rite a short informati!e composition highlighting your role and
the in!ention you )ill use as part of your ,ob.
? Remember to obser!e correct capitaliation and to use correct
punctuations.
? 'hare your informati!e composition )ith the class.


1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.

I$press upon the learners that since they ha*e se*eral i$pressi*e ieas on
reco!nizin! an per"or$in! roles in li"e( they ha*e to keep in $in that it can
inspire the$ to practice ha'its o" oin! thin!s well% They can always consier
it as a special !i"t "or the$ to pro*e their worth as a uni:ue hu$an 'ein!%
O'*iously( they are now reay to pro*e their unerstanin! o" how this
*alue concepts can 'e realize throu!h !ettin! in*ol*e in real 8 li"e tasks%


For 'O,R CISCO%ER' TAS*S ! the learners )ill do tas, 1 @
#N)OL)EMENT&
/ere+ they )ill do the follo)ing(
? -orm small groups of si*+ and discuss the ans)er to the "uestionA
/hat can # do to 1er2orm my role e22ecti!elyB
? List the )ays in )hich you ha!e already contributed+ are contributing+
and predict the )ays in )hich you0ll contribute to the )orld in the
future.
? $opy the chart+ and fill it out )ith entries called for.
? 'hare your ideas )ith your classmates.
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.
For Task @" Gi6e me Ei3ht+ they )ill


-orm ei5ht 0C 3 small 5rou1s+ and choose one from the follo)ing tasks
to )ork on.
'or Grou1 1 Yes4 its im1le Dut its Too Good To Miss4 they )ill
? -orm a tableau.
? 1osition your body to form a tableau that depicts a scene
from the poem.
? -ind out if the other groups can identify the scene and
each person0s part in it.
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.
For Grou/ 2 Fan Letter to a Role Model! they must remember
that
they look up to your parents+ grandparents+ teachers+ relati!es or
friends because you find them inspire you to perform roles in life
effecti!ely. %hey regard them as good role models )ho help you
along the )ay. %hey )ill
? choose an inspirational person+ and )rite a fan letter to him5her.
? include a re"uest for some meaningful ob,ect or symbol and
for some tips for their success.
? e*plain in your letter )hy you admire this person and )hy
you consider him5her as your role model.
? mention also ho) he5she helps you and )hy you )ant
the ob,ect.
? read your letter to your classmates.


1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.
-or Grou/ " #ERSONAL 5EROES! emphasie to them that )e all
ha!e personal heroes or idols; people )ho represent e!erything )e0d like to
be. %hey can be people )hom )e kno) like a classmate+ player+ coach+
mo!ie star+ musician+ singer+ politician+ reporter+ media man+ leader etc.
.ake them
? brainstorm and make a list of people )hom they admire
because they ser!e as positi!e influences on your
generartion.
? choose the famous or popular ones.
? list ob,ects you associate )ith each person.
? act out silently; pantomime; a famous role model and ask
other groups to guess )ho he5she is.
? use one or t)o ob,ects you can associate )ith each role
model.
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.
? 'or Grou1 E 8 Leadin5 Li5ht4 tell them that others say that some
people are born )inners. %hey perform )ell in any role they ha!e.
%hey shine in school academics+ contests+ e*tra;curricular acti!ities
and e!en in sports. In real;)orld tasks+ they do )ell. .aybe they
aren0t born )inners after all but they0!e learned ho) to become
)inners& .hat could <e the secrets o0 success in /er0ormin3
their roles& Tell them to do the follo)ing(
? $hoose your most remembered poet5 persona in your fa!orite poem
and use him5her as your role model in life.
? %hink about5 )rite about his5her outstanding trait5 "uality5 attitude that
is )orthy to follo)5 praise.
Remember to e*plain the secrets of his5 her success in performing his5her
role.'hare your thoughts )ith the class.
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.
'or Grou1 < 8 ;oetic Music )ideo4 they )ill
? choose a song 9 rap+ pop+ rock+ ethnic+ classical+ country+ religious+
etc.: that e*presses ho) one !alue one0s role in life.
? match it to your fa!ourite poem.
? If possible+ try )riting5adding ne) )ords 9 e*pressing your ideas on
ho) : to go )ith the music .
? use the song as the musical background
? .assemble illustrations+ props to accompany your recording.
? If possible+ !ideotape your presentation.
? try singing it to class.


1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.


For Grou/ + Cance Cuo! the2 1ill do the 0ollo1in3B
? Recall as many songs as you can about the importance of playing
roles in life.
? $hoose some music that you think con!eys the feeling and
the meaning of or the one that represents the poem+ A %he 'e!en
7ges of .anA .
? 'ing it and use appropriate mo!ement that suggest the meaning
of the poem.
? Interpret your chosen lines from the poem through dance steps5
mo!ements..
? Rehearse a performance of the poem and dance.
? 1resent it to class.
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.


For Grou/ D Roles and Concerns! they )ill do the follo)ing(
? 2ith your groupmates+ discuss ho) you0ll s"uarely come up )ith
any of the follo)ing.
? 2hat recent )orld issues5 problems can be sol!ed if people
)ill recognie and perform their roles effecti!ely3
? /o) )ill our li!es be different similar to people )ho ha!e been
successful3
? =iscuss ma,or change in your life.
? Use the follo)ing guide "uestions.
? 2hat )as difficult in playing that role3
? /o) did the situation impro!e3
? /o) can you handle the role successfully3
? Remember to share your responses5 ideas )ith other groups.
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback..
'or Grou1 C *i5h F Lo: ;oints4 tell them that the roles they per"or$ in li"e
ri*es the$ to e#perience hi!h points an low points& $s, them these
Guestions&
? 2hat are these high points and lo) points you e*perience3 E*plain.
.ake them sure they0ll share these points they e*perience as they
perform their role in their past and present life.
1ost these high and lo) points in your -# or %)itter 2all or send it to
your friends through e mail.
In!ite them to gi!e comments+ suggestions+ or reaction.
1rocess the learners0 responses and gi!e feedback.


7ckno)ledge them as they0re doing greatI 7sk them ho) they feel about it+
and if they )ant to add more proofs of their understanding on the target
concepts and to hone their communication skills


-or YOUR -IN7L %7'8 phase+ point out to them that as e!idence of their
understanding and learning the target concepts and enhancing the target
skills+ they ha!e to try your hand on their ma,or output for this lesson+ and
that is+ Community er!ices "rochure and the criteria for assessment )ill
be( -ocus5 $ontent+ Organiation+ 'upports+ &isuals+ $larity and Language
.echanics. You )ill do this by groups. Ne*t+ they )ill do the follo)ing(


? -orm fi!e big groups+ and perform your assigned tasks.
;ere are so$e !ran ieas "or the preparation an presentation o" a
Community er!ices "rochure % 0ook the$ o*er 'e"ore you plun!e into it%
1eep these points in $in as you !o throu!h the process%
/ou pro'a'ly know o" clu's( or!anizations( centers or e*en key
persons o""erin! ser*ices in your 'aran!ay + co$$unity% Consier the$ as
ones who per"or$e e#traorinary roles in li"e%
? 'cout for and present sample brochures.
? #ear in mind that a Drochure like a letter+ report+ speech+ re!ie)+
instruction pamphlet and any other form of informati!e )riting
presents factual information and details.
? =iscuss the ans)er to the follo)ing "uestions.
? 2hat is the brochure all about3
? 2hat do you think is the purpose of this brochure3
? 2ho do you think are the target audience of this brochure3
? 2hat are the information or basic features contained in the
brochure3
? 7re the information based on facts3
? /o) are the basic information presented in the brochure3
? 2hich of the follo)ing methods 9description+ enumeration+
comparison5contrast or e*emplification: used in the presentation
of the information3
? 2hat is the basic structure of a brochure3
? 2hat makes the brochure interesting3
? 2hat )ords capture your attention3
? 2hat help5 support5ad!antages does the brochure offers3

#lannin3 Sta3e
? $onduct a meeting and plan for the preparation of the brochure
)here the follo)ing points should be co!ered.
? 7ssigning specific role to each member. e.g. a leader+
researcher5s+ illustrator+ compiler5s+ lay out artist5s+
)riter5s+ inter!ie)er+ editor+ concept artist+ presenter
? $larifying the functions of each member%
? $larifying the main re"uirements for the brochure are the
topic+ purpose and audience
? Identifying the topic for the brochure.
? $larify the purpose of the brochure. 7ns)er these
"uestions( 2hy are )e )riting5composing this brochure3 2ho
)ill be interested in reading it3 2ho need it3
? Identifying the key persons5 clubs5 organiations+ centers
and the ser!ices they )ill highlight in the brochure.
Gatherin3 In0ormation
? -ind out the key persons+ clubs+ centers+ organiations in the
barangay that offer ser!ices that make a difference.
? 1repare "uestions and put them in logical order
? $all or !isit and inter!ie) at least three 9F: people )hom you
consider successful in performing their roles to learn more about their
ser!ices.
? .ake a list of their accomplishments5 achie!ements and
specialiation.
? -ind out )hat they consider important to their success.
? $ollect photos+ dra)ings+ illustrations or !ideos 9 if possible:sho)ing
ordinary people making a difference by performing their roles in life )illingly
and graciously.


Cra0tin3%
? $onsolidate the information you gather+ and choose the ones you )ill
use in your brochure.
? Use fe)+ simple+ short+ catchy but meaningful sentences.
? %hink of the order you )ill use to organie the factual information.
? E*plain the significance of the ser!ices to the target readers.
? Report orally and in )ritten form the ser!ices each offers plus the
needs.
? Use photos and charts in the presentation.
/ritin5 and ;resentin5
? 7sk other schoolmates to read and e!aluate your brochure.
? 7sk for comments and suggestions.
? Look o!er the first draft+ and re)rite it .
? 1olish your draft incorporating the suggestions made by your
e!aluators&
? =o the finishing touches and present your Community er!ices
"rochure&
1rocess the learners0 output+ and gi!e feedback.
9oint out the help+ support+ 'ene"its + specialization + ser*ices the
or!anization( clu'( or key persons o""er+ are $ae a*aila'le%
$onsider and be guided by the follo)ing criteria (
? -ocus5 $ontent
? Organiation
? 'upports
? &isuals
? $larity
? Language .echanics.
$heck their progress.


-or YOUR TRE$URE phase+ clarify to them that they0!e acti!ely
engaged in !arious tasks that helped them impro!e their understanding of
the target concepts+ at the same time+ de!elop their language
communication and literary skills.
%heir $ommunity 'er!ices #rochure informing the public on the
ser!ices a!ailable in your community ser!es as a ma,or proof5 e!idence of
their understanding of concepts and skills.
%o further pro!e their successful and e*citing learning e*periences and that
they ob!iously en,oy learning+ it is ,ust but fitting they think back and focus on
the follo)ing essential points.


2hich task5 acti!ity ha!e you
en,oyed3
4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
found helpfu
444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
)ould like to )ork further on 3
444444444444444444444444444444444
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
_
8eep a record of all of these and add your ans)ers to the follo)ing "uestions.


1. 2hat ne) and special )ay about recogniing your roles in life ha!e
you learned 3
2. 2hat approach to5 attitude in life do you think can help you chart your
course in life3
3. /o) )ill it help you to become a better person3
4. 2hat is it you found most difficult in this lesson3
5. 2hat )ill you do to do a)ay )ith these difficulties3
6. 2rite at least F possible )ays5 steps you can adopt for you to get
a)ay )ith them.
7. 2hat do you hope to strengthen in the ne*t lesson5s3
? $omplete the e!aluation chart sho)n in their Learning .aterials.
Teachers Guide
Module 1
Lesson @
___________________________________________________________________
MA:IMIZING M' STRENGT5
B. Resources
1. .aterials
a. $= recording of listening inputs.
b. pictures5 photos of supernatural heroes
2. E"uipment
a. 7udio $= 1layer5 cellphone audio player
b. speakers
C. 7cti!ities
Your Journey
.Character can not 'e e*elope in ease an :uiet%
Only throu!h e#perience o" trial an su""erin!
can the soul 'e stren!thene(
a$'ition inspire an success achie*e%3
- ;ellen 1eller
-
.a*imiing means @making the best use ofA and this is )hat you must do )ith
your strength. %his happens )hen you focus on the areas you are most skilled+
talented and strong )hile a!oiding your )eakness.
%his )eek0s lesson )ill unfold one0s greatness and heroic acts )hich )ill lead
you to disco!er your hidden potentials and de!elop skills for the realiation of
the )orld0s ultimate goal ;;; positi!e transformation.
Your Goals
? 'hare thoughts+ feelings+ and intentions in the material !ie)ed.
? Restate the ideas con!eyed by the te*t listened to.
? E*plain ho) )ords are deri!ed from names of persons and
places.
? E*plain ho) the )ords used in the poem )ork together and
contribute to the theme of the selection.
? 7nalye ho) literature helps in disco!ering oneself.
? %ake note of se"uence signals or connectors to establish the
patterns of idea de!elopment in a te*t
? Use appropriate punctuation marks+ capitaliation+ and
inter,ections in )riting descripti!e paragraphs.
? Use appropriate stress+ intonation+ pitch+ pronunciation+ and
gestures in deli!ering a poem.
? $on!ey a message to an idolied hero through a rap. Your
Initial %asks
/I% the /IN%' 9C? minutes:
'ee %ask > @Your Initial %asksA
a. 'ho) the pictures of supernatural heroes
b. Let the students infer about the strengths or po)ers of each
hero.
c. 1rocess the ans)ers5 output of the students.
'7Y that 767IN 9F? minutes:
'ee %ask C @Your Initial %asksA
a. Let the students )rite three lines from the listening te*t that they
like the most.
b. /a!e them restate the lines using their o)n )ords and
sentences.
c. %ell them to read their )ork in front of the class.
d. 7fter processing the abo!e task+ discuss the tips in
paraphrasing.
Listening %e*t( /ero

2riter9s:(7-7N7'IE--+ 27L%ER 5 $7REY+ .7RI7/
7rtist( .ariah $arey Lyrics
1opularity( B>DBJ users ha!e !isited this page.
7lbum( %rack C on .usic #o*
/ereKs a hero
If you look inside your heart
You donKt ha!e to be afraid
Of )hat you are
%hereKs an ans)er
If you reach into your soul
7nd the sorro) that you kno)
2ill melt a)ay
L$horusM
7nd then a hero comes along
2ith the strength to carry on
7nd you cast your fears aside
7nd you kno) you can sur!i!e
'o )hen you feel like hope is gone
Look inside you and be strong
7nd youKll finally see the truth
%hat a hero lies in you
ItKs a long+ road
2hen you face the )orld alone
No one reaches out a hand
-or you to hold
You can find lo!e
If you search )ithin yourself
7nd the emptiness you felt
2ill disappear

L$horusM
Lord kno)s
=reams are hard to follo)
#ut donKt let anyone
%ear them a)ay
/old on
%here )ill be tomorro)
In time youKll find the )ay

7nd then a hero comes along
2ith the strength to carry on
7nd you cast your fears aside
7nd you kno) you can sur!i!e
'o )hen you feel like hope is gone
Look inside you and be strong
7nd youKll finally see the truth
%hat a hero lies in you
%hat a hero lies in you
%hat a hero lies in you
http(55))).lyrics??J.com5.ariahNC?$areyNC?Lyrics5/eroNC?
Lyrics.html
Your %e*t
7%%7$8 those 2OR=' 9>? minutes:; =ay >
'ee %ask F @Your %e*tA
a. Instruct the students to classify the compound )ords based on
their deri!ation indicated on the table.
b. 1rocess the ans)ers. You may ask the follo)ing "uestions(
1. 2hat is your basis in classifying the )ords according to
their category3
2. 2hat is the modern e"ui!alent meaning of each )ord3
Let the students read the poem aloud obser!ing appropriate
intonation+ stress+
and pronunciation.
Your =isco!ery %asks
'7Y YE' or NO 9F? minutes:
'ee %ask HAYour %e*tA
a. %ell the students to say yes if the statement is congruent to
the poem read and no if it is not.
b. Let them cite lines from the poem to test if their
interpretation is correct.
c. /a!e them e*plain their ans)er to lead them to the
understanding of the theme and message of the poem.
Illustrate the $reations 9>? minutes:; =ay C
'ee %ask B of @Your %e*tA
a. Instruct the students to describe the entities mentioned based
on the poem read.
b. $all some !olunteers to discuss their ans)ers.
c. 'tress the challenges faced by the people in a certain place+
their rights and responsibilities that entail a person or citien in order
to ha!e peaceful life.
$O.17RE and $ON%R7'% 9=yads: 9 >? minutes:
'ee %ask O of @Your %e*tA
a. %ell the students to use the &enn diagram in comparing
and contrasting #eo)ulf and 6rendel.
b. Lead them in realiing that sometimes )ealth cannot be a
solution to a problem. 7ssociate this to /rothgar0s status.
c. Emphasie the importance of personal strengths in
order to o!ercome one0s problems.
d. 7sk ho) the poem helps them in disco!ering their inner
strengths+ potentials+ and capabilities as an indi!idual.
IN%O %/E /EROP
'ee task JAYour %e*tA
a. %ell the students to ans)er the "uestions pertaining to the te*t.
b. 1rocess the ans)ers.


E1I$ &'. LYRI$
'ee task DAYour %e*tA
a. /a!e the students take note of the similarities and differences of the t)o
poetry.
b. Let them ans)er the "uestions about the t)o poetry.


YOUR .#CO)ERY T$%
'1O% %/E 'I6N7L' 7N= 1UN$%U7%ION .7R8'
'ee task QAYour =isco!ery %asksA


a. Instruct the class to scan once again the poem @#eo)ulfA and list do)n
se"uence signals they could spot.
b. /a!e them illustrate ho) these )ords are used in the selection by filling
out the grid.
c. Remind them about the use of se"uence markers.


'e"uence markers can signal ho) to interpret the relationship bet)een
sentences in a number of different )ays. -or e*ample(
1. %hey can indicate chronological order+ or order of importance 9e.g. "irst %%%
seconly %%% thirly< to 'e!in with %%%% ne#t %%% to conclue:.
2. %hey can add to or reinforce )hat has already been said
9e.g. "urther$ore< in aition< what is $ore)%
3. %hey can indicate that t)o propositions ha!e e"ual status
( likewise< si$ilarly:.
4. %hey can indicate cause;result relationships 9e.g. conse:uently< so< as a
result:.
5. %hey can indicate that a gi!en proposition contradicts an earlier one
9e.g. con*ersely< on the contrary7'y way o" contrast:.
6. %hey can indicate concession 9e.g. ne*ertheless< in any case< "or all
that< all the sa$e:.
7. 'ometimes a distinction is made bet)een internal and e*ternal
se"uencers+ i.e. the use of these markers to indicate Rreal )orld0 e!ents
9e*ternal:+ or Rrhetorical organiation0 9internal:. -or e*ample+ First o" all %%%%
then %%%% "inally can indicate chronological se"uence 9e*ternal:+ or order of
importance 9internal:.


http(55))).arts.gla.ac.uk5'%ELL75LIL%5se"mark.htm


? =iscuss the se"uence signals before letting the students
ans)er task Q. 9>? minutes:
.7R8 %/E 1UN$%U7%ION'
'ee task >?0Your =isco!ery %asksA
a. /a!e the students read the stanas from #eo)ulf and then let
them take note
of the punctuation marks.
b. Instruct them to ans)er the "uestions about the punctuation marks.
c. 6i!e inputs as regards punctuation marks.

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Uses of $olon and 'emi E $olons( 9>? minutes:
1. Use a colon to introduce a list+ "uote or statement that you )ant to
dra) attention to in a complete sentence. E*ample( %his )eekend+ )e )ill
attend a !ariety of e!ents( a concert+ a fair+ a football game and church.
2. Use a colon to separate numbers in !arious instances+ such as time
9>C(F?(?> a.m.:+ a ratio 9C(>: or a scripture 9John F(>O:.
'ponsored Links
-ree n%rustS .aster$ardS
7pply in 'econds ; 1/1 .aster$ardS 'hop Online or in 'tores
))).n%rust.com
3. Use a colon to separate a title from a subtitle in a book+ lecture or other
body of )ork.
E*ample( T/ome( 7 No!el.T
4. Use a colon in memos or after a salutation in a formal5business letter.
E*ample( T%o 2hom It .ay $oncern(T and
T%O( John 7dams
-RO.( E!e .aybury =7%E(
June CQ+ C??D
'U#JE$%( JuneKs meetingT
5. Use a colon after a summariing )ord. E*ample( TE*ample( babiesT
and T7ns)er( chicken.T
6. Use a colon in dialogue )riting+ such as in a script.
E*ample( TJohn( I told you that I lo!ed you.T
'emicolon
7. Use a semicolon to separate t)o complete+ but related+ sentences.
E*ample( TI asked .ary to go to the game )ith me last )eek< she told me no.T

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8. Use a semicolon to separate t)o+ often
contradictory+ complete sentences )ith a con,uncti!e ad!erb like Tho)e!erT or
Ttherefore.T
E*ample( T'herry and I )ent to the mo!ies earlier today< ho)e!er+ )e missed the
film that )e )anted to see.T
9. Use a semicolon in a series+ usually )hen the series calls for multiple commas
that could confuse the reader. E*ample( %he county high schoolKs homecoming court
include 'andy .ay+ senior< %iffany #ills+ ,unior< Leslie .addo*+ sophomore< and Lisa
June+ freshman.
'ponsored Links
Read more( http(55))).eho).com5ho)4HOCB>DJ4use;colon;use;
semicolon.htmlUi*Cguh8,-/s




IN%RO=U$E %/E $/7R7$%ER'
'ee task >>A=isco!ery %asksA


3. /a!e the class )rite a speech balloon to introduce
#eo)ulf and 6rendel using the cartoon strips being pro!ided.
4. Let them use se"uence signals and punctuation marks.
5. Instruct them to suggest on ho) to effecti!ely speak and
deli!er their lines.
6. Let them read or deli!er the lines by obser!ing appropriate
stress+ intonation and ,uncture in reading @#eo)ulfA.
7. Remind them that each group )ill take turns reading
specific stanas from #eo)ulf.


%Y1E %/E %EV%
'ee task >CAYour =isco!ery %asksA
a. 7sk the students to identify the te*t type of the follo)ing articles
as to
,ournalistic+ informati!e+ or literary.
b. 7fter doing the task abo!e+ ask them )rite their ideas about the features
of a literary te*t and ho) each should be read.
#n2ormati!e teHtA 'er!es to inform< pro!ides or discloses information<
instructi!e< instructional
Journalistic teHtA radio+ print+ tele!ision+ and online ,ournalism that presents
information.
http(55uk.ask.com5"uestion5,ournalistic;te*t
Literary TeHtA Literary te*t is defined as a )ide !ariety of imaginati!e and
creati!e )riting that leads to the appreciation of the cultural
heritages of students. Literary is defined as something related
or associated )ith literature or scholarly learning and )riting.
http(55))).ask.com5"uestion5)hat;is;the;definition;of;a;literary;te*t


YOUR '#N$L T$% ;=7Y H
R71 a .E''76E for your /ERO 9'6=: 9B? minutes:
'ee @Your -inal %askA
a. .oti!ate the students in )riting meaningful sentences to
describe their hero.
b. 7llot sufficient time for them to con!ert the sentences into a rap.
c. Let them present it in class.
d. 1resent to them your rubrics in rating the output before the
group0s presentation.
e. 7ssign student obser!ers to comment on e!ery
group0s presentation.

YOUR TRE$URE
'/7RE your LI-E0' LE''ON 9Journal 2riting: 9D minutes:
a. Encourage the students to share their strengths and ho)
they intend to use them.
b. Let them take note of the acti!ities5lessons that they !alue the
most in the )eek0s meaningful encounter.
c. %ell them to )rite the reasons for !aluing a particular acti!ity
or lesson.


#ring Out the /ero in You 97ssignment: 9C minutes:
a. 6i!e this acti!ity in preparation to the ne*t lesson.
b. $ollect this and ha!e a fe) !olunteers to share their output.
7s a student+ a son5daughter+ or as a citien+ make a simple action plan
on ho) to sho) your small acts of heroism. -ollo) the format belo).
Teachers Guide
Module 1
Lesson I
______________________________________________________________
/EE% E4 JU$RTER 1
A. O!er!ie: o2 Content and ODKecti!es
Theme
Enhancing the
'elf through
$hanges and
$hallenges 9on
personal strength+
identity+ rising to
challenges+ and
other related
themes:
;rimary
election
%he =ay of
=estiny
uD8theme Lea!ing a Legacy
9focus on the self
concept of
memory< )hat do
you )ant to be
remembered for3:
;arallel
elections
UNE'$o
'ends
E*perts to
%ubbataha
Reefs
/o) to
.aintain
%he $ourage that
my .other /ad


B. $ssessment ;lan
1. ;re8assessment
2. ;ost Lassessment
C. Resources
1. Materials
a. handouts
b. pictures
2. EGui1ment
a. pro,ector 9for digital pictures:
D. $cti!ities
1. Your #nitial Tas,s
%ask >. 9 -ilm !ie)ing: %he /.O...E.
a. Let students )atch the !ideo
b. 1rior to the !ie)ing pose these "uestions( /o) )ould you
rise to the challenges presented3 2hat do you think moti!ate them to do this
!ideo3
c. 'et the goal of enhancing oneself through literature
9Note( If digital picture cannot be accessed through Yout %ubr+ you may use
the alternate acti!ity for !ie)ing:
%ask C. Lend .e an Ear
a. Instruct students to listen to !ery )ell to the !ideo5te*t for the second
time.
b. /a!e them take note of the ideas they ha!e seen5)atched in the !ideo
and encourage them to e*press )hether they agree or disagree )ith it.
%ask F. In a $apsule
a. /a!e the students summarie the contents of the !ideo )atched.
b. Instruct them to use the appropriate se"uence signals or
connectors
c. %he teacher must present some key points on the use of these
se"uence connectors 9e.g. first+ second+ finally+ lastlyP:

2. Your TeHt
%ask >. 2hat0s in a 2ord3
a. /a!e the students )rite the !ocabulary )ords on their notebook
and do as instructed.
b. 7sk them to use the )ords in sentences
c. %he teacher should relate the !ocabulary )ords to the
te*t5lesson for the day.
%ask C. 7 /ero in You
a. 1ose the moti!e "uestion+ @2hat does it take to be a great
man3A9Remember to ask it again and elicit the students responses after the
discussion of the te*t:.
b. .ake sure you ha!e assigned the reading selection ahead of time.
Encourage students to )rite at least fi!e "uestions they )ant to be ans)ered
during class discussion.
%ask F. %he .irage
a. /a!e the students accomplish the chart on sensory images
b. &alidate their responses by checking the acti!ity after)ards
c. 7sk students ho) important sensory images are in poetry )riting
%ask H. .ull O!er in 6roupsI
a. /a!e the students form F groups
b. Instruct them to reflect and ans)er at least C of the "uestions about the
te*t
c. 7sk them to present their responses before the class
d. Encourage students to ha!e their feedbacks after each
presentation
e. %o process the lesson thoroughly+ you as the teacher should also
pro!ide your feedbacks.

3. Your .isco!ery Tas,s
%ask >. 6roup 7cti!ity
a. 6roup students into three 9F:
b. 1ro!ide them )ith the handouts
c. 7llo) them to read the assigned article for >? minutes
%ask C. 1lotting them all
a. Instruct students to e*amine the three articles that they ha!e read.
b. 7sk them to accomplish the chart by )riting do)n ho) these articles
)ere )ritten gi!en the specified criteria.
%ask F. 2eigh UpI
a. Let students e*amine the different reading te*ts
b. /a!e them point out the distinguishing marks of each type then
identify )hat type of reading te*ts they are.
%ask H. #ite the =ashW
a. Introduce dash as one of the punctuation marks
b. 1resent the sentences to the students
c. E*tract from them the rule for each sample statement
d. 2rite on the board the students formulated statement
e. Elicit from the students its general function.
f. Instruct them to ans)er %ask B.
%ask O. %ype the /ype E
a. 6uide students on the samples of hyphenated )ords
b. 1ro!ide them )ith guide "uestions to formulate the rule for each
sample
c. Instruct them to ans)er %ask J.
%ask J.
a. Instruct the students to do as directed.
%ask D. .e;.etaphors5 One )ith the Others
a. 7sk students to share their insights on the article that they
ha!e read. Encourage students to )rite their !ie)s about the article.
%ask Q. .y Legacies
a. /a!e the students accomplish the three charts. 1ro!ide
clarifications if necessary.
b. 7sk them to )rite at least C to F sentence for each aspect.




4. Your 'inal Tas,s
%ask >. 'haring Other 1eople0s 1erspecti!es
a. 6uide the students to e*amine carefully the picture
b. Let them !oice out )hat they think about the picture
c. .oti!ate them to be in the place of each gi!en sector
d. Encourage students to )rite do)n their opinion about it.
e. 7complish all the sectors gi!en
f. Use the attached rubrics for the assessment
%ask C. &i!a &oceI
a. 7sk students to choose their fa!orite part in the te*t+ %he =ay of
=estiny.
b. %ell them that they )ill be e!aluated by the gi!en rubrics


5. My Treasures
a. 7sk students to )rite their reflections on(
a.> part of the lesson )hich enables me to learn
a.C realiation
a.F commitment
Teachers Guide
Module 1
Lesson E
___________________________________________________________________
CO#ING .IT5 C5ALLENGES


In!ite your students to read the YOUR JOURNEY part. .ake them
mull on )hat it says (


<or$ally you hear "ro$ people who care say( .&on5t 'e your own roa'lock to
success=3 This is the challen!e you nee to atten to a$ist i""iculties an
su""erin!s you $ay e#perience% This si$ply $eans you nee to 'e aware o"(
"ace( then re$o*e the set'acks( 'urens an i""iculties which are
upsettin! you at ti$es% Fear the$ is alri!ht 'ut you ha*e to "ace these "ears
an li*e 'y the$ coura!eously% They are parts o" the !a$es to $ake your li"e
'etter% It is always in your hans "or you to start $akin! the $ost out o" these
chan!es as trials + set'acks + roa'locks + challen!es%
Reiterate to them that this lesson is dra)n from the baseline( ho)
they0ll cope )ith challenges to enhance oneself and confirm that the poems
)ill not only be for the e*ploration of target concepts5 ideas+ but also for
en,oyment and for the help it gi!es them to understand self as )ell as the
people any)here+ anytime. 'tress to them that the enhancement of their
communication and literary skills are their main targets.


Remind them that the o!erriding and underlying concepts plus the tasks 5
acti!ities they0ll engaged in this lesson )ill surely lead 5 guide them to
ans)er the #I6 Xuestion( 5o1 do I co/e 1ith challen3es in li0e&
Lead them to focus their attention on the follo)ing ob,ecti!es for this lesson.
? make connection bet)een the present te*t and the
pre!iously read te*t.
( reading:
? assess the rele!ance and )orth of ideas presented in
the material !ie)ed. 9!ie)ing:
? dra) generaliations and conclusions from the material
listened to.
? listening:
? use synonyms of )ords to clarify meanings 9 !ocabulary:
? e*plain ho) the tone of the poem helps clarify its meaning
9 literary concept:
? use contractions proficiently 9 language use:
? make use of lyric poem0s feature in an 7d campaign. 9 )riting:
? use effecti!e )ays of beating5 coping )ith challenges to
enhance self
( !alues clarification:
? sho) appreciation for the significant human e*periences
highlighted and shared during the discussion 9 literature:


Remind them of the e*pected output ( an #n2o $d F $d!ocacy
Cam1ai5n on Usin5 ;ositi!e /ays To Co1e /ith Challen5es4 and the
criteria for assessment )ill be( focus5 content+ !isuals+ clarity of purpose+ and
language con!ention.


-or the YOUR #N#T#$L T$%4 guide them to do the T1isters task for
them to


? Inter!ie) three of their classmates as to the "uestions they ha!e
about coping )ith challenges and )rite at least three 9F: "uestions 9in
line )ith coping )ith challenges : they hope to ans)er later.


Questions I have about coping with





? /a!e them )ork )ith
their peers and reflect on this( .hat do 2ou
consider as 2our challen3es in li0e&
? .ake them list at least >? challenges they ha!e obser!ed5
e*perienced by students like them.
? Let them copy the chart as sho)n+ and fill it up )ith entries called for.
$/7LLEN6E' #EIN6 .E% #Y '%U=EN%'
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________



? Instruct them to rank them in their order of difficulty )here Rank > is
the most challenging and >? is the least challenging.
? .ake them decide )hat is the most effecti!e method of coping )ith
challenges and rank them in their order of effecti!eness. Rank > the
most effecti!e and >? as the least effecti!e.
? Instruct them to share
their findings )ith the class.
? 6i!e feedback.


? -or the Constant Recall part4 stress to them the challenge they need
to face )hich is ho) to unfold and sho) appreciation for the meaning of a
poem.


? .ake them )ork in groups of fi!e+ and think back 5 refresh in their
memory the salient points 5 aspects5 elements of poetry to be gi!en
attention to in unfolding its meaning. Let them check their ans)ers
against these ( sub,ect+ sounds+ imagery+ tone+ meaning5sense.
? $larify to them the 2/7%+ 2/Y and /O2 of these aspects.
? 'ub,ect is the ob,ect5 thing5idea5 person 5 situation the poem
presents.
? 'ounds call for the use of rhyme + rhythm+ repetition+
alliteration and other sound de!ices.
? Imagery calls for the use of colourful and mo!ing )ords that
appeal to the senses and e!oke feelings.
? %one is the poet0s attitude to)ard the sub,ect.
? .eaning is the intended comment about life 5 obser!ation about
the e*periences in life.


? 7llo) them to point out )hich of these elements 9 sub,ect+ theme+
poetic de!ices+ sounds+ tone+ significant e*perience:+ they ha!en0t E
? touched
? e*plored yet 9 responses may !ary:
? understood
? mastered
? Let them emphasie )hich ones they need to gi!e more attention+
then report their findings in class.


? 'park their interest in using 'YNONY.' or )ords )ith the same or
almost the same meaning . 1oint out to them that it is another good )ay to gi!e
a brief definition or restatement . this is one good strategy to arri!e at the
nearest meaning of an unfamiliar )ord.
? Instruct them to Ma,e $ YNONYM Match Challen5e )here they0ll
fill each blank )ith a single letter to form the gi!en pairs of )ords into
'YNONY.'.
? 1ro!ide them an e*ample like 447$%U7L 44RUE )here they can
become
-7$%U7L %RUE
? .ake them check their ans)ers against the follo)ing entries.
1. '$OL= $/I=E
2. YE7RNIN6 $R7&IN6
3. %7LLY '$ORE
4. 27&ER -7L%ER
5. 6ROUN= 'OIL
6. N7RRO2 'LEN=ER
7. $LI.# 7'$EN%
8. '%U.#LE %RI1
9. &IN=I$7%E $LE7R
10. =2ELLIN6 7#O=E
? Remind them of the FOC,S -,ESTIONB
*o: do # co1e :ith challen5es in li2eB
? Encourage them to gi!e temporary ans)ers to the focus "uestion.
7ccept !aried ans)ers.


? Incite them to )rite their targets on )hat they e*pect 5 need 5 hope to
learn in this lesson. %ell them to be reminded of these e*pectations as
they )ork on the follo)ing phases of this lesson.


-or the YOUR TE(T phase+


? Instruct them to pair up and reflect on the follo)ing "uotations in the
/hy notB part&
chal bord
ce, all su
1. Dont let n
your bes .A
irtue is i
- )nony$ous8.
leep.
2. When v
powers s
- -alph 4alo



? Let them take turns in ans)ering these "uestions.
? 2hat does each of the "uotations suggest3
? =o you agree on )hat each suggests3 2hy3
? 2hat does it take to face life0s difficulties5 challenges3
? In!ite them to share your findings )ith the rest of the class.
? 7ccept !aried responses and gi!e feedback.


? In!ite them to )ork on the "E T*E "ET YOU C$N "E task )here
they0ll
? )ork )ith a partner and look closely at the picture5 dra)ing of
a father5 mother carrying his5her son5 daughter at his5her back
.#oth of them are laughing5 smiling contentedly seem to be
en,oying life .
? talk about ho) the dra)ing5 picture illustrates the same meaning
being con!eyed in the "uotations+ then relate them.


? e*plain ho) closely they think5 belie!e the dra)ing match their
mental image of coping )ith challenges.
? Let them share your findings )ith the rest of the class.
? 7ccept !aried responses+ then gi!e feedback.
? In!ite them to reflect on these "uestions(
? To what can you co$pare li"e 6
? &o wors ha*e the power to help a person !et throu!h har+
i""icult ti$es6
? Encourage them to find out ho) a poem )ritten by Langston /ughes
)ill help them achie!e insights about them as they listen to you read
the poem
MOT*ER TO ON A 'y: 0an!ston ;u!hes%




Mother to on
By:0an!ston ;u!hes
2ell+ son+ IKll tell you(
Life for me ainKt been no crystal stair.
ItKs had tacks in it+
7nd splinters+
7nd boards torn up+
7nd places )ith no carpet on the floorW
#are.
#ut all the time
IKse been a;climbinK on+
7nd reachinK landinKs+
7nd turninK corners+
7nd sometimes goinK in the dark
2here there ainKt been no light.
'o+ boy+ donKt you turn back.
=onKt you set do)n on the steps.
K$ause you finds itKs kinder hard.
=onKt you fall no)W
-or IKse still goinK+ honey+
IKse still climbinK+
7nd life for me ainKt been no crystal stair.




? 6uide them on to focus on the conte*t of the poem%
? Engage them to take acti!e control in '6=2 9 mall Grou1
.i22erentiated /or, 3 )here they )ill form J small groups .
? .ake them read the poem aloud+ and perform their assigned tasks.
? $larify to them their functions like
for Grou1 1 /ords4 :ords4 :ords they )ill read the poem and look
for )ords that they found difficult then make a list of all of them. %hen
, they0ll use a dictionary to find the synonyms of each )ord.
%hey0ll share their findings )ith the class.
? 7ccept !aried ans)ers and gi!e feedback.
for Grou1 @
? Lead them to disco!er ho) the details in the poem tells a story and
ask group C to find the meanin5F meanin52ul si5ni2icant
eH1erience. Impress upon them that )hen they read a poem + they
get to kno) the e*perience of other people through its theme or its
meanin5 . %his is something that the poet re!eals about the sub,ect .
It0s the core of thought or the reactions5 !ie)s of the poet about
humanity . %his gi!es insights about meaningful e*periences of
human beings. %his gi!es them a better handle on their relationship
)ith others and ho) they0ll react to challenges in life.
? .ake them ans)er the follo)ing guide "uestions + then check their
ans)ers against the ones inside the parentheses.
1. 2ho is the speaker 5 persona in the poem3 9 a mother:
2. %o )hat does the speaker compare her life3 9 stair)ay:
3. 2hat is the speaker doing3 9 climbing the stairs:
4. 2hat kind of stair)ay is it3 9 stairs )ith tacks+ splinters andboards+
)ithout carpet+ bare:
5. 2hat kind of stair)ay is the mother0s life not like3 9 crystal stair:
6. 2hat does the mother tell her son3 9 life is full of challenges they
continually need to face 5 o!ercome+ so they must be strong :
? Let them copy the illustration of the stairs as sho)n in their learning
material and fill it up )ith entries called for. 7ccept !aried responses and
gi!e feedback .


for Grou1 I they need to )ork on the alient ;oints of the poem .
? $larify to them that )hen they read the poem or listen to others read
a poem+ they can come up )ith a broad statement that sums up the
poem0s central meaning. %his is the aDility to ma,e 5eneraliMation
about life and human nature as con!eyed in the poem read or listened
to. %his can help you en,oy reading poem or listening to poems read.
? 7s they )ill read the poem they )ill disco!er the ans)er to these
"uestions.
? 7s a )hole+ )hat does the poem talk about3 9 7 mother
ad!ices her son to be strong in facing and o!ercoming
challenges in life.:
? %he poem is di!ided into F parts. 2hich part5 lines of the poem
talk about hardships3 responses to hardships3 .other0s ad!ice to
keep3 Use the table for their r responses.
? .ake them check their ans)ers against these.
*ardshi1s


the first J lines
( line >;J:
Res1onses to
hardshi1s
the ne*t O lines 9line D; >F :
Mothers ad!ice to ,ee1


the last J lines 9 >H ; C?:
? 2hich is the most interesting5 catchiest line5 phrase in the
poem3 )hy3
? 2hich part makes you think of someone 5 something in true to
life e*perience3
? 2hat do you think is the most probable purpose of the )riter for
)riting this poem3
? .ake them share their findings )ith the class.
? 7ccept !aried responses and gi!e feedback.


-or Grou1 H Messa5e 2or you4 ask them to discuss the ans)er to the
follo)ing
"uestions and share their findings )ith the class
? 2hat poetic de!ices are used in the poem3 9 imagery+ sounds+
poetic contractions+ repetition+ tone:
? 2hich one helps clarify the message more3
? 2hich part do you like best3 2hy3
? 2hat do you think might ha!e moti!ated the mother to ad!ice
her son3
? Is the message of the poem )orth)hile3 1ro!e your point.
? /o) important is the poem0s message in your life3
? 2hat ha!e you learned from it3
? 7ccept !aried ans)ers to the "uestions 9e*cept the first one: and
gi!e feedback.


'or Grou1 < 8 J>$ 0 Jualities and $ttitudes dis1layed3
? 7sk them to point out )hat approach to5 attitude in life the persona
intended to sho)5 share in the poem. Let them list these attitudes and plot
them in the chart.
;ersonas
$TT#TU.E
MiHtu
re
Good Not Good Good Not Good







? 2hat ne) and special )ay does the poem gi!e you3
? /o) )ill it help you to become a better person3


? .ake them share your findings )ith the class.
? 7ccept !aried ans)ers and gi!e feedback.
? E*plain further to them that TONE tells the speaker0s attitude to)ard
the sub,ect. %his can be one of these 9 serious+ light+ bored+ inspired+
sarcastic+ happy+ sad+ )orried self;satisfied+ )ishful+ optimistic etc.: %his
re!eals the speaker0s feeling to)ard the sub,ect.
-or Grou1 = More Challen5es are in store for them. %hey ha!e to
? talk about ho) the speaker 5 persona feel about the challenges in life
and e*plain her reaction to these challenges. 9 %he persona has an
optimistic attitude to)ards facing and o!ercoming these challenges in
life.:
? 1oint out the lines 5 phrases that shed light on these.
? Use a table like the one sho)n for your responses.
#ersonaEs 0eelin3 Reason LinesF /hrases as
su//orts




? .ake them share their findings )ith the class and gi!e feedback.


-or Grou1 ? let them do the $ %ey toNacti!ity.
? Impress to them that the speaker0s 5 persona0s attitude to)ards the
sub,ect can be gleamed from the "uality of the language the poet
used. %his is called the tone )hich can either be formal or informal+
serious or light.in most cases+ tone is suggested by the "uality of the
language used by the poet. 2ords re!eal the speaker0s feeling and
attitude in life.


? .ake them choose from
the list the tone used by the speaker 5
persona.
7ppro!ing admiring critical fearing playful serious light
mimic calm
.ocking polite angry persuasi!e en!ious an*ious afraid
mysterious confused triumphant defeated cynical hopeful
defiant
/ostile sorro)ful happy doubtful forgi!ing inspiring


? /a!e them note )ords that reflect the poet0s 5 speaker0s attitude
to)ard the sub,ect and select a single )ord 9 ad,ecti!e: to identify the
s1ea,ers tone.
PERSONA Word Choices
? .ake them e*plain ho) the tone change in the poem0s last part+ the
effect of the change and the )ay the poet uses tone to emphasie the
im/ortance o0 meetin3 F co/in3F <eatin3 challen3es to enhance
sel08 7sk them to report back to class.


? 6i!e feedback.
-or Grou1 C4 let them try the EHtended Meta1hor acti!ity.
? Impress upon them that an EAtended
Meta/hor is a feature of a lyric poem that presents
comparison o!er se!eral lines of 5 throughout the poem. Let them point out
ho) the persona makes many comparisons from the start up to the end
line of the poem. 7sk them to list these comparisons.
of the mother $rystal stair)ay


? Let them describe )hat the image of crystal stair)ay suggests.
Crystal stair:ays ima5e /hat it
su55ests
$arpeted+ not bare
2ithout tacks+ splinters and
boards
ease and
comfort
lu*uries in life
? .ake them share their findings )ith the class and gi!e feedback.


-or Grou1 O+ their ,ob is .ra:in5 Conclusions. Lead them to discuss )hat
illustrates the persona0s state of mind at the end of the poem. 7nd list
the choices offered to her. $ontinue by considering the choice she
made.
? E*plain further that dra)ing conclusions 5 generaliations entails
deciding )hat solution in terms of !ie) about life and human nature is best
for you to adopt. You can use the details presented in the poem as
e!idence that the e*perience applies not only to fe) but also to the ma,ority.
? 7sk them to make conclusion as to the kind of choice the mother5
persona made+ then gi!e e!idences 9 lines from the poem: to support
their conclusion.
? .ake them share their ideas )ith the class and remember to gi!e
feedback.


-or the last group+ Grou1 1- make them )ork on the Ty1es o2 ;oetry&
? 7sk them to think back and recall the F types of poetry. %hen+ ask
them( /o) they differ+ )hich of them tells a story+ e*presses !i!id thoughts
and feelings+ and uses dramatic techni"ue like speaker+ conflict and
story.
? .ake them categorie
@.other to 'onA as to )hat type of poetry it is
and recall the other poems they 0!e e*plored in class+ then decide to )hat
type each belongs.
? Lead them share their ideas )ith the class.
? 6i!e feedback by pointing out the features of the F types of poetry.


In!ite them On Usin5 CONTR$CT#ON& .ake them find a partner and mull
on ho) the follo)ing "uotation relates to the message of ;MOT5ER To
SONG by Langston /ughes.


Our stru33les! e00orts to 0ace di00iculties in li0e!
sacri0ices! charit2 and 0er6ent /ra2ers are the seeds o0 our
success8 To <e stron3 0or storms that last not 0oreEer as seasons
chan3e 1ith God in control kee/ us standinE8G
? 1ay attention to the t)o underlined )ords.
? 2hat do they ha!e in common3 9 the punctuation mark L + M
? 2hat punctuation mark is used in each of them39 apostrophe:
? 2hat term do )e use to identify the e*pressions that use
apostrophe in place of omitted letter5s3 9 contraction:
? 2hy do some poets use this form of e*pressions3 9 for
emphasis+ style:
? .ake them re read the poem+ ;MOT5ER TO SONG by Langston
/ughes+ and look for sample of poetic contractions 9 contractions used
in poem to suggest different culture+ language use+ etc. :.
%heir possible ans)ers are B IEll! ainEt! clim<inE! IEse! landinE!
reachinE! turninE 3oinE! donEt! Hcause
? $larify )ith them the effect of these contractions to the tone and
message of the poem.


7sk them To use or not to useN contractions in these sentences through
correcting each error in the use of contraction and possessi!e pronoun.
1. 2ho0se it 0s author3 to
2. /a!e you accepted they0re opinion about coping challenges.
3. %heir here to demonstrate they0re understanding.
4. Its too late for you to go they0re.
5. %hey0re here to stay and its about time too.
? In!ite them to do the Contractions Game
)here they0ll form three
groups and )rite each of these !erbs in the inde* cards5 slips of
papers. 9 )ill+ could+ is+ ha!e+ do+ does+ did+ can+ are+ )as etc.:+ and
place the cards5 slips of papers in a pile.%hey must take turns in
turning each !erb into contraction )ith the )ord NO%. 7fter a )hile each
player tells and spells the contraction aloud+ then uses it in a
sentence.
? 6i!e B pts. for each correct and complete ans)er and consider the
group )ith the most number of points as the )inner.
? In!ite them to Try #t Out& %hey )ill i
magine t)o personas+ poets 9
from the t)o poems you like5 find interesting: meet and ha!e meal
together and ho) each shares !ie)s5 thoughts on ho) to face
challenges in life .%hen+ they0ll make up fe) lines of dialog sho)ing
their sharing of ideas. Remind them to use contractions.
? 7ccept !aried ans)ers and gi!e feedback.


? %his time+ encourage them to keep in mind these disco!eries+ ne)
ideas + ne) de!elopments you ha!e as you continue on the ne*t phase.
%his clearly sho)s that they are ready to do some practical application
as e*tension of their understanding of the key concepts. %hrough using
their communication and literary skills learned+ try the 'O,R
CISCO%ER' TAS*S
? One is An Ad6ice task )here they0ll discuss ho) to )ork )ith a
student )ho has been disappointed 5 frustrated 5 almost disillusioned
because of a problem met .%hey ha!e to think of )hat ad!ice they
ha!e to offer adults )ho )ork )ith young people
like this disillusioned adolescent. 7fter a )hile+ they0ll
prepare a brief oral report about it+ then share their ideas )ith others.
? 7ccept !aried reactions and gi!e comments5 suggestions.

? Incite them to make
an $d!ice Colla5e )here they0ll c reate
a collage based on their chosen lines5 images from the poem and find 5
create pictures5 photos5 dra)ings that illustrate the message they )ant to
con!ey. Remind them to design the layout of their collage and use the
internet and other forms of technology to enhance their collage.
? 6i!e comments and suggestions.
? Let them ha!e a NOM#NEE task. %hey )ill imagine that an
international agency is going to gi!e a Medal o2 *onor $:ard to
anyone )ho is able to inspire a lot of people through his5 her poem5
)riting. %hey are to )rite a letter to the head of the agency and
nominate your fa!ourite poet for the a)ard and remember to highlight
the reasons for your choice. 7sk them to read their letter in class .


? Encourage them to do the Musically Yours task. 7sk them to scout
for songs that e*press any or some of these e*periences. 9 1o!erty+
pre,udice+ loss of lo!ed ones+ failures+ setbacks+ hope+
perse!erance+ sound decisions+ charity+ courage+ faith + and
determination. In!ite them to play the tape of 5 render the song then
talk about its connection to the poem.
? In!ite them to add more proofs of their understanding on the target
concepts and to hone their communication skills through acti!ating for
their '#N$L T$% since they are all set to try this ne*t phase of the
lesson that )ill sho) them ho) they can present an #n2o8 $d!ocacy
Cam1ai5n on Usin5 ;ositi!e /ays To Co1e /ith Challen5es4
and the criteria for assessment )ill be( focus5 content+ !isuals+ clarity
of purpose+ and language con!ention.
? -or the initial stage they0ll try the M$G#C C as they )ork in groups of
fi!e and find out ho) familiar they are )ith these MAGIC 7 )ays.
? 'ee hardships as challenges rather than insurmountable
obstacles.
? -ocus on the positi!e rather than the negati!e effects.
? %ake comfort in the lo!e and support of the family.
? Look for and take comfort in small pleasures.
? =e!elop a greater sense of pride or accomplishment from
the challenges5 decision made.
? Offer opportunities to all )ho can pro!ide solutions.
? Increase tolerance under e*treme condition.
? 7ct and think that )hat you do make a difference.
? .ake them point out )hich of them ha!e you tried 5 e*perienced
already as you faced the challenges of e!eryday life and as basis for self;
impro!ement and
,ot do)n their thoughts about ho) their e*periences ha!e gi!en them
second5 best chance for self;enhancement.
? .ake them share their thoughts )ith their peers+ group mates and
others.
? 7ccept !aried reactions and gi!e feedback.
? Ne*t+
let them do the T*E "ET #N'O8 $. C$M;$#GN )here
they0ll imagine that each of them is a famous 5 influential person )ho
is committed to promote ho) to cope )ith challenges through using
all forms of media and that he5 she is the go!ernment official )ho
)ill help in the promotion and information dri!e to educate and help
teenagers like you in coping )ith challenges.
? 7sk them to prepare a radio script highlighting your chosen magic
)ays from .agic D acti!ity and focus on the important concerns5
issues5 problems confronting teen agers of today.
? .ake them choose the best ads that present the concerns of the
ma,ority among the groups and analye the structure+ format+
contents+ style+ strategies used in the ads.
? .ake them find and choose contemporary songs that re!eal some of
the same emotions con!eyed in the radio script and share the songs
)ith your classmates. %hen+ talk about ho) it relates to the message
of the radio script.
? $hoose members of the group )ho )ill form the cast+ including the
narrator and the leading character and make a tape of the
background music and sound effects that you might use.
? Let them put together+ relate and use the musical recordings and the
radio script ready for the rehearsals.
? 1ushthem to rehearse+ polish+ record and share your radio script )ith
the class.
? Gi*e feedback.


? Let them set up a special meeting for them to brainstorm+ discuss and
decide on the
? Ob,ecti!es
? =ifferent $ommittees
? 1rograms they need to produce your ma,or
task
( an #n2o8$d F $d!ocacy Cam1ai5n on usin5
1ositi!e :ays to co1e :ith
challen5es 3
? 7cti!ities
? 1lans
.
? Let them inter!ie) groupmates on the specific topic5 sub,ect for the
Info;7d you )ant to )ork on and come to a group consensus then rank
them .
? .ake them decide on and choose the most preferred topic by
the ma,ority.
? Encourage them to research and gather information about the topic
for the 7d and use note cards for gathered information.
? In!ite them to
? share findings5 disco!eries )ith the group.
? create a "uestionnaire designed to gather information they
need about the "ualities and features of an ad campaign that
)ould attract people.
? ask and ans)er "uestions on ho) they )ill present the 7d..
? plan the concept+ features and modes of presenting the Info E
7d.
? prepare the script+ technological aids + musical background and
materials needed for the Info;ad.
? rehearse and shoot for the Info;7d.
? conduct peer checking.
? present+ re!ie)+ edit and polish the Info;7d based on the
comments and the suggestions made by your peers.
? ans)er the follo)ing "uestions.
? 7re there other changes they )ant to make on your
Info;7d3
? Is there anything included that you )ould like to take
out5 omit3
? Is there any information5 idea that you missed to
include5 need to add3
? 7re there other changes they thought could ha!e been
made3
? Is there anything included that they )ould ha!e taken
out3
? Is there any information that they )ould ha!e
elaborated on3


? make necessary changes and modifications
? use appropriate technology aids in your oral presentation of
your Info;7d.
?
? Encourage them to present their #n2o8$d F $d!ocacy Cam1ai5n on
Usin5 ;ositi!e /ays to Co1e :ith Challen5es and post it in their
facebook 5 t)itter )all 5 blog + email in!iting the public especially
their friends to share their comments and suggestions through -#5
%)itter 2all or e;mail.
? Let them assess the #n2o8$d F $d!ocacy Cam1ai5n on Usin5
;ositi!e /ays to Co1e :ith Challen5es based on the follo)ing
criteria( focus5 content+ purpose+ organiation5 de!elopment+
rele!ance+ clarity+ style+ impact and I$% integration.
-inally+ for YOUR TRE$URE 4 impress upon them that they0!e
learned that in their life0s ,ourney+ simple or complicated changes keep
going and going. %hese changes bring a lot of trials 5 roadblocks or
challenges. 'ometimes they bring happiness+ at times depression. Just
the same + you ha!e to cherish these changes that bring challenges
because they push you either up and do)n that is )hy you react
positi!ely by looking for )ays to make your life better if not the best%
? In!ite them to do the *o: are you doin5NB phase )here they )ill
think back on the acti!ities+ tasks they00!e finished+ concepts5 ideas they0!e
learned and reflect on then ans)er the follo)ing "uestions.
1. 2hat is it that you found most en,oyable5 most difficult in
this lesson3
2. 2hat do you plan to do a)ay )ith these difficulties3
3. 2rite at least F possible )ays 5 steps you can adopt for you to
get a)ay )ith these difficulties.
4. 2hat skills do you hope5 e*pect to impro!e5 strengthen in the
ne*t lessons3
5.
? .ake them plot their responses in their Learning Log.
My !"#$I$% &%
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Teachers Guide
Module 1
Lesson <
___________________________________________________________________
LI%ING .IT5 A #,R#OSE


In!ite your students to read the YOUR JOURNEY phase and clarify
that this is the time+ they can see )hy there are changes they are
e*periencing that are best for them and ho) they )ill make them feel great.
.ake them see that their physical+ social+ emotional and moral changes may
lead to their personal strengths and )eaknesses. Lead them to the
#I6 Xuestion( *o: can # ha!e a 1ur1ose dri!en li2e 3 that )ill ser!e as
the gra!itational core of the ideas they0ll share.


Inform them that the discussion 5 e*ploration they0ll engaged in this lesson )ill
naturally tie together )ith the information carried in the !aried
acti!ities follo)ing 5 supporting the o!erall theme A Enhancin5 The el2& %he
elements of the poem they0ll re!isit and e*plore more fully gra!itate around
the sub; theme li6in3 1ith a /ur/ose.

.ake them go o!er the list in the YOUR O"JECT#)E part )here they
are e*pected to(


? sho) appreciation for the significant human e*periences
highlighted
and shared during the discussion5 presentation. 9literature:
? compare and contrast information listened to. 9 listening:
? dra) generaliations and conclusions from the materials
!ie)ed. 9 !ie)ing:
? use antonyms to arri!e at meaning of )ords. 9 !ocabulary:
? dra) similarities and differences of the featured selections in
relation to the theme. 9literature:
? use "uotation marks effecti!ely.9 grammar a)areness:
? )rite a script for a poetry reading. 9)riting:
? use the appropriate and effecti!e speech con!entions in poetry
reading.
( oral language and fluency:
'tress at them it is e*pected that they are to demonstrate ho) their language
communication and literary skills can be continuously de!eloped as
they e*plore chosen poem highlighting the importance of li!ing )ith a
purpose.


Remind them that their e*pected output )ill be 1oetry readin54 and
the criteria for assessment )ill be( =eli!ery+ &oice+ 6estures+ -acial
E*pression and Eye $ontact


Lead them to YOUR #N#T#$L T$% part. -irst ask them to try
JUEEPE.&
7sk them if they are "on of listening to music. E*plain to them that
listening to music is the same as looking closely at the picture5
dra)ing5 illustration ,ust as it is like reading a poem to unfold its
meaning.


? $heck on )hat problem they ha!e in unfolding the meaning
of a poem and )hat )ill they0ll do to impro!e in this area.
? .ake them remember this "uestion as they )ork on the phases
of this lesson.


*O/ .O YOU LOO% $T L#'EB


.ake them read the follo)ing "uotations and


@%o be )hat )e are+ and to become )hat )e are capable of
becoming is the only end of life.A ;;; Robert Louise '!enson


@Life is a big sea full of many fish. I let do)n my nets and pull.A
Langston /ughes


? compare them+ then look for )hat they ha!e in common.
? ask them if they agree on )hat each suggests and pro!e their
contention.


=ri!e them to do the /hy NotB task.
? make them listen to the song+ @2here are you going to @ and
reflect then share ans)ers to these "uestions.
? 2hat feeling5 emotion does this song e!oke3 E*plain.
? /o) does the song0s message relate to your life3
? 2hat is the best )ay to li!e life3
? =o you belie!e on the importance of personal achie!ement on
earth and look to one another as )ell as 6od for inspiration3
? 2hat do I already kno)
about li!ing )ith a purpose3
? 2hat do I )ant to kno) more about li!ing )ith a purpose3


In!ite them to )ork on the Core Juestion phase )here you0ll ask
them to
? pair up and take turns in asking "uestions they ha!e about
ho) to li!e )ith a purpose.
? )rite at least three 9F: "uestions 9in line )ith li!ing )ith a
purpose : they hope to ans)er later.



Questions I have about living
with a purpose





? %his time+ make them come up )ith the most essential 5 focus
"uestion+ and check it against this one(
*o: can # ha!e a 1ur1ose dri!en li2eB

? =ri!e their attention back to the FOC,S -,ESTIONB
*o: can # ha!e a 1ur1ose dri!en li2e3
? .ake them gi!e logical temporary ans)ers to the focus "uestion.
? 7sk them to )rite on 2hat they e*pect5 need 5 hope to learn and )rite
your
targets on )hat you e*pect 5 need 5 hope to learn in this lesson.
? Inspire them by saying they are no) ready "or the ne*t phase of the
lesson.
? Lead them to YOUR TE(T 1hase of the lesson )here they )ill )ork
on the My Resol!e tas,.
? /ere+ ask them to pair up and look closely on the dra)ing5picture of a
father )ith his daughter and a puppy strolling leisurely along the
seashore.
? Instruct them to take turns in ans)ering these "uestions.
? 2hom do you remember and )hat situation in life do you
remember as you look at the dra)ing3
? 2hat general obser!ation in life is illustrated 5 suggested in the
dra)ing3
? /o) closely do you think5 belie!e do the dra)ing match your
mental image of li!ing a life )ith purpose3 1ro!e your point.
? 2hat is your o!er; all impression of this dra)ing3
? /o) does the picture make you feel3
? 2hat other !isuals can you think of to illustrate li!ing )ith a
purpose3 1ro!e your point.
? .ake them share their findings )ith the rest of the class.


7t this point+ they should try 'U#ON O' OUN. $N. ENE&
$larify to them )hat really contribute to the poem0s meaning. Remind them
that the orchestration of sounds+ story+ sense and form brings about @lifeA in a
poem they read and that absolutely dri!es them to @feelA life in it. %hrough the
)ords used by the poet+ as e*pressed by the @personaA 5 speaker+ the !i!id
images+ clear sounds+ e*act feelings are clearly con!eyed.
No)+ incite them to find out ho) they can li!e a 1ur1ose dri!en li2e by
? -irst+ they ha!e to listen to you read the poem )hile they read it
silently.
? 7sk them to focus on the conte*t of the poem and try to list )ords5
phrases5 lines that con!ey sound+ feeling and meaning.



$ ;salm o2 Li2e
DyA *enry /ads:orth Lon52ello:


%ell me not+ in mournful numbers+
Life is but an empty dreamI
-or the soul is dead that slumbers+
7nd things are not )hat they seem.
Life is realI Life is earnestI
7nd the gra!e is not its goal<
=ust thou art+ to dust returnest+
2as not spoken of the soul.
Not en,oyment+ and not sorro)+
Is our destined end or )ay<
#ut to act+ that each to;morro)
-ind us farther than to;day.
7rt is long+ and %ime is fleeting+
7nd our hearts+ though stout and bra!e+
'till+ like muffled drums+ are beating
-uneral marches to the gra!e.


In the )orld0s broad field of battle+
In the bi!ouac of Life+
#e not like dumb+ dri!en cattleI
#e a hero in the strifeI
%rust no -uture+ ho)e0er pleasantI
Let the dead 1ast bury its deadI
7ct+W act in the li!ing 1resentI
/eart )ithin+ and 6od o0erheadI
Li!es of great men all remind us
2e can make our li!es sublime+
7nd+ departing+ lea!e behind us
-ootprints on the sands of time<
-ootprints+ that perhaps another+
'ailing o0er life0s solemn main+
7 forlorn and ship)recked brother+
'eeing+ shall take heart again.


Let us+ then+ be up and doing+
2ith a heart for any fate<
'till achie!ing+ still pursuing+
Learn to labor and to )ait.




In!ite them to be acti!e in 'mall 6roup =ifferentiated 2ork )here
they0ll )ork in O small groups .
7sk them to read the poem aloud+ and perform their assigned task.


for Grou1 1 The O11osites
? .ake them look for )ords in the poem )hich are opposite in meaning
to each of the follo)ing. /a!e them check their ans)ers against these
ones.
1. ha11y Q 2orlorn ?& Duilt Q
shi1:rec,ed
2. smart Q dumD C& mo!es Q slumDers
3. Ridiculous Q suDlime O& #nsincereQ earnest
4. Unserious Q solemn 1- &harmonyQ stri2e
5. cheer2ul Q mourn2ul 11&1ermanentQ 2leetin5
6. o1en Q Di!ouac 1@& Loud Q
mu22led 2or Grou1 @
? Let them discuss their ans)ers to the follo)ing "uestions.
? 2hat according to the poem is our @destined endA or purpose3
? Is the poem morally uplifting and sentimental3 1ro!e your point.
? /o) can one be a man according to Rudyard 8ipling3
? 2hat conditions are suggested by the persona5 speaker in order
for anyone to become a man. Recite lines that Illustrate each condition.
? 6i!e feedback.


2or Grou1 I
? .ake them think about
? )hat the speaker says life is not.
? the command @ 7ct+ act in the li!ing present.A
? the last four lines of the poem
? the "uotation you choose as closest to your philosophy in life.
? )hy the poem is an inspirational one
? ho) the poem celebrates the gift of life3
? 6i!e feedback.


2or Grou1 E
? 7sk them )hich of the lines suggests
? 9eople shoul continue to appreciate li"e on earth as *ery
i$portant an real%
? ) ti$e to act is <O4( to $ake spiritual( $oral an intellectual
$arks in this worl%
? Ur!es people not to waste the short ti$e that they ha*e%
? )ct as heroes a$ist the earth stri"e
? 4ork towar personal achie*e$ent%
? Re"uire them to report back to class.
? 6i!e feedback.


2or Grou1 < # "elie!e
? Let them share their ans)ers to the follo)ing "uestions
? =o you belie!e that Longfello) has a strong !ie) in life3
? /o) does Longfello)0s !ie) of life compare )ith your o)n
!ie)3
? Re"uire them to point out the lines in the poem that
? sho) Longfello) has a strong and optimistic !ie) in life
? you think5belie!e the young people might5 might not
agree )ith.
;*#LOO;*Y in L#'E
Lon30ello1Es 6ie1





? 6i!e feedback.
M2 6ie1 Results
'or Grou1 =
? .ake them mull on and ans)er these ( 2hat are the !alues e*pressed
in the poem3 =o the people of today still share the !alues e*pressed in the
@1salm of LifeA3 1ro!e.
? -or further e*ploration in!ite them to do the # Li,e #t acti!ity.
? .ake them find F or H classmates and talk on )hat they like about
a. the poem
b. its sub,ect
c. the poem0s mysteriousness
d. the )ay the )ords appear on the page
e. the mood of the poem puts you in
f. )hat makes you remember
g. )hat it makes you think about
h.
/*$T # L#%E aDout
Title o0 the /oem

Its su<Iect
The /oemEs
m2steriousness


The 1a2 the 1ords
a//ear on the /a3e
The mood o0 the /oem
/uts 2ou in


.hat it makes 2ou
remem<er


.hat it makes 2ou
think a<out > theme or
3eneral truth in li0e?




? .ake them share their findings )ith the class.
? 6i!e feedback.
? It0s time for Com1arin5 and Contrastin5&
? $larify to them that finding similarities and recogniing differences
can help them understand their reaction to different persons and
information they listened to.
? .ake them )ork in small groups of H as they recall another poem they
ha!e e*plored in class and they found interesting.
? /a!e them compare it )ith $
;salm o2 Li2e 'y:;enry 4asworth
0on!"ellow+ then choose the basic categories such as ( sub,ect + the
mood5tone+ and !ie)point on general truth in life.
? Ne*t+ let them compare the specific points that are similar enough to
enable you to dra) effecti!e comparison.
? 7llo) them to plot their ans)ers in the chart as sho)n.


;oem R 1 ;oem R @
Title o" the poe$


Su',ect
The $oo + tone


The$e or !eneral truth o'ser*e in li"e


?

6i!
e
fee
? 6uide them On Usin5 JUOT$T#ON M$R%&
? Remind them that e!en in poems+ especially in dramatic or
narrati!e poems+ "uotation marks 9 6 6 : are used to enclose the
e*act )ords of the speaker5 persona+ character. .ake them consider
these lines from the poems.
1.
They say( . Ti$e assua!es%3
"ro$ :3 >erse ?@3 'y 2$ily &ickinson.



2.
;e $et a pil!ri$ shaow8
Shaow(3 sai he(
.where it can 'e8
This lan o" 2lorao63


"ro$: ; EL
CORACOG
2!ar )llan 9oe

? Instruct them to )ork )ith three or four of your classmates for
them to discuss their ans)ers to the follo)ing "uestions.
? /o) are the "uotation marks used in !erse No. >3 !erse no. C
3
? 2here are they 9 open and close "uotation marks: positioned
in sentences3
? 2hat are enclosed in "uotation marks3
? /o) do the use of the "uotation marks from !erse no.> differ
from !erse no.C3
? 2hen do )e use a set of single "uotation mark 9 + + :3
? 2hat are the other uses of "uotation marks3
? Instruct them to report back to class+ and share their findings.
? 6i!e feedback.
? .ake them do the JUOTE ME e*ercise as they recall their most
liked 5 interesting lines 9 at least three : from the poems e*plored in
class.
? Ne*t+ they0ll Imagine the persona5 poet is personally talking to them.
? Instruct them to report directly )hat the persona5 poet is
saying by )riting these lines through using "uotation marks.
? 6i!e feedback.
You aid #t
? 7sk them to find a partner+ and create a brief con!ersation they )ould ha!e
on ho) to ha!e a purpose dri!en life.
? Lead them to create a discussion )ith the poet5 persona about it.
? .ake them act out a con!ersation and present a )ritten copy of the
con!ersation5 dialogue.
? Remind them to use "uotation marks in your dialogue.
? 6i!e feedback.
-or 'O,R CISCO%ER' TAS*S
? In!ite them to e*pand their e*periences on the message of the poem
through TR#)E& /ere+ they need to pair up+ and share ideas+
thoughts on ho) can a poem help young people )ho are ha!ing
trouble.
? Instruct them to report back to class.
? 6i!e feedback.
? /a!e them do the harin5 :ith the ;ersona as they )ork in groups
of fi!e and imagine they meet the persona.
? .ake them share )hich of the persona0s
? insights they like to discuss )ith him.
? e*periences that make the change their mind strengthen their
resol!e about something or see something about ,Y themsel!es
others in a ne) light.
? Instruct them to report back to class.
? 6i!e feedback.


-or Your Turn
? Incite them to imagine they are the poet recei!ing the .edal of /onor
7)ard for the inspirational poem he5she shared.
? Instruct them to )rite a speech about ho) grateful they are of the
a)ard.
? .ake them e*plain )hy they came up )ith the masterpiece.
? 7sk the to deli!er the speech and use correct phrasing+ pausing+ !oice
pro,ection+ facial e*pression+ eye contact and gestures


? Remind them to talk about
? ho) they may apply the ad!ice gi!en by Longfello) in the
poem.
? 2hat might be their life be like if they )ere pre!ented from
pursuing their dreams or goals.
? 2hich personal "ualities are needed to hold on to dreams in
ad!ersity.
? Instruct them to report back to class.


? 6i!e feedback.
? In!ite them to add more proofs of their understanding on ho) to li!e a
purpose dri!en life through taking acti!e control in the YOUR '#N$L
T$%&
? E*plain to them that one good )ay to sho) their appreciation of the
poem they read and e*plore is through gi!ing ,ustice in reading it
orally. 7ssure them that they can pro!e their understanding of the
poem0s message through oral reading. %his is obser!able )hen they
communicate the pri!ate+ personal+ uni"ue e*perience of the poet5
persona to their audience.
.ake it clear to them that their final output is poetry reading. 2hen
they get ready for it they must keep in mind the follo)ing points.
? $larify to them that their first ,ob is to find a poem they feel a
connection )ith and they )ant 5 feel5 en,oy reading in public.
? .ake them think about their purpose< that is+ to share the @feelingA and
the @e*perienceA.
? Remind them to follo) the follo)ing(
? pre!ie) the te*t to check the difficult and unfamiliar )ords.
? make a )orking script )here you need to ha!e the copy of the
poem.
? identify the speaker and )hat he5she is trying to say.
? point out the tone of !oice to be used.5
? note )here his5her tone might change slo)ly+ fast+ soft+ loud
? 1rompt them not to come to a full pause but read on to the ne*t line to
complete the thought.
? In!ite them to plan and rehearse )here they0ll
? memorie and understand the te*t.
? plan their mo!ements.
? Remind them of these criteria as they read the poem aloud.
? &oice 9 "uality+ pro,ection+ !olume+ pitch:
? =eli!ery 9 phrasing+ pausing+ intonation+ stress:
? -acial e*pression+ gestures+ eye contact.
? 1rompt them to practice reading aloud.
? 'tress on them the importance of reading according to punctuation and
breaking do)n the parts into sub,ect and its meaning.
? 6uide them to read groups of )ords for meaning rather than reading
single )ords.
? Remind them to change the tone of their !oice to add meaning to the
)ork )hile they remember the criteria ( =eli!ery+ &oice+ 6estures+ and
-acial E*pressions
? 7llo) them to read the poem to the class.


? Remember to ackno)ledge them and ask ho) they feel about their
ma,or output before leading them to the YOUR TRE$URE 1hase&


? 1rompt them by
saying they en,oy learning( and let the$ t hink
back on the acti!ities+ tasks they0!e ,ust finished and concepts
they0!e learned. .ake them reflect on and ans)er these "uestions.


1. 2hat is it you found most en,oyable3 .ost difficult in this
lesson3
2. 2hat )ill you do to do a)ay )ith these difficulties3
3. 2rite at least F possible )ays5 steps you can adopt for you to
get a)ay )ith them.
4. 2hat do you hope to strengthen in the ne*t lesson5s3


? -or their final task in!ite them to complete the chart as sho)n )ith
entries called for.


NameA __________________ GradeF ection
___________
-uarter JJJ Lesson JJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJ
#art o0 the lesson that I
Most enKoyaDle Most di00icult .a2s to 3et
a1a2 1ith the
most di00icult
5o/eF eA/ect to
im/ro6eF
stren3then in the
neAt lesson
Teachers Guide
Module 1
Lesson =
___________________________________________________________________
CELERATING SELFK.ORT5


'tart this lesson by in!iting your students to read the o!er!ie) in the
initial Your Journey phase and ask them reflect on its importance.


Impress upon them that this lesson marks the first ma,or stop of their itinerary in
6rade Q English. %hey are to demonstrate their understanding of all the
important self;concepts side along the essential literary concepts and
language communication skills they )ill need for them to celeDrate their sel28
:orth4 and raise their sel28esteem . %his is made possible through a speech
choir presentation as e!idence of their understanding.


.ake their e*pectations clear< that+ this lesson is dra)n from the
baseline of celeDratin5 sel28:orth )here it their e*ploration of some
important concepts leading to self enhancement.


$larify that through their understanding of the o!erriding and underlying
concepts plus the tasks they )ill engage )ith in this lesson+ they0ll
surely be able to ans)er the #I6 Xuestions( 5o1 can I attain sel0K1orth&
What does it ta)e to get the *ost out o+ li+e,
'tress to them that they0ll pro!e that reading poems can really help uplift their
sense of self; )orth. 1arallel to this+ taking acti!e control of all the language
communication skills they0!e fostered in this "uarter marks their understanding.
/opefully+ this can be demonstrated through a !ery
impressi!e s1eech choir 1resentation.


In!ite them to go o!er the entries in the YOUR O"JECT#)E phase
)here they are to focus on their ob,ecti!es like(


? dra) generaliations and conclusions from the
material !ie)ed 9 !ie)ing:
? summarie information from the te*t listened to 9 listening:
? pro!e that the title ser!es as a big clue as to the meaning
of the poem 9reading:
? use definition to arri!e at the meaning of )ords 9 !ocabulary:
? e*plain ho) a poem is influenced by culture and
other factors 9 literature:
? use literary de!ices and techni"ues to craft poetic
forms 9 )riting:
? use the appropriate and effecti!e speech con!entions
e*pected of speech choir presentations 9 oral language and
fluency:
.
? Remind them that their e*pected output is a !ery impressi!e s1eech
choir 1resentation4 and the criteria for assessment )ill be( =eli!ery+
&oice+ 7udience Impact+ 6estures -acial E*pressions and
$horeography.


? .ake them start )ith the Somethin3 S/ecial Game in YOUR #N#T#$L
T$% phase. /ere they )ill form t)o big groups and
? recall the poems they0!e e*plored in class
? select lines that they found special or ne) or that
affected their attitude in life that allo)ed them to
become a better person
? )rite these chosen lines from the poems on slips of
papers+ and deposit them in the designated special bo*
? /a!e them dra) lots on )hich group )ill be the first to read the chosen
lines and to share their thoughts about them.
? 7llo) them to take turns in sharing their insights and alot three 9F:
minutes to share their insights and gi!e fi!e 9B: points for each
sharing.
? $onsider the first group to come up )ith the most number of points as
the )inner.


? 1erk up their interest
through the .i5nity .eli5ht acti!ity &
? 7sk them( 2hat do you do to celebrate self;)orth3 %hey can probably
buy )hat they )ant+ take a trip to the mall+ stroll in the park or
seashore+ or hang out )ith their friends doing things they like to do.
? In!ite them to dra) a picture or illustrate the )ays they celebrate their
self;)orth.
? .oti!ate them to use creati!e )ays in their dra)ing.
? 7llo) them to )ork )ith a group of classmates and compare their
ideas about the .)ay they celebrate self )orth. 7sk them ho) closely
they think5 belie!e these dra)ings match their mental image of
celebrating self;)orth. .ake them pro!e their point. %hen+ ask them to
share their group0s ideas )ith the )hole class.
? -or the *ere and No: acti!ity+ ha!e them reflect on the
recent
issues and problems that they need to attend to and decide
)hich of them can be sol!ed through their understanding of the
concepts re!ealed in the pre!ious lessons.
? Lead them by asking( 2hich of these concepts do they need more to
help sol!e these problems3
? In!ite the students to a the Gettin5 The Most Out o2 Li2e acti!ity )here
they )ill form a threesome. 7sk them to take a good look at the picture
you0ll present to them.
7sk them to talk about )hat it communicates to them. T hen+ ask them
to use the follo)ing guide "uestions.
? =oes the dra)ing ans)er the "uestion( What does it ta)e to
get the *ost out o+ li+e,
? 2hat general truth in life comes to your mind as you see this
picture3
? =oes the picture illustrate the !alue of celebrating self;)orth3
? 2hat details of the picture suggest the importance of attaining
self;)orth3
? /o) )ell+ do you think the illustrations interpret the !alue of
celebrating self;)orth3
? 2hat is your o!er; all impression of this dra)ing3
? /o) does the picture make you feel3
? 2hat other !isuals can you think of to illustrate your sense of self;
)orth3 1ro!e your point.


? .ake them con!ene after ten 9>?: minutes+ and keep a record of their
findings 9in line )ith celebrating self;)orth: and share their findings
)ith the class.
? Encourage them to find common grounds around their ideas.
? /ighlight the FOC,S -,ESTIONSB 5o1 can I attain sel0K1orth&
and What does it ta)e to get the *ost out o+ li+e,
? .oti!ate them to gi!e logical temporary ans)ers to the focus
"uestion.
? 7ccept !aried ans)ers from your students.
? Lead them to share ans)ers to this
"uestion( /hat do # eH1ect4
need or ho1e to learnB
? .ake them )rite their targets on )hat they e*pect+ need and hope to
learn in this lesson.
.hat I eA/ect! need!! orF ho/e to learn
KKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKK


? $onfirm their
readiness for the 'our TeAt phase of the lesson8
? .ake sure they )ill do the Li2es tair:ay task& /ere+ they )ill
? =ra) and label a stair)ay or road or path that reflects their life or the
life
of someone in the family or someone )hom they lo!ed so dearly.
? Use the follo)ing "uestions as a guide.
? 7re there t)ists and turns in your life3
? 2hat are they3
? 7re all the steps the same height3 2hy or )hy not3
? Is part of this stair)ay or road or path in the past+ present or
future3
? /o) are the parts different3
? 2hich part in the past or present or future represents your self;
)orth and ho) did you celebrate or )ould like to celebrate
this3
? 7sk them to )rite a short description of )hat they dre).
? 7sk them to share their )ork )ith the class.
? 6i!e your comments and feedback.


? %ell them that they can get clues to the meaning of the selection they )ill
read if they kno) ho) to predict or pro,ect.
? In!ite them to pro,ect by using the TITLE of the piece they )ill read.
? /a!e them(
? read and focus your attention on the title 6#'S 'y -uyar
1iplin!%
? e*press their thoughts+ !ie)s on )hat the sub,ect of the poem
could be.
? copy the illustration as sho)n in their learning material and fill it
out )ith their predictions.
? 7ccept !aried ans)ers from your students+ and in!ite them to confirm
their predictions as they )ork on the follo)ing acti!ities.


? Encourage the interest of your students by stressing that the poem 6 #'
'y -uyar 1iplin! pro!ides cherished pieces of information )hich are
clearly con!eyed to illustrate the importance of celebrating self;)orth.
? Lead your students to do the
$ Golden .oor acti!ity& 7sk them to(
? -orm a threesome and take turns in sharing their thoughts+ feelings and
e*periences that relate to the follo)ing "uotation.


? 7sk them to share their findings )ith the rest of the class.
? Lead them to find out ho) a poem 6 #'S )ritten 'y -uyar 1iplin! )ill
help them achie!e more insights on ho)A to make life better if not the
best. @
? /a!e them first listen to you read the poem 6#'S as they read it
silently.
? In!ite them to )atch out for and prepare a list of loaded )ords.


#2T
'y -uyar 1iplin!
If you can keep your head )hen all about you
7re losing theirs and blaming it on you<
If you can trust yourself )hen all men doubt you+
#ut make allo)ance for their doubting too<
If you can )ait and not be tired by )aiting+
Or+ being lied about+ donKt deal in lies+
Or+ being hated+ donKt gi!e )ay to hating+
7nd yet donKt look too good+ nor talk too )ise<

If you can dream;;and not make dreams your master<
If you can think;;and not make thoughts your aim<
If you can meet )ith triumph and disaster
7nd treat those t)o impostors ,ust the same< If
you can bear to hear the truth youK!e spoken
%)isted by kna!es to make a trap for fools+
Or )atch the things you ga!e your life to broken+
7nd stoop and build Kem up )ith )ornout tools<

If you can make one heap of all your )innings
7nd risk it on one turn of pitch;and;toss+
7nd lose+ and start again at your beginnings
7nd ne!er breathe a )ord about your loss<
If you can force your heart and ner!e and sine)
%o ser!e your turn long after they are gone+
7nd so hold on )hen there is nothing in you
E*cept the 2ill )hich says to them( T/old onT<
If you can talk )ith cro)ds and keep your !irtue+ Or
)alk )ith kings;;nor lose the common touch< If
neither foes nor lo!ing friends can hurt you<
If all men count )ith you+ but none too much< If
you can fill the unforgi!ing minute
2ith si*ty secondsK )orth of distance run;;
Yours is the Earth and e!erything thatKs in it+
7nd;;)hich is more;;youKll be a .an+ my sonI



? Impress upon them that they ha!e already de!eloped a !ariety of
strategies to help figure out the meaning of unfamiliar )ords. $larify
)ith them that )hen they find hints to the meaning of a )ord in the
)ords or sentences that surround it+ these are called conteHt clues.
%hese conte*t clues can help them e*pand their !ocabulary all the
more. One simple strategy is through .E'#N#T#ON or RET$TEMENT
clues. /ere+ they must )atch out for )ords like( 6or 6that is 6in other
:ords 6also called asS that often signal definition or restatement.6i!e
them an e*ample to analye.

? .ake them do the )OC$"UL$RY Game )here they
? form t)o big groups
? go o!er their list and find out )hich of the )ords are clearly described
by the follo)ing definitions(
1. it means 6mis0ortuneG or ; <ad luckG
2. in other )ords+ they are your 6enemiesG
or ;o//onentsG
3. it means ;stackG or ;<undleG
4. they are called @ /retendersG or ;0akesG
5. they are also called theA /la2in3 cardsG
6. it means @ stren3thG
7. this means ; to <o1G or ;to <endG
8. it is a ; trickG or set u/G or ;dece/tionG
9. this calls for ;3ood Lualit2G or ;morall2 3oodG
10. in other )ords+ these are your ; achie6ementsG!
accom/lishmentsG! or ;successG
? take turns in identifying each of these )ords in a minute
? 6i!e t)o 9C: points to each correct ans)er
? 7sk them to check their ans)ers against these )ords(
1. .#$TER =& #NE/
2. 'OE ?& TOO;
3. *E$; C& TR$;
4. #M;OTOR O& )#RTUE
5. %N$)E 1-& TR#UM;*
? =eclare the group to come up )ith the most number of points as the
)inner.


? Lead your students to form four 9H: groups for them to do an in depth
e*ploration of the poem& Inform them that they ha!e fifteen 9>B: minutes
to do their tasks.
? 6i!e each group an assigned task.
'or Grou1 1 'our ;arts
? .ake them read the poem once more to find its meaning.
? 'tress on them that the poem is di!ided into H parts+ and it is their ,ob
to find out )hat something or someone in real life is suggested in
each part. .
? %ell them to pick out lines that clearly suggest such and for them to
complete the follo)ing table )ith entries called for before they )ill
present their findings to the class.













'or Grou1 @ $l:ays .o the ;ositi!e
? Impress upon them that the poem sets conditions that ser!e as
positi!e signs for success or attainment of self;)orth. 7sk them to check
out )hich of these positi!e signs are con!eyed in the poem.


1. Overcome challenges and obstacles in life; dont let them beat you.
2. Follow your dreams / set up your goals.
3. Be realistic.
4. Continue ( eep going; dont stop even if there are many challenges in
your way!.
5. "e are all e#ual and no one is above anyone else.
6. $o not waste time. %se your every minute of your time wisely.
7. Be true to oneself.
8. %nderstand people who thin differently of you and provoe you in
doing bad/ evil actions.
9. &lways do what is right and 'ust.
10. (now the value of self)worth without being too proud of your own
#ualities.
11. Overcome obstacles in life.
12. $o what is best.
13. *ave hope in life even if it is hard.
14. $ont give up.


? =iscuss )ith them the images in the poem by specifying )hich part or
stana lines clearly point out each positi!e sign.
? /a!e them check their ans)er against these ones.
;O#T#)E #GN
;$RT or
T$NP$
15. Overcome challenges and obstacles in life; do
+,. Follow your dreams. -et up your goals.
CN=
stana
+.. Be realistic.
CN=
stana
+/. Continue ( eep going; dont stop even if there
are many challenges in your way!.
CN=
stana
+0. "e are all e#ual and no one is above anyone
else.
Hth
stana
12. $o not waste time. %se your every minute of
your time wisely.
Hth
stana
1+. Be true to oneself.
>st
stana
11. %nderstand people who thin differently from
you and provoe you in committing negative
actions.
>st
stana
13. &lways do what is right and 'ust.
>st
stana
24. (now the value of your self)worth without
being too proud of your own #ualities.
>st
stana
14. Overcome obstacles in life.
>st
stana
1,. $o what is best.
Frd
stana
1.. *ave hope in life even if it is hard
Frd
stana
1/. $ont give up.
Frd
stana
? 7llo) them to talk about and e*plain )hich of these positi!e signs they
agree on or disagree )ith.
? 6i!e them chances to share their ideas )ith the class.
? 6i!e comments and feedback.


'or Grou1 I 'irmin5 u1 the !alue o2 sel28:orth
? 7sk them to ans)er the follo)ing guide "uestions
? 2hich part makes you think of someone or something in real
life3
? 2hat kind of roadmap in life is con!eyed in the poem3
? /o) can one be a man according to R. 8ipling3
? 2hat conditions are stated in each stana3
? Is the message of the poem )orth)hile3 1ro!e your point.
? /o) important is the poem0s message in your life3
? 7ccept !aried ans)ers.


'or Grou1 E UMM$R#P#NG
? In!ite them to think back on )hat they usually do to summari4e points
in a te*t they ha!e read and to the ideas they ha!e listened to.
? E*plain to them that gi!ing the summary helps clarify their
understanding of the key information in a reading or listening to a
literary piece. 2hen they summarie+ they must condense the ideas
they ha!e read or listened to.
? Remind them that as they summarie+ they restate the main ideas
and the most im/ortant details in a 0e1 1ord and sentences8
? /a!e them use the follo)ing "uestions as guide.
? 2hat ha!e you learned from the te*t3
? 2hat approach to5 attitude in life do you think the poet intended
to sho) in the poem3
? 2hat ne) and special )ay of enhancing yourself does the
poem gi!e you for you to celebrate your self;)orth3
? /o) )ill it help you become a better person3
? Encourage them to share their ideas orally in class.
? 6i!e feedback.


? 6uide the students on Usin5 ELL#;# by in!iting them to look
closely at the Info 7d. -irst+ ask them )hat the ad is all about.
? 7sk them to look for )hat is common in these e*pressions.
1. 'hare your talents P
2. $aaahhhh N youre interestedN
3. -ippeee . We can help.
a. 7sk them to recall the name )e gi!e these punctuation marks.
b. Remind your students that ELLI#SIS /oints > (? are punctuation
marks that are used to sho) that something has not been e*pressed. It
usually indicates any of the follo)ing(
c. 2ords that ha!e been left out of a "uotation.
d. 7 series that continues beyond the items mentioned.
e. %ime that passes or action that occurs in a narration.
f. .ake them pay particular attention to the presence of gi!en sentences
)ith ellipsis points > (?
? =iscuss )ith them the possible situations )hen and ho) they can use
ellipsis.
? .ake them form generaliations on usin5 elli1sis.

? In!ite your students to do the Mar, #t Ri5htU e*ercise.
? 7sk your students to read the gi!en sentences and choose the blank
that marks the most appropriate place to insert ellipsis points.
? .ake them re)rite the sentences then check their ans)ers against
the follo)ing(
1. @ %he intellect+ seeker of absolute truth or the heart lo!er of
absolute good P )e a)ake. A 'y -alph 4alo 2$erson
2. @ %ime is a test of trouble but not a remedy P.A 'y 2$ily
&ickinson
3. %ime ne!er P an actual suffering strengthens as sine)s do )ith
age.A by( Emily =ickinson
4. If )e )ere things born not to
shed a tear A%3 'y: 9ercy Bysshe
'helley
5. @ Rise in the spiritual rock + flo) through our deed Pand make
them pure. @ 'y: )l"re 0or Tennyson
? In!ite them to share their #nsi5hts
by )riting their reflection5 insights on their most memorable poem. 7sk
them to illustrate at least t)o 9C:
of the ellipsis rules in their )ork.
? %ell them to find a partner+ and e*change papers.
? 7sk them gi!e comments or feedback on each others0 )ork.
? 7sk them to do the "est o2
Round U1 task )here they can talk about
their family or friend or classmate or about their special abilities and )hy
they feel great because of them. .ake them present a )rite up of this
sharing then remind them to use ellipsis )hene!er necessary.
? In!ite them to do the Elli1sis ;atrol tas, )here they
)ill look for a
stack of old ne)spapers and magaines. %hey need to scout for and
choose articles of that interest them. %hen+ instruct them to look for
and encircle all the ellipsis used in the articles.
? Lead them to disco!er )ho in the class can find the most number of
articles )ith ellipsis.

? =ouble check if they clearly understood the meaning of the poem
e*plored in class as )ell as )hy they need to celebrate self;)orth. 7llo)
them to pro!e their understanding of ho) these !alued concepts can be
realied through getting in!ol!ed in real ; life tasks in the follo)ing phase.


? -or the YOUR .#CO)ERY T$% phase of the lesson+ re"uire
them to form 2our 0E 3 Di5 5rou1s+ and each group should choose
one from the follo)ing tasks to )ork on.
? 7llo) them to discuss ho) they0ll best achie!e any of the follo)ing.


'or Grou1 1 8 $n $d!ice ;oem
? .oti!ate them to )rite a poem that offers ad!ice to a friend+ relati!e+
classmate+ schoolmate or anyone else.
? .ake them use these )ords and phrases in any order.
? Remember
? -orget
? =o
? =o not
? 'eek
? 2atch out for
? Remind them to use rhyme5 rhythm5 repetition 5 imagery in their
poem
? In!ite them to read or recite their poem to other groups or to the
class.
? 6i!e feedback.
? Read ad!iceP that persuadeP.
? Look at printP that persuadeP
? Listen to theP that persuadeP


'or Grou1 @ 8 $d!ice Column
? In!ite them to( Read ad!ice columns from ne)spapers or magaines
or comics that persuade people toP..
? look at print or email ads+ billboards posts on -# or %)itter+ listen
to the radio+ or )atch %& talk sho)s or %& commercials that persuade
people to do 5not to do something in order to celebrate self;)orth
? look for ad!ice for those )ho ha!e problems )ith their self;)orth
? collect them and e*change their collection )ith their group mates
? Note the )ords you read or hear+ images that you see and
ho) the persuade you
? find out if humor is used in the ads
? )atch out for )hat these ad!ices ha!e in common
? report your findings to the other groups.
? 6i!e feedback.


'or Grou1 I 8 Loo, U1 to the *ero
? .ake them choose their most remembered poet5 persona in their
fa!orite poem and use him5her as their role model in life.
? 7sk them to think and )rite about the outstanding trait5 "uality5
attitude that is )orthy of an e!aluating.
? Remind them to cite the lines con!eying such a trait and use them as
possible )ords of )isdom.
? 'hare their thoughts )ith the class.
? 6i!e feedback.

Grou1 E 8 Musical "eat
? In!ite them to choose a song 9rap+ pop+ rock+ ethnic+ classical+
country+ religious+ etc.: that can be matched to their fa!ourite poem.
? 7sk them to try )riting ne) )ords 9e*pressing their ideas on ho) to
celebrate self;)orth: to go )ith the music.
? .ake them use rhymes+ repetition+ imagery+ figures of speech+
rhythm.
? In!ite them to render the song in class.
? 6i!e feedback.

? Impress upon them that they0!e finished the enabling acti!ities at this
point. .ake them think about+ look o!er+ then consolidate )hat they0!e
learned on the ma,or and sub concepts+ literary and language communication
skills. Encourage them to ans)er these "uestions( /o) did you like3 =oes
they the acti!ities feel right to you3 2hat )ill you do ne*t3
? 6uide them on their -IN7L %7'8. 'tress to them that they are ready
to try their hand on their ma,or task for the first "uarter( a speech choir
presentation. .ake them ans)er this "uestion ( /a!e you e!er )anted to
be on stage )hile you0re )ith a group reciting a poem6
? %ell them they are lucky to ha!e the chance to perform in a speech choir
presentation. Remind them that they ha!e e!erything they need
to come up )ith a !ery impressi!e one. 'tress that they ha!e to make it
as best as they can+ and they must undergo a process.
? 6i!e them some tips or guidelines to follo) to come up
)ith an impressi!e speech choir presentation. .ake sure they re!ie)
the guidelines before they plunge into the process. Remind them to keep
these points in mind as they go through the process.

? Let them do the CONNECT part )here they0ll form three big groups+
and from the poems they ha!e e*plored in class+ choose one that(
? interests the ma,ority of the group members
? is most liked
? members feel a close connection to
? members )ant to read and
? members en,oy reading in public.
? /a!e them decide )hich poem is the best for speech choir
presentation.


? Ne*t+ let them prepare a /or,in5 cri1t& /a!e them recall the steps
to follo) in making a )orking script like(
? ha!e a copy of the poem and use it as a )orking script
? underline the parts they find most dramatic 9)ords+ phrases+
images+ sounds and rhythm:
? mark the parts )here they0ll go slo)ly+ speak up or pause
? not end )ith a line but )ith a punctuation mark
? make notes describing the speaker or persona or characters
and consider his5 her
? age
? feeling e*pressed in the poem 9 Is there a change in
this5her feeling as the poem goes on3:
? clarify the tone5 attitude 9 thoughtful+ tender+ serious+
sarcastic+ sad+ happy: you need to con!ey.
? decide
? )hether the poem should be read by(
in alternating lines
in se!eral !oices or single !oice
? ho) you )ill use your !oice to con!ey your tone and
? )hat single impression you )ant your audience to
get from your reading
? 'tress to them the importance of ha!ing The 'air ;lan phase )here
they )illA
? understand the te*t
throughly before they memorie it
? plan their mo!ements
? specify the posture and )hat mo!ements )ill be used e!en in
the entrance and the e*it
? act out some parts especially the key parts of the poem
? decide on and be creati!e in their choice of props+ costumes+
scenery sound effects or other forms of musical background
? Ne*t+ push them to Rehearse4 rehearse4 rehearseI )here they )ill
? practice reading aloud
? read according to punctuation
? break do)n long sentences into sub,ect and its meaning
? read groups of )ords for meaning rather than reading single
)ords
? not come to a full pause but read on to the ne*t line to
complete the thought
? read )ith e*pression 9 $hange the tone of your !oice to add
meaning to the )ord:
? use the tone of your !oice+ eye mo!ement+ facial e*pressions
and minimal gestures to emphasie key )ords and phrases
? read aloud into the tape recorder+ and listen to it to note
accuracy and e*pression
? read aloud+ and share feedback )ith a partner first+ then )ith
the rest of the group
? be open for comments and suggestions for impro!ing your
performance.
? use eye contact )ith your audience
? consider and be guided by the follo)ing criteria in your speech
choir presentation
=eli!ery 9 phrasing+ pausing+ intonation+ stress:
&oice 9 "uality+ pro,ection+ !olume+ pitch or tone:
-acial e*pression+ eye contact+ gestures
$horeography 9 mo!ement:
$ostumes5 props5 background music+ sounds
? $heck their progress.
? 6i!e comments and suggestions.


? 6uide them to the YOUR
TRE$URE phase of the lesson. 'tress to
them that this is the first "uarter final appraisal )here it is safe to integrate and
the concepts they0!e learned as )ell as the skills they0!e de!eloped or enhanced
during the course. Remind them that they must think back+ reflect and focus on
the essential points that they en,oyed
found helpful
)ould like to )ork on further
? In!ite them to keep a record of all of these and add their ans)ers to
the follo)ing "uestions(
5. 2hat is it you found most difficult in this lesson3
6. 2hat )ill you do to sol!e these difficulties3
7. 2rite at least three 9F: possible steps you can adopt for you to
sol!e this difficulties.
8. 2hat do you hope to strengthen in the ne*t lesson5s3
? .oti!ate them to complete the chart as sho)n )ith entries
called for.



NameA _________________________GradeF ection ___________
Juarter _______________Lesson __________________________ t
enKoyed hel12ul Most
di22icult
/ays to
5et a:ay
:ith the
most
di22icult
*o1eF
eH1ect to
im1ro!eF
stren5then
in the neHt
lesson
:oul
d
li,e
to
:or,
2urth
er
Teachers Guide
Module @
Lesson 1
______________________________________________________________
FINCING OT5ERES GREATNESS


A. O!er!ie: o2 Content and ODKecti!es
1. compare and contrast similar information presented in different te*ts
2. shift from one listening strategy to another based on topic+ purpose
and le!el of difficulty of the persuasi!e te*t
3. establish connections of e!ents and ho) these lead to the ending of a
material
4. gi!e the appropriate communicati!e style for an intimate situation
5. analye literature as a means of !aluing other people and their !arious
circumstances in life
6. distinguish the features present in poetry and prose
7. employ !aried !erbal and non;!erbal strategies to create impact on the
audience )hile deli!ering lines in a Reader0s %heater or in a $hamber
%heatre
8. use ad!erbs in narration


B. $ssessment ;lan
1. 1re;assessment( Tas, 1 Methin,s 'ee page 444 of the
learning
package.
2. 1ost;assessment( Your 'inal Tas,A earch 2or
Greatness Refer to
page 444.


C. $cti!ities
1. #ntroduction
Tas, @A Connectin5 Li!es
a. 7sk students to
consider this situation( 7 student recei*e
acae$ic reco!nition "ro$ the school% ;ow o you think a
supporti*e parent woul speak to the chil6 4ill others( such as a
"rien or teacher( speak to her in the sa$e $anner6 Use the !ri
'elow to create possi'le ialo!ues 'etween the "ollowin!: stuent8
parent( stuent8"rien( stuent8teacher% Brainstor$ on
what each one woul say to the stuent%
b. 0et stuents acco$plish the task in !roups o" "our%
c. 7sk them to present their dialogues to the class. Each member
has to take on a role.
d. 'ynthesie the acti!ity by discussing that people ha!e different
language registers depending on the audience+ situation and topic.
Zoom in on the language register 9intimate: bet)een the
child5student and parent. #e guided by the follo)ing "uestions(
1. 2hat is the degree of formality in each con!ersation3 1lace a
check mark on the column )hich corresponds )ith your ans)er.
.e5ree
o2
'ormality
LO/ *#G
*
tudent8
;arent
tudent8
'riend
tudent8
Teacher
2. /o) does our relationship )ith others influence the )ay )e
communicate )ith them3

RE$.#NG *OME/OR%


a. Instruct the students to read the selections at home.
b. 7sk students to think of friends that they are reminded of after
reading @7uld Lang 'yne.A
c. 1rompt students to list do)n names of people that they encounter
on a daily basis and )ho e*emplify greatness in their o)n special )ay.

2. ;resentation


Readin5 TeHtsA
a. 7sk the moti!ational "uestion+ @2hat does greatness mean3A
b. Read the poem+ )ul 0an! Syne. 1ose the follo)ing
"uestions(
1. 2hen is @7uld Lang 'yneA usually sung3
2. 2ho is being referred to in the song3
3. 2hat makes the persona0s friends unforgettable3
4. 2hat e*periences ha!e they gone through3
5. 2hat makes the persona0s friends unforgettable3 2hat
e*periences ha!e they gone through3


c. 'egue by asking+ @Of the people you meet+ ho) do you sho) an
appreciation for their greatness3A
d. Read the poem+ I %hink $ontinually Of %hose 2ho 2ere %ruly
6reat by Stephen Spener% 7sk these processing "uestions(
1. 2hat distinct "uality of those )ho are great does
the persona mention in the first stana3
2. 7ccording to the second stana+ )hat should not
be forgotten3
3. 2hat is the legacy of those )ho are great3

'indin5 imilarities and .i22erences 0Re2er to Tas, I3
a. Instruct students to compare and contrast the ideas found in
the t)o te*ts.
b. 7sk them to ans)er the E*ercise 7 and # of %ask F.
c. 1rocess their ans)ers(
%ask F7( >. C C. > F. 5 H. C B. 5
d. 7sk students to think of responses to this "uestion( %hink about
this "uestion( =ramatic poetry is marked by the e*pression of feelings
or emotions. =o the t)o poems fall under this genre3 Justify your
ans)er.
e. Engage students in a class discussion concerning Item No. H.


3. Enrichment
Tas, <A Greatness Re!isited
a. Instruct students to use the pro!ided )eblinks in order to
kno) more about @greatnessA
b. 7sk them to !ie) Oprah0s speech concerning .artin Luther 8ing.
c. Let them fill out the table that follo)s.
d. 1rocess the acti!ity through the follo)ing "uestions(
1. 2ho is .artin Luther 8ing Jr.3
2. 7ccording to him+ )ho has the potential to be great3
3. /o) does Oprah 2infrey pay tribute to the greatness
of .artin Luther 8ing3
4. /o) does she persuade her audience to take the
path to)ards greatness3
5. /o) do the signposts and key )ords aid you in
determining the main idea of the speech3
6. /o) do these details aid you in comprehending the
speech better3


OR7L 1R7$%I$E( T$% EA Greatness .eli!ered
a. .odel the proper reading of the poem.
b. 6i!e a mini;lecture on the importance of using facial
e*pressions and gestures to con!ey the meaning of the te*t.
c. Let students read the te*t to e*emplify these points
about proper oral reading

4. EH1ansion
Tas, <A Unco!erin5 Greatness
a. 7sk the students to read the infographic e*cerpt.
b. Let them identify the ad!erbs. 7sk them to e*plain )hat
is signified by the highlighted ad!erbs.
c. Instruct them to make generaliations about the forms
and functions of ad!erbs of time and place.
d. /a!e them pro!ide more e*amples of ad!erbs of time
and place.
e. Instruct students to ans)er Tas, ?&

Tas, CA Greatness Recounted
a. 7sk students to read the sample paragraph on page 444.
b. Engage students in discussion through the
follo)ing "uestions
2hat does the )riter articulate in the first sentence3
1. /o) does the )riter de!elop this idea in the
sentences that follo)3
2. /o) does the paragraph end3 2hat is signified in
the last sentence3
3. 2hat are the parts of the paragraph3
4. /o) does the character in the paragraph
manifest greatness3
5. $ompare
this paragraph )ith the t)o poems in YOUR
TE(T3 2hat makes it different from the t)o3
c. 7sk students to use a table to organie their ans)er to Item
B. Let them share their ans)ers to Xuestion B )ith the class.

Tas, OA /ritesho1
a. #efore allo)ing the students to go through the
)riting process+ ask them to gather more information
about narrati!e paragraphs through this link(
http(55classroom.synonym.com5)rite;one;)ellde!eloped;
narrati!e;paragraph;HHJB.html
b. 7llo) them to share )hat they ha!e learned through the )eb
link.
c. 6uide them as they brainstorm+ draft+ re!ise and
assess their narrati!e paragraphs. /a!e them use the
organiers
pro!ided on pages 44444.
d. Remind your students that they )ill continue to re!ise
their output in the succeeding lessons.

5. ynthesis
EVI% %I$8E%
a. 7sk students to accomplish the F;C;> e*it ticket.
b. 7sk them to share their ans)ers )ith their peers.
c. Resol!e "uestions that students may ha!e.
d. 'ynthesie the lesson.
-IN7L %7'8
a. E*plain the mechanics of their final task+ %ask >>(
%he 'earch for 6reatness.
b. 1ro!ide more e*amples of infographics.
c. /a!e students )ork in groups of B.
.Y %RE7'URE
a. 7sk students to accomplish %ask >C( .y -inal %houghts.
b. Encourage se!eral students to share their ans)ers )ith
the class.
Xuarter C+ Lesson C
A. O!er!ie: o2 Content and ODKecti!es
%heme( ODser!in5 Others Circumstances
1. get information from print media
2. make inferences from )hat )as said
3. summarie the information contained in the !ie)ed material
4. gi!e the appropriate communicati!e styles for a casual situation
5. e*plain ho) the elements specific to a selection build the theme
6. distinguish the features present in the selected te*t
7. employ !aried !erbal and non;!erbal strategies to create impact on the
audience )hile deli!ering lines in a Readers %heatre
8. use ad!erbs of manner in narration


B. $ssessment ;lan
1. 1re;assessment( Social Lens 'ee page 444 of the learning
package.
2. 1ost;assessment( SiA .ords! @ Stor2 Refer to page 444.


C. $cti!ities
1. #ntroduction
Tas, 1A ocial Lens 0;icture $nalysis3
a. 7sk the students to
obser!e the pictures closely.
b. Instruct them to )rite an essay in one minute based on their
obser!ation.
c. Let them share their ans)ers in triads. $all representati!es
to share their ans)er )ith the class
d. 1ose the moti!ational "uestion+ @/o) do you !ie) other
people0s circumstances3A
e. %ell them that they )ill continue to think of and rethink their
responses to the said "uestion.

Tas, @A Casual Con!ersations
a. $s, students to share their oDser!ations :ith a 1artner&
b. $s, them to thin, aDout the di22erence Det:een tal,in5
:ith their 2riends and their 1arents& Let them Kot do:n their
oDser!ations usin5 the taDle 1ro!ided& $s, them to determine
:hich o2 the re5isters4 intimate or casual4 is used
in their con!ersation :ith others&
c. 'ynthesie by discussing the importance of recogniing the
audience and purpose in order to communicate effecti!ely )ith
others.

RE$.#NG *OME/OR%
7sk students to read the t)o poems and then ans)er the
graphic organiers that follo).


2. ;resentation
Readin5 TeHtsA
a. 1ose the moti!ational "uestion+ @/o) do you !ie) other
people0s circumstances3A
b. Engage the students in a discussion by processing
these "uestions(
Xuestions to ans)er for @.an )ith the /oe
1. 2hat is the image of the man )ith the hoe3
2. /o) does the poet describe him3
3. 2hat does the line+ @2hat to him are 1lato and the s)ing
of 1leaiades3A
4. 2hat does the bent body of the man )ith the hoe signify3
5. 7ccording to the poet+ )ho is responsible for the
condition or state of the man )ith the hoe3


Juestions to ans:er 2or 6onnet @OS
1. 2hat does the opening line of the poem mean3
2. 2ho is being addressed by
the poet3
3. 2hy
does the poet consider the faiths of old his daily bread3
4. 2hat makes the persona happy3

5. /o) do you !ie) the persona0s circumstance3


3. Enrichment
Tas, @A 1ot the .i22erence
a. 7sk the students to share their illustrations of the man
)ith the hoe.
b. Let them e*plain their illustration.
c. 7sk them to share their o)n !ie)s concerning people
)ho share the same situation.
Tas, @A Music to my ears
a. /a!e students accomplish the graphic organier for this segment.
b. 7sk representati!es to share their ans)ers )ith the class.
c. =iscuss the structure of the sonnet.


OR7L 1R7$%I$E
a. .odel the proper reading of the sonnet.
b. 6i!e a mini;lecture on the importance of using one0s !oice
in rendering an oral interpretation of poems and other te*ts.
d. 7sk students to read the poem to e*emplify these points
about proper oral reading.


4. EH1ansion
Tas, <A *o: did you do itB
a. 7sk the students to read the infographic and to focus on the
highlighted )ords. Elicit the form and function of these )ords. #e
guided by these "uestions
1. 2hat does the informational material say about the economic
situation of the country3
2. /o) can the generation of more ,obs influence the -ilipino
)orkers3
3. /o) should the ,ob challenge be addressed3
4. /o) do the )ords+ ra/idl2 and in0ormall2+ function
in the
sentence abo!e3
5. 2hat kind of ad!erbs are these3


b. 7sk them to create a generaliation about ad!erbs of manner.
c. 7sk them to ans)er %ask O( $ontrolled 1ractice. 1rocess
their ans)ers.
Tas, ?A /ritesho1

a. 7sk students to re!ise their narrati!e paragraph using the
ad!erbs they ha!e learned in this lesson.
b. /a!e them assess their )ork through the Output
'atisfaction 2orksheet.
5. ynthesis
-IN7L %7'8
a. E*plain the mechanics of
their final task+ = /ords4 1 tory&
b. 7sk students to summarie the main idea of Oprah0s
speech in si* )ords. 7sk them to share their ans)ers


.Y %RE7'URE
c. 7sk students to ans)er the prompt found on page 444of
the learning package.
d. Encourage se!eral students to share their ans)ers )ith
the class.


Xuarter C+ Lesson F this is not included in the %6
A. O!er!ie: o2 Content and ODKecti!es
ThemeA Learnin5 2rom Others Challen5es

1. get information from a pamphlet
2. listen and summarie information from persuasi!e te*ts
3. summarie the information contained in the material !ie)ed
4. gi!e the appropriate communicati!e style for !arious 9con!ersational:
situation
5. e*plain ho) the elements specific to a genre contribute to the theme of
a particular literary selection.
6. distinguish the features present in poetry.
7. use the correct production of English sound( !o)el sound+ consonant
sounds+ diphthongs+ etc.< and
8. use ad!erbs of fre"uency
B. $ssessment ;lan
1. 1re;assessment( Tas, 1 Lets Tal, aDout "ullyin5 'ee page 444
of the learning package.


TO; "ULLY#NG&&&T$%E $ T$N.U
TRANSCRI#T
Open(
.icah( Right a)ay )hen I hear the )ord bullying+ IKm like+ I think maybe
somebody )as physically hurt+ but really+ itKs not.
%ricia( %here )as a group of boys+ actually+ that started follo)ing me around.
=a!e( IK!e made fun of people+ )hen IKm )ith my friends+ you kno)+ IKm not
gonna lie.
Rebecca( %here )as one kid )ho I think I teased pretty relentlessly for a
)hile+ you kno)+ ,ust to get a laugh.
.icah( You could really hurt somebody. .ore so emotionally than physically.
1hysical )ounds heal+ but the emotional ones are the ones that you
remember.
=a!e( %he reason )hy I did this is pretty much for laughs+ to make my group
laugh.
%ricia( I felt )orthless+ I felt like )ho I )as+ I shouldnKt be.
#rittany( %hat hurts the most and girls )ill ,ust keep going at it and they )onKt
stop.
#rendon( I think e!eryone bullies sometimes+ )hether they realie it or not.
http(55))).pbs.org5inthemi*5sho)s5transcript4bullying.html
2. 1ost;assessment( Your 'inal Tas,A #n a Nutshell Refer
to page
444.
C. $cti!ities
1. #ntroduction
Tas, @A # /itnessU
a. 7sk students if they ha!e )itnessed bullying in school or e!en at
home.
b. Let them read the pamphlet on bullying.
c. =iscuss the content of the material through the processing
"uestions(
1. 2hat is bullying3
2. 2hat are the signs that a person is being bullied3
3. /o) can you reach out to these persons3
4. 2hat can you learn from this specific challenging
situation3 2rite a >;minute essay. 2rite your ans)er in your
notebook.


d. Let them )rite a One8Binute 2ssay thereafter.
RE$.#NG *OME/OR%


a. Instruct the students to read the selections at home.
b. 7sk students to think of people )hose e*periences are similar
to the persona in the poems.
c. Let students ans)er %ask F at home.
2. ;resentation
Readin5 TeHtsA
a. Refer to Tas, IA Ta,in5 a tand to discuss the reading te*ts.
b. 7sk the moti!ational "uestion+ @2hat can you learn from
others0 challenges3
c. Read the poem+ @If 2e .ust =ie.A 1ose the follo)ing "uestions(
1. 2hat do the >st four lines establish3
2. 2hat message does the persona for)ard to his allies3
3. /o) does the persona describe his enemies3
4. 7ccording to the poet+ ho) can one die nobly3
d. 'egue to the discussion of the other poem by asking if they
kno) the origin or meaning of the )ord+ In!ictus. 9Note( In!ictus is the
latin )ord for @uncon"uered.A
e. 7sk them+ @2hat does
it mean to be uncon"uered3A
f. Read the poem. 7sk
these processing "uestions(
1. 2hat is the setting of the poem3
2. 2hat is the persona0s attitude to)ard the predicament that
he is in3
3. 2hat is his resolution3

3. Enrichment
T$% EA 1ea, EasyU
a. .odel the proper reading of the poem. -ocus on articulation of
the !o)el sounds.
b. Let the students differentiate the long and short !o)el
sounds through the pro!ided )ords under this task.


4. EH1ansion
Tas, <A "ullyin5 ur!ey
a. 7sk students to ans)er the sur!ey on bullying.
b. Let them share their responses )ith their peers.
c. $onduct a class sur!ey of the "uestion+ @/o) often do you
)itness bullying in the campus3A
d. Elicit from the students the function of these )ords( ne!er+
rarely+ occasionally+ al)ays.
e. Let students construct generaliations about ad!erbs of fre"uency.
f. 7sk them to ans)er Tas, =A Controlled ;ractice. 1rocess
their
ans)ers.


5. ynthesis
-IN7L %7'8
a. E*plain the mechanics of their final task.
b. Let them )atch the ad!ocacy !ideo on bullying.
c. 7sk them to summarie the message of !ideo.


.Y %RE7'URE
a. 7sk students to ans)er the prompt found on page 444of
the learning package.
b. Encourage se!eral students to share their ans)ers to the class.






Teachers Guide
Module @
Lesson @
______________________________________________________________
O<ser6in3 OthersE Circumstances
A. O!er!ie: o2 Content and ODKecti!es
1. get information from print media
2. make inferences from )hat )as said
3. summarie the information contained in the !ie)ed material
4. gi!e the appropriate communicati!e styles for a casual situation
5. e*plain ho) the elements specific to a selection build the theme
6. distinguish the features present in the selected te*t
7. employ !aried !erbal and non;!erbal strategies to create impact on the
audience )hile deli!ering lines in a Readers %heatre
8. use ad!erbs of manner in narration


B. $ssessment ;lan
1. 1re;assessment( Social Lens 'ee page 444 of the learning
package.
2. 1ost;assessment( SiA .ords! @ Stor2 Refer to page 444.
1. $cti!ities
1. #ntroduction
Tas, 1A ocial Lens 0;icture $nalysis3
a. 7sk the students to
obser!e the pictures closely.
b. Instruct them to )rite an essay in one minute based on their
obser!ation.
c. Let them share their ans)ers in triads. $all representati!es
to share their ans)er )ith the class
d. 1ose the moti!ational "uestion+ @/o) do you !ie) other
people0s circumstances3A
e. %ell them that they )ill continue to think of and rethink their
responses to the said "uestion.


Tas, @A Casual Con!ersations
a. $s, students to share their oDser!ations :ith a 1artner&
b. $s, them to thin, aDout the di22erence Det:een tal,in5
:ith their 2riends and their 1arents& Let them Kot do:n their
oDser!ations usin5 the taDle 1ro!ided& $s, them to determine
:hich o2 the re5isters4 intimate or casual4 is used
in their con!ersation :ith others&
c. 'ynthesie by discussing the importance of recogniing the
audience and purpose in order to communicate effecti!ely )ith
others.

RE$.#NG *OME/OR%


7sk students to read the t)o poems and then ans)er the
graphic organiers that follo).

2. ;resentation
Readin5 TeHtsA
a. 1ose the moti!ational "uestion+ @/o) do you !ie)
other people0s circumstances3A
b. Engage the students in a discussion by processing
these "uestions(
Xuestions to ans)er for @.an )ith the /oe
1. 2hat is the image of the man )ith the hoe3
2. /o) does the poet describe him3
3. 2hat does the line+ @2hat to him are 1lato and
the s)ing of 1leaiades3A
4. 2hat does the bent body of the man )ith the
hoe signify3
5. 7ccording to the poet+ )ho is responsible for
the condition or state of the man )ith the hoe3


Juestions to ans:er 2or 6onnet @OS
1. 2hat does the opening line of the poem mean3
2. 2ho is being addressed
by the poet3
3. 2hy does the poet consider the faiths of old his
daily bread3
4. 2hat makes the persona
happy3
5. /o) do you !ie) the persona0s circumstance3

3. Enrichment
Tas, @A 1ot the .i22erence
a. 7sk the students to share their illustrations of the man
)ith the hoe.
b. Let them e*plain their illustration.
c. 7sk them to share their o)n !ie)s concerning people
)ho share the same situation.
Tas, @A Music to my ears
a. /a!e students accomplish the graphic organier for this segment.
b. 7sk representati!es to share their ans)ers )ith the class.
c. =iscuss the structure of the sonnet.


OR7L 1R7$%I$E
a. .odel the proper reading of the sonnet.
b. 6i!e a mini;lecture on the importance of using one0s !oice
in rendering an oral interpretation of poems and other te*ts.
a. 7sk students to read the poem to e*emplify these
points about proper oral reading.
4. EH1ansion Tas, <A *o:
did you do itB
a. 7sk the students to read the infographic and to focus on
the highlighted )ords. Elicit the form and function of these
)ords. #e guided by these "uestions


1. 2hat does the informational material say about the
economic situation of the country3
2. /o) can the generation of more ,obs influence the
-ilipino )orkers3
3. /o) should the ,ob challenge be addressed3
4. /o) do the )ords+ ra/idl2 and
in0ormall2+ function in
the sentence abo!e3
5. 2hat kind of ad!erbs are these3


b. 7sk them to create a generaliation about ad!erbs
of manner.
c. 7sk them to ans)er %ask O( $ontrolled 1ractice.
1rocess their ans)ers.


Tas, ?A /ritesho1
a. 7sk students to re!ise their narrati!e paragraph using the
ad!erbs they ha!e learned in this lesson.
b. /a!e them assess their )ork through the Output
'atisfaction 2orksheet.


5. ynthesis
-IN7L %7'8
a. E*plain the mechanics of
their final task+ = /ords4 1 tory&
b. 7sk students to summarie the main idea of Oprah0s
speech in si* )ords. 7sk them to share their ans)ers


.Y %RE7'URE
a. 7sk students to ans)er the prompt found on page 444of
the learning package.
b. Encourage se!eral students to share their ans)ers )ith
the class.
Teachers Guide
Module @
Lesson I
______________________________________________________________
Feelin3 0or Others
B. $ssessment ;lan
1. ;re8assessment
1ossible 'entences
2. ;ost assessment
Re!isiting the 1ossible 'entences


C. Resources
1. Materials
a. mo!ie poster of @%he /unger 6amesA
b. recording of a short story
c. )orksheets


2. EGui1ment
a. 7udio $= player
b. 1ro,ector 9if digital pictures )ill be used:


D. $cti!ities


1. #ntroduction
Scrutinize an Speculate
'ee %ask > RYour Initial %asks0
a. 'ho) a picture featuring the mo!ie+ @%he /unger 6amesA
b. 7sk students to predict )hat the story is all about.
c. 'ho) the connection of the mo!ie to the short story that they are
about to read.
2. 1resentation
'ee %ask F C9iece 'y 9iece5
a. /a!e the students accomplish the task.
b. %he correct ans)ers are(
1. beamed
2. clung
3. boisterous
4. lapse
5. daintily
6. petulantly
7. lottery
8. paraphernalia


II. #E7. ; smile
$LIN6 ; embrace
#OI'%EROU' ; uproarious
=7IN%ILY ; elegantly
17R71/ERN7LI7 ; e"uipment

'ee %ask H CBake a Bin Bo*ie5
a. /a!e the students accomplish the task.
b. Remind them to !isualie or imagine the e!ents in the story as they
listen to the recording of it.
c. 7sk the students to dra) their !isualiation of the story.
d. /a!e the students indicate the paragraph number of the lines in the
story that they are sketching.


3. Enrichment
'ee %ask B CShare /our Bin Bo*ies5
a. =i!ide the class into small groups.
b. 7sk the students to share )ith their group their images of the story.
c. 7sk the students to describe the setting+ the characters+ and the
important e!ents in the story.


'ee %ask O C9ickin! Out Optical Illusions5
a. =i!ide the class into small groups.
b. 7sk the groups to identify the sensory images in the story+ @%he
Lottery.A
c. 7sk the groups to e*plain ho) the sensory images used in the
selection make the story more realistic.
'ee %ask J C9rose in 9rocess5
a. 6i!e additional input about the elements of prose.


%he Elements of 1rose
? $haracters
? 'etting
? 1lot
? 1oint of !ie)
? %heme
? .ood


You ha!e learned about the elements of poetry+ drama+ and prose.
$haracters
$haracters are the people or animals in the story. 7 story often describes the
interaction of characters+ including their relationships and the changes they
undergo.
In the story you ,ust read. %he characters are #rian+ his mom+ 7le*+ 8enya+
and .ike.


'etting
'etting is )hen and )here the story takes place.
%here are t)o settings in this story. %he first is #rian0s home and the second
is art camp. %he story takes place o!er the summer.


1lot
1lot is )hat happens in the story+ or the se"uence of e!ents.
%he plot of the story is #rian is )orried about going to art camp. 2hen he
arri!es+ there is only one spot left for him to sit do)n. /e meets three other
kids at the table and they all start talking. #rian goes home kno)ing he has
ne) friends.


1oint of &ie)
%he point of !ie) of the story relates to the person telling the story.
'ometimes the narrator is a character in the story and tells the story. %his
type of narrator tells the story from a 2irst81erson 1oint o2 !ie:& 'ometimes
the narrator is not a character in the story and refers to the characters by
name or as he or she% %his type of narrator tells the story from a third81erson
1oint o2 !ie:.
%his story is )ritten in third;person point of !ie) because #rian is not telling
the story. %he narrator refers to #rian as he and the kids as they.


%heme
%heme is the lesson or message of a story. %o identify the story0s message+
look for clues in )hat the characters say and do+ )hat happens as the result
of their actions+ and ho) the characters change.
In this story+ the theme is ne) and scary situations can change to be !ery
happy e!ents.


.ood
%he mood of a selection is the feeling the author creates using story details+
the setting+ and images.
%he mood of this story starts off )orrisome because #rian is ner!ous about
not kno)ing anyone at art camp. #ut the mood changes by the end of the
story )hen #rian is happy to meet three ne) friends.


'ource( http(55mhschool.com5lead4C>5gradeH5ccslh4gH4rl4>4Cc.html




8ey 1oints( 2hat is a 1eriodical3


1eriodicals are publications )hich are issued at regular inter!als+ such as
,ournals+ magaines+ and ne)spapers. %hey are also often referred to as
serials. 1eriodicals usually consist of a collection of articles+ )hich may range
from a single page story in a magaine to a H? page study in a scholarly
,ournal.


1eriodicals can offer some ad!antages o!er books depending upon your
information need. /o)e!er+ )hen using periodicals+ it is important to
understand the difference bet)een scholarly and popular periodicals.

The $d!anta5es o2 Usin5 ;eriodicals
? #ecause they are published fre"uently+ periodicals are the best
sources for current information.
? $urrent e!ents are usually discussed in periodicals long before they
become the sub,ect of a book.
? 1eriodicals often contain information on the latest trends+ products+
research and theories.
? 1eriodicals are the best source for ephemeral or !ery specialied
information.
? 1eriodicals e*ist for e!ery field and e!ery interest+ pro!iding access to
a !ariety of hard;to find information.
? =ue to the shorter length of periodical articles+ more topics may be
co!ered )ithin one !olume of a periodical than in one book.
%he most common types of periodicals are cholarly+ ;o1ular+ and Trade
Journals.


cholarly Journals
? Report original research or e*perimentation+ often in specific academic
disciplines.
? %he targeted audience is the scholarly researcher+ faculty+ and
students.
? 7rticles are )ritten by e*perts in the field+ and are signed.
? 7rticles often use specialied ,argon of the discipline+ and assume a
familiarity )ith the sub,ect.


;o1ular Ma5aMines
? $o!er ne)s+ current e!ents+ hobbies+ or special interests.
? 7re targeted at the general public+ and a!ailable to a broad audience.
? 7rticles are usually )ritten by a member of the editorial staff or a free
lance )riter.
? %he language of the articles is geared for any educated audience+ and
does not assume familiarity )ith the sub,ect matter.


Trade Journals
? =iscuss practical information and concerns in a particular industry.
? $ontain business ne)s+ product information+ ad!ertising+ trends in
technology+ and la).
? 7re targeted at the professionals in that industry+ or students
researching that industry.
? 7rticles are )ritten by e*perts in the field for other e*perts in the field.


'ource( http(55))).libraries.iub.edu53pageId[>??CCCB
'ee %ask D CBrowsin! throu!h Dournals5
a. /a!e the students accomplish the task.
b. 1rocess the ans)ers of the students.
c. =ra) students0 attention to the narrator0s perspecti!e about death.


'ee %ask Q CTippin! the Scale5
a. /a!e the students accomplish the task.
b. 1rocess the ans)ers of the students.

'ee %ask >? CCon*ersin! in >erse5
a. 6i!e input about the elements of poetry.
b. 1rocess the ans)ers of the students.


Elements of 1oetry
2hen you read a poem+ pay attention to some basic ideas(
)oice 92ho the speaking persona3 /o) is he5she speaking3:
tanMas 9ho) lines are grouped:
ound 9includes rhyme+ but also many other patterns:
Rhythm 9the kind of TbeatT or meter the poem has:
'i5ures o2 s1eech 9many poems are full of metaphors and other figurati!e
language:
'orm 9there are standard types of poem:


%oice
&oice is a )ord people use to talk about the )ay poems TtalkT to the reader.
Lyric poems and narrati!e poems are the ones you )ill see most. Lyric
poems e*press the feelings of the )riter. 7 narrati!e poem tells a story.
'ome other types of !oice are mas,4 a1ostro1he4 and con!ersation& $
mas, puts on the identity of someone or something else+ and speaks for it&
$1ostro1he talks to something that canKt ans)er 9a bee+ the moon+ a tree:
and is good for )ondering+ asking+ or offering ad!ice. Con!ersation is a
dialogue bet)een t)o !oices and often asks us to guess )ho the !oices are.
Stan4a
7 stanMa is a group )ithin a poem )hich may ha!e t)o or more lines. %hey
are like paragraphs.
'ome poems are made of RE7LLY short stanas+ called cou1lets;;t)o lines
that rhyme+ one after the other+ usually e"ual in length.
Sound
One of the most important things poems do is play )ith sound. %hat doesnKt
,ust mean rhyme. It means many other things. %he earliest poems )ere
memoried and recited+ not )ritten do)n+ so sound is !ery important in
poetry.
Rhyme ; Rhyme means sounds that agree. TRhymeT usually means end
rhymes 9)ords at the end of a line:. %hey gi!e balance and please the ear.
'ometimes rhymes are e*act. Other times they are ,ust similar. #oth are
okay.
You mark rhyme in a poem )ith the letters of the alphabet. -or instance+ in
this stana(
2hose )oods these are I think I kno). 9a:
/is house is in the !illage though< 9a:
/e )ill not see me stopping here 9b:
%o )atch his )oods fill up )ith sno). 9a:
the rhyme scheme is aaDa 9because Tkno)+T Tthough+T and Tsno)T rhyme+
they are marked Ta+T )hile ThereT is another rhyme+ and is marked TbT:
Re1etition ; Repetition occurs )hen a )ord or phrase is used more than
once. Repetition can create a pattern
Re2rain ; Lines repeated in the same )ay+ that repeat regularly in the poem.
$lliteration ; 7lliteration is the repetition of the same sound in different
)ords.
Onomato1oeia ; Onomatopoeia means )ords or phrases that sound like the
things they are describing. 9hiss+ oom+ bo);)o)+ etc.:
Consonance ; $onsonance happens )hen consonants agree in )ords+
though they may not rhyme. 9fast+ lost:
$ssonance 8 7ssonance happens )hen !o)els agree in )ords+ though they
may not rhyme. 9peach+ tree:
Rh2thm
Meter 9or metrics: ; 2hen you speak+ you donKt say e!erything in a steady
tone like a hum;;youKd sound funny. Instead+ you stress parts of )ords. You
say different parts of )ords )ith different !olume+ and your !oice rises and
falls as if you )ere singing a song. .ostly+ )e donKt notice )eKre doing it.
1oetry in English is often made up of poetic units or 2eet. %he most common
feet are the iamb+ the trochee+ the anapest+ and the dactyl. Each foot has one
stress or beat.
=epending on )hat kind of poem youKre )riting+ each line can ha!e any)here
from one to many stressed beats+ other)ise kno)n as feet. .ost common are(
Trimeter 9three beats:
Tetrameter 9four beats:
;entameter 9fi!e beats:
You also sometimes see dimeter 9t)o beats: and he*ameter 9si* beats: but
lines longer than that canKt be said in one breath+ so poets tend to a!oid them.
Fi3ures o0 s/eech
-igures of speech are also called figurati!e language. %he most )ell;kno)n
figures of speech are are simile+ metaphor+ and personification. %hey are
used to help )ith the task of Ttelling+ not sho)ing.T
imile ; a comparison of one thing to another+ using the )ords Tlike+T Tas+T or
Tas though.T
Meta1hor ; comparing one thing to another by saying that one thing is
another thing. .etaphors are stronger than similes+ but they are more difficult
to see.
;ersoni2ication ; speaking as if something )ere human )hen itKs not.
#oetic 0orms
%here are a number of common poetic 2orms. .
"allad ; story told in !erse. 7 ballad stana is usually four lines+ and there is
often a repetiti!e refrain. 7s you might guess+ this form started out as a song.
7n e*ample of a traditional 'cottish ballad is Lord Randal at
http(55))).bartleby.com5CHF5OO.html
*ai,u ; a short poem )ith se!enteen syllables+ usually )ritten in three lines
)ith fi!e syllables in the first line+ se!en in the second+ and fi!e in the third.
%he present tense is used+ the sub,ect is one thing happening no)+ and
)ords are not repeated. It does not rhyme. %he origin of the haiku is
Japanese.
CinGuain ; a fi!e;line poem )ith t)o syllables in the first line+ four in the
second+ si* in the third+ eight in the fourth+ and t)o in the fifth. It e*presses
one image or thought+ in one or possibly t)o sentences.
)illanelle ; a >Q;line poem )ith fi!e tercets and one "uatrain at the end. %)o
of the lines are repeated alternately at the ends of the tercets+ and finish off
the poem( the first line and the third line of the first tercet. 7lthough it sounds
!ery complicated+ itKs like a song or a dance and easy to see once youK!e
looked at a !illanelle.
Limeric, ; 7 fi!e;line poem+ usually meant to be funny. %he rhythm is
anapests. Lines >+ C+ and B rhyme )ith one another+ and lines F and H rhyme
)ith one another. Lines >+ C+ and B ha!e three feet+ lines F and H ha!e t)o
feet. 7n iamb can be substituted for an anapest in the first foot of any line. %he
last foot can add another unstressed beat for the rhyming effect.
onnet ; %here are different types of sonnet. %he most familiar to us is made
of three "uatrains and ends )ith a couplet. %hey tend to be complicated and
elegant. 2illiam 'hakespeare )rote the most )ell;kno)n sonnets.
'ree !erse 9or o1en 2orm: ; .uch modern poetry does not ob!iously rhyme
and doesnKt ha!e a set meter. /o)e!er+ sound and rhythm are often still
important+ and it is still often )ritten in short lines.
Concrete poetry 9pattern or sha1e poetry: is a picture poem+ in )hich the
!isual shape of the poem contributes to its meaning.
'ource( http(55))).dmturner.org5English51oetry5elements.htm


'ee %ask >> CCo$parin! an Contrastin! 9oetry an 9rose5
1rocess the ans)ers of the students.


4. E*pansion
'ee %ask >C CQuali"yin! Batters5
a. /a!e the students accomplish the task.
b. %he correct or possible ans)ers are(
1. ad!erbs
2. )here+ )hen+ ho)+ ho) often+ to )hat degree
3. 7d!erbs make our )riting more interesting+ appealing and attracti!e
to readers.

'ee %ask >F CFill in the Gap5
a. /a!e the students accomplish the task.
b. %he correct ans)ers are(
1. closely
2. often
3. interchangeably
4. usually
5. o!erly
6. )idely
7. more than t)o thousand years ago
8. e"ually
9. une"ually


'ee %ask >H C9roucin! Gliin! >owels5
a. .odel the correct production of the diphthongs.
b. Let the students produce the diphthongs properly.
http(55home.hib.no5al5engelsk5seks,on5'O--;.7'%ER5diphthongchar.htm

.i1hthon5 characteristics
7s diphthongs are gliding sounds+ they are described on the basis of the
tongue mo!ement from a beginning to an end position. %he phoneme













is a rising diphthong+ starting from the position of
the !o)el 5a5 and ending in the position of the !o)el 5u5. 7s 5a5 is not rounded+
the diphthong starts )ith spread lips+ but there is increasing lip rounding as the
glide approaches 5u5+ )hich is pronounced )ith rounded lips. In practice the
glide is hardly e!er long enough for the full second sound to be reached+
and in front of 'ortis consonants the glide is particularly short. 2hen follo)ed
by Lenis consonants+ the first element of the diphthong is considerably
lengthened. In the pronunciation of diphthongs+ therefore+ the -ortis5Lenis
contrast is particularly important+ and Nor)egians should take great care to
obser!e this phenomenon. %he illustrations ser!e as a reminder of the !ocal
organs+ and diphthongs must be en!isaged as resulting from the tongue and
lip mo!ement from an initial position to a position approaching the position of
the second sound element.
















starts as an open 9central:
sound
tongue mo!es up to)ards 5i5
lips stay unrounded











starts as a half;open back
sound
tongue mo!es front to)ards
5i5
lips gradually spread


Risin5 di1hthon5s
Rising diphthongs glide from a more open to a less open tongue position.
Rising dipthongs may be defined as fully back or fully front+ or they may glide
from a back to a front position. %he lip position or mo!ement is related to the
position of corresponding !o)el phonemes. 7 back rising diphthong )ill
therefore ha!e lip rounding+ )hereas a front rising diphthong )ill ha!e spread
lips. '#E has fi!e rising diphthong phonemes.































'ee
%ask
>B C&rill It On5
a. /a!e the students accomplish the task by pairs.
b. 6i!e feedback about their deli!ery.


'ee %ask >O CCreatin! Catchy Chronicles5
a. /a!e the students accomplish the task.
b. Remind the students to use ad!erbs in )riting their summaries.

'ee %ask >J CSu$ It Up=5
a. 1resent to the students the rubrics for the oral summary.
b. 6i!e feedback about students0 performance.


5. 'ynthesis
'ee %ask >D C-e*isitin! the 9ossi'le Sentences5
a./a!e the students accomplish the task.
b. 1rocess the sentences of the students.
Teachers Guide
Module @
Lesson E
______________________________________________________________
Su//ortin3 OtherEs Ad6ocacies


B. $ssessment ;lan
1. ;re8assessment
2. ;ost assessment

C. Resources
1. Materials
a. mo!ie clip about ,ustice
b. )orksheets
2. EGui1ment
a. 7udio $=5mo!ie player
b. 1ro,ector 9if digital picture )ill be used:


D. $cti!ities
1. #ntroduction
'ee %ask >+ 4orth Conte$platin!
a. Let the students )atch a !ideo clip about ,ustice.
b. 7sk students to share )ith the class their personal opinion about the
ideas presented in the !ideo clip.


'ee %ask C+ The First 4or
a. Let the students accomplish the task.
b. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.
9'haring T-irst 2ordsT )ill allo) students to identify important concepts
that may ha!e been left out of their o)n )ork.:


2. 1resentation
'ee %ask F. It5s &isclosin! Ti$e=
a. /a!e the students accomplish the task.
b. %he correct ans)ers are(
1. i B. b
2. a O. h
3. g J. e
4. c D. d
1. lynch ; to put to death+ especially by hanging+ by mob action and
)ithout
legal authority
2. ardent ; intensely de!oted+ eager+ or enthusiastic
3. emblematic ; symbolic
4. fortitude ; mental and emotional strength in facing difficulty+
ad!ersity+ or
danger
5. atrocity ; )ickedness or ruthlessness
6. mettle ; courage
7. fraudulent ; deceitful+ crooked+ or underhanded
8. suffrage ; the right to !ote+ especially in a political election


'ee %ask H+ O'ser*e Breaks
a. Let the students accomplish the task.
b. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.


'ee %ask B+ Seize Ieas
a. Let the students accomplish the task.
b. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.

'ee %ask O+ Cra"tin! a Ti$eline
a. /a!e the students accomplish the task.
b. 'ho) a sample of a timeline to students.
NumDer
>


C
F
H

















'ource(
http(55esl.about.com5od5)ritinglessonplaC5ig56raphic;
Organiers5%imeline;E*ample.htm


Using %imelines to Enhance $omprehension
#y( 7my /ines 9C??O:
ack3round
Educators may find timelines a useful strategy for a !ariety of educational
purposes. %hey can be used to record e!ents from a story or a history lesson in
a se"uential format. %hey can help students keep e!ents in chronological order
as they )rite summaries. #ut most important of all+ they can also pro!ide
comprehension support to English language learners 9ELLs:+ helping them
make connections and recognie patterns in a series or process. #ecause
numerical markers such as hours+ years+ days or months are placed apart )ith
plenty of space in bet)een+ timelines can appear !isually less comple* than
pure te*t+ helping ELLs more easily relate e!ents to their corresponding times.
#oth educators and parents can use timelines to help students organie
information in a chronological se"uence so that they can better understand
gro)th+ change+ recurring e!ents+ cause and effect+ and key e!ents of
historical+ social+ and scientific significance 9.oline+ >QQB:.


*e2 ene0its
%imelines pro!ide ELLs )ith a !isual frame)ork that supports reading
comprehension+ )hether it be in social studies+ science 9e.g.+ life cycles:+ or
simply in fiction or nonfiction stories.
'ource( http(55))).colorincolorado.org5article5>F?FF5
'ee %ask J+ /ou &ecie <ow=
a. Let the students accomplish the task.
b. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.

3. Enrichment
See Task E( Sin!le It Out
a. 6i!e the key points about the types of prose.


)$R#OU TE(TA TY;E O' ;ROE


Ty1es o2 ;rose
Unlike poetry+ prose does not fall into neatly defined forms such as sonnets+
blank !erse+ etc. 2e must therefore look at the KtypeK of prose and consider its
function or ob,ecti!e W i.e. to inform+ to describe+ to change+ etc. 7ssessing the
type of prose ser!es a limited+ yet useful purpose< limited because many
passages )ill combine different KtypesK of prose )riting simultaneously+ yet
useful in pro!iding a starting;point that )ill direct the more detailed analysis to
follo). %he different types of prose fall into the follo)ing broad categories.


N$RR$T#)E
%his is the most common type of prose found in no!els and stories. #asically it
relates to any sort of )riting that tells a story+ or de!elops a plot. If a gi!en
e*tract deals )ith e!ents or situations+ they are likely to be those of a
particularly telling or significant nature 9for the characters or the author:< if it
deals )ith a character+ it )ill illuminate something important about that
character in action. In narrati!e prose+ the )riter is concerned )ith t)o basic
ob,ecti!es(

1. to gi!e the reader all the necessary and rele!ant information so
that characters and e!ents in his narrati!e are e*plained+ or make
sense<
2. to promote and sustain the readerKs interest and curiosity+ offering
the interesting+ the unusual+ or the intriguing in character and situation.

%he second aspect )ill be in particular e!idence at the beginning of a )ork+
)hile in the same )ay a sense of drama or suspense often accompanies
passages that close a chapter or section. Narrati!e prose )ill be either first or
third person narrati!e. %he first person+ or KIK narrati!e generally produces a
more personal+ intimate form of communication. %he reader is dra)n in to
share the )riterKs e*perience and a sense of sympathy or understanding is
fre"uently de!eloped+ e!en )hen the narrator is seen to transgress moral or
legal norms. %he third person narrati!e is more KdetachedK+ yet its scope is
)ider. %he )riter 9and the reader follo)ing him: assumes a KgodlikeK
perspecti!e abo!e the action+ sho)ing us all things at all times and leading us
into the minds and hearts and moti!es of all his main characters.
%here is also a type of narrati!e prose kno)n as Kstream of consciousnessK.
%his is a modern de!elopment that seeks to take the first person narrati!e e!en
deeper. %he aim is to reproduce the random flo) of fre"uently unassociated
ideas that race through the human mind at any gi!en moment. %he ob,ecti!e+
e*ternal )orld is diminished and e!erything is seen e*clusi!ely through the
perceptions of one mind+ )hich is analysed in all its ramifications+ )ith the
tri!ial and the significant side by side. It is an attempt to be more accurate and
honest in the portrayal of human psychology. In the hands of a Joyce or a
2oolf+ it has pro!ed an e*tremely effecti!e form of narration.


.ECR#;T#)E
/ere the main function+ ob!iously+ is to describe+ to gi!e as accurately+ or
intriguingly+ or po)erfully as possible a deep impression of a character+ place+
or situation. %he reader should KfeelK the scene and be able to see it or hear it
as !i!idly as possible. 'uch prose is usually strong on atmosphere and the
atmosphere of the description )ill say much about ho) the )riter+ or the
characters in!ol!ed+ feel about )hat is being described. 'uch )riting is usually
the sort of prose that assumes a KpoeticK "uality and )ill employ images and
figurati!e language to colour the descriptions and in!ol!e the readerKs
emotions. No!els and stories )ill generally combine narrati!e and descripti!e
prose in the flo) of the )riting+ e!en )ithin short e*tracts. 7n e!ent may be
narrated+ follo)ed by a description of the mood or feeling it produces in the
characters.

%he effecti!e use of detail is crucial to good descripti!e )riting. 7 )riter cannot
include e!erything about a person or an e!ent+ so he )ill seek the most telling
and significant details+ those that gi!e us the !ery essence of the person+
place+ or e!ent as he sees them. %he type of detail chosen and the sort of
associations aroused )ill say much about ho) the )riter feels to)ards
his sub,ect< )e al)ays+ for instance+ kno) e*actly ho) =ickens feels 9and
)ants the reader to feel: about all his characters from his initial descriptions.
%he student should consider the use of detail carefully. =oes the )riter ha!e a
real KeyeK for telling detail3 =o the details combine to produce a uniform
atmosphere3 7re they surprising+ une*pected+ memorable3 =o the details
come ali!e for the reader and allo) him to !isualie or understand more !i!idly3
Or are the details perhaps contri!ed or stale or insignificant3


.#CUR#)E
=iscursi!e )riting offers the )riterKs thoughts on a particular topic such as Kthe
delights of li!ing in the countryK+ or Kthe tribulations of urban lifeK+ pro!iding
general obser!ations from his o)n and perhaps humorous or unusual+
perspecti!e. %here is usually a sense of a mind en,oying its o)n intellectual
acti!ity and creati!e e*pression. %he basic intention )ill !ary some)hat+ as the
)ord KdiscourseK can mean a lecture or sermon+ )hereas Kdiscursi!eK has
connotations of random obser!ations and light con!ersation. 7 no!elist may
)ell employ discursi!e sections to re!eal the thoughts and !alues of his
characters W a more subtle means of KcharacteriationK than simply telling us
ho) characters think and feel+ as the reader shares the actual thoughts.

.#.$CT#CF.#RECT#)E
'uch )riting attempts to influence the readerKs thinking or beha!ior in a specific
manner+ as the )riter seeks to persuade+ or ca,ole+ or coerce the reader into
thinking in a certain )ay. 6enerally+ such )riting deals )ith moral or political
issues and is most commonly found in the sermon+ treatise+ ,ournalism+ or+ at its
lo)est form+ propaganda. %he )riter is usually passionately in!ol!ed )ith his
sub,ect+ seeing )rongs and e!ils that must be corrected. 7t its best+ such
)riting can be po)erful+ mo!ing and persuasi!e. 7t its )orst+ it usually reeks of
fanaticism and+ though its social conse"uences may be dangerous+ it is usually
poor )riting.
7 differentiation may be made bet)een KdidacticK and Kdirecti!eK. 7t a simple
le!el+ it lies in the difference bet)een the impassioned prose of a sermon and
the detached prose of instruction 9)hich KdirectsK the reader as to )hat to do:.
=idactic is+ in fact+ best reser!ed for purely moral issues+ )hile directi!e
ade"uately co!ers the rest.


$T#R#C
Like certain other literary terms W i.e. KpatheticK W the modern usage of this
)ord does not fully indicate the original meaning. No)adays+ )e tend to use
the )ord KsatiricK for anything that ridicules the e*cesses or pretensions of
certain types of people 9politicians being an e!er;popular target+ especially for
cartoonists:. %raditionally+ ho)e!er+ a KsatireK )as more seriously intended and
concei!ed. It highlightted folly+ immorality or e*cess by e*aggeration thereby
deflating it and making it appear ludicrous and ridiculous. Yet such satires had
the genuinely didactic purpose of correcting such )eaknesses+ or at least
pre!enting those possessed of them from gaining po)er and influence. %he
hope )as that the reader )ould note the ludicrous+ despicable and
contemptible nature of such beha!iour and a!oid it himself W if only for fear of
appearing e"ually ridiculous.
%he elements of satire tend to be e*aggeration+ disproportion+ ridicule and
sarcasm. %he reader must catch the right tone to a!oid a reading that is too
literal and taken at face !alue W the type of reading that might dismiss 7nimal
-arm as a harmless fantasy of KtalkingK animals. .odern satire has tended to
be less moral than traditional satire+ highlighting folly+ etc. in an anarchic or
destructi!e manner )ithout offering or implying an alternati!e W as in the
K7bsurdK dramatists.




The Lan5ua5e in ;roseA
'i5urati!e Lan5ua5e4 Meta1hor4 #ma5ery
7ll forms of language communication make fre"uent use of figurati!e language.
9T/eKs a tough nut to crackT+ Tthe mouth of a ri!erT+ Ta thorny issueT+ Tthe foot of
the stairsT+ Ton top of the )orldT are all common e*amples of Ke!erydayK
figurati!e language:. 1rose )riters )ill fre"uently employ figurati!e de!ices W
and for the same reason )e all do W to make our e*pression more li!ely and
!i!id+ more easy for our reader or listener to appreciate and comprehend in a
full sense. 7 prose )riter may e!en a!ail himself of the full range of poetic
de!ices W such as imagery+ metaphor+ simile W e!en alliteration 9=ickensK Kbat
in blisters+ ball scorched bro)nT:. =escripti!e prose )ill depend hea!ily upon
such de!ices for its atmospheric effect W and there is a fine e*ample of this in
Reference 1assage #. Images may also be used to increase the emotional
content of a passage+ as in this e*ample by - 'cott -itgerald( Ther mouth
damp to his kisses and her eyes plainti!e )ith melancholy and her freshness
like ne) fine linen in the morning. 2hy+ these things )ere no longer in the
)orldIT.

$haracters in a narrati!e can be fi*ed forcefully in the mindKs eye by a striking
image+ metaphor or simile. $harles =ickens is a master of ,ust such effects. 9TIf
the con!entional $herub could e!er gro) up and be clothed+ he might be
photographed as a portrait of 2ilfer+A T2egg )as a knotty man ... )ith a face
car!ed out of !ery hard material ... he )as so )ooden that he seemed to ha!e
taken his )ooden leg naturally.


'ource( http(55englischlehrer.de5te*ts5prose4types.php


a. Let the students accomplish the task.
b. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.


'ee %ask Q+ Te#ts or Fi!ures6
a. Let the students study the table and the paragraph.
b. 6i!e input on ho) information is presented in linear and nonlinear
te*ts.
Non8Linear TeHt to Linear TeHt
? %he ability to interpret non;linear information such as tables+ graphs+
charts+ and diagrams complements the linear te*t.
? /a!ing the ability to interpret non;!isual te*ts is crucial for the critical
reader because by doing so+ the reader is able to interpret and
comprehend messages better.
6raphs5 charts 'ho)s a relationship
bet)een
t)o or more sets of
measurements.
Line graphs Used to sho) trends
#ar graphs
Used to sho) comparisons
bet)een !ariables.
1ie charts
&isual representations of
information on parts or
segments as a proportion+
percentage or fraction of the
)hole.
%ables
Understanding of complicated
facts and figures.
'ource( http(55barneybaini.blogspot.com5C?>>5?F5non;linear;te*t;to;linear;
te*t.html


c. 1rocess the students0 ans)ers.

'ee %ask >?+ 0en a ;an
a. /a!e the students accomplish the task.
b. 1rocess the students0 ans)ers.

'ee %ask>>+ Thou!hts to 9oner
a. /a!e the students accomplish the task.
b. %he correct ans)ers are(
1. fallacies
2. -allacies are sometimes used to persuade others to
adopt a particular stand or position on a certain matter.
c. 1rocess the students0 ans)ers.
'ee %ask >C+ Fin the Treacherous One
a. /a!e the students accomplish the task.
b. %he correct ans)ers are(
1. 7rgument ) ho$ine$
2. 7rgument a populu$
3. Non se"uitur
4. #egging the "uestion
5. #and)agon
6. ')eeping generaliation
7. 1ost hoc fallacy
8. /asty generaliation
9. Either5or fallacy
10. -alse analogy
'ee %ask >F+ 2#press It in 9rose
a. /a!e the students accomplish the task.
b. 6i!e comments on the students0 performance.


'ee %ask >H C5Shapin! Up -e*iew3
1rocess the ans)ers of the students.
Teachers Guide
Module @
Lesson <
______________________________________________________________
Seekin3 Mustice 0or Others


B. $ssessment ;lan
1. ;re assessment L 1resent a 82L
chart to measure their kno)ledge of the
theme and topic
2. ;ost assessment L complete the 82L chart


C. Resources
1. Materials
a. $harts as presented in the L.
b. 1ictures presented in the L.
c. $opies of the parallel selections
2. EGui1ment
a. &ideo5Laptop
b. 1ro,ector 9if digital pictures )ill be used:
D. $cti!ities


YOUR #N#T#$L T$%
Tas, 1A "L$C% OUTU
? 1resent the illustration to the student using a cartolina paper or po)er
point presentation.
? =iscuss the situation as presented in the learning material.
? 7sk them to )rite their ans)ers on the space pro!ided belo) the L. or
use a separate sheet should the space be not enough for their ans)er.
? 1rocess their ans)ers by asking the follo)ing "uestions(
? 2hat ha!e you noticed )ith all your ans)ers3
? 2hat does this imply3
? 2hich realiations about life ha!e you disco!ered from this
acti!ity3
? Use this acti!ity to build a schema on social ,ustice.
Tas, @& #M$G#NE
? /a!e the students !ie) and listen to the song @ImagineA> by John
Lennon.
? 7sk them to list fi!e 9B: lines from the song and fi!e 9B: photos
from the !ideo that struck them the most.
? 7llo) them to cite their opinion about these lines.
? 1rocess the acti!ity by asking the follo)ing "uestions(
? /o) do you compare your )ork )ith others3
? 2hat do these common ans)ers tell you about human
beings3
? =oes this in any )ay speak the truth about you3
E*pound your ans)er.
? 2hat are your personal dreams for yourself+ your family and
friends+ our country and the )orld3
? 2hat is the role of social ,ustice in fulfilling these
dreams3
? Use this acti!ity as moti!ation to the succeeding discussions.
? Use this acti!ity as a means to clarify e*pectations about the
theme @seeking ,ustice for others.A


YOUR TE(T
Tas, 1 A 'our ;ictures4 One #dea


? /a!e the students identify the )ords being described by the photos in
the L..
? %ell them that all of these )ords ha!e to do )ith social in,ustice.
? $heck their ans)ers. 7ns)ers to the !ocabulary building are 9>:
emancipation+ 9C: !icious+ 9F: crooked+ 9H: discrimination.
? Use this acti!ity as a springboard to the te*t.


RE$.#NG T*E TE(T
? Introduce the te*t by asking the moti!e "uestion( *o: do you
contriDute to the eGuitaDle4 res1ect2ul and Kust society 2or
e!eryoneB



1
http://www.youtube.co/w!tch"#$t_%&S'(A!hE
? 6et a fe) responses from the students and ask them to read the te*t @I
ha!e a =reamA by .artin Luther 8ing to !alidate )hether their ans)ers are
correct later on.
? %he te*t is also broken by bo*ed "uestions. 7llo) them to reflect on
these "uestions as they read through the te*t.
Tas, @A .ream Catcher
? /a!e the students recall the te*t.
? 7sk them to dra) a graphic organier that highlights 8ing0s most
important dreams about change+ liberation and social ,ustice.
? 7sk them to pair up and discuss their )ork )ith a partner.
? 6i!e each member three 9F: minutes to discuss his )ork. .ember 7
speaks )hile member # listens and !ice !ersa.
? 1rocess this acti!ity by asking comprehension "uestions.


Tas, IA .e!ice .eli!ered
Tas, I&1 $&
? 7sk the students to scan the te*t @I /a!e a =reamA once again.
? /a!e them locate the literary de!ices used in the te*t.
? 7sk them to )rite their ans)ers on the chart pro!ided for them.
? 1rocess their ans)ers.
Tas, I&1 ". Geo5ra8ture 0Geo5ra1hy and Literature3
? 7sk the students to scan the te*t once again. %his time+ focus on ho)
8ing Jr. used geographical orientations as !ehicles for his idea.
? /a!e them match $olumn 7 )ith $olumn # in this acti!ity to complete
8ing0s characteriation of social in,ustice in his time.
? 1rocess the acti!ity by asking the follo)ing "uestions(
? 2hat ha!e you noticed about 8ing0s style of using
geographical orientations to e*press his idea3
? =oes this tell you something about 8ing0s origin+ culture
or personal !alues3
? 2as he able to con!ey his message effecti!ely through
these de!ices3 2hy or )hy not3


Tas, EA #N *# *OE
? Refer to the te*t.
? /a!e the students determine tone+ mood+ techni"ue and
purpose of the author in )riting the speech.
? 7sk them to )rite their ans)ers on the balloons pro!ided for them.
? 7sk a fe) representati!es to discuss their )ork in class.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.


Tas, <A CON.#T#ON#NG CON.#T#ON$L
? /a!e a short discussion on conditionals.
? You might )ant to use the notes belo) or look for other references for
the said purpose.
#resent Real Conditional
? -OR.
LIf 5 2hen ... 'imple 1resent ...+ ... 'imple 1resent ...M
L... 'imple 1resent ... if 5 )hen ... 'imple 1resent ...M
? U'E
%he 1resent Real $onditional is used to talk about )hat you normally do in
real;life situations.
E*amples(
? If I 5o to a friendKs house for dinner+ I usually ta,e a bottle of )ine or
some flo)ers.
e. 2hen I ha!e a day off from )ork+ I
often 5o to the beach.
f. If the )eather is nice+ she :al,s to )ork.
g. Jerry hel1s me )ith my home)ork )hen he has time.
h. I read if there is nothing on %&.
i. 7( 2hat do you do )hen it rains3
B. I stay at home.
? 7( 2here do you stay )hen you 5o to 'ydney3
B. I stay )ith my friends near the harbor.


? I.1OR%7N% If 5 2hen
#oth TifT and T)henT are used in the 1resent Real $onditional. Using TifT
suggests that something happens less fre"uently. Using T)henT suggests that
something happens regularly.
E*amples(
? /hen I ha!e a day off from )ork+ I usually go to the beach.
I -2GU0)-0/ ;)>2 &)/S OFF F-OB 4O-1 %
C. #2 I ha!e a day off from )ork+ I usually go to the beach.
I -)-20/ ;)>2 &)/S OFF F-OB 4O-1%
#resent ,nreal Conditional
? -OR.
LIf ... 'imple 1ast ...+ ... )ould \ !erb ...M
L... )ould \ !erb ... if ... 'imple 1ast ...M
? U'E
%he 1resent Unreal $onditional is used to talk about )hat you )ould
generally do in imaginary situations.
E*amples(
? If I o:ned a car+ I :ould dri!e to )ork. #ut I donKt o)n a car.
? 'he :ould tra!el around the )orld if she had more money. #ut she
doesnKt ha!e much money.
? I :ould read more if I didnVt :atch so much %&.
? .ary :ould mo!e to Japan if she s1o,e Japanese.
? If they :or,ed harder+ they :ould earn more money.
? 7( 2hat :ould you do if you :on the lottery3
B. I :ould Duy a house.
? 7( 2here :ould you li!e if you mo!ed to the U.'.3
B. I :ould li!e in 'eattle.


EV$E1%ION If I )ere ...
In the 1resent Unreal $onditional+ the form T)asT is not considered
grammatically correct. In )ritten English or in testing situations+ you should
al)ays use T)ere.T /o)e!er+ in e!eryday con!ersation+ T)asT is often used.
E*amples(
? If he :ere -rench+ he )ould li!e in 1aris.
? If she :ere rich+ she )ould buy a yacht.
? I )ould play basketball if I :ere taller.
? I )ould buy that computer if it :ere cheaper.
? I )ould buy that computer if it :as
cheaper. Not Correct (BUT OFT2<
S)I& I< CO<>2-S)TIO<%)
I.1OR%7N% Only use TIfT
Only the )ord TifT is used )ith the 1resent Unreal $onditional because you
are discussing imaginary situations. T2henT cannot be used.
E*amples(
? I )ould buy that computer :hen it )ere cheaper.
Not Correct
? I )ould buy that computer i2 it )ere cheaper. Correct
EV$E1%ION $onditional )ith .odal &erbs
%here are some special conditional forms for modal !erbs in English(
:ould W can Q could
:ould W shall Q should
:ould W may Q mi5ht
%he )ords Tcan+T TshallT and TmayT cannot be used )ith T)ould.T Instead+ they
must be used in these special forms.
E*amples(
? If I )ent to Egypt+ I :ould can learn 7rabic. Not Correct
? If I )ent to Egypt+ I could learn 7rabic. Correct
? If she had time+ she :ould may go to the party. Not Correct
? If she had time+ she mi5ht go to the party. Correct
%he )ords Tcould+T should+T TmightT and Tought toT include conditional+ so you
cannot combine them )ith T)ould.T
E*amples(
? If I had more time+ I :ould could e*ercise after )ork. Not Correct
? If I had more time+ I could e*ercise after )ork. Correct
? If he in!ited you+ you really :ould should go. Not Correct
? If he in!ited you+ you really should go. Correct

Tas, <&1
? /a!e the students scan the illustrations in the L..
? %hese illustrations are three important social and
en!ironmental issues today that affect them
? 7sk them to use RE7L 1RE'EN% $ON=I%ION7L' in
presenting their arguments.

Tas, <&@
? Introduce the optimistic e*pressions of the status of social
,ustice today in L..
? 7sk them if they agree or disagree )ith the e*pressions.
? 7sk them to present their arguments using 1RE'EN%
UNRE7L $ON=I%ION7L'.

YOUR .#CO)ERY T$%
? =iscuss )hat a commentary is as presented in the L..
? =iscuss the elements and features of a commentary as a kind
of prose.
? 1resent the commentary of 8rystie Lee Yandoli0s entitled
@>F Lessons 7bout 'ocial Justice -rom /arry 1otterA


>F Lessons 7bout 'ocial Justice -rom @/arry 1otterA
by %rystie Lee Yandoli
poste on )u!ust ?F( GH?@ at ?G:@Ep$ 2&T%
9er$ission to use the te#t !rante on Oct ?G( GH?@


The wizarin! worl can teach Bu!!les a thin! or two a'out how to "i!ht "or the
co$$on !oo%

1. The personal is political%
%here0s no better )ay to understand ho) something affects society as a )hole
than to feel its implications on an indi!idual le!el. /arry0s personal struggles are
)hat make him such an effecti!e agent for social change in the series. /e lost
his parents+ godfather+ and mentor all at the hands of &oldemort. 'ince he
feels the impact of these issues so personally+ it0s easier for him to see ho)
they translate into larger political agendas.


2. Check your pri*ile!e%
/arry selflessly de!oted his life to the cause of defeating &oldemort and the
betterment of society+ but he )as )ell a)are of all the tools and resources he
had because he )as @the boy )ho li!ed.A %he surplus of gold his parents left in
his 6ringotts !ault+ special gifts like the In!isibility $loak and .arauder0s .ap+
and his famous reputation all aided him in achie!ing his goals. %hese ma,or
ad!antages )eren0t a!ailable to other characters+ but /arry )as al)ays
conscious of his pri!ileges.


3. 4ork with people you trust%
%here needs to be an element of assurance and reliability bet)een people )ho
organie together for ,ustice. =umbledore trusts 'nape+ /arry trusts
=umbledore+ and e!eryone else trusts /arry< there0s clearly a trickle; do)n
effect in )ho others ha!e confidence in. It0s important to kno) )ho you can
count on in dark times )hen e!erything seems bleak.
4. 9eople in power aren5t necessarily in the ri!ht%
%hose )ho are in charge of ma,or institutions don0t al)ays ha!e others0 best
interests at heart. %he .inistry of .agic had its o)n+ secret agenda before it
)as e!en infiltrated by =eath Eaters+ and at one point =olores Umbridge
had run of /og)arts and its students. It0s not al)ays safe to assume that
those in positions of po)er automatically do the right thing.


5. )*oi 'lin alle!iance%
Ne!er follo) leaders )ithout "uestion+ no matter )hat they claim to stand for.
%he )itches and )iards )ho don0t challenge &oldemort only make it easier for
him to rise to more po)er. %he =eath Eaters obey e!ery last order from
&oldemort and remain eternally loyal despite his intentions. It isn0t
until the !ery end of &eathly ;allows that the .alfoy family comes to their
senses and )alks a)ay from the #attle of /og)arts. Just because someone
)ith con!iction dictates )hat they )ant you to do+ you shouldn0t follo) them
blindly.


6. /ou can5t acco$plish e*erythin! alone%
/arry )as labeled the @chosen oneA and often takes matters into his o)n
hands+ he )ouldn0t ha!e been able to ultimately defeat &oldemort )ithout
the help of so many others. /e looked to figures like =umbledore and 'irius for
guidance+ )as sho)n unconditional lo!e and support from the 2easleys
and other Order of the 1hoeni* members+ and /arry also hea!ily relied on
/ermione and Ron to fill in the gaps 9and e!en destroy a fe) /orcru*es:.
'ocial ,ustice and fighting for )hat0s right doesn0t take ,ust one person alone W
it0s !ery much a group effort.


7. <ews sources aren5t always accurate%
The &aily 9rophet intentionally portrays /arry and =umbledore
negati!ely so the rest of the )iarding )orld doesn0t trust their )ord. 7s you
continue on the path to fighting for )hat0s right+ it0s important to be a critical
consumer of mass media and not ,ust belie!e e!erything you read in the ne)s.
7ll human beings ha!e bias+ and reporters aren0t any different< they can also be
influenced by their o)n e*periences and surroundings.

8. 9eople
No one is born )ith a particular set of beliefs and opinions< as
indi!iduals+ )e all operate )ithin the systems that shape us and affect our
e!entual outcomes. %om Riddle )as shaped by a number of e*periences before
he transformed himself into Lord &oldemort+ from the orphanage that raised him
to the problematic social norms that dro!e his .uggle father a)ay
from his )itch mother+ and e!en his e*perience in 'lytherin house. /e didn0t
come up )ith his dark plans for the )iarding )orld all on his o)n.


9. &o your research%
In order to kno) )here you0re going+ you ha!e to kno) )here others ha!e
been. /ermione is especially good at reading into the past and
understanding important histories so that the group is a)are of others0
successes and failures. %he more information you kno)+ the better off you0ll be.
It0s crucial to ha!e full conte*t.

10. In,ustices operate within syste$s%
Ine"ualities and e!ils aren0t ,ust isolated incidents+ nor do they come about by
coincidence. =iscrimination against house;el!es+ .uggle;borns+ and half;bloods
occurs because of the social structures that e*ist in the )iarding )orld. Other
instances of in,ustice W like professor Umbridge0s @discipliningA of students and
ho) /agrid is treated as a giant W are e!idence of greater systems
perpetuating different kinds of oppression.


11. Follow your own $oral co$pass%
It0s not easy to stand up for )hat you kno) is the right thing+ but trusting your
gut feeling is the key to being an ad!ocate for social change. E!en if your
opinion is unpopular+ like /ermione creating the 'ociety for the 1romotion of
Elfish 2elfare+ that doesn0t make it any less ,ust. 2e all ha!e instincts for a
reason+ and more often than not your o)n moral compass )on0t steer you
)rong.


12. <e*er !i*e up%
Re!olutioniing the )ay societies operate and shifting political discourse is
ne!er a simple task W there are plenty of hardships that change; seekers
come up against along the )ay. /arry+ Ron+ and /ermione encountered a
number of difficulties since the beginning of their ad!entures and the )iarding
)orld had to go through t)o )ars before finally defeating &oldemort for good+
but they remained resilient through it all and triumphed in the end.


13. 0o*e is the $ost power"ul tool you ha*e%
One of the ma,or themes in the entire series+ lo!e plays an essential role in
o!ercoming the )orst kinds of e!il. It is a uni!ersal emotion that all human
beings 9and )iards: can relate to in one )ay or another+ and is a ma,or
dri!ing force behind social change. Lo!e is strong enough to inspire Narcissa
.alfoy to protect /arry against &oldemort because she )anted to
kno) her son )as safe and moti!ates characters like -red 2easley to
!oluntarily sacrifice their li!es for the greater good. .ost importantly+ it gi!es
characters something )orth fighting for. %he )orld kno)s no greater force.

Tas, 1A
? 'can 8rystie Lee Yandoli0s commentary entitled @>F Lessons about
'ocial Justice from /arry 1otterA.
? 7sk them to identify the features of this short prose.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.


Tas, @A MERC#'UL ;ORT#$
? 1ro!ide the students )ith copies of the poem @.ercyA 1ortia0s
'olilo"uy in the .erchant of &enice by 2illiam 'hakespeare.
? 7sk them to identify the act of mercy 1ortia sho)ed in the poem.
? /a!e them cite lines from the poem to ,ustify their ans)er.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.

Tas, IA $ ;OET ;OEM4 $ '$N ;ROE
? 7sk the students to go back to Yandoli0s commentary on Social Dustice
in ;arry 9otter Series and 'hakespeare0s .Bercy3 "ro$ the Berchant
o" >enice.
? /a!e them e*amine ho) prose and poetry differ from one another.
? 7ccomplish the chart in the L..
? 1rocess the acti!ity.


Tas, EA L#G*T ON
? 7sk the students to remember the t)o friends caught in a black out in
the initial acti!ity.
? %ell them that the lights are no) on and their identities are re!ealed.
%hey are 1ortia from @%he .erchant of &eniceA and /ermione 6ranger from
@/arry 1otter 'eriesA.
? 7sk them to play on these characters and )rite a short paragraph about
ho) 1ortia could seek ,ustice on discrimination against /ermione.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.
Tas, <A NUM" ON NUM"ER
? ;ro!ided in the LM are statistics on the state
of social in,ustice and discrimination against )omen+ children+ the poor and
the marginalied
in the 1hilippines.
? $s, the students to i nterpret the tables and
)rite their implications to our democracy.
? ;rocess the acti!ity&


;rocessin5 o2 the endurin5 Guestion
? 6o back to the moti!e "uestion asked before reading .artin Luther
8ing0s speech.
? 7sk the students to respond to the "uestion @;ow o you contri'ute to
an e:uita'le( respect"ul an ,ust society "or e*eryone63
? 1rocess the acti!ity by comparing their pre!ious ans)ers )ith their
final ans)ers.


YOUR '#N$L T$%
? 7sk them to remember that they are to perform a Readers0 %heatre at
the end of the "uarter.
? Emphasie that the tasks )ill help them 9>: meet people in history that
could teach them ho) to get firm about the stand or side they chose to
be in+ 9C: learning ho) to collaborate )ith a group and 9F: make use of
appropriate non!erbal communication to help them con!ey )hat they
truly mean.


Tas, 1A $ GL#M;E 'ROM T*E ;$T
? 7s an assignment+ ask them to research an e*ample from history
about a person or group of people )ho )orked to)ards achie!ing
social ,ustice.
? 7sk them to prepare a presentation for the class on the person or
group the ne*t day.
? 1rocess the acti!ity using the follo)ing "uestions(
2hat )as this person or group fighting for3
2hat )ere some of the efforts they used for achie!ing social ,ustice3
2ere these efforts successful3 2hy or )hy not3
/o) )as this success measured3
7re they still pursuing these ideals3 If not+ has someone
else or another
organiation continued to pursue their )ork3


Tas, @& #GN $N. YM"OL
? 7sk them to consider .artin Luther 8ing0s @I /a!e 7
=reamA as a sample piece for a Reader0s %heatre.
? 7sk them to dra) t)o 9C: columns in their notebook.
? /a!e them pick ten 9>?: lines or sentences )hich they )ould like to
deli!er.
? %ell them to )rite these lines on the left column of their notebook and
indicate on the right column non!erbal communication tools such as !oice+
facial e*pressions+ and gestures appropriate to these lines.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.




MY TRE$URE
? 7sk the students to share their thoughts about the enduring
understanding belo).

.4e are our 'rothers5 keepers% Unerstanin! other5s li"e
challen!es( 'uilin! relationship with the$ an
colla'oratin! with the$ to a""ect chan!e to the li"e o"
another is the secret o" 'uilin! a co$$unity with e:uality
an social ,ustice%3


? 1rocess the acti!ities belo)(


.y ,ourney through this lesson enabled me to learn
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It made me realie that
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I therefore commit to
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Teachers Guide
Module @
Lesson =
______________________________________________________________
O6ercomin3 Indi00erence


B. $ssessment ;lan
1. ;re assessment L 1resent initial acti!ity >
2. ;ost assessment L 1resent final acti!ity >

C. Resources
1. Materials
a& $harts as presented in the L.
b. 1ictures presented in the L.
c. $opies of the parallel selections
2. EGui1ment
a. &ideo5Laptop
b. 1ro,ector 9if digital pictures )ill be used:
D. $cti!ities

YOUR #N#T#$L T$%
Tas, 1A UNL#%ELY R$''LE
? 1ost a dra)ing of a rocket ship lea!ing Earth on the board.
? 7sk the students to imagine that life is no longer possible on Earth and
that a rocket ship has been built to carry si* people to another planet and
start a ne) life. 7 raffle )as held to select the final ten people from )hom
they could choose the final si* from. 7sk them to select the si* they )ould
take and )hich four they )ould lea!e behind and
)hy.
? 1rocess the acti!ity

Tas, @A T#ME ;O.
? 6roup the students into fi!e 9B:
? Each group )ill decide on anything they )ould like to upload in their
%I.E 1O= that+ )hen opened in F+??? years+ )ould let the future kno)
)hat our present society )as like.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.
Tas, IA *$N. .O T*E T$L%#NG
? 1ro,ect or post a dra)ing of the illustration presented in the L..
? 7sk the students to say something about the picture.
? 7sk them if they ha!e e!er encountered the same e*perience in
school+ at home or community.
? 7llo) them to find a partner and share their stories.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.


YOUR TE(T
Tas, 1A )OC$"UL$RY .E)ELO;MENT
? 7sk the students to ans)er the !ocabulary de!elopment e*ercises.
? $heck their responses.
? 6uide them in unlocking the meaning of the )ords through conte*t
clues.



Tas,s @ and IA .R$#N #N $ TR$#N F #NL#NE /#T* T*E TE(T


? /a!e the
students read the te*t entitled By the -ailway Sie by 7lice
.eynell and reflect on the "uestions enclosed in bo*es.
1. 7sk the moti!e "uestions and accept initial responses.
2. =iscuss the te*t after reading.
3. 7sk the comprehension "uestions presented in the L.


Tas, EA /*$T $ 'EEL#NG
? /a!e the students scan the te*t once again and list at least three 9F:
people in the train.
? 7sk them to analye ho) the author described ho) they felt as they
)itnessed )hat had happened.
? 7llo) them to )rite their ans)ers in the chart pro!ided in the L..
? 1rocess the acti!ity.


Tas,s <8O
? =o a short lecture about past conditionals.
? 7sk them to complete the sentences )ith the correct form of
past conditionals5!erbs in parentheses as presented in the L..
YOUR .#CO)ERY T$% Tas, 1A MUC*
$.O $"OUT /*$T TO .O
? 1resent the situations cited in the L. to the class.
? 7sk them to e*plain )hy they )ould or )ould not get in!ol!ed
in any of the cited situations.
? 7sk them to use past conditionals in e*pressing their ans)ers.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.


Tas, @A )OGUE )#GNETTE


? /a!e a short discussion on !ignette+ its features and elements.
? Re!eal to the students that #y the Rail)ay 'ide by 7lice .eynell
is a kind of prose called @!ignette.A
? 7sk them to scan the te*t once again and compare it to one 9>:
from the te*ts you ha!e pre!iously discussed.
? 7sk the students to dra) a !enn diagram to illustrate their
comparison.
? 7sk the students ho) a !ignette differs from other prose.
? 7sk them if they find it interesting or not and e*plain their ans)er.
? 1rocess their ans)ers.


Tas, @A NOY NE/
? 7sk the students to read the ne)s article entitled /I' N7.E I'
REYN7L=O $7R$ILL7R( %he pedicab dri!er )hose death has
sparked debate and introspection by #ernard %esta
? =iscuss )ith them the kind of indifference sho)n in the
ne)s article.
? 1rocess the acti!ity by asking the follo)ing "uestions(
? 2hat )ould you ha!e done if you )ere in the same
situation3
? $ome up )ith ideas on ho) your group can help change
the indifference of the people in!ol!ed in the accident.
Tas, IA C$E CLOE.
? 6roup the students into four 9H:.
? .ake them dra) lots of the topics )hich shall be )orked on by
each group.
? 7fter assigning the topics+ ask them to accomplish the acti!ity in
the L.
? 7sk a leader to report the class response to the class.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.
Tas, EA $ ;RE#.ENT #N $ .$Y
? 6roup the students in fi!e to si* members.
? 7sk them to think of a 1hilippine president )ho has left an
indelible mark on the history of our nation.
? 7sk them share their ideas )ith the group.
? 7s a group+ ha!e them decide on one person and discuss )hat
they )ould ha!e done had they been that person.
? 7sk them to choose rapporteur to report the group0s ideas to the
)hole class.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.

Tas, <A )#GNETTE )#G#L$NCE
? 7sk the students to remember )hat a !ignette is and its elements.
? 7sk them to )rite their o)n !ignette about any incident they ha!e seen
or e*perienced )hich they could ha!e changed 5 impro!ed if they only had
the courage to do so.
? 1rocess their ans)ers

Tas, =A EN.UR#NG UN.ERT$N.#NG
? 7sk the students to remember the moti!e "uestion before reading @#y
the Rail)ay 'ideA by 7lice .eynell.
? 7fter accomplishing se!eral acti!ities in this lesson+ e*plain to them that
it0s no) time to ans)er this "uestion. /o) can your character affect others3
? 7sk them to share their ans)ers )ith the class.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.


YOUR '#N$L T$%
? Remind them that they ha!e one more lesson before finally performing
the Readers %heatre or $hamber %heatre.
? 7sk them to sit )ith their group members in choosing the piece they
)ould like to perform.
? =iscuss ho) the piece should be deli!ered.
? %ell them to use symbols of prosodic features of
speech to edit their piece.

MY TRE$URE
? 7sk the students to share their thoughts about
the enduring understanding belo).

.Builin! relationships helps us not only to show how we
care "or so$eone( 'ut $ore i$portantly to see how we
!row as persons% It teaches us lessons a'out li"e that
otherwise woul 'e i""icult to learn( lessons a'out
co$$unication( listenin!( co$pro$ise( an !i*in!
sel"lessly o" oursel*es an e#pectin! nothin! in return 8
the "ruit o" o*erco$in! ini""erence%3


? 1rocess the acti!ities belo)(


.y ,ourney through this lesson enabled me to learn
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
444444444444444444444444
It made me realie that
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
444444444444444444444444
I therefore commit to
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
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Teachers Guide
Module @
Lesson ?
______________________________________________________________
.orkin3 1ith Others


B. $ssessment ;lan
1. ;re assessment L 1resent a 82L chart to
measure their
kno)ledge of the theme and topic
2. ;ost assessment L complete the 82L chart


C. Resources
1. Materials
a. $harts as presented in the L.
b. 1ictures presented in the L.
c. $opies of the parallel selections
2. EGui1ment
a. &ideo5Laptop
b. 1ro,ector 9if digital pictures )ill be used:


D. $cti!ities


YOUR #N#T#$L T$%
Tas, 1A "UN.LE O' JOY
? $reate a concept map of the )ord bundle and encourage
students to share ideas
? 7sk the students @2hat can a bundle do3A
? 1resent the photos in the L. and ask them to e*press their
thoughts about the photos and e*plain )hy it is better if they come in
a bundle or group.
? 7sk them to share their ans)ers )ith the class.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.


Tas, @& $ M$TTER O' ;ER;ECT#)E
? 1resent an editorial cartoon about people helping each other.
? 7sk the students about their thoughts or interpretation of the
editorial cartoon.
? 1rocess their ans)ers.


Tas, IA %#N.NE "EGET %#N.NE
? 1resent the !ideo entitled 0i"e >est Insie 8 1inness Boo$eran!
through this link http(55))).youtube.com5)atch3![n)7YpL&ye-U.
? 7fter !ie)ing the !ideo+ process the acti!ity using the follo)ing
"uestions(
? 2hat is the !ideo all about3
? In )hat )ay does @)orking )ith othersA sho)n in the !ideo3
? 2hy is it entitled 8indness #oomerang3
? =o you belie!e that people no)adays can actually help and
)ork )ith each other )ith kindness3


? #ased on the !ideo+ ask them to dra) a cycle about ho) kindness
begets kindness.


YOUR TE(T
? 7sk the students to ans)er the !ocabulary de!elopment e*ercises in the
L..
? Inform them that each of the numbered !ocabulary )ords appears in
/ughes0s story.
? 7fter checking their ans)ers+ ask them the moti!e "uestion @2ho
should be responsible for the moral education of a child3 1arents3 'ociety3
'chools3 Or E!eryone3A before reading the te*t.
? 2elcome tentati!e ans)ers
? Read the
short story entitled 6T*$N% YOU4 M$$MS D y Langston
/ughes.
? Remind them to reflect on the "uestions in the bo*es that break the te*t.
? 7llo) them to find a partner to discuss the te*t using the follo)ing
"uestions(
1. /o) does .rs. Jones react )hen Roger tries to steal her purse3
2. Is her reaction belie!able3 2hy or )hy not3
3. 2hen they arri!e at the boarding house+ )hat do you think Roger
is thinking
or planning to do3
4. =oes .rs. Jones like the boy3 2hy3
5. /o) do you think Roger0s encounter )ith .rs. Jones alters his life3
6. 2hy does /ughes title the story+ @%hank You+ .a0m3A
7. In )hat )ay did the characters sho) they )orked )ith each other3
? 7sk some to share their responses )ith the class
? 1rocess the acti!ity

Tas, IA E(TEN.#NG T*E TE(T
? 6roup the students into four 9H:.
? 7ssign a particular task to each group.
? %he tasks are specified in the L..
? 7llo) each group to discuss among the members the task gi!en.
? 7sk group representati!es to share their ans)ers )ith the class.
? Elicit reactions from other groups.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.


Tas, EA O' C*O#CE $N. "$E
? ;resent the stimulus 1resented in the LM&
? /a!e the students accomplish the chart that follo)s.
? 7sk some students to share their responses )ith the class.
? Elicit reactions from other groups.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.


Tas, <A TO8RETELLER
? 7sk the students to )rite their o)n synopsis of @%hank you ma0amA using
any of the literary de!ices mentioned in the L..
? $ollect the outputs and pro!ide feedback the ne*t day.
? 7ssign them to read the poem @I-A by Rudyard 8ipling.


YOUR .#CO)ERY T$%
Tas, 1A CRO O)ER
? 1resent the stimulus cited in the L..
? 7sk the students to create a dialogue bet)een Rudyard 8ipling and
Roger about helping other people no matter )hat the conse"uences are.
? 7sk some students to share their responses )ith the class.
? Elicit reactions from the other groups.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.


Tas, @A CON.#T#ON$L LOG#C
? 7sk the students to accomplish the grammar e*ercises in the L..
? $heck their ans)ers.


Tas, EA *#;;#TY8*O;;#TY8TOE
? 7sk the students to read the synopsis of 6eorge .iller0s @/appy -eet.A
? 7sk them to accomplish the task that follo)s.
? 1rocess the acti!ity using the follo)ing "uestions(
? 2hat makes the te*t prose3
? 2hat kind of prose is it3
? 2hich part5s of the te*t is5are about )orking )ith others3


Tas, <A ELEMENT$L
? 7sk the students to complete the chart in the L. using 6eorge .iller0s
@/appy -eet.A
? 7sk some students to share their outputs )ith the class.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.


Tas, =A ;OTER8N #TY
a. 7sk the students to scan the posters of )ell kno)n mo!ies presented
in the L..
b. #ased on the images and details in each poster+ ask them to share
their thoughts about )hat could the mo!ie be all about.
c. %hen ask the students to organie information about the mo!ies listed
abo!e using the diagram presented in the L..
d. 7sk some students to share their outputs )ith the class.
e. 7sk others to pro!ide feedback on their classmates presentation.
f. 1rocess the acti!ity.
Tas, ?A /OR%#NG #N CONTE(T
? 7sk the students about their stand in the issues presented
in the L..
? 7sk them about ho) they can )ork )ith others to
help support these concerns.
? 7sk some students to share their outputs )ith the class
? 7sk others to pro!ide feedback on their classmates presentation
? 1rocess the acti!ity


YOUR '#N$L T$%
? Inform the students that they no) ha!e to present their Reader0s
%heatre.
? Remind them to use the appropriate prosodic features of speech )hen
deli!ering the lines.
? 1ro!ide them copies of rubrics for grading.
? 7fter the performance+ ask the audience to gi!e feedback.
? =o not also forget to pro!ide your o)n feedback.
? 1rocess the acti!ity.

MY TRE$URE
? 7sk the students to share their thoughts about the enduring
understanding belo).
0or )l"re Tennyson once sai( .I a$ a part o" all I ha*e
$et%3 4hat you are an what you will 'eco$e( there"ore(
is si!ni"icantly linke with the people you worke with%
? 1rocess the acti!ities belo)(


.y ,ourney through this lesson enabled me to learn
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
444444444444444444444444
It made me realie that
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
444444444444444444444444
I therefore commit to
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
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Teachers Guide
Module I
Lesson 1
T5RO,G5 TEC5NOLOG'


B. $ssessment ;lan
1. ;re8assessment
0I<1I<G TOG2T;2- See pa!e ? o" learnin! packa!e%
2. ;ost8assessment
2<;)<CI<G S20F (;o$ework)
See pa!e II o" learnin! packa!e%

C. Resources
1. Materials
a. $= recording of listening inputs
2. EGui1ment
a. 7udio $= player


D. $cti!ities
1. Your Journey
Your #nitial Tas,s
0I<G1I<G TOG2T;2- (J $inutes)
See Task ? C/our Initial Tasks%5
a. 'ho) pictures of cell phones.
b. 7sk students )hat is their most important use of a cell phone.
c. 7sk students to dra) lines to connect the )ords )ith
synonymous )ords.


B-2)1I<G B)--I2-S (K $inutes)
See Task G C/our Initial Tasks%5
a. .odel the reading of the poem @%he %elephoneA by Ed)ard
-ield
b. 7sk students to read the poem for the second time.


BO<&I<G TOG2T;2- (@H $inutes)
See Task @ C/our Initial Tasks%5
a. /a!e students )ork in groups of se!en to ten to discuss the
message of the poem.
b. /a!e each group discuss the gi!en part of the poem prompted
by the guide "uestions.
c. =iscuss some of the responses+ leading to the theme+
connecting to the )orld.


2LT-)CTI<G I<FO-B)TIO< (?K $inutes)
a. /a!e students listen to the reading of the poem and ,ot do)n
the information listened to.
b. Read the te*t @'tudents 'hould Not #e 7llo)ed to
#ring .obile 1hones to 'chool 9E*cerpted:A
TeHtA tudents hould Not "e $llo:ed to "rin5 MoDile
;hones to chool 0EHcer1ted3
In recent times+ the number of people o)ning mobile phones has
increased dramatically. No) mobile phones are not ,ust for
calling+ but you can no) te*t+ take and send pictures+ record
!ideos+ access the internet+ play games and much more. %he
!ariety of functions has increased dramatically. %hey ha!e also
become a lot cheaper. %hus more and more young people no)
o)n a mobile. 'o should they be allo)ed to bring them to
school3

.obile phones can cause a distraction in education. %hey can
disturb teachers and students. -or e*ample+ if you )ere )orking
hard on a piece of )ork+ concentrating hard+ and a personKs
phone rings+ it disrupts the )hole class. You may become side;
tracked or the teacher may be interrupted during speaking to the
class. %hus teaching )ould be constantly disrupted if this
kept happening. %hus education standards )ould deteriorate.
Looking then at long term effects+ if this )as happening e!ery day+
you )ould be )asting fi!e minutes a day+ so nearly half an hour a
)eek+ and so that )ould be o!er ten hours a year of disruption.
7lso+ mobile phones pro!ide a large temptation to cheat in tests.
%hey can communicate to almost any)here and anyone in the
)orld. #ecause they are small+ students can "uietly and discreetly
send a te*t and it can go unnoticed. You got to school to learn+ not
to )aste time playing games or cheating in tests.
Research has pro!en that fre"uent use of a mobile phone can
put the o)ner at risk of long term health damage. .obile phones
ha!e radiation in them )hich they send out )hich can destroy or
damage cells. %hus a student )ho uses a mobile phone regularly
is at risk of health damage. 2ith the increase in o)nership of
mobiles+ there is increased usage and
so the students are putting themsel!es at risk more and more of
health damage.
7lso younger students may not be properly educated on phone
usage. .ost phones no)adays ha!e internet access on them.
'tudents can access sites )hich they should not see+ like
pornography.


https(55))).studymode.com5,oin.php3redirectUrl[NC-essaysNC-'tud
ents;'hould;Not;#e;7llo)ed;%o;>F>>QF.htmlGfrom[essay


c. 7sk students to list do)n the reasons for not allo)ing
students to bring cell phones to school+ !erify if the facts support
the
argument+ and if these are con!incing.
d. .ake students realie )hat persuasi!e or argumentati!e )riting
is.
-2)&I<G ;OB24O-1 (@ $inutes)
See C/our Te#t5: Sorry( 4ron! <u$'er
a. 7ssign one poem for home reading.
b. /a!e students )rite on their notebooks )hy man has to play
se!en roles.


Your TeHtA orry4 /ron5 NumDer 0a radio 1lay3
G2TTI<G T;2 C;I00 (?H $inutes)
See Task ?( C/our Te#t%5
a. /a!e the students do the task.
b. 7sk students to describe a time )hen something ordinary
seemed or became frightening or suspenseful.
C-OSSI<G &IFFICU0TI2S
See Task G( C/our Te#t%5
a. /a!e the students do the task.
8ey( >. # C. $ F. = H. e B. a
b. 7sk students to use the ne) )ords in
sentences. .
TU<I<G I< (?K $inutes)
See Task @( C/our Te#t%5
a. 1lay the taped audio of the one;act radio play and ha!e
students listen and read the te*t silently and simultaneously.




http(55))).youtube.com5)atch3![au)8?8dyRlE


b. .ake students focus on the deli!ery of lines+ tone of !oice
of the characters+ and the sound effects+ and ho) they contribute to
the "uality of the play.


&20>I<G &2292- (@H $inutes)
See Task F( C/our Te#t%5
a. /a!e the four 9H: groups of students accomplish the task.
b. 7sk the students to present the outcome of the group tasks.


FI-BI<G U9 (?K $inutes)
a. )sk the stuents to respon to the !i*en :uestions%


Your .isco!ery
SOU<&I<G 4O-&S CO--2CT0/ (GH $inutes)
See Task ?% C/our &isco*ery Tasks5
a. .odel the enunciation of four critical !o)el sounds(


7a9 7X9 7e9 7Y9


b. /a!e the )hole class read the gi!en )ords.
c. 7sk student to )ork in groups of four 9H: to practice reading the
sentences.
d. 1resent more e*amples for students to ha!e more practice.


2<T2-I<G I<TO T;2 4O-0& OF 0)UG;T2- )<& T2)-S ( GH
$inutes)
a. /a!e students do the task then discuss )ith a partner
%eaching 1oints(
? %heatER( %he structure )ithin )hich theatrical performances
are gi!en. Usually includes an orchestra or seating area+ and
a stage.
? %heatREA 7 collaborati!e art form including the
composition+ enactment+ and interpretation of dramatic
presentations for
an audience.
? 7 1lay( 7 literary piece consisting of dialogues bet)een
!arious characters+ epilogue+ monologue+ prologue and an end.
It refers to composition.
? .ramaA refers to acting+ and to the set up of the play
)hich includes the theater+ the hall+ the accessories+ the green
room+ costumes+ music and the like.
? 7 scene is like a di!ision of an act+ in )hich a certain portion
of the play unfolds+ usually separated by location9in the
bedroom+ at the dinner table:+ or ti$e 9e.g. in the morning+
then the follo)ing e!ening:.
? 7 one8act 1lay is a play that takes place+ from beginning to
end+ in a single act. It can range from one minute to one hour long.
? 7 scri1t is a )ritten !ersion of a play or mo!ie. If youKre
auditioning for a mo!ie+ youKll get the script to practice a
scene or t)o.
? .ramatist is .a person )ho is skilled in the
production of a play is called a /e is )ell !ersed )ith the rudiments
and the principles of dramaturgy such as the measurement of
the stage on )hich the play has to be staged+ the nature of
characters+ the costumes that fit the characters+ the music to be
played+ the music room+ the green room+ the synchroniation of
music and dialogue deli!ery+ and the like. In short+ it can be said
that drama deals )ith all the nuances of the composition of play.
? %he author of a play is called as 1lay:ri5ht. %he duty of a
play)right is to adhere to the principles of composing a play.


-2>ISITI<G T;2 -)&IO 90)/ (GH $inutes)
See Task @% C/our &isco*ery Tasks5
a. 2n!a!e stuents in answerin! the application :uestions%

Your 'inal Tas,s
2<DO/I<G B/ 9)SSIO<( GH $inutes)
See Task ?a ./our Final Tasks3
a. 7sk the students about the )orth)hile acti!ities
they are engaged in and ho) they are able to e*tend help.
b. /a!e the students focus on the underlined )ords in
each sentence.
c. 7llo) the students to disco!er )hat !erbal gerund is.
d. 1rocess the ans)ers of the students.



%eaching 1oints(
7 gerund is usually defined as a )ord ending in Min! that is
formed from a !erb and that functions as a noun such as sub,ect+
sub,ecti!e complement+ ob,ect of a preposition+ direct ob,ect+ and
appositi!e.



GI>I<G IT ) T-/ ( K $inutes)
'ee %ask >;b . @Your -inal %asksA
a. /a!e students determine the use of underlined gerunds.


;O<I<G S1I00S (?H $inutes)
'ee %ask >;c . @Your -inal %asksA
a. .ake students find the gerunds in each sentence.


B)ST2-I<G IT= (?K $inutes)
'ee %ask >;d. . @Your -inal %asksA
a. 7sk students to )ork in pairs+ discuss and construct sentences
using the gi!en !erbs.


My Treasure
G2TTI<G ) C02)- 9ICTU-2
'ee %ask >. CBy Treasure5
a. 1resent a t)o;column matri* of plot summary ,u*taposed
)ith guidelines to )riting plot summary or synopsis.
b. 7sk students to compare the ,u*taposed te*ts.
c. Elicit from students reasons for follo)ing the guidelines.
CO<<2CTI<G 0I>2S
'ee %ask >. R.y %reasure0
a. 7sk students about the time that they ha!e had to call a friend.
b. Remind students that they ha!e a ci!ic obligation to help
others+ especially those in need.
c. 7sk students to )rite a paragraph on helping others to the point
of risking one0s self.


1ossible situations(
1. 7 friend is habitually absent and asks you to co!er up his being
hooked on
computer games.
2. You )itness a hit and run !ehicular accident and the !ictim needs
your help.
3. Your classmate0s cell phone )as confiscated because he
)as caught )atching pornography+ and he )ants you to help him get
his cell phone back.
4. Your neighbor badly needs money+ but the only money you ha!e
got is your )eekly allo)ance.
5. 7 close friend runs a)ay from home and asks you to let him stay in
*ome:or,
2<;)<CI<G S20F
a. E*plain to students that they ha!e to look for a one;act 7nglo;
7merican play
that they can use in )riting a synopsis.


? 'tudents 'hould Not #e 7llo)ed to #ring .obile 1hones to 'chool
9E*erpted:A https(55))).studymode.com5,oin.php3redirectUrl[NC-essays
NC-'tud
ents;'hould;Not;#e;7llo)ed;%o;>F>>QF.htmlGfrom[essay







http(55))).youtube.com5)atch3![au)8?8dyRlE


? %eaching 1oints
http(55))).differencebet)een.com5difference;bet)een;drama;and;!s;
play5Ui*ChNE6uarZ
Teachers Guide
Module I
Lesson @
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
Makin3 a Ci00erence


B. $ssessment ;lan


#ntroduction
In many )ays ha!e your life has been made easier and more efficient )ith
technology that enables you to keep in touch. 2ith ,ust a click of a button 9or a
mouse: you ha!e email -acebook+ %)itter+ blogs+ online fora+ list;ser!s and
threads+ !irtual reality+ )ebcasts and )ebinars+ instant messaging 9I.:+ te*t
messaging 9and many other features of technology: )ith )hich you are able to
connect to the )orld.
.
%his lesson allo)s you to further e*plore the )orld and see ho) people
make a difference in the li!es of other people by making use of their time+
talent and heart. Your in!ol!ement in making connections is an enriching
and empo)ering e*perience.
ODKecti!esA
-or students to clarify the path of their ,ourney in making !aluable
contributions to the )orld+ they are e*pected to(
? interpret ideas presented on a poster
? reflect on the message con!eyed in the material !ie)ed
? analye literature as a means of connecting to the )orld
? produce the critical consonant sounds correctly
? use gerunds and gerund phrases in e*pressing )ays on ho) to
shape the )orld
? reflect on ho) to manage the use of I$% gadgets )ithout de!iating
from human interaction
? recognie the different types of stages for a stage play
? finalie the content of plot synopsis
? enhance their e*perience through the library0s information sources


3. ;re8assessment
9-OBOTI<G )&>OC)CI2S See pa!e ? o" learnin! packa!e%
4. ;ost8assessment
B)1I<G ) &IFF2-2<C2 (;o$ework)
See pa!e II o" learnin! packa!e%

C. Resources
3. Materials
1O2ER1OIN% 1resentation EE*traordinary 1eople
1oster
4. EGui1ment
$omputer and pro,ector


D. $cti!ities
6. Your Journey
Your #nitial Tas,s
9-OBOTI<G )&>OC)CI2S (E $inutes)
See Task ? ./our Initial Tasks%3

a. 7sk students to study the poster and e!aluate its message.
b. Elicit from students )hat in the poster )ould make them accept
the in!itation to ,oin the conference.
c. .ake the students realie the importance of de!eloping
themsel!es into a better person by gi!ing a part of themsel!es to the
community.
B2SS)GI<G 202CT-O<IC)00/ (J $inutes)
See Task G ./our Initial Tasks%3
d. 'ho) a picture of laptops and ask students if they ha!e a
-acebook account.
e. 7sk students their purpose for ha!ing a -acebook account.
f. 1rompt students to gi!e other e*amples of modern gadgets for
messaging.
g. -ocus on the conte*t that ad!ancement in technology does not
hinder the spirit of helping one another.

2BU0)TI<G )CCOB90IS;2& 92O902 (GH $inutes)
See Task @ ./our Initial Tasks%3

a. .ake students predict )hat they are about to see in the
1o)er1oint presentation.

;ersonalities Nationality $d!ocacy
$ombat disease+ famine+ and
.elinda 6ates 7merican education for the less
fortunate.
6halib 8halil 1akistani
Impro!e the li!es of the youth
and gi!e hope that they can
Efren 1e]aflorida -ilipino
.ark /yman 7merican
Educate street children
through
7rnel 1ineda -ilipino
E!ans 2adongo 8enyan
%reat a diabetes ;common
illness of people in this
Rose abo!e po!erty and
hunger

1ro!ide light to 8enya.


/elp the homeless+ the poor+

b. 7sk students to ,ot do)n notes as they !ie) the presentation+
and then complete the grid.
c. =iscuss )ith students the significance of the material sho)n+
focusing on(
? the "ualities that make these people e*traordinary
? )hat prompted them to make a difference in other
people0s li!es
? the impact they ha!e made on the people around them
? simple people like 7rnel 1ineda+ Efren 1e]aflorida+ and
6halib 8halil )ho ha!e become e*traordinary
? and if it means that they can also be an e*traordinary
person


d. 7sk students )hat they realie about these e*traordinary
people0s ad!ocacies that make significant impact on others0
li!es.
? /a!e students )rite their reflections on these ad!ocacies on ^
sheet of paper.

-2)&I<G ;OB24O-1 (@ $inutes)
See ./our Initial Tasks%3
c. 7ssign the essay @-or $on!ersation+ 1ress U>A for home
reading.
d. /a!e students )rite on their notebooks.
e. 7sk students to bring a memorable photograph to class.


CO<SI&2-I<G O9TIO<S (?H $inutes)
See Task F( ./our Initial Tasks%3
a. Elicit the students0 opinion as to )hy the man is still lonely
although he has access to modern gadgets.
b. Elicit from students the general truth being depicted in the te*t.


FIGU-I<G IT OUT (?H $inutes)
See Task K ./our Initial Tasks%3


c. 7sk students to do the !ocabulary task.
7ns)er key(


7 F # H
$ > = C E
B - O


STIBU0)TI<G -2S9O<SIBI0ITI2S (?K $inutes)
See Task N ./our Initial Tasks%3


1. /a!e the class )ork in groups of four.
2. 7sk students to read the selection and take notes in order to formulate
"uestions and note details to be able to gi!e ans)ers.
3. /a!e students discuss )ith their groupmates for ten minutes and formulate
"uestions.
4. %ell students that for each "uestion and ans)er gi!en+ the group gains a
smiley+ to be entered in the score board. %he group )ith the highest score is the
)inner.
'core board for the group acti!ity
Grou1sZcores Juestions
0cores3
$ns:er
0cores3
Tot
al
c
1




@
I
E


U<&2-ST)<&I<G T;2 T2LT( ?H $inutes)
See Task J ./our Initial Tasks%3


a. /a!e students ans)er the B;item "ui.
7ns)er 8ey( >.a C. c F. b H. c B. =


2<-IC;I<G /OU- 2L92-I2<C2 (@K $inutes)
See Task E ./our Initial Tasks%3
c. /a!e students go back to the te*t @ For
Con*ersation( 9ress O ?%A
? 7sk students to cite other ad!ances in communication that
make a person de!iate from human interaction.
? /a!e students to reflect on the concern of the )riter+ and
emphasie the importance of human interaction.
d. /a!e fi!e groups of students do the task.
e. 7sk students to )ork on the acti!ity assigned to them.


-2)&I<G ;OB24O-1 (@ $inutes)
See C/our Te#t5: .Sorry( 4ron! <u$'er3 (e#cerpte)
a. 7ssign the continuation of the te*t @ Sorry(
4ron! <u$'er
.(e#cerpte)
for home reading.
b. /a!e students )rite on their notebooks )hy .rs. 'te!enson
made a series of calls.
c. 7sk students to bring a memorable photograph to class.
Your TeHtA orry4 /ron5 NumDer 0a radio 1lay4 eHcer1ted388continuation
-2C)00I<G 2>2<TS: T;-O4B)C1 BO&2 (?H $inutes)
See Task P ./our Te#t3
a. /a!e !olunteer students read the parts of the play.
b. 7sk students to find out the reasons for the character0s actionsW
their moti!ations.
c. 7sk students to listen to the characters read their parts on the
radio con!ersations.
f. 'top the character at a certain point+ ask some "uestions+ and ha!e
students ans)er in character.


&20>I<G &2292- (GH $inutes)
See Task ?H ./our Te#t%3
a. /a!e si* groups of students do the task.
b. 7sk students to discuss the content of the part gi!en to them.


FI-BI<G U9 (?H $inutes)
See Task?? ./our Te#t%3
b. 7sk students )hat makes the story suspenseful and the
reason .rs. 'te!enson is not able to get help.
c. 1ut the students in the situation of .rs. 'te!enson+ )hat
they )ould do if they sensed that they )ere in the murder plan3
d. /a!e students reflect on the most interesting part they learned
from the story.


2<-IC;I<G /OU- 2L92-I2<C2 (GH $inutes)
See Task ?G ./our Te#t3


a. 7sk students to form fi!e groups to )ork on the si* acti!ities.
b. =iscuss )ith students the criteria for ,udging their
performance reflected in the rubric.


Rubric in Judging a 6roup 1resentation
Each group e!aluates the presentation of the other groups using the
follo)ing criteria.
'%U=EN%0' %E7$/ER0' -inal
$RI%ERI7 1ER$EN%;
76E
R7%IN6
#y 6roup
R7%IN6

R7%IN
6


> C F H
$ontent H?N






Rele!ance CBN
$larity of E*pression >BN
$reati!ity >?N
.a*imum
1articipation
>?N
%O%7L >??N


SOU<&I<G 4O-&S CO--2CT0/ (GK $inutes)


See Task ?@ ./our Te#t3


7[9 7\9 7D9 7!9 719 729
thin
thick
tha)
thud
theory
theater
ether
method
author
nothing
athlete
they
thus
them
)eather
clothing
fathom
breathe
lathe
scythe
tithe
be"ueath
bat
back
bun
boat
big
beam
bet
bog
club
nab
sob
!at
!ote
!alue
!anity
!ital
!el!et
a!ail
a!id
co!e
sa!e
lo!e
pat
pen
pint
pear
post
play
prey
posture
puncture
clap
grip
fat
fame
font
fur
foot
fabric
fortu
ne
foggy
flour
safe
caf_
e. .odel the enunciation of four critical consonant sounds(

6roup H. 7\9

7d987\9


day;they

dot;that dose;those
)ordy;)orthy )eed;)idth
6roup B. 7!9

7!98 7D9
!ase; base !ote;boat
!end;bend !eil;bail
!ague;big
f. /a!e the )hole class read the gi!en )ords.
g. 7sk the students to )ork in four groups to practice reading
the sentences.
6roup>. 7[9


7t9 8 7[9
6roup C. 7D9


7D987!9
6roup F . 729


7198729
tin8thin ban;!an
pact;
fact
team8theme boat;!ote
tie8thi5h
ti228thie2
best;!est
bile;!ile
buy;!ie
curbing;cur!ing
habit;ha!e it
pay;fay
pace;
face
pail;fail
peal;feel
pull;full
pool;fool
pry;fry


d. 1resent more e*amples for students to ha!e more practice.

S;)-I<G B/ 4O-0& (NH $inutes)
See Task ?F ./our Te#t3
a. 1ro!ide the students fi!e 9B: minutes to discuss the topic.
b. &olunteering One0s 'elf 9>B minutes:
c. /a!e students read and study the sentences in the springboard.
1rocessing(
1. Lead the students in analying the sentences+ by asking them
)hat )ord introduces the phrase in italics and )hat they call this
phrase.
2. -urther ask students )hat )ord comes before the gerund in
each sentence and the function of the pronoun in relation to the
gerund.


%eaching 1oints(
7 gerund phrase begins )ith a gerund+ an; in! )ord+ and
includes other modifiers and5or ob,ects. 6erund phrases al)ays
function as nouns+ so they )ill be sub,ects+ sub,ect complements+ or
ob,ects in the sentence.
If a noun or pronoun immediately precedes the gerund and is a part of
the gerund phrase+ it should be in the possessi!e case+ not the
ob,ecti!e. %his noun or pronoun implies the doer or recei!er of the
gerund action and is the )ord to )hich the gerund refers to.


.ake students )ork )ith a partner+ read the paragraph + then
underline the gerundial phrases.


d. Li!ing )ith Others 9>B minutes:
7sk students to )ork )ith a partner in completing the task.
7ns)er 8ey(
1. Lara0s O. Your
C. /er




J. their
F. her
D.
members0
H. my Q. your
B. our >?. her
e. 7sking the E*pert 9>C minutes:
a. 7sk students to form fi!e groups to make up a )riting
team for a popular ad!ice column.
b. /a!e students )rite H;B lines of ad!ice and make use
of gerunds.
Your .isco!ery Tas,s


GOI<G I<TO T;2 4O-0& OF )CTI<G ( NH $inutes)
See Task ?K C/our &isco*ery Tasks3


2arming up( Impro!isation 9B minutes:
a. /a!e students )ork in pairs and do the %elephone
$hain. -amiliariing one0s self )ith the stage 9C? minutes:
a. =iscuss )ith students that in de!ising drama+ they need to
think about how to sta!e their per"or$ance+ and )hat type of
stage to use.
b. /a!e students )ork )ith a partner and study the four
types of stage.


%hinking it o!er.
a. /a!e students )ork in groups of four.
b. /a!e students think of an e*ample of each type of stage or dra)
them. It could be one of those stages that they ha!e already
been to.


6aining more information about the stage
7sk students to discuss )ith a partner the stage area
boundaries+ the backdrops+ and other things relati!e to the
materials on and off the stage.


%eaching 1oints(
? ;rosceniumA %he !ie) of the stage for the audience< also called
a proscenium arch. %he arch)ay is in a sense the frame for stage as
defined by the boundaries of the stage beyond )hich a !ie)er
cannot see.
? TeaserA the border drapes across the top of the stage that
conceals the lighting instruments
? TormentorA %he border drapes on the sides of the stage that
conceal the backstage areas
? CycloramaA %he large muslin drape hung across the e*treme
upstage area that represents the sky.
? Grand .ra1eA %he main curtain that conceals the stage from
the audience. Usually red.
? $1ronA %he area of the stage on the audience side of the grand
drape.
? 'ly RailA %he ropes+ pulleys+ and arbors off stage right that
control the height of the drapes+ electrics+ battens+ and hanging
scenery.
? "attensA 1ipes hung abo!e the )idth of the stage that can be
used for hanging scenery.
? ElectricA 7 batten affi*ed )ith electrical outlets used for hanging
and po)ering lighting instruments.
? "ac,dro1( 7 large piece of painted fabric hung behind the
actors. Usually painted to resemble a realistic location.

Your 'inal Tas,s
G2TTI<G IBB2-S2& (@K $inutes)
'ee %ask >O ./our Final Tasks3
d. 1resent t)o synopses to t)o groups of students.
e. 7sk students to analye the features of a synopsis.
f. /a!e students refer to the guidelines on )riting a synopsis.
g. 7sk students ho) the synopsis is arranged+ and if the ending
is gi!en.


%eaching 1oints(
Rule o2 thumDA You should only name three characters in a short
synopsis E usually+ the protagonist+ antagonist+ and possible lo!e
interest5side;kick. 7ll other characters should be referred to by their
roles 9e.g. the )aitress+ the mother+ the basketball player:.
Rule o2 thumDA You must tell the endingI %he purpose of a
synopsis is to sho) an editor5agent you can tell a story from
beginning to end. You )ill not entice them into reading your )hole
.' if you don0t share the ending E you0ll ,ust tick them offI
Rule o2 thumDA =o not include subplots unless you ha!e e*tra
space at the end. 'tick to the .7IN 1LO% E&EN%'.


G2TTI<G T;2 4;O02 9ICTU-2 (GK $inutes)
See Task ?J C/our Final Tasks5
=iscuss )ith students that in the pre!ious lesson+ they analyed
synopses based on the guidelines to )riting a good plot synopsis or
summary. %his time they )ill re!ise the summary of the radio play
! Sorry 4ron! <u$'er5 and come up )ith an impro!ed synopsis of
the )hole play.
.rs. 'te!enson is sick and confined to her bed. /er only lifeline is
the telephone. One night+ )hile )aiting for her husband to return home+
she tries to locate him. 'he picks up the phone and accidentally
o!erhears a con!ersation through a cross;line+ bet)een t)o men
planning to murder a )oman )ho li!es near the bridge on 'econd
7!enue at >>(>B at night of that same day. 'he begins a series of calls;;
to the operator+ to the police+ and others+ desperate to pre!ent the crime.




1rocessing(
a. 'tudents refer to the guidelines on )riting synopsis as they re!ise
the partial synopsis of RSorry 4ron! <u$'er%5
b. %hey submit their finished )ork on a )hole sheet of paper.

MY TRE$URE
See C.y %reasure5



@%o make a difference in this )orld+ you start it )ithin your heart.
7sk yourself T2hat can I do
to make this )orld a better place for me and for you3T






*ome:or,

B)1I<G ) &IFF2-2<C2
a. Using the library information sources+ research on )hy our
country is said to be in the ring of fire and )hich seems to be the cause
the constant occurrences of natural disasters.
b. Reflect on the recent disastrous e!ents in the country like the
floods in Luon+ the armed conflict in Zamboanga+ the J.C magnitude
earth"uake in #ohol+ and the storm surge due to %yphoon Yolanda in
Leyte and 'amar. 2rite in your ,ournal ho) you can be of help and
make a difference in the li!es of the !ictims.
Teachers Guide
Module I
Lesson I
______________________________________________________________
Ces/ite Ci00erences in #oint o0 %ie1


A. #ntroduction
%his lesson )ill allo) the students to embark on a ,ourney that )ill allo) them a
better understanding and connection )ith indi!iduals )ith a di!ersity of beliefs
or non;beliefs in order to promote openness and transparency as a )ay to
share and connect )ith the )orld. 2e all stri!e to maintain a sense of
)ellbeing. &arious things that happen in our li!es can impact on ho) )e feel+
both positi!ely and negati!ely.


@7 man does )hat he must ; in spite of personal conse"uences+ in spite of
obstacles and dangers and pressures ; and that is the basis of all human
morality.A
? 2inston $hurchill 3

B. ODKecti!esA
? Recognie faulty logic+ unsupported facts+ and emotional appeal.
? 7nalye the information contained in the material !ie)ed.
? 7nalye literature as a means of connecting to the )orld.
? E*press appreciation of sensory images and e*plain the literary
de!ices used.
? Use infiniti!es correctly.
? $ompose forms of literary )riting.
? Use the appropriate prosodic features of speech )hen deli!ering lines
in a one;act play.
? #e familiar )ith the technical !ocabulary for drama and theatre 9acting
!ocabulary:.


B. $ssessment ;lan
C. ResourcesA
1. .aterials(
$= recording the music !ideo
2. E"uipment
a. 7udio $= player5 laptop
b. L$= pro,ector
c. 7mplifier5 microphone


D. $cti!ities

1. ;RE8$EMENT
Tas, 1& LOG#C4 '$CT OR $;;E$L
0o!ic is the process o" rawin! conclusions% O"ten( writers an
speakers( whether intentionally or otherwise( $isuse lo!ic to arri*e at the
conclusion they pre"er%Faulty lo!ic occurs when you use wors with
connotations that $ake a "alse connection 'etween a person or iea an
the worQs connotation( whether it 'e positi*e or ne!ati*e%

7sk the students to read the sentences and choose from the )ord pool
gi!en+ the appropriate )ords in place of the #OL= letters to
describe someone0s clothing.See Task ? ./our Initial Tasks3
( ele!ance( costu$e( $eie*al( tools( 4estern wear( elicate(
*ery polite( archaic)


Tas, @& "E /#EU T*#N% T/#CEU
In e*erythin! we o an say we ha*e to 'e wise% 4e shoul choose
whether it 'e so$ethin! is to 'e 'elie*e or not% 0et us test your
critical thinkin! skills to eter$ine the worth o" ieas%


7sk the students to listen to the statements that )ill be read to them. %ell
them to use the checklist to identify the statements )hich
ha!e faulty logic+ unsupported facts+ and emotional appeal. See Task
2 ./our Initial Tasks3


1. I argued )ith .rs. #am before I turned in my home)ork so I
got a bad grade on my paper.9unsupported facts:
2. 7 teenager argues against the familyKs !acation plans+ and
the mother responds by saying+ T2hen you pay the bills+ you
can make the decisions.T9emotional appeal:
3. 7fter making it clear that he !alues employee Tloyalty+T
a super!isor asks for T!olunteersT to help a fello)
super!isor mo!e on the )eekend.9 faulty logic: H.E*ercising makes
you feel good.9unsupported facts:
5. I kno) )hy you failed all your classes last semester. You
don0t study. 9unsupported facts:
Tas, IA $ T#ME 'OR U
7sk the students to )atch a music !ideo from a popular romantic and tragic
play @Romeo and JulietA. %hen ask them to do the follo)ing acti!ities.


http(55))).youtube.com5)atch3![H-/pmn;8Yec


a. 2rite one scene that presents the follo)ing.
1. faulty logic
2. unsupported facts
3. emotional appeal


b. -ill up the re"uired information in the &isualiation
1lot 2orksheet to analye the music !ideo.

Tas, E UnscramDle the Letters
7sk the students to unscramble the letters of terms related to the theatre
stage. %ell the students that the theatre stage !ocabulary )ill help them in
their performance of a one;act play.
'ee %ask H @Your Initial %asksA


7. ;resentation
%his simple acti!ity gi!es higher;le!el students the chance to )rite and act in
their o)n !ersion of Romeo and Juliet.

;re1aration
? =i!ide students into groups of about three. It is not necessary to ha!e
all male or all female groups but you could consider it. 6i!e half the
class $ard > and the other half of the class $ard C.
$ard >
You are >B. You kno) a !ery $ard C
beautiful girl called Juliet and you )ould like
to marry her. You ha!e decided to go and
talk to her. 1repare )hat you are going to
say to make a good impression. Let her
kno) ho) you feel. You are rich and
handsome
and kno) that you are a good catch.
You are >B. You0!e heard
from your friends that a boy called 1aris
)ould like to marry you. /e0s !ery rich
and handsome but not really your type
and you don0t lo!e him. 2hat are you
going to say )hen he comes to speak to
you3
;rocedure
? Regroup the class so that e!eryone is in a pair of 1aris0 and Juliets.
%hen act out their con!ersation.
? $all on H;B pairs for each group to present the con!ersation.
? 7fter)ards ask the students to return to their proper places and gi!e
some feedback about the presentations.
=o you kno) )hich famous play starts in this )ay3
? 7sk the students to ans)er the !ocabulary de!elopment as schemata
building.
'ee %ask B @Your %e*tA


; E R N # C # O U
U 2 R = ' 7 * % ' T
N = R X L - 6 2 $
# ' 1 # # L V $ # "
# E N ) 6 J L . 2
* - $ = E $ . O O X
M " - = 6 6 L E = 1
E L = N . O ' L ' E
N 7 L T O M " E R '
T L ' . O 1 X R ' %



8. Enrichment


T$% =& Ma,in5 Connections
A. /hat the teHt says
7sk the students to group themsel!es into fi!e and choose one "uestion )ord
to discuss. %hen ask each group )hat their "uestion is based on the "uestion
)ord they ha!e chosen.
? /*$T t)o families are feuding3 E*plain the reason for the family feud.
? /*O are the characters in the story3 .ake a character diagram.
? /*ERE does the story take place3 .ake a sketch and sho) it to the
class.
? /*EN does the story take place3 Indicate the physical setting such as
time of day+ season+ )eather or temperature+ type of building+ indoors
or outdoors+ ob,ects+ colors+ imagery 9fi!e senses: if a!ailable.
? /*Y does Lady $apulet )ant Juliet to marry 1aris03
Note( 1ro!ide some additional inputs on the student0s discussion.
7sk the )hole class. @/o) does 'hakespeare describe Romeo and
Juliet3 7ns)er( 7 pair of star;crossed lo!ers
The Chorus5s re$ark that -o$eo an Duliet are .star8crosse3 an
"ate to .take their li*es3 in"or$s the auience that the lo*ers
are estine to ie tra!ically.


B. /hat the TeHt Means
7sk the students ans)er the 2hat the %e*t .eans acti!ity.
Encourage them to be critical in ans)ering the "uestions. 1ro!ide them
)ith a further e*planation for a better understanding of the te*t and lead
them to make connections on ho) the te*t relates to real life situations.
'ee %ask H # @Your %e*tA


C. Ta,e to Mean
/a!e the students identify )ho said the follo)ing lines and )hy they
said it
a& @Is she a $apulet3 O+ dear+ account+ my lie is a foe of debtIA
-o$eo says this when he learns that Duliet is a $e$'er or the
Capulet "a$ily%
@O+ I am fortune0s foolIA illustrates the fact that Romeo sees
b.@.y only lo!e sprung from my only hate. %oo early seen
unkno)n and kno)n too late.A
Duliet says this when she learns that -o$eo is a Bonta!ue( an
ene$y o" her "a$ily%

Tas, ?&Connect and %inect
A. ensory #ma5es
7sk the students to identify the sensory images used in the te*t.


B. #n the %no:
7sk the students to match the literary de!ices on the left )ith its
e*ample line on the right. =iscuss briefly the literary de!ices found in the
acti!ity.
'ee %ask O # @Your %e*tA
T$% CA Lan5ua5e in Use
? /a!e the students read the lines taken from the play Romeo
and Juliet and ask them to identify )hat !erb form is common
among them.
? Lead the students to a discussion of infiniti!es used as a sub,ect
of the sentence.
? 7sk them to ans)er 7cti!ity # as practice using infiniti!es as a
sub,ect.
? %he last grammar acti!ity )ill lead to the ne*t lesson on
infiniti!es used as a direct ob,ect.
'ee %ask J @Your %e*tA


Tas, OA $ct and Communicate
6i!e a brief lecture about prosodic features in English. Emphasie the
use and importance of stress in speaking. /a!e the students group
themsel!es into fi!e and perform the group differentiated acti!ity.
6roup > .atching Opposites
6roup C &ariations
6roup F 'entence .atching
6roup H 'e"uencing sentences
6roup B 'entence $onstruction
Note( Lead the students in the proper pronunciation.


9. EH1ansion
Tas, 1-& Li2es Lin,a5es
Recogniing the student0s life e*periences contributes to ne) learning. In this
lesson allo) the students to realie that falling in lo!e deeply at a young age is
not good nor is entering into an early marriage. 7sk the students to relate the
story of Romeo and Juliet )ith real life situation and help them realie that )hat
Romeo and Juliet did )ill not gi!e them a better future.


10. ynthesis


T$% 11A /rite No:
7sk the students to group themsel!es into three and )rite a dialogue based
on the part of the story gi!en. 'ee %ask D @Your -inal %asks.A
Tas, 1@ Li5hts Camera $ctionU
? 6roup the students into three and ask them to act out the first part of
the play of Romeo and Juliet. Instruct them that if they don0t ha!e the right
number of people+ they may find another )ay.
-or e*ample+ one person may take on se!eral small roles or a puppet
or an inanimate ob,ect may become a character.
? 6i!e them time to )ork on a rough script 9>B mins.: and then to
practice 9>B mins.:.
? /a!e them use the dialogue they crafted in the )riting acti!ity.
'ee task >> Lights $amera 7ction @Your -inal %asks.A

MY TRE$URE
%his acti!ity is something that )ill lea!e an impact in their li!es and )ill allo)
them on. E*plain further the importance of this acti!ity because this is one of
the ingredients in order to achie!e success in connecting and sur!i!ing in the
)orld despite different points of !ie). -urthermore guide the students in
understanding others and indi!idual differences in order to a!oid conflicts.






Teachers Guide
Module I
Lesson E
______________________________________________________________
.ith Fortitude and Cetermination

". #ntroduction
/a!e you al)ays made the best decisions3 2hat )ould your life be if you had
decided differently3 2hat if you )ere consistently able to make )ise decisions+
)ouldn0t the "uality of your life impro!e3 2hether you are no) in the process of
making an important decision or ,ust )ant to hone your skills+ you )ill find
something !aluable here.


In this ,ourney the students )ill be able to link themsel!es to the past up to
the modern era to a!oid making sudden decisions.

B. ODKecti!esA
? 1ro!ide appropriate and critical feedback5reaction to a specific conte*t
or specific situation.
? 7nalye the information contained in the material !ie)ed.
? 7nalye literature as a means of connecting to the )orld.
? 7nalye a one;act play that e*presses appreciation for
the sensory images used.
? E*plain literary de!ice used.
? Use infiniti!es correctly.
? #ecome familiar )ith the technical !ocabulary for drama
and theatre 9acting
? &ocabulary:.
? Use the appropriate prosodic features of speech )hen deli!ering lines
in
a one;act play.
? $ompose forms of literary )riting.


C. $ssessment ;lan
D. ResourcesA
1. .aterials(
a. $= recording dialogue for the listening inputs.
b. $omic story as the te*t
2. E"uipment
a. 7udio $= player5 laptop
b. L$= pro,ector
c. 7mplifier5 microphone
D. $cti!ities
1. ;RE8$EMENT

Tas, 1& Listen4Thin, and React
? Introduce the lesson to the class using the follo)ing
background. 6i!e additional feedback on inputs to further
acti!ate the schema of the students.
'ee %ask > @Your Initial %askA
#ntroduction(


2hether the te*t is a piece of )riting+ an ad!ertisement+ a
painting+ a performance+ or a film+ it can con!ey information to
us+ but )hen )e read a te*t )e do not respond to the
information 9or facts: but to process the information. 7 critical
response means interacting )ith ideas. 7 critical response to
a literary or other artistic )ork means using the skills of close te*tual
analysis.
? 7sk the students to listen to the dialogue taken from 7ct > of the
play Romeo and Juliet+ paying close attention to /O2 the te*t makes
meaning and ho) is ambiguity achie!ed. 6i!e your critical
feedback in a fe) sentences.


1. TyDaltA Uncle $apuletI %hat man is a .ontagueI
Lord Ca1uletA 2hich man3
TyDaltA
%he man )ho came in a fe) minutes
ago.
O!er there # the man )hoKs )earing a
mask. I kno) his !oice. /is name is Romeo+ and heKs a .ontague. IKm
going to kill him.
2. RomeoA %his is troubleI Lord $apulet is my fatherKs
enemy. I lo!e Juliet+but )e can ne!er meet againI
JulietA (4atchin! -o$eo lea*e) <urse( whatQs that
young manKs name3 O!er there+ the one )hoKs lea!ing. If he
has a )ife+ IKll die unmarried.
3. TyDaltA Uncle $apuletI %hat man is a .ontagueI
Lord Ca1uletA 2hich man3
TyDaltA %he man )ho came in a fe) minutes ago.
O!er there E the man )hoKs )earing a
mask. I kno) his !oice. /is name is Romeo+ and heKs a .ontague. IKm
going to kill himI
4. Lady Ca1uletA 2ell+ you must think about it no). 7 young
man )ants to marry you. /is name is 1aris+ and he is young+ rich
and good;looking. /e is a friend of the 1rince of &erona. I )ant you to
try !ery+ !ery hard to lo!e him.
JulietA #ut I donKt kno) himI
Lady Ca1uletA %hat doesnKt matter. YouKll meet him this
e!ening+ at the party. You )ill like him+ IKm sure.
5. NurseA /is name is Romeo+ and heKs a .ontague+
the only son of your familyKs great enemy.
JulietA .y only lo!e+ a hated .ontagueI
NurseA 2hat )as that3 $ome+ Juliet. Your mother
is )aiting
Tas, @A $udience ;oint o2 )ie:
? Introduce the lesson using the introductory statement. 6i!e
further inputs.
'ee Your %e*t
? 7sk the students to analye the photo gallery and create a story
out of them. 7rrange the pictures according to its occurrence in order
to ha!e a !i!id representation of a story.
? 7sk a representati!e for each group to present the story they
created out of the pictures.


2. ;REENT$T#ON
In the balcony scene+ notice that the more that Juliet speaks+ the more that
Romeo stutters dumbfounded to the point that he can barely complete his
sentences.
? =iscuss the comprehension "uestions. 'ee -irst %houghts Your %e*t.
? %o del!e deeper into the selection+ group the students into fi!e and ask
them to discuss the interpretati!e "uestions. /a!e them dra) lots as
to )hat "uestion they are going to discuss.
'ee %ask H 'mart 'hapes to 'mart .inds+ RYour%e*tA
? /a!e the students arrange the e!ents based on the balcony scene.
'ee %ask H Reminisce and 'chematie @Your %e*tA
3. ENR#C*MENT
? 7sk the students to ans)er the Imagery %ree. =iscuss further the
definition of imagery and )hy it is used in discussing literary te*ts. 'ee
%ask B 7+ @Your %e*tA
? /a!e the students )rite the follo)ing e*ample line to its appropriate
literary de!ice by completing the Literary Net)ork .ap.
'ee %ask B#+ @Your%e*tA
? 7sk the students to read the sentences )ith infiniti!es used as an
ob,ect in the sentence. =iscuss the meaning of ob,ect. %ake note of the
use of direct ob,ect and sub,ecti!e complement in the sentence. 'ee
%ask O+ @Your %e*t.A
? 7sk them to ans)er letter 7;$. 9Note( 7cti!ity $ )ill lead the students in
formulating their o)n sentence and lead them to use the infiniti!e as an
ob,ect in the sentence.:
'ee %ask O @Your %e*tA
? %ask J -or Oral -luency of the students discuss intonation.
2hat )ould be an utterance )ithout intonation3
Intonation makes it easier for the listener to understand )hat the
speaker is trying to con!ey. Intonation is used to carry different kinds of
information. It signals grammatical structure+ though not in a one;to; one
)ay< )hilst the end of a complete intonation pattern )ill normally
coincide )ith the end of a grammatical structure such as a sentence or
clause. E!en "uite ma,or grammatical boundaries may lack
intonational marking+ particularly if the speech is fast.


LE7= %/E '%U=EN% IN %/I' 7$%I&I%Y. #E 7 .O=EL.
? 7sk the student to )ork in groups to perform the intonation acti!ities for
oral fluency.
6roup > 1ractice the dialogue )ith appropriate intonation substituting
the gi!en
)ords.
6roup C Read aloud each of the sentences belo). 1lease pay special
attention to the intonation patterns.
6roup F Read aloud each of the sentences belo). 1lease pay special
attention to the intonation patterns.
6roup H Read the follo)ing passage aloud. 1lease concentrate on its
intonation and )eak pronunciation forms.
6roup B Read the follo)ing sketch. 1lease pay special attention to its
intonation and )eak pronunciation forms.
'ee %ask J @Your %e*tA
? /a!e the students figure out the different theatre !ocabulary in relation
to stage.
'ee %ask D+ @Your%e*tA
$ns& blocking+ cross+ position+gesture+ tableau


4. EH1ansion
%his phase of the lesson is the transfer stage of )hat they ha!e learned in
the pre!ious acti!ities gi!en. %his is )here the students disco!er their
learned kno)ledge.
? /a!e the students perform the group differentiated acti!ity.
6roup > .etaphor 'ong
6roup C 7postrophe 'ong
6roup F /yperbole 'ong
6roup H 1ersonification 'ong
6roup B 'imile 'ong
ee Tas, O 6Your .isco!ery Tas,sS
? /a!e the students group themsel!es into three and ask them to re;
)rite the balcony scene in e!eryday speech or modern dialogue.
Remind the students to retain the original intent and meaning of the
balcony scene. ee Tas, 1- 6Your .isco!ery Tas,sS
? 7sk the students to group themsel!es into three and re;enact the
balcony scene Romeo and Juliet using the modern dialogue they ha!e
)ritten in %ask >?. 7sk them to perform the t)ist. ee Tas, 11 6Your
.isco!ery Tas,sS


5. YNT*E#
-or this acti!ity e*plain further )hat is a -lipbook as illustrated in %ask >C Your
-inal %ask. 'ee to it that the students understand )hat they are going to do
before they start crafting their flipbook.
? /a!e the students make a -lipbook.
? %hey need to create a comic book for the balcony scene in the modern
times.
? %heir comic book should ha!e pictures and captions for each scene
from the play.
? Remind them to make sure to choose an important moment from each
scene+ and include their o)n dialogue that might be spoken in that
scene.
? %he comic books should be creati!ely done and in color.
? Use the follo)ing -lipbook Rubric in scoring the students0 output.
-lipbook Rubric



'tudent Name( 4444444444444444444444444444444444444444



2 8 Needs
$7%E6ORY E 8 EHcellent I 8 atis2actory #m1ro!ement 1 8 Not Yet
$ccuracy 7ll facts in
flipbook are
accurate.
QQ;Q?N of
the
facts in the
flipbook are
accurate.
DQ;D?N of
the
facts in the
flipbook are
accurate.
-e)er than
D?N of the
facts in the
flipbook are
accurate.
Citation $itation is
accurate.
$itation is
incomplete.
$itation is
inaccurate.
No citation
listed.
1ellin5 >
;roo2readin5
No spelling
errors.
Less than H
spelling
errors+ but
they do not
B;D spelling
errors< some
distraction
due to
errors.
Q or more
spelling
errors
cause ma,or
distraction
distract the
reader.
the
reader.
Research B fact bullets
per page
H fact bullets
per page
F fact bullets
per page
Less than F
fact bullets
per
page
Titles and
LaDels
7ll titles and
labels are
present.
7ll pages
ha!e either
title or label.
'ome pages
are missing
titles or
labels.
No titles or
labels are
present.


CommentsA
coreA



MY TRE$URE
In our li!es many situations arise in )hich it becomes difficult to do the right
thing+ e!en )hen )e kno) )hat it is. %here may be all sorts of reasons for )hy
it is disagreeable to act according to )hat )e kno) is best. In order to stay
strong and do )hat is good+ )e need to ha!e fortitude+ courage+ or bra!ery.
%hese are the !irtues by )hich )e do the right thing+ e!en in the midst of
hardship. Like)ise this acti!ity is e"ually important to allo) the students to
)eigh their strengths and )eaknesses in order to a!oid making rash decisions
especially like falling in lo!e at a young age.
Teachers Guide
Module I
Lesson <
______________________________________________________________
Across Time


". #ntroduction


In this ,ourney the students )ill be able to recognie that people0s li!es are
shaped by the circumstances of the time and place in )hich they li!e 9family
and social mores+ religion+ po)er relations+ etc.: and to an e*tent can control
the direction and final outcomes of our li!es. $ircumstances of life change us
and mold us.
6#n the lon5 run4 :e sha1e our li!es4 and :e sha1e oursel!es& The
1rocess ne!er ends until :e die& $nd the choices :e ma,e are
ultimately our o:n res1onsiDility&S
]Eleanor Roose!elt]


B. ODKecti!esA
? 7nalye a one;act play.
? E*press appreciation for sensory images used.
? E*plain the literary de!ice used.
? 1ro!ide appropriate and critical feedback5reaction to a specific
conte*t or situation.
? 7nalye literature as a means of connecting to the )orld.
? 7nalye the information contained in the material !ie)ed.
? Use &erbals< infiniti!es 9ad,ecti!e G ad!erb:.
? #e familiar )ith the technical !ocabulary for drama and theatre 9!oice:.
? Use effecti!e and appropriate non;!erbal communication strategies.
? $ompose forms of literary )riting.
C. $ssessment ;lan
D. ResourcesA
1. .aterials(
$= recording te*t for the listening inputs.
2. E"uipment
a. L$= pro,ector
c. 7mplifier5 microphone
$. $cti!ities


1. ;RE8$EMENT

Tas, 1& ensation and ;erce1tion
? 7sk the students to identify the sensory
imagery in the follo)ing sentences.
'ee %ask > letter 7. @Your Initial %askA
? 7sk the students to read the lines and identify )hat literary
de!ice is used.
'ee %ask > letter #+ @Your Initial %askA

Tas, @A Tune #n
%his listening acti!ity )ill help them to associate )ith the ne) lesson
? 7sk the students to group themsel!es into fi!e 9B:.
? 7sk them to choose one audio de!ice. Each audio de!ice has its
corresponding "uotation taken from the play Romeo and Juliet.
? 7sk them to listen as you read the "uotation for the de!ice that
they ha!e chosen+
? Instruct them to discuss )ith their group members the
interpretation of the "uotation and gi!e their reaction to it.
? 7fter)ards ask them to present their interpretation in front of the
class.
? 1ro!ide some inputs after the students0 presentation for further
understanding the te*t.


@2hen he shall die+
%ake him and cut him out in little stars+
7nd he )ill make the face of hea!en so fine
%hat all the )orld )ill be in lo!e )ith night
7nd pay no )orship to the garish sun.A
? 2illiam 'hakespeare+ -o$eo an
Duliet @%hese !iolent delights ha!e !iolent
ends
7nd in their triumph die+ like fire and po)der
2hich+ as they kiss+ consume.A
? 2illiam 'hakespeare+ -o$eo an Duliet
@O+ here 2ill I set up my
e!erlasting rest+
7nd shake the yoke of inauspicious stars -rom this
)orld;)earied flesh. Eyes+ look your lastI 7rms+
take your last embraceI and+ lips+ O you
%he doors of breath+ seal )ith a righteous kiss
7 dateless bargain to engrossing deathIA
? 2illiam 'hakespeare+ -o$eo an Duliet
@7 glooming peace this morning )ith it brings<
%he sun+ for sorro)+ )ill not sho) his head( 6o
hence+ to ha!e more talk of these sad things<
'ome shall be pardonKd+ and some punished( -or
ne!er )as a story of more )oe
%han this of Juliet and her Romeo.A
? 2illiam 'hakespeare+ -o$eo an Duliet
@Eyes+ look your lastI
7rms+ take your last embraceI
7nd+ lips+ oh you the doors of breath+ seal )ith a
righteous kiss a dateless bargain to engrossing
deathIA
? 2illiam 'hakespeare+ -o$eo an Duliet






2. ;REENT$T#ON
/a!e the students unlock some of the difficult )ords before the
discussion of the story.
6'ind Your MatchS
? 7sk the students to match the )ords in first column )ith its definition in
the second column.
? %ell them that the underlined !ocabulary )ords are used in a sentence
in order to gi!e them a clue as to the correct match of each )ord to its
meaning.


'ay( %here are se!eral types of lo!e alluded to in -o$eo an Duliet:
unre"uited lo!e+ @puppyA lo!e+ arranged marriage+ lo!e at first sight. -ind
e*amples of these in the play and describe them. $an any of these forms the
basis of a good relationship3 2hat is needed for a good relationship3
Read your teHt& ee Your TeHt&
'actual Recount
Lead the students in the initial discussion of the selection through the gi!en
factual "uestions. %his )ill help the students to note do)n details from the
selection.
'ee -actual Recount @Your %e*tA


Tas, IA Thin, Throu5h
A. $ct #n Res1onse
? 7sk the students to group themsel!es into fi!e and ha!e a
collaborati!e discussion on the gi!en "uestions the first "uestion )ill be
for group B+ second )ill be group H+ third )ill be group F+ fourth )ill be
group C and fifth )ill be group >.
'ee %ask F. @Your =isco!ery %asksA
? 1ro!ide additional inputs or e*planations for further understanding and
realiation to lead them in relating the )orth)hile human !alues into
their life.
B. )isual inter1retation(
%his acti!ity )ill lead the students in the !ie)ing lesson.
? Instruct the students to use the same groupings )hen doing the !isual
interpretation.
? 7sk them to create a painting+ a dra)ing or some other !isual art piece
that depicts your interpretation of one of the themes or a particular
character0s personality from the last part of the story.

Cloc,:ise )iDes
-rom the !isual interpretation made by each group+ ask the students to
do the follo)ing.
? %ake turns in gi!ing feedback.
? .ake a clock)ise reaction based on the choice of color+ medium+
te*ture+ something about the theme and e!ents of the act.
? -ollo) the cycle presented.
ee Tas, E4 6Your TeHtS
3. ENR#C*MENT
Tas, < ;anel 'orum
In order to analye the literary piece in connecting to the )orld ask the
students to organie a 1anel -orum. %his )ill enlighten the students to !alue
life and a!oid tragedy in their li!es. ee Tas, < 6Your TeHtS
Tas, = Grammar #n 'ocus
In lesson H the students learned that infiniti!es are used as an ob,ect in the
sentence. In this lesson let us find out )hat are the other uses of infiniti!es.

%ey ;oints
%he infiniti!e can be used as an ad,ecti!e+ ad!erb+ or noun. %his sheet )ill
go o!er the infiniti!e as an ad!erb. %herefore+ the infiniti!e )ill ans)er the
"uestions an ad!erb ans)ers.
E*amples(
Our neighbor+ Jack Jones+ returned home to recuperate from a heart attack.
%o recuperate is the infiniti!e and it ans)ers the "uestion )hy he returned
home. It is+ therefore+ an ad!erb infiniti!e.
Eager to get home+ Jack left the hospital early in the day.


$dKecti!e Re!ie:A Remember that an ad,ecti!e is a )ord that modifies a
noun or pronoun and ans)ers the "uestions( )hich one3 )hat kind3 and ho)
many3 7n infiniti!e that acts like an ad,ecti!e )ill do the same thing.
EHam1leA
)"ter 'reakin! his le!( &a*e ha $any o'stacles to o*erco$e%
%o o!ercome is the infiniti!e and tells )hich obstacles ha!e to be
o!ercome. %hus+ it modifies the noun+ obstacles.
? 7sk the students to read the sentences.
=iscuss the use of the infiniti!es in the sentences
? 7sk the students to underline the infiniti!e in each sentence+ then )rite
7=J if it is used as an ad,ecti!e and 7=& it is used as an ad!erb.
? 7sk the students to complete the sentences )ith an infiniti!e using the
indicated )ord inside the parentheses.
'ee %ask J @Your %e*tA

Tas, ? /ord8 *oard
'our8;ics One /ord
? 7sk the students to guess the )ord through the four pictures. -ill in the
blanks )ith the correct letters based on the definition inside the bo*.
'ee %ask D @Your %e*tA
Tas, C /rite U1s
$ Ta,e .o:n Game
? 7sk the students to )ork in small groups of fi!e and do as directed in
the L.
'ee %ask D @Your %e*tA


Tas, O 1ea, U1
E*plain the meaning of non;!erbal communication.
ayA 2hen )e interact )ith others+ )e continuously gi!e and recei!e
)ordless signals. 7ll of our non!erbal beha!ioursWthe gestures )e make+ the
)ay )e sit+ ho) fast or ho) loud )e talk+ ho) close )e stand+ ho) much eye
contact )e makeWsend strong messages. %hese messages donKt stop )hen
you stop speaking either. E!en )hen youKre silent+ youKre still communicating
non;!erbally.
Oftentimes+ )hat comes out of our mouths and )hat )e communicate through
our body language are t)o totally different things. 2hen faced )ith these
mi*ed signals+ the listener has to choose )hether to belie!e your !erbal or
non;!erbal message+ and+ in most cases+ theyKre going to choose the non;
!erbal because itKs a natural+ unconscious language that broadcasts our true
feelings and intentions in any gi!en moment.


Encodin5 and .ecodin5 'acial EH1ressions
? 7sk the students to do the non;!erbal acti!ities for oral fluency.
'ee %ask Q @Your%e*tA


4. E(;$N#ON
%he acti!ities pro!ided )ill allo) the students to disco!er their different talents
and capabilities )hich )ere dra)n from the lesson they ha!e learned. %his
acti!ity is '6=
/a!e the students group into fi!e and asked them to perform the acti!ities in
their L.
'ee %ask >? @ Your =isco!ery %asksA
A. Ne)s -lash
B. =ance
C. 'ong performance
D. .ural 1ainting
$. 1ush 7 1encil
5. YNT*E#
%his acti!ity )ill meet the aimed performance standard )hich is to transfer
learning by composing a plot synopsis.

.iscussA
7 =irector0s 1romptbook is essentially a copy of the script that contains notes
about
the performanceblocking+ deli!ery of lines+ setting+ costumes+ and so on.
%hey are used by directors+ actors+ stage managers+ and others in!ol!ed in a
production.


=iscuss the follo)ing guide for the creation of the promptbook (


>.
2rite an introductory page for the promptbook in )hich you e*plain your o!er
all concept of the scene and ho) you plan to con!ey that concept or idea to a
n audience. In other )ords+ as an acting company+ )hat are you trying to sho
%. 7!oid simply retelling the plot of the scene. %horoughly and thoughtfully
d escribe )hat you )ill do to highlight particular emotions+ relationships+
themes
, and issues present in your scene.


C.
%ype out the scene you ha!e chosen. Lea!e plenty of margin space around t
he te*t in order to )rite in instructions for the actors.


F.
You may make cuts in your scene by crossing out lines+ but 'hakespeare0s )
ords must appear in their original se"uence )ithout changes in their )ording
or sense. In the margin+ e*plain briefly )hy you cut the scene as you did.


H.
In the margin beside the te*t+ make production notes that describe the )ay yo
u )ant thescene to be played. %hink about the meaning of and subte*t behin
d each characterKs )ords. Include information about tone of !oice+ gestures+ f
acial e*pression+ and )here and ho) each character )ill mo!e. 7 minimum of
fi!e clear+ specific production notes must accompany each page.
5.
=ecide ho) you )ant to stage the scene and then dra) a diagram of the
stage set. .ake a list offstage property for your scene. If your scene needs
special lighting or music+ )rite a description of a plan for
these design elements. E*plain your choices in at least a paragraph.


O.
=esign costumes appropriate for your concept of the scene. Include a dra)in
g or picture of the costumes and a ,ustification for selecting them. 2hether yo
u do the scene in modern dress or in another time period+ e*plain your reason
&. 2rite at least a paragraph for each costume choice.


J.
.ake a co!er and table of contents for your promptbook. Neatly and securely
bind your promptbook.


D.
Each companyKs book )ill be gi!en one letter grade+ )hich each member gets
9don0t allo) group members to @freeload<A alert me if you can0t handle it amon
g yoursel!es:. %he books )ill be e!aluated on the basis of completeness+ eff
ort+ imagination+ and accuracy.


MY TRE$URE
Each of us holds and is influenced by our !alues+ but )e differ in ho) strongly
)e hold each of them. %his in turn is related to ho) our !alues ha!e been
shaped throughout our li!es.Our e*perience of !arious aspects of our society
)ill help strengthen particular !alues.Lead the students in determining the
!alues )hich )ill help them to become a better person. Emphasie the !alue
of life. %he students should understand that this acti!ity )ill help them to hold
on their !alues that )ill lead them to a good future.
Teachers Guide
Module I
Lesson =
______________________________________________________________
Ces/ite Ci00erences in Social Class


B. $ssessment ;lan
C. ResourcesA
1. Materials(
a. -ilm clip of the !ie)ing inputs
b. $opies of the parallel selections
c. 1ictures presented in the Learning .aterials 9L.s:
c. 2riting implements
2. EGui1ment
a. &ideo5Laptop
b. 7udio 5$= player
b. L$= pro,ector
c. 'peaker

D. $cti!ities
YOUR #N#T#$L T$%
Tas, 1 $cti!ate Your Mind
a. 'ho) the pictures of the famous and influential people )ho
ha!e touched and made a difference in the li!es of others )ith
their determination+ selflessness and commitment to ser!e.
b. 7sk students to identify some of them.
1. 7braham Lincoln
2. .artin Luther 8ing
3. .other %eresa
4. .ahatma 6andhi
5. Nelson .andela
c. 7sk them to share )hat they kno) about them and mention
famous people they admire.
d. /a!e them )rite their ans)ers on the space pro!ided belo) the L..
e. 1rocess the students0 ans)ers.
f. 6i!e feedback.


Tas, @& ODser!e and #mitate
a. 'ho) photos of influential people in the )orld.
b. 7sk students to form t)o 9C: groups to perform the
tasks assigned to them.
c. 7llo) students to share their thoughts and opinions.
d. 1rocess the students0 ans)ers.
e. 6i!e feedback.

Tas, I& ;hoto React
a. 'ho) pictures of the t)o masks associated )ith drama
representing
the traditional generic di!ision bet)een comedy and tragedy
b. 7sk the students to share their thoughts about the
photo based on their prior kno)ledge and state the
difference bet)een comedy and tragedy.
c. /a!e the students gu ess the right )ords from
the ,umbled
)ords
that )ill lead them to arri!e at the definition of a one;act play.
CluesA
1 % This $ay inclue $any scenes
2. This is the art o" proucin! ra$atic works
3. ) part o" so$ethin!( one that is essential or characteristic
4. The hi!hest or $ost intense point in the e*elop$ent or
resolution
5. The part o" the story5s plot line in which the pro'le$ o" the
story is
resol*e
*e2B
1.
act
G%play
@%ele$ents
F%cli$a#
K%resolution
g. Use this acti!ity to build the schema of a one;act play.
Tas, E 'rom Mind to ;icturesA hare /hat You %no:
a. /a!e the students
)atch the !ideo clip titled One8)ct 9lay+
http(55))).youtube.com5)atch3![ZR%usl.CR); %he
!ideo gi!es an o!er !ie) of ho) to )rite a one;act play. It
says that )riting a one;act play is a good e*ercise to
de!elop their )riting skills.
( Transcript : ;ow to 4rite a One8)ct 9lay% ) one8act play is
to the "ull8len!th play what a short story is to the no*el( at least
in ter$s o" len!th an co$ple#ity% ) one8act play( like the short
story( is not necessarily easier to write si$ply 'ecause it is 'rie"%
But it oes pro*ie less o" a challen!e than a traitional three8
act play an has a iscipline an 'eauty all its own%
2#periencin! how to write a one act play is essential to the
e*elop$ent o" your unerstanin! o" this particular "or$ o"
artsA)
b. 7sk the students to enumerate some of the tips mentioned
in the !ideo.
c. 7llo) them to share their thoughts and )hether they agree
or disagree.
d. Elicit students responses based on the !ideo presented.


;re8readin5 Tas,
a. Introduce the te*t by asking the follo)ing "uestions(
;a*e you e*er 'een te$pte to preten that you were
so$eone else6 &o you think people will respect you $ore i"
they think you are rich6 Can you ,u!e people 'y their
appearance6
b. $ollect a fe) ans)ers from the students and ask them
to read the te*t< 2hile the 7uto 2aitsA by O. /enry to confirm
)hether their responses are correct later on.


YOUR TE(T
a. In this short one;act play+ adapted from the classic short
story by O. /enry+ a young man and )oman meet in a public
park and instantly fall for one another ... but neither of them is
)hat they seem.
b. /a!e the students accomplish the task.
c. $all on the students to pro!e the correctness of
their responses.
d. 6i!e feedback.
Tas, < /hats the /ord
a. Introduce the technical !ocabulary terms for a drama te*t
by allo)ing students to guess the )ords hidden in the
constellation of letters.
b. /a!e students use the description as a clue.
%eyA
1. clima*
2. play
3. characters
4. dialogue
5. setting
6. stage
c. 7llo) students to share )hat they kno) about
the !ocabulary terms used in drama.


Tas, =& Reco5niMin5 Literary .e!ice
CharacteriMation.
a. =iscuss the literary de!ices )ith the students.
b. 7sk the students to share )hat their thoughts.
c. /a!e the students do the task.
d. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.
e. 6i!e feedback.

Tas, ?& ;lay in ;rocess
A. tory Grammar
1. /a!e the students recall the te*t.
2. 7sk them to complete the story grammar by )riting the details of
the play; characters+ setting+ plot+ conflict.
3. =iscuss the students0 responses.
4. 6i!e feedback.


B. Character $nalysis
1. 1resent the graphic organier to the students.
2. /a!e the students fill out the graphic organier to gi!e
characteriation to the characters of the play.
3. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.
4. 6i!e feedback.


C. .escriDin5 a Character
1. =iscuss the characters in the play.
2. 7sk the students to choose from the )ord pool the )ords that
best describe the lady in the play.
3. 7sk them to )rite three )ords that best describe the lady in
gray.
4. =iscuss the students0 responses.
5. 6i!e feedback.


Tas, C ;lot .ia5ram
$&
a. 7sk the students to scan the te*t once again. %his time+ focus
on the de!elopment of the plot.
b. E*plain the plot diagram to the students
c. 'ho) ho) the main e!ents in the play are organied into a plot.
d. /a!e the students come up )ith a plot diagram as to the
presentation of the character0s thoughts+ feelings and actions.
e. 7llo) students to present their plot diagram to the class.
f. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.
g. 6i!e feedback.

B. /hat ha11ened :henN
a. 7sk the students to study the te*t taken from the selection.
b. /a!e them complete the missing thought by gi!ing the possible
ans)ers.
c. 1rocess the students0 ans)ers.
d. 6i!e feedback.


Tas, O The O& *enry T:ist
a. Emphasie to the students that O. /enry+ an 7merican )riter
and author of the play+ is famous for surprise endings or Tt)istsT in his
stories.
b. 7sk them to gi!e their thoughts about O. /enry.
c. 7sk the students to recall the play and ha!e them determine
the tone+ mood+ techni"ue+ and purpose of the author.
d. 6i!e feedback.
e. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.


Tas, 1-& #denti2yin5 ;artici1les
a. /a!e a short discussion on participles.
b. %ey ;oints(


%he participle is a !erbal used as an ad,ecti!e.
7 participle may make use of the past participle of the !erb or its
present participle 9;ing form:. %he one;)ord participle comes before
the noun it modifies.


E*amples(
1. 7 large;$eshe !eil hangs o!er her face.
2. 'uddenly+ a )aitress approaches+ )earing a soile+ dirty
uniformWe!idently ,ust coming off her shift.
3. I come here to sit because here+ only+ can I be near the great+
common+ thro''in! heart of humanity.
Note that the underlined )ords E $eshe( soile an thro''in!
describe the nouns that came after them. %hey function as ad,ecti!es.
Note that meshed and soiled are the 1ast 1artici1le forms of mesh
and soil )hile thro''in! is the 1resent 1artici1le of throb.

%hese underlined )ords belong to a special group of )ords
called !erDals& %he !erbals in the sample sentences are called
1artici1les&

c. 7sk them to underline the participle in each of the sentences that
follo).
*e2 to Corrections(
>.%he crying baby had a )et diaper.
2. 7 shouting cro)d greeted us.
3. %he cracked !ase cannot be repaired.
4. %he burning log fell off the fire.
5. 'miling+ she hugged the panting dog.
6. 2e remind him of his forgotten promise.
7. %he o!erloaded car gathered speed slo)ly.
8. 2e greeted the presiding officer.
9. /e held out his bitten finger .
>?.%he captured rebel died after a fe) days.


;air /or,
a. 7sk students to )ork )ith a partner.
b. 7sk them to choose fi!e )ords list belo) and change the )ords
to become participles.
c. Use the selected )ords to form meaningful sentences.


2#a$ple: The pourin! rain "orce us to stay inoors%


pour laugh amuse in!igorate
Interest care learn prohi
bit
try dance sparkle play



*e2 to CorrectionsB
? 7ns)ers may !ary


Tas, 11& Cartoon Tal,
a. /a!e the students make a comic strip by filling out the thought
call; outs.
b. 7sk them to discuss the e!ents in the comic strip.
c. /a!e them )rite a short paragraph about the story.
d. Remind the students to use participles in making comic strip.



YOUR .#CO)ERY T$%
Tas, 1@& Connection :ith O11ression
a. Using their ,ournals+ ask the students to )rite or dra) a picture
about a situation in )hich they ha!e felt oppressed.
b. 7sk them ho) the incident made them feel.
c. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.
d. 6i!e feedback.
Tas, 1I& ocial Class EH1loration
a. %his task )ill be done indi!idually.
b. /and in the students0 )orksheet that )ill determine their
social status.
c. 7sk the students to ans)er the "uestions as honestly as they can.
d. /a!e them complete the table belo)
e. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.
f. 6i!e feedback

Tas, 1EA ilent Mo!ie
a. =iscuss non!erbal communication strategies )ith the students.
b. /a!e the students act out and read non;!erbal messages
c. 1rocess students0 performance.
d. 6i!e feedback.


Tas, 1<& /ritin5 Your O:n
a. =iscuss the mechanics of a one;act play.
b. Remind the students that in this task+ they )ill use )hat they
ha!e learned in the lesson.
c. 7sk them to dra) up a cast of characters of a sho) that they
)atch regularly.
d. 6i!e the students the steps on ho) to do the task.




YOUR '#N$L T$%
Tas, 1=& /ritin5 a Character ,etch
a. 7s a final output+ remind the students that they are going to
)rite a character sketch.
b. 7sk them to think of a person they admire.
c. /a!e them )rite )hat they kno) about the person by describing
his or her physical details or "ualities that make the person stand out in
their mind.
d. /a!e the students )rite a character sketch.
e. 1rocess the acti!ity.
f. 6i!e feedback.
g. Remind the students that the output )ill be rated based on the
follo)ing criteria(
? )ord choice
? introduction
? se"uencing
? transition
? accuracy of facts
? focus 9content:
? pacing 9organiation:


Trait /ritin5 Model A Character ,etch RuDric
C$TEGORY E I @ 1
2ord $hoice 2riter uses
!i!id
)ords and
phrases that
linger or dra)
pictures in
the readerKs
mind+ and the
choice and
placement of
the )ords
seems
accurate+
natural
and not
forced. Introduction
%he 9Organiatio
introductio
n:
n is in!iting<
states the
main topic
and pre!ie)s
the structure
of the paper.
2riter uses !i!id
)ords and phrases
that linger or dra)
pictures in the
readerKs mind+ but
occasionally the
)ords are used
inaccurately or
seem o!erdone.
















%he introduction
clearly states the
main topic and
pre!ie)s the
structure of the
paper+ but is not
particularly in!iting to
the reader.
2riter uses
)ords that
communicat e
clearly+ but
the )riting
lacks !ariety+
punch or flair.
















%he
introduction
states the
main topic+
but does not
ade"uately
pre!ie) the
structure of
the paper nor
is it
particularly
in!iting to
2riter uses a
limited
!ocabulary
that does not
communicat e
strongly or
capture the
readerKs
interest.














%here is no
clear
introduction
of the main
topic or
structure of
the paper.
the reader.
'e"uencing
9Organiatio
n:
=etails are
placed in a
logical
order and
the )ay
they are
presented
effecti!ely
keeps the
interest of
the reader.
=etails are placed
in a logical order+
but the )ay in
)hich they are
presented5introduc
ed sometimes
makes the )riting
less interesting.
'ome
details are
not in a
logical or
e*pected
order+ and
this distracts
the reader.
.any
details are
not in a
logical or
e*pected
order.
%here
is little
sense that
the )riting
is
organied.
%ransitions
9Organiatio
n:
7 !ariety
of
thoughtful
transitions
are used.
%hey
clearly
sho) ho)
ideas are
connected.
%ransitions clearly
sho) ho) ideas
are connected+ but
there is little !ariety.
'ome
transitions
)ork )ell
but
connections
bet)een
other ideas
are fuy.
%he
transitions
bet)een
ideas are
unclear or
none*isten
t.
7ccuracy of
-acts
9$ontent:
7ll
supporti!e
facts are
reported
accurately.
7lmost all
supporti!e facts are
reported
accurately.
.ost
supporti!e
facts are
reported
accurately.
No facts
are
reported or
most are
inaccuratel
y
'upport for
%opic
9$ontent:
'upporting
details
gi!e the
reader
important
informatio
n that
goes
beyond
the
ob!ious or
predictable
.
'upporting details
and information are
rele!ant+ but one
key issue or portion
of the storyline is
unsupported.
'upporting
details and
information
are rele!ant+
but se!eral
key issues
or portions
of the
storyline are
unsupported
.
'upporting
details and
informatio
n
are
typically
unclear or
not related
to the
topic.
-ocus on
%opic
9$ontent:
%here is
one clear+
)ell;
.ain idea is clear
but the supporting
information is
.ain idea is
some)hat
clear but
%he main
idea is not
clear.
%here
focused
topic. .ain
idea
stands out
and is
supported
by detailed
informatio
n.
general. there is a
need for
more
supporting
information.
is a
seemingly
random
collection
of
informatio
n.
1acing
9Organiatio
n:
%he
pacing is
)ell;
controlled.
%he )riter
kno)s
)hen to
slo) do)n
and
elaborate+
and )hen
to pick up
the pace
and mo!e
on.
%he pacing is
generally )ell;
controlled but the
)riter occasionally
does not elaborate
enough.
%he pacing
is generally
)ell;
controlled
but the
)riter
sometimes
repeats the
same point
o!er and
o!er+ or
spends too
much time
on details
that donKt
matter.
%he
pacing
often feels
a)k)ard
to
the reader.
%he )riter
elaborates
)hen
there
is little
need+
and then
lea!es out
necessary
supporting
informatio





MY TRE$URE
7sk the students to think back on the tasks that they ha!e ,ust finished and ask
them to ans)er the follo)ing "uestions(
1. 2hat is it that you found most interesting and en,oyable in this
lesson3
2. 2hich of the acti!ities ha!e helped you make a connection )ith other
people despite differences in social class3
3. /o) did it influence you3
4. 2hat skills do you e*pect to impro!e in the ne*t lesson3
Teachers Guide
Module I
Lesson ?
______________________________________________________________
Ces/ite Racial Ci00erences


B. $ssessment ;lan
C. Resources(
1 & MaterialsA
a. 1ictures presented in the Learners0 .aterials 9L.s:
b. 2riting implements
2. EGui1ment
a. &ideo5laptop
b. 7udio $= player


D. $cti!ities
YOUR #N#T#$L T$%


Tas, 1& Meet Ne: /ords
d. 'ho) the eight 9D: hidden )ords in the pule.
e. 7sk students to use the descriptions as clues to figure out the
)ords )hich they )ill find in the play they are about to read.
f. Remind students that some letters are gi!en for additional clues.
g. =iscuss some of the students0 responses.
h. 6i!e feedback.


Tas, @& Chec,1oint
a. Remind students that the purpose of this acti!ity is to test ho)
much they kno) about drama and theatre lingo.
b. 7sk the students to complete the pule by filling in the bo*es
)ith the letters of the )ords defined belo) the pule.
c. 7llo) students to articulate their prior kno)ledge about the terms
used in drama and theatre.
The correct answers are:
$cross
1. stage direction
H.play
B.dialogue
J.comedy

.o:n
1. style
2. tragedy
3. genre
6. te*t

Tas, I& Loo, /hos Tal,in5B
a. 1ost a dra)ing of a cab dri!er.
b. 7sk the students to see and analye the pictures posted
on the board.
c. 7sk them to share their thoughts and opinion.
d. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.
e. 6i!e feedback.


B. C2adic .ork
a. 7sk students to share their concept of friendship.
b. 7sk the students to ponder the "uote(
) "rien in nee is a "rien in ee3
c. 7llo) students to react and respond critically to
the "uestions raised by the teacher.
f. 7ssess the students0 response.
g. 6i!e feedback.
h. Introduce the te*t


YOUR TE(T
a. $O.1RE/EN'ION $/E$8;U1 %E'%
1. 2ho are the three characters3
2. 2ho is =aisy3
3. /o) old is she3
4. 2hat e!ent led her to ha!e a personal dri!er3 9chauffer:
5. 2ho is /oke3
6. %o )hom is /oke0s daughter married3
7. 2hen /oke first meets #oolie+ he fi*es something in
his factory. 2hat did /oke fi*3
8. 2hat kind of company does #oolie o)n and operate3
9. 7t the end of the play+ )hat did .iss =aisy disco!er
about /oke3


1RE&IE2IN6 %/E %EV%
b. 6i!e students background information about the
literary selection.
Se*enty8two8year8ol &aisy 4erthan( a Dewish wiow(
can no lon!er
operate a car sa"ely% In her last ri*in! outin!( she
e$olishe her new car( a !ara!e( an a she% ;er son
Boolie ecies that &aisy nees a chau""eur to ri*e her
aroun her ho$etown o" )tlanta( Geor!ia% &aisy isa!rees
*iolently( sayin! that she is capa'le o" ri*in! hersel"%
I!norin! his $other5s protests( Boolie hires a NH8year8ol
)"rican8)$erican ri*er na$e ;oke Cole'urn to 'e
&aisy5s chau""eur%

&ri*in! Biss &aisy is the story o" how &aisy an ;oke learn to !et
alon! an *alue each other o*er a GK8year perio% Their relationship
!rows to the point where( near the en o" the play( &aisy can say to
;oke( ./ou5re $y 'est "rien%3

9laywri!ht )l"re Uhry 'ase the $ain characters( &aisy an ;oke( on
his !ran$other an her )"rican8)$erican ri*er( 4ill Cole$an%

&ri*in! Biss &aisy won the 9ulitzer 9rize in ?PEE( an in ?PEP Uhry
wrote the screenplay "or the $o*ie *ersion% The "il$( starrin! Bor!an
Free$an as ;oke( Dessica Tany as &aisy( an &an )ckroy as
Boolie( won "our )cae$y )wars%

! Your TeHt
a. /a!e the students ans)er the process "uestions.
b. $all on the students to pro!e the correctness of
their responses.
c. 6i!e feedback.
Tas, E& eGuencin5 E!ents
7rrange the follo)ing e!ents according to se"uence. 2rite > for the
first e!ent+ C for the second+ F for the third+ and so on.
5. /a!e the students recall the te*t.
6. 7sk them to arrange the e!ents in the story according to
se"uence. 2rite > for the first e!ent+ C for the second+ F
for the third+ and so on.
7. =iscuss the students0 responses.
8. 6i!e feedback.

Tas, <& Character Traits
a. 1oint out to the students that moti!ation is the reason a
character acts in
a certain )ay. 7 character0s moti!ation may be stated
directly or indirectly.
b. 7sk them to analye each character0s moti!ation+ traits
and sho) some e!idence for each character0s traits.
c. -ill in the chart )ith the reasons behind the follo)ing
decisions.
d. =iscuss the students0 responses.
e. 6i!e feedback.


Tas, =& "rid5in5 the Ga1
d. 7sk the students to think about )hat action or trait of the
play)right can best use to bridge the gap among different
cultures+ religion+ race+ or language.
e. /a!e them e*plain their ans)er.
f. 7llo) the students to react or respond to the "ueries
gi!en by the teacher.
g. 7llo) students to articulate their thoughts.
h. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.
i. 6i!e feedback


Tas, ?& L R hashta5s 8 Le!el o2 Utterance
e. /a!e the students listen carefully as their teacher reads some
te*t or "uotes by )ell;kno)n people.
f. 7llo) students to disco!er the po)er of )ords.
g. 7sk them to analye the content and emotion and gi!e
their reactions )hether they agree or disagree.
Tas, C& /riters "loc,
e. Remind the students that the purpose of this
acti!ity is to determine the style+ mood and techni"ue of the
play)right.
f. 7llo) the students to choose dialogues or lines
from the play )hich appeal to them and reflect the author0s
style+
techni"ue+ tone and mood.
g. 1rocess students0 response.
h. 6i!e feedback.


Tas, O& Learn Grammar
f. 7llo) the students to ac"uire a full understanding of
participial phrase5s.
g. %ey ;oints(
7 participial phrase consists of a participle plus its modifiers
and its complements. %he )hole phrase functions as an
ad,ecti!e.
Look at these e*amples(
;resent ;artici1le (*er' R 8in!)
Du$pin! happily( the orphans recei!ed their
toys%
;ast ;artici1le 9 *er' R 8 or Me in re!ular *er' or other
"or$s( in
Irre!ular *er's
%he girl sa) the memo attache to the 'o#%


In the abo!e e*amples+ the participial phrase+ ,u$pin!
happily+ modifies the orphans< and the participial phrase
attache to the 'o# modifies the memo.
4or Boi"ier 9hrase Boi"ier



```7ns)ers may !ary
YOUR .#CO)ERY T$%


Tas, 1-& Gettin5 .ee1er
h. Recall the play+ @=ri!ing .iss =aisyA.
i. /a!e students read the different con!ersations bet)een
=aisy and /oke+
'. 7llo) the students to analye the dialogues to discern the
characters0 characteristics.
(. Let them use )hat they ha!e learned to ans)er the
"uestions that follo) it.
). 1rocess students0 ans)ers.
*. 6i!e feedback.


Tas, 11& Memory Lane
a. Remind students that this acti!ity )ill sho) ho) their
relationship )ith their elderly friend or relati!e changed
o!er time.
b. /a!e the students follo) the follo)ing steps.
c. 7sk the students to di!ide a paper into t)o columns. 7t
the top of the first column+ ha!e them )rite @2hen I )as
younger.A 7t the top of the second column+ )rite @No).A
d. Instruct them to think about )hat they thought + felt+ or did
)ith their friend or relati!e )hen they )ere much younger.
e. 7dd these ideas in the column labeled @2hen I )as
younger.A Under the column labeled @No)+A record ho)
their thoughts+ ideas+ and actions ha!e changed. -or
e*ample+ they might )rite in the first column+ @4hen I was
little I crie an ran to $y !ran"ather when I "ell own. In
the second column+ they might )rite+ .<ow I !o to $y
!ran"ather "or a*ice when I nee%


Grou1 1(
$hoose a scene from e*cerpt
and perform it in a radio
play.
Grou1 @(
2rite an open letter for
/oke persuading him to
study e!en if
he is already old.

Grou1 I(
=ra) a picture sho)ing the most
interesting scene of
the play.
Grou1 E(
$ompose a song depicting the
theme of the play.
.




Tas, 1@& Grou1 .i22erentiated Tas,s
f. 7sk the students to form four 9H: groups and do the
acti!ity assigned to their group.
g. Instruct them to use the appropriate multi;media
resources to accompany the oral deli!ery of lines.
h. 7sk them to gi!e a presentation.
i. 6i!e feedback.

Tas, 1I& Reco5niMin5 Literary .e!ice
a. /a!e the students de!elop an
understanding of .ialo5ue as a
literary de!ice.
.ialo5ue is a con!ersational passage in a play used to ad!ance
the plot or de!elop the characters.


2riting good dialogue takes practice and patience. /ere are tips to
impro!e ho) you )rite your dialogue.
1. =ialogue should sound real. You don0t need all the
/ellos+ 6oodbyes and boring small talk of daily life. $ut it out.
2. 6ood dialogue should mo!e the story for)ard+ con!ey character
and feel full of life. %he best place to see great dialogue is by
attending 9or reading: plays+ )atching mo!ies or e!en ,ust s)itching
on the %&.
3. Learn ho) to )rite the correct punctuation for a speech. It0ll be
a useful tool for you as a )riter+ making it easier for you to )rite the
dialogue you )ant.
4. /a!e people argue )ith people+ or ha!e people saying
surprising+ contrary things. If e!eryone is agreeing )ith each
other+ your story )ill feel flat.
5. %hink about ho) each of your characters sound. .ake each
!oice distinct E this can be subtle or dramatic.
6. 1eople don0t ha!e to
ans)er each other directly &


b. Instruct the students to recall
the play again.
c. 6i!e the students the steps on ho) to do the task.

YOUR '#N$L T$%


Tas, 1E /ritin5 on Your O:n
h. 7s a final output+ remind the students that they are going
to )rite a dialogue
i. 7sk them to look for a partner and de!elop a t)o; or;three
minute con!ersation that they might hear in the cafeteria
or on a bus.
'. Remind them that the dialogue must be real and
belie!able.
(. /a!e them present the dialogue to the class.
). Remind the students that the output )ill be rated based on
the follo)ing criteria(
? kno)ledge and understanding 9grammar:
? communication 9accuracy of oral language<
pronunciation+ enunciation:
? fluency5e*pression
? application 9con!eyance of meaning )ith
non!erbal cues< !oice+ gestures
? thinking and in"uiry


MY TRE$URE
a. 7sk the students to think back on the tasks you ha!e ,ust
finished and state )hat they learned and ho) they learned
it.
b. /a!e the students )rite their reflection
44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444
44444444444
RU"R#CA OR$L COMMUN#C$T#ON .#$LOGUE
%his rubric reflects performing the dialogue
Criteria Le!el 1 Le!el @ Le!el I Le!el E
8no)ledge5 6rammar 6rammar 6rammar 6rammar
Understandi
ng
0Grammar3
and !ocab
sho) limited
accuracy
and
effecti!eness
and !ocab
sho) some
accuracy
and
effecti!eness
and !ocab
sho)
considerable
accuracy
and
effecti!eness
and
&ocab
sho) a
high
degree of
accuracy
and
$ommunicati
on
0accuracy
o2 oral
lan5ua5e^
1ronunciati
on4
intonation3
02luency
and
eH1ression3
'peaks the
language
)ith many
errors in
pronunciatio
n and
intonation
Limited
fluency and
e*pression
'peaks the
language
)ith fre"uent
errors in
pronunciatio
n and
intonation
'ome
fluency and
e*pression
'peaks the
language
)ith
occasional
errors in
pronunciatio
n and
intonation
$onsiderabl
e fluency
and
e*pression
'peaks
the
language
)ith fe)
or
no
errors in
pronunciati
o
n and
intonation
7 high
degree of
fluency
and
7pplication
0con!eyanc
e o2
meanin5
:ith non8
!erDal cues^
!oice4
5estures3
$on!eys
meaning
using non;
!erbal cues
)ith limited
effecti!eness
$on!eys
meaning
using non;
!erbal cues
)ith
moderate
effecti!eness
$on!eys
meaning
using non;
!erbal cues
)ith
considerable
effecti!eness
$on!eys
meaning
using
non;
!erbal
cues
)ith a
high
degree of
%hinking and
In"uiry
9$reati!ity:
'ho)s little
creati!ity
'ho)s some
creati!ity
'ho)s
significant
creati!ity
'ho)s
incredible
creati!ity
Source: &octoc( Oral Co$$unication &ialo!ue -u'ric(
http:++www%ocstoc%co$+ocs+GNG@NFKE+( 9u'lic &o$ain
Teachers Guide
Module I
Lesson C
______________________________________________________________
Transcendin3 Ci00erences


B. $ssessment ;lan


C. ResourcesA
1. MaterialsA
a. -ilm clip of the !ie)ing inputs
b. $opies of the parallel selections
c. 1ictures presented in the Learning .aterials 9L.s:
d. 2riting implements.
2. EGui1ment
a. &ideo5Laptop
b. 7udio 5$= player
c. L$= pro,ector
d. 'peaker

D. $cti!ities


YOUR #N#T#$L T$%

Tas, 1& Theatre )ocaDulary
d. Remind students that the purpose of this acti!ity is to test ho)
much they kno) about drama terms and theatre lingo.
e. 7sk the students to complete the pule by filling in the bo*es
)ith the letters of the )ords defined belo) the pule.
f. 7llo) students to articulate their prior kno)ledge about the terms
used in drama and theatre.


%ey
$cross
1. protagonist
5. antagonist
6. conflict
8. clima*
9. e*position

.o:n
2. rising action
3. articulation
4. plot
7. crisis


Tas, @& )erDaliMe Your Thou5hts

a. 7sk the students to get ready for the listening acti!ity.
b. 7sk the students to listen carefully as the teacher reads a
te*t about Nelson .andela.
c. =istribute a transcript of the listening acti!ity to the students.


MandelaA #con o2 ;eace
8... Raisul /u" #aha
%O=7Y is Nelson .andela International =ay. %he )hole global
community+ irrespecti!e of colour+ creed+ belief+ and political as )ell as
continental di!ide+ )ill celebrate .andela =ay )ith a ne) pledge to
carry for)ard the high ideals of this great man to a ne) height. %his
year+ the people of the )orld are in a sombre mood as they obser!e the
day because Nelson Rolihlahla .andela+ QH+ the icon of peace and
harmony+ has been in hospital for more than one month.
.andela is the man )ho not only freed the black people of 'outh 7frica
from the clutch of F?? years of apartheid and racial discrimination
created by the )hite colonial rulers but also set an e*ample of political
leadership )hich is uni"ue all the )ay. /e is the man )ho took up arms
to )age )ar against the inhuman and indescribable oppression and
blatant e*ploitation of the )hite ruling cli"ue of 1retoria to emancipate
the black ma,ority of 'outh 7frica. /e )as elected as the $ommander
of 7frican National $ongress 97N$:0s armed )ing. .andela )as put in
,ail for CJ years by the despotic rulers for his uncompromising stance
and relentless struggle against any sort of inhuman and discriminatory
treatment of his countrymen.
.andela+ in his famous autobiographical book @Long 2alk to
-reedom+A )rote about the concept of leadership in detail and
compared it )ith the shepherd )ho dri!es the herd of sheep to its
home from the graing field from behind. /e himself is the symbol of
this distincti!e leadership. 1assing the most precious >D years of his
CJ years ,ail life in an isolated cell of Robben Island+ .andela set an
un"uestionable e*ample of leading a people+ sub,ugated by the most
brutal form of sla!ery+ to the rainbo) horion of freedom.
/e led his party and organised his people from behind bars to a
political mo!ement to attain the goal of abolition of all racial disparity
and segregation. %he )estern )orld+ particularly the U' )hich once
branded .andela as a terrorist+ accepted the idea of reconciliation
instead of suppressing the dissenting !oice and put pressure on the
apartheid rulers of 1retoria to stop political oppression and come to a
solution acceptable to 7N$+ .andela and black ma,ority populace of
'outh 7frica. #o)ing to the international pressure the )hite ruler -.2.
de 8lerk freed .andela from ,ail in >QQ?.
%he first election in 'outh 7frica )ith unfettered multiracial adult
franchise and participation of all political parties including 7N$ and de
8lerk0s ruling National 1arty 9N1: )as held in >QQH. 7N$ came out
!ictorious in the election. .andela became the first black president of
the country and formed a go!ernment of national unity to set the strife;
torn country to)ards the path of peace. .andela formed a %ruth and
Reconciliation $ommission to address the past scars of apartheid+
)hich )as an unprecedented step in the annals of resol!ing conflicts in
the )orld political arena. /e ser!ed as president for only one full fi!e;
year term and relin"uished the post )hen he )as at the enith of his
popularity.
%hese and many other e*ceptional leadership attributes of
.andela made him an e*ceptional statesman+ parallel to none in
contemporary political history. .andela lo!es his people and his
people too lo!e him. #ut .andela is not the leader of his nation only.
/e is a leader of )orld stature. 7ll peace;lo!ing+ democratic minded
and progressi!e people the )orld o!er respect him and recognise him
as their o)n leader.
.andela+ born in July >D+ >Q>D in a !illage in 'outh 7frica0s $ape
1ro!ince+ had his primary education in a .ethodist 'chool+ secondary
in a 2estern;style institute in %hembuland+ graduation in -orte /are
Uni!ersity+ and la) in the Uni!ersity of 2it)atersrand. /e )as a
founding member of 7N$0s Youth League. In C??Q+ United Nations
decided to celebrate International .andela =ay e!ery year on the
birthday of the )orld peace hero on July >D. -rom then on e!ery year
.andela =ay has been celebrated )ith great enthusiasm+ much
admiration and ne)er commitment to further the ideals of peace+
,ustice+ harmony and social amity to establish a ,ust global order. 2e
are a !ery proud nation because )e achie!ed our independence
through an arduous armed struggle of nine long months against the
colonial 1akistani occupation forces+ and because )e found this great
freedom fighter amidst us during the sil!er ,ubilee
celebration of our Independence =ay in >QQJ
along )ith another iconic figure Yasser 7rafat of
1alestine Liberation 'truggle. %oday+ on the Bth
.andela =ay+ )e pay our rich tribute to this great
man.
Source: The &aily Star


d. =i!ide the students into four 9H: groups and ask them to
perform
the '6= acti!ities.
6roup >
1. )sk stuents to e#a$ine the picture an
!i*e their insi!hts re!arin! the su""erin!s o"
people who atte$pte to li*e as hu$an
'ein!s%




6roup C
2. )sk stuents to cite situations that
pro*e the rele*ance an worth o"
this :uote







6roup F
3. )nalyze the eitorial cartoon











6roup H

F%Say so$ethin! a'out the picture
Education is the most
po)erful )eapon )hich you can
use to change the )orld@.
# Nelson .andela
an share your personal opinion a'out
the topic ('ullyin!)%
.
Tas, I& Le!el u1
1. 1resent "uotation about racism to the students.
2. /a!e students read the "uotation.
3. 7llo) students to find a partner and take turns in reading
the "uotation.
4. 7sk the students to react as to its truth or falsity.
5. 'ho) the students a picture of a colored man )ho is a
!ictim of racism.
6. 7llo) students to analye the picture.
7. 7sk the students to form a ,udgement re( material !ie)ed.
8. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.
9. 6i!e feedback.


Tas, E& # *a!e a .ream
1. 2atch the !ideo clip
http(55))).youtube.com5)atch3![&BJlotn86-D+ of .artin Luther
8ing0s speech+ I 5a6e a Cream.
2. /a!e the students listen carefully to the speech of the
famous #lack 7merican.
3. 7llo) students to share their personal opinion about the
materials !ie)ed.
4. 7llo) students to gi!e critical feedback about the speech.
5. 7sk the students to share their thoughts about )hat they
kno) about racism and discrimination.
6. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.
7. 6i!e feedback.


Tas, <& eGuencin5 E!ents
d. /a!e the students accomplish the task.
e. $all on the students to pro!e the correctness of
their responses.
f. 6i!e feedback.
Tas, =& EstaDlishin5 Lin,s
9. /a!e the students ponder on the essential "uestions raised by
the teacher.
10. Using a graphic organier+ students point out the
feelings+ e*periences and other important details in the play.
11. 7sk the students to )rite the interesting details in the chart.
12. -ill in the chart )ith the reasons behind the follo)ing decisions.
13. =iscuss the students0 responses.
14. 6i!e feedback.

Tas, ?& Re!isit and Connect


+. Recall the play+ @=ri!ing .iss =aisyA.
,. /a!e students see the connection of the literary selection to the
)orld
4 7sk them to use )hat they ha!e learned to ans)er the "uestions
that follo) it.
-. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.
.. 6i!e feedback.

Tas, C& Learn Grammar


h. .ake sure the students ha!e a thorough
understanding of participial phrase5s.
i. Remind the students that there are t)o )ays to correct the
dangling participial phrase.
1. #y supplying the doer or recei!er of the action implied by
the participle and placing the participial phrase before or ne*t to
it.
2#% ;urryin! own the aisle( the enthusiastic 'oy roppe the
'ooks%
2. #y changing the participial phrase to a clause making
clear the sub,ect )hich is the doer of the action.
2#% 4hile I was waitin! in the roo$( I was attracte 'y a
poster
3. /a!e them do the tasks assigned to them.
A. Test Your %no:led5e&
%he correct ans)ers are(
1. =angling
2. $orrect
3. $orrect
4. =angling
5. =angling
6. $orrect
7. =angling
8. =angling
9. $orrect
10. =angling
B. =on0t =angle Your 1articipleI
1. /a!ing finished the assignment+ Jeff turned the %& on.
2. 7fter )e placed them in a tidy bundle+ )e left
3. %he )omen obser!ed the co)s graing on the grass.
2ishing I could sing+ I feel taunted by the high notes.
4. /iking the trail+ the boys heard birds chirping loudly.
5. %rying to a!ert an accident+ the dri!er dro!e the car into
the ditch.
6. Offered a ride to the beach+ the picnickers refused the
offer.
7. Returning to our camp after a day of salmon fishing+ )e
had eaten our food.
8. 2hile I )as reading the ne)spaper by the )indo)+ my
cat ,umped into my lap.
9. 6ro)ling+ my hungry dog )as finally fed.




YOUR .#CO)ERY T$%
Tas, O& Ne:s in the #nDoH
a. 7sk the students to read the ne)s about 7lfred Uhry0s )inning a
1uliter 1rie for his play+ &ri*in! Biss &aisy. -ind a partner and
discuss the play)right0s style and techni"ue.
b. 'ho) the ne)s clippings pointing out a particular ne)s
intended only for the play)right+ 7lfred Uhry.
c. 7sk the students read the ne)s about 7lfred.
d. 7sk students to find a partner and ask them to discuss
the play)right0s style and techni"ue


Tas, 1-& LET T$L%
'. 7sk the students to )ork in pairs.
(. 7sk them to read the model dialogue.
). %ell the students that they ha!e to act out the dialogue using
multi; media resources.
*. Rate the students0 performance based on the rubrics.
+. 6i!e feedback.


Tas, 11A 'ilm Re!ie:
a. /a!e the students )ork in groups of fi!e 9B:.
b. 7sk the students to recall a mo!ie that they ha!e seen recently in the
mo!ie house or on %&.
c. %ell them to narrate the stories and take turns in doing the task
d. 7sk them to select one memorable episode in the film they )atched
and )rite about their feelings )hen they )ere )atching it.
e. 7sk them to sho) )hat they ha!e )ritten to a partner and tell
him or her )hy they ha!e felt that )ay.
,. /a!e the students to make an outline of the mo!ie by completing
the form that follo)s.
g. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.
h. 6i!e feedback

Tas, 1@& Reco5niMin5 Literary .e!ices
a. .ake sure the students understand that =ramatic
$on!entions are
literary de!ices. =ramatic $on!entions are the established )ays of
)orking in a drama and are used to represent and organie
dramatic
ideas.
b. Instruct the students to do the tasks assigned to them again.
c. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.
d. 6i!e feedback.
Tas, 1I& EHam1les o2 a 1lay scri1t
a. /a!e the students study and analye the parts of play script.
b. 7sk the students to share their thoughts )ith their classmates.
c. 1rocess students0 ans)ers.
d. 6i!e feedback.


Tas, 1E& 6.ri!in5 Ms& .aisy4S The Mo!ie
2. /a!e the students )atch the film+ @=ri!ing .s. =aisyA on youtube<
http(55))).youtube.com5)atch3![R"U$;81CYYs4
directed by #ruce #eresford. 2ith .organ -reeman+ Jessica
%andy+ =an 7ykroyd+ and 1atti Lu1one%
b% 7sk the students to share their thoughts about the materials
!ie)ed.
c. 6i!e feedback%

Tas, 1<& EHem1lars o2 'ilm ummaries
a. 7llo) students to form groups of fi!e 9B: e*amples.
b. /a!e the students read and analye the of one;act
play summaries.
c. 7llo) the students to come up )ith their o)n ideas on
ho) to compose a plot synopsis.


YOUR '#N$L T$%
Tas, 1=& Com1osin5 a ;lot yno1sis
7s a final output+ remind the students that they )ill use )hat they
ha!e learned
in the lesson to compose a plot synopsis.
*E' #OINTS:
Steps that will help the$ co$pose a plot synopsis:
1. Start .ith a 5ook
This shoul 'e a para!raph or two si$ilar to the 'lur' on
the 'ack o" a 'ook% Boo an tone is i$portant
here( use special a,ecti*es%
2. Introduction o0 Characters
Introuce the $ain characters in your 'ook%
-e*eal their moti6ation! con0lict! an 3oals8 Stay
away "ro$ etaile physical escriptions%
3. Construct the od2 o0 'our S2no/sis
4rite the hi!h points o" your story in chronolo!ical orer%
1eep these para!raphs ti!ht( on5t !i*e e*ery little
etail% -e$e$'er( each scene shoul inclue action!
reaction! an a decision8
4. ,se Three or Four #ara3ra/hs to .rite the
CRISIS and RESOL,TION o0 2our Stor28
1eep this si$ple( 'ut $ake sure you show your $ain
characters5 reactions% /our synopsis $ust inclue
the resolution to your story%
5. Re1rite until each sentence is polishe to the
point o" per"ection% Use stron! a,ecti*es an *er's( an
always
write in the present tense%




Guidelines in /ritin5 a ;lot yno1sis
1. %he time and place should be indicated at the beginning of synopsis.
2. 7 brief description of the main characters should be gi!en as they
appear in the story.
3. %he synopsis should begin at the opening of the story and told in the
same order as the play+ and end at the play0s conclusion.
4. =ramatic scenes that propel the story for)ard+ including climactic
scenes should be described )ithin the synopsis.
5. %he synopsis must be no longer than CB? )ords long.
6. %he story must be told in the present tense and in the third person.


Tas, 1=& The /rite and $ct tu22
a. %his task )ill make them use )hat they ha!e learned in the
lesson to )rite a plot
synopsis and perform a one;act play.
/a!e the students follo) the 6R7'1' in doing the tasks(


G ; the 5oal is to incorporate the elements+ features and
style
and most appropriate language forms in composing an
impressi!e play synopsis and performing a one;act play
using appropriate dramatic con!entions+ multi;media resources+
!erbal and non!erbal strategies.
R; the role that they )ill assume is that of a creati!e
script)riter of Urban %heatre.
$ 8 the target audience are the urban theatre a!id !ie)ers.
/. the situation that pro!ides the conte*t is a creati!e
)riting conference.
; 8 the 1roduct is a play synopsis and presentation of one;
act play.
; the standard from )hich the product )ill be ,udged
include organiation+ creati!ity+ structure+ and dramatic
con!ention.


MY TRE$URE
c. 7sk the students to read the "uotation that summaries
the lesson tackled.
d. 7sk them to gi!e the implication of the lesson in their life.
e. /a!e the students )rite their reflection.




;lot yno1sis RuDric
$7%E6ORY E 3 2 1
Circle #lot
Or3ani4ation T
he story is
!ery )ell
%he story
tells a circular
%he story is a
little hard to
Ideas and
scenes
seem
organied
circular story.
One idea or
scene follo)s
another in a
logical se"uence
)ith clear
transitions+
returning to the
beginning point.
story. One idea
or scene may
seem out of
place+ but the
story does
return to the
beginning point.
$lear
transitions are
used.
follo). %he
transitions are
sometimes not
clear< ho)e!er+
the story does
begin and end
in the same
place.
to be randomly
arranged. %he
story is not a
circular story.
It does not
return to its
beginning
point.
Creati6it2 %he story0s
plot focuses
on a creati!e
series of
e!ents that
%he story0s plot
contains a fe)
creati!e e!ents
that contribute
to
%he story0s plot
contains a fe)
creati!e e!ents+
but they distract
%here is little
e!idence of
creati!ity in the
story. %he
author does

contributes to the
readerKs en,oyment.
%he author has
really used his or
her imagination.
the readerKs
en,oyment. %he
author has used
his or her
imagination.
from the story.
%he author has
tried to use his
or her
imagination.
not seem to
ha!e used
much
imagination.
Sentence
Structure














S/ellin3!
#unctuation!
and
Grammar
%he sentence
structure uses
matching or
similar )ords+
that establish a
clear+ consistent
pattern that is
maintained
through the
entire story.
%here are no
spelling+
punctuation+ or
grammar errors
in the final draft.
$haracter and
place names
that the author
in!ented are
spelled
consistently
throughout.
%he sentence
structure uses
matching or
similar )ords+
that establish a
clear pattern that
is maintained
through the
entire story.

%here is one
spelling+
punctuation+ or
grammar error
in the final draft.
'ome sentences
use matching or
similar )ords+
but the pattern is
not maintained
through the
entire story.



%here are C;F
spelling+
punctuation+ or
grammar errors
in the final draft.
'entences do
not use matching
or similar )ords.
%he sentence
structure
distracts from
the story0s
circular plot.





%he final draft
has more than F
spelling+
punctuation+ or
grammar erro
One8$ct ;lay
unacce1taDle
0 1ts
does not yet
meet
eH1ectations
1 1ts
minimally
meets
eH1ectations
2 1ts
meets
eH1ectations
3 1ts
eHceeds
eH1ectations
4 1ts
Non8!erDal
EH1ression
C 1ts
No
mo!ement of
body
7ctorKs head+
eye+ and
hand
mo!ements
are do not
match the
script or
engage the
audience.
7ctorKs
mo!ements
are minimal
and under
rehearsed.
'ome
e!idence of
either eye
contact )ith
others OR
gestures.
7ctor performs
)ith confidence<
head+ eye+ and
hand
mo!ements
engages
audience and
enhances
characteriation.
7ctorKs
performance
reflects )ell
rehearsed+
e*pressi!e
mo!ements+
enthusiastic
rendering of
character.
/ead+ eye+
and
hand
mo!ements
engages
audience
throughout
performance
and sho)s
e*ceptional
characteriatio
n
)oice
EH1ression
> )olume
C 1ts
.onotone
!oice<
audience
could not
understand
most of
actorKs
dialogue.
&oice pace+
e*pression+
and !olume
gi!es TflatT
deli!ery )ith
little regard to
emotion.
&oice is
barely
audible.
&oice pace+
e*pression+
and !olume
communicates
one emotion.
&oice is either
too soft or too
loud+ but is
audible
throughout
performance.
7ctorKs !oice
sho)s
understanding of
character. 1ace+
e*pression+ and
!olume !ary to
accurately
demonstrate
characterKs
emotions. &oice
is clearly audible
throughout
performance.
7ctorKs !oice
thoroughly
masters the
characteriatio
n.
1ace+
e*pression+
and
!olume !ary
dramatically
and
skillfully
demonstrate
characterKs
emotions.
&oice
performance.







.ialo5ue
'luency
C 1ts
Read directly
from script
throughout
performance.
Re"uired
fre"uent line
prompts OR
read much of
the lines from
the script
during the
performance.
Lines )ere
memoried+
but re"uired F
; B line
prompts.
Lines )ere )ell
memoried+ but
re"uired >;C line
prompts.
1erfect
memoriatio
n
and deli!ery
of
lines.
Costume
8 1ts
No costume. $ostume
does not fit
the
personality of
the character
or match the
script.
7ctor dressed
like self+ but
has added >
piece for
costume<
costume piece
fits the
characterKs
personality and
matches the
script.
7ctor dressed like
self+ but has
added at least C
pieces for
costume<
costume pieces
fit the characterKs
personality and
matches the
script.
7ctor completely
dressed in
costume and
makeup to look
like character.
$ostume
matches the
script )ell.
$ostume makes
character more
belie!able.
;ro1s
4
1ts
No props
used in the
play.
1lay uses at
least > prop+
but is not a
high "uality+
hand made
item.
1lay uses at
least C props
that help
audience
understand
the plot of the
play+ but may
not be high
"uality+ hand
made items.
1lay uses at
least F props
that help
audience
understand the
plot of the play.
7t least one of
the props is a
high "uality+
hand made
item.
1lays uses O or
more different
props that
enhance
audience
understanding of
plot. 7t least half
of the props are
high "uality+
hand made
items.
"ac,dro1 No backdrop 1lay uses 1lay uses one 1lay uses one 1lay uses one
'lat
E 1ts
flat used in
play.
one HVD
backdrop
does not
match the
script.
HVD backdrop
flat that
suggests
setting.
'cenery is
painted
some)hat
neatly on the
flat.
HVD backdrop
flat that helps
audience
understand
setting of play.
-lat has neatly
painted scenery.
HVD
backdrop
flat that
makes
the play
setting
instantly
recogniable.
-lat has
neatly
Teachers Guide Module
E
Lesson 1
______________________________________________________________
5OLCING ON TO A CREAM IN A C5ANGING .ORLC
A. O!er!ie) of $ontent and Ob,ecti!es
%heme( Literature as a means of Understanding Unchanging &alues in a $hanging
2orld


'ub;%heme( /olding On to a =ream in a $hanging 2orld 1rimary
'election( @7 Raisin in the 'unA by
'econdary 'election( @=reams =eferredA by Langston /ughes


B. 7ssessment 1lan
1. 1re;7ssessment
2. 1ost;7ssessment


C. Resources
1. .aterials
a. $= Recording of listening outputs
b. 1ictures
2. E"uipment
a. 7udio5$= 1layer
b. 1ro,ector


D. 7cti!ities
'our Initial Tasks
Task >. Introuction an Initial Tasks
8The -i*er o" &rea$s


a. 1ost the "uestions on the board that the students are e*pected to ans)er and
discuss them in the listening acti!ity.
b. %hen ha!e the students listen to the song t)ice
c. Elicit the responses of the students based on the "uestions posted.
d. 7llo) students to discuss his5her ans)er )ith a partner then share it )ith the
class.
e. 1rocess the students0 ans)er.

Task G% 9eek at the <ote
a. Instruct the students to read the lines of the song 9or let them sing if they kno)
the melody of the song:
b. 1rocess the acti!ity guided by the gi!en "uestions.
c. Instruct students to analye the pictures.
9-or clarification in case the pictures are black and )hite:
-irst 1icture( %he fish facing the hand is green )hereas the rest are gold.
%hird 1icture( 7ll the lady bugs are red e*cept for one )hich is yello).
d. 7sk students "uestions > and C+ then process their ans)ers.
e. Instruct them to accomplish the chart. /a!e them share their ans)ers
before the class for discussion and clarification.
f. Link5 Relate the acti!ity to the te*t of the lesson
g. Relate %ask > to %ask C




'our TeAt
Task F. 9er$ Ter$
a. /a!e the students accomplish this acti!ity in pairs.
b. Instruct them to read first the )ords in the )ord pool. /a!e them read
it aloud )ith your guidance on correct pronunciation


Task H. Try to Connect
a. 7sk the students to read the poem+ @=reams =eferredA by Langston /ughes
b. 7sk them to associate the poem to the story 9List do)n their ans)ers:
c. Introduce the te*t 9You can tell something about the author or any back;
ground of the story.:
d. Insruct students to read the te*t silently. 9'ee to it that the te*t is pre;
assigned or pre;read ahead of time:.
Task K% Grasp it
a. 1ose the "uestions for understanding the te*t.
b. Instruct students to accomplish the tasks as instructed.
b. You can ha!e the brainstorming by group or by round table.
c. Note the significant responses of the students and process it.


Task N% 9reict a &rea$
a. Instruct students to analye the picture and predict )hat could be the dream
of the people in the picture.
b. Instruct them to )rite the ans)er on a separate sheet of paper.


Task J% Te#t ;u'
a. %ell students to read on the teaching points.
b. %hen ask them to scan and skim on the selection and locate the places
indicating the functions of dialogue.


Task E% The >oice
a. Instruct students to read on the teaching points.
b. 7llo) them to study the e*amples gi!en.
b. %he teacher may ha!e some inputs or gi!e additional e*amples in case of
gray areas
c. 'olicit students responses on the differences bet)een acti!e and passi!e
constructions
d. 7sk students to gi!e their o)n e*amples.

Task P% On 0ocation
a. Instruct the students to identify in the dialogue the !erbs in the acti!e
!oice )hich should be transformed to the passi!e !oice or !ice !ersa.

Task >?. The >oice in )ction
a. Instruct students to )rite their o)n sentences in the acti!e !oice.
b. %hen change these sentences into the passi!e !oice.
c. -or in depth analysis+ instruct them to note the changes that took place in the
sentences.
'our Cisco6er2 Tasks
Task >>. The &rea$ -oute
a. Instruct the students clearly about this task.
b. 'ee to it that they understand clearly the instructions for this acti!ity.
c. .oti!ate the students and be able to bring out the creati!ity that is inherent in
all of them.


Task >C. 9lay 9resient
a. Instruct stuents to resol*e the issues presente%
b. /ou $ay e#pan on the ter$ "or clearer unerstanin!%
c. &irect the$ to use the acti*e *oice o" the *er' in their sentence
construction%


'our Final Tasks
Task ?@% -e*iew( )nalyze( -e"lect
a. 7sk students to read the important pointers on ho) to prepare a report
for a
play re!ie) as they )ill be re"uired to submit a report at the end of the third
)eek of the "uarter.
b. Instruct them to fill up each blank


Task >H. Tippa'le Tips=
a. ;a*e the stuents rea an analyze the tips on ra$atizin! a play%
b. )llow the$ to take own notes i" necessary%
c. Tell the$ that the tips woul 'e *ery use"ul in the "inal acti*ity% Task
?K% &eli*er the Goos=
a. 4alk with the stuents throu!h this "inal acti*ity%
b. Tell the$ how they will 'e assesse 'y presentin! to the$ the
ru'rics "or per"or$ance assess$ent%


M2 Treasure
a. ;a*e the stuents re"lect on the :uotation 'y -alph 4alo
2$erson%
b. ;a*e the$ "urther re"lect on their stren!ths%
c. Then instruct the$ to co$plete the state$ent%
Teachers Guide Module
E
Lesson @
______________________________________________________________
Ensurin3 Famil2 Securit2


B. $ssessment ;lan
1re;assessment and 1ost;assessment tests are gi!en at the beginning and end of the
"uarter respecti!ely.
C. Resources
1. .aterials
a. !ideo from you tube entitled a @heart touching !ideo about a
perfect fatherA
b. !ideo transcript of 1res. Ronald Reagan0s campaign ad @It0s
.orning 7gain in 7mericaA
c. &ideo of a short one act play of @Romeo and JulietA
d. &ideo of @-ridayA+ one act play by Rebecca #lack
c. strips of paper5metacards
2. E"uipment
a. 1ro,ector 9=L1:
b. audio G !ideo system
c. laptop


D. $cti!ities

1. #ntroduction 9>st day:


%ask >. 2/7%0' NEV%3
a. 7sk the class ho) much they lo!e their father in preparation for the
!ideo clip they are about to )atch.
b. 7s soon as you gather enough responses+ tell the class that they
)ill )atch a !ideo about a father and a daughter.
c. Remind the class that you )ill pause the !ideo three times to gi!e
them time to reflect on )hat )ill happen ne*t.
? %ell the class to fill out the table in the L. )ith their predictions
and reasons as to )hat )ill happen ne*t e!ery time you pause the
!ideo.
? 7llo) for a number of responses before playing the !ideo again.
7ckno)ledge the predictions5guesses of the class.
? 7sk them )hy they are able to make the right guesses.

d. 1rocess students0 ans)ers in the 6uide Xuestions. 7llo) for
!aried ans)ers.
e. Xuestion F in the 6uide Xuestions )ould re"uire your
students to role play an ending they )ould )ant to gi!e to
the @heart touching !ideo about a perfect father.A
f. 7sk the class to form fi!e groups and for three minutes
discuss their !ersion of the !ideo0s ending.
g. Inform each group that they ha!e to assign t)o members from
their group to ser!e as the @analystsA )ho )ill be in charge of ans)ering
%ask C )hile the rest of the group performs.
h. 1rocess the groups0 ans)ers in %ask C.
i. 7sk these follo) up "uestions( 2hat helped you analye the stand
of each group3 2hy is it important to analye the stand of a speaker
or group of people3
'. =ra) out
generaliations from the students( 9reictions are 'ase
on concrete e*iences an are not ,ust 'ase on
intuitions an "eelin!s%



%ask F.%78E %2O
a. 7fter dra)ing out ideas from the students on the importance
of analying one0s stand on an issue and predicting outcomes+
ask them to )ork on %ask F )ith a partner.
b. %ell the class that they )ill )atch a !ideo again about the political
ad that features U' 1resident Ronald Reagan. /ere0s a short
background about the ad!ertisement.
0 Mornin3 in AmericaS is the co$$on na$e o" a political
ca$pai!n tele*ision co$$ercial( "or$ally title S #rouder!
Stron3er! etter S an "eaturin! the openin! line SItQs
$ornin! a!ain in )$erica%S The a was part o" the ?PEF U%S%
presiential ca$pai!n o" -epu'lican 9arty caniate -onal
-ea!an% It "eature a $onta!e o" i$a!es o" )$ericans !oin! to
work an a cal$( opti$istic narration that su!!este the
i$pro*e$ents to the U%S% econo$y since his ?PEH election
which were ue to -ea!anQs policies% It aske *oters why they
woul want to return to the pre8-ea!an policies o" &e$ocrats like
his opponent 4alter Bonale( who ha ser*e as >ice
9resient uner -ea!anQs i$$eiate preecessor Di$$y Carter%
%he phrase TItKs morning again in 7mericaT is used both as
a literal statement 9people are sho)n going to )ork as
they )ould in the morning:+ and as a metaphor for rene)al.
-ull te*t of the ad(
@ItKs morning again in 7merica. %oday more men and )omen )ill go to )ork than
e!er before in our countryKs history. 2ith interest rates at about half the record
highs of >QD?+ nearly C+??? families today )ill buy ne) homes+ more than at any
time in the past four years. %his afternoon O+B?? young men and )omen )ill be
married+ and )ith inflation at less than half of )hat it )as ,ust four years ago+ they
can look for)ard )ith confidence to the future. ItKs morning again in 7merica+ and
under the leadership of 1resident Reagan+ our country is prouder and stronger
and better. 2hy )ould )e e!er )ant to return to )here )e )ere less than four
short years ago3A
The a was written an narrate 'y a $an ;al -iney( who also wrote an
narrate -ea!anQs resonant SBear in the woosS a (title SBearS) as well as his
S)$ericaQs BackS a% To $any( his rich( a*uncular *oice represente
wholeso$eness an authenticity%T?U Bernie >an!rin o" ;al -iney V 9artners
was the )rt &irector o" the a( which was irecte an "il$e 'y Dohn 9ytka o"
0e*ine+9ytka 9rouctions%

This a*ertise$ent won inustry awars an praise "ro$ the political an
a*ertisin! worl% -epu'lican strate!ist &an Schnur sai o" -ineyQs work:
SBost political a*ertisin! hits *iewers o*er the hea( while his work $akes ,ust
as stron! a point 'ut in a less con"rontational an a $ore soothin! $anner%S
Source:http:++en%wikipeia%or!+wiki+Bornin!IinI)$erica


c. Remind the students to )atch the !ideo but pay particular attention to the
message of the ad. 7llo) them to )atch and listen three times. %ell them to )rite
do)n their ans)ers on the follo)ing "uestions(
? 2hat is the stand of the speaker in the ad3
? 2hat are the facts he presented3
? 2hat are the speaker0s biases3

d. %ell the class to )ork on %ask F )ith a partner. Inform them that they could use
their ans)ers to the three "uestions you presented in ans)ering the task.
e. 7fter fi!e minutes+ call on pairs to share their ans)ers )ith the class. 1rocess
their ans)ers focusing on their @standA on the issue presented
by the ad.
f. )s coul 'e appealin! an 'elie*a'le 'ut we shoul learn how to
istin!uish real "ro$ i$a!inary ieas% $onnect it also to the political
ads in the 1hilippines that )e often )atch during election time.
RE7=IN6 /O.E2OR8
9'ee your %e*t( =eath of 7 'alesman+ 7ct > by 7rthur .iller:
Inform the students to research on the background of the play+ author and
historical background.


2. ;resentation 9Your %e*t: 9Cnd day:

Task F T;2 4O-0& OF 4O-&S (?H $ins%)
a. /a!e the students gi!e )ords associated )ith @'alesmanA and
connect this acti!ity )ith the featured literary piece @=eath of 7
'alesmanA.
b. You may also ask the students to predict )hat this play is all
about based on its title.
c. $ontinue the discussion by telling the students that there are
)ords in the play that must be properly defined to aid in understanding
the play. %ell the class to )ork on %ask H+ acti!ities # G $ found in the L..
In acti!ity $+ each student shall copy the lines )here each )ord is used.
%hen+ they ha!e to use each )ord in their o)n sentence


Task K% 0IT TO -2)& (?K $ins%)
a. 7fter unlocking the meaning of terms used in the play+ ask
students )hat they ha!e read and researched about the historical
background of the play and its author.
b. 7llo) for !olunteers to share their research then post the
author0s picture on the board. &alidate the information your students
ha!e gi!en.
%his )ebsite may be of help to you(
http(55thebestnotes.com5booknotes5=eath4Of474'alesman4
'ummary5=eath4Of474'alesman4.iller>?.html
Task N <)B2 T;2 C;)-)CT2-
a. =iscuss about the play focusing first on the character. 6i!e enough
time for the class to ans)er the task. 6ather ans)ers from the class
orally.
b. 1ro!ide follo) up "uestions so students )ould get to kno) the
characters better.


7ns)er
1. E
2. =
3. #
4. 7
5. $
6. 6
7. /
8. -



c. 1rocess students0 ans)ers to the guide "uestions. #elo) are
additional information about the protagonist and antagonist
in @=eath of a 'alesmanA
#rota3onist
The prota!onist o" a story is the $ain character who traitionally
uner!oes so$e sort o" chan!e% 4illy 0o$an is the prota!onist% ;e is a
tra*elin! sales$an( the low $an o" popular Unite States culture( who
'elie*es in the "alse pro$ises o" the )$erican &rea$%
Anta3onist
The anta!onist o" a story is the "orce that pro*ies an o'stacle "or the
prota!onist% The anta!onist oes not always ha*e to 'e a sin!le
character or e*en a character at all% The anta!onist is the "alse pro$ise o"
the )$erican &rea$( which $akes people 'elie*e that anyone in the
Unite States can 'eco$e rich throu!h har work( perse*erance( or
personality% The rea$ also see$s to say that the ini*iual nee
not $aster any "or$ o" skill or pro"ession to $ake it 'i!%
Un"ortunately( 4illy is o*erco$e 'y his rea$s an illusions urin! the
course o" the play% ;e is "ire 'y the co$pany that he 'elie*es will
pro$ote hi$7 he is re,ecte 'y his sons( "or who$
he has worke an stru!!le7 an he is "orce to see that his
li"e an his philosophies are a lie


%ask J 6UE'' %/E .E''76E
a. %ell the class to )ork on this task )ith their group. 7llo) the group
to discuss their ans)ers in fi!e minutes. %hen allo) each group to present
and e*plain their ans)ers. -acilitate the class discussion and process
groups0 ans)ers.




%ask D %7L8 .E IN
a. 7sk the class )hat interior or internal monologue is and ask them
)ho among the characters in the play al)ays has an internal monologue.
b. 7sk them to cite e*amples from the play.
c. 7sk the class )hat allo)ed them to understand the play
better and )hat real life e*perience they ha!e that are similar to any
of the characters in the play.
d. 7sk them to )rite their ans)ers in the thought bubble.


/ere are possible "uestions you might )ant to use to help your students
better understand the play. You might find these "uestions useful.
%hese "uestions are taken from theA =E7%/ O- 7 '7LE'.7NA
1 7 UNI% 1L7N 'econd Edition by .ary #. $ollins.
Xuestions for 7ct One
1. 2ho is 2illy Loman3
2. 2ho is Linda3
3. 2hat happened to 2illy after he got a little abo!e Yonkers3
4. 2hat is LindaKs reaction to 2illyKs complaints about himself3
5. 2hat reason does 2illy gi!e that he canKt )ork in Ne) York3
6. 2ho are #iff and /appy3
7. In the first scene )ith Linda+ 2illy contradicts himself t)ice. 7bout
)hat did he contradict himself3
8. 2hat seems to be the problem bet)een #iff and 2illy3
9. 2hy doesnKt /appy go )est )ith #iff3
10. 2hat does #iff )ant from #ill Oli!er3
11. 2hy did #iff stop )orking for #ill Oli!er3
12. /appy says+ TI donKt kno) )hat to do about him L2illyM+ itKs getting
embarrassing.T %o )hat is he referring to and )hat does the fact that
/appy thinks this )ay tell you about his character3
13. 2hy does 2illy talk so much about the car3
14. 2here did #iff get the football3 2hat does 2illy ha!e to say about
that3
15. 2hat does 2illy admit to Linda about his business3 2hat is her
reaction3
16. 2ho is %he 2oman3
17. 2hat does 2illy mean+ TIKll make it up to you+ Linda+ IKll ;;T3 2hat
does Linda think he means3
18. 2hat does 2illy )ant young #ernard to do for #iff3
19. 2hat does 2illy tell /appy about #en )hen /appy asks ho) #en
Tdid itT3
20. 2ho is #en3
21. 2ho is $harley3
22. $harley says+ T%o hell )ith it. 2hen a deposit bottle is
broken+ you donKt get your nickel back.T 2hat does he mean3
23. $harley and 2illy are playing cards. 2hy does $harley
lea!e3
24. 2hat did 2illyKs father do for a li!ing3 /o) is that different from
)hat 2illy does3
25. 2hy does $harley tell 2illy Tthe ,ails are full of fearless
charactersT3
26. Linda says+ T7ttention+ attention must be paid to such a person.T
E*plain )hy she says this.
27. Linda tells the boys that 2illy )onKt be all right. 2hen the boys ask
)hy he )onKt+ )hat is her reply3
28. 2hat ad!ice does 2illy gi!e #iff on the e!ening before he goes to
see #ill Oli!er3 /o) does 2illy contradict himself again3
29. /o) much time passes in the first act3 /o) much time are )e
gi!en information about3
3. Enrichment 9Frd day: 9Your =isco!ery %asks:


S92)1 )<& )CT= (@H $ins%)
a. 6i!e the class time to read the lines silently.
b. 7fter F minutes+ assign groups to read a particular dialogue.
Remind them to be in character. -eel )hat the characters
are feeling )hen they present the dialogue assigned to them.
c. -acilitate the discussion of their performance. 1rocess the
students ans)ers in the guide "uestions.
d. #ased on the gi!en "uestions+ dra) out from the class
important learning on the use of non;!erbal strategies in
communicating. &isit this )ebsite(
http(55))).businessballs.com5body;language.htmUeyes;
body;language for more details.


S2T T;2 ST/02
a. Inform the class that there are particular )ords used in
theatre. %hese theatre styles are needed )hen the class plans for a
production.
b. 7sk them to ans)er the acti!ity )hile reminding the class that
indirectly they ha!e used one or t)o of them )hen they deli!ered the
lines assigned to them.
7ns)ers( >. Impro!isation< C. .elodrama< F. .ime< H. .usical
%heater


G2T T;2 ISSU2A(@H $ins%)
a. $onnect the pre!ious acti!ity to this by asking the class )hat
theater style do they think is suitable to @=eath of 7
'alesmanA. 2hile the play is a tragedy+ there is also a touch of
melodrama in it.
b. 7sk the class ho) 2illy+ Linda+ #iff and /appy are related.
$ontinue further by asking )hat they are like as a family.
c. /a!e the class read the informati!e te*t. 7llo) them to
ans)er the F;C;>\> chart.
d. /ighlight the issue reflected in the te*t. 7llo) students to gi!e
other possible )ays to keep the family together.
4. EH1ansion 0 Hth day: 9Your -inal %ask5Your %reasure:


BO&20 /OU- BO&)0S (@H $ins%)
a. -acilitate the class0 analysis of the gi!en statements. 7sk the class
to ans)er "uestions about the gi!en sentences. 9>?
mins.:
b. =ra) out from the students the idea that there are t)o types
of modal !erDs o2 oDli5ation^ those that primarily e*press a
firm obligation or necessity ; must and ha!e to ; and those
that e*press a recommendation or moral obligation ;
should and ou5ht to& (GH $ins%)
c. $heck out this )ebsite for a detailed e*planation(
http(55linguapress.com5grammar5modal;obligation.htm.
d. /ere are the ans)ers for the acti!ity /ello Obligation( >.
.ust5ha!e to< C. /a!e to5must< should< should< should< must5 ha!e to<
must5ha!e to< should.


-2>I24 T;)T 90)/ (@H $ins%)
a. 7llo) for !aried ans)ers in this acti!ity. %his should be done )ith a
partner. $all on !olunteers from the class to read their )ork and allo)
the class to react on the ad!ice or suggestions gi!en. 9B mins.:
b. Lead the class in recalling the one act play !ideo of Romeo and
Juliet that they ha!e seen in their pre!ious lesson.
c. %ell the class that they )ill )atch the !ideo clip again but before
that they need to fill out an information sheet about
the play. 7d!ise the class that they may use their notes in their
pre!ious lesson in filling out the information sheet of 7cti!ity #.
d. 'ho) the !ideo to the class+ then tell them to )ork on
7cti!ity $ )ith their partner.
e. Once done+ help the class come up )ith an indi!idual output in
7cti!ity =. 1rocess the ans)ers of the students in the guide "uestions.
/ighlight the elements of effecti!e )riting( $oherence+ Unity and
Emphasis.
f. -inally+ inform the class to )rite a play re!ie) focusing on (
? %itle of the play
? Name of the play)right
? %he group0s general impression of the play
? %heme or message of the play+ and
? the acting of the main characters


g. Remind the class that they )ill do the play re!ie) by group. Each
member must be gi!en an assigned task in )riting the play re!ie)+ eg.
%)o members )ill gi!e their general impression of the play )hile
others )ould comment on the acting.
h. E*plain the rubrics for grading the play re!ie) to the class.
Criteria 1- 1ts&
%here is at least
one paragraph
that mentions
the theme
7 1ts&
%here is at least
> paragraph that
mentions the
theme
5 1ts&
%he theme of
the play is
partly
mentione d in
the
3 1ts&
%here is little
e!idence to sho)
understandin g of
)hat the play )as
Understandin
g
of the play
and has
identified
at least
three
names of
the
characters
and their
description
.
of the play
and
included
t)o names
of the
characters
and their
descriptions
.
paragraph
and
included
only one
character.
about.
Opinion 7t least F
reasons
are gi!en
)hy the
7t least t)o
reasons
are
gi!en )hy
7t least
t)o
reasons
are gi!en
7n opinion
is
gi!en
)ithout
$on!entions
%he )ork
is free
9almost
%he )ork
has fe)
grammar
%he )ork
needs
editing for
%he )ork
has
many errors

spelling
errors
spelling
errors.
meanin
g.
%eam)ork 7ll the
members in
the team
contribute in
the )ork
One or t)o
members
do not
contribute in
the )ork
%hree or
more
members do
not
contribute in
the )ork
Only the team
leader )orks in
the group
i. 'ho) the !ideo @-ridayA+ a short play in one act by Rebecca #lack.
'. 1ro!ide ample time for the students to )rite their play
re!ie).
(. #efore collecting the group0s )ork+ ask( 2hat is your
prediction about the play3 =o you think it )ill become a @hitA3 2hy3
). /ighlight the day0s learning by informing the class that the initial
fact sheet contains the introduction of the play re!ie) that they )ill
accomplish on the Oth )eek.
*. 6rade the group0s )ork using the rubric pro!ided here.




My Treasure 0ynthesis3


a. E*plain to the class ho) they )ill )ork on the 1.I 91lus+ .inus
and Interesting: chart. %his is part of their synthesis or summary of
learning acti!ity.
b. 7s soon as the task is understood by the class+ allo) them to )ork
on this acti!ity at home. 7d!ise the class to )rite their 1.I in their Journal
of Learning.
c. #egin ne*t )eek0s discussion by calling on a representati!e from
the class to share their ans)ers in their 1.I chart.
Teachers Guide Module
E
Lesson I
______________________________________________________________
Learnin3 0rom Others


B. $ssessment ;lan
1re;assessment and 1ost;assessment tests are gi!en at the beginning and end of the
"uarter respecti!ely.
C. Resources
1. .aterials
a. graphic organier on making decisions
b. pictures of 7donis and lady )ith stockings
c. graphic organier for elements galore
d. ppt or dra)ings of captured images from !ideo clips
e. !ideo clips( moti!ational and inspiring !ideos on success in life+
successful life moti!ational !ideo+ and inspirational !ideo( @,ust do itA
f. strips of manila paper
2. E"uipment
a. 1ro,ector 9=L1:
b. laptop
c. audio;!ideo system

D. $cti!ities


5. #ntroduction 9>st day:
2/7%0' IN 7 1I$3
a. In!ite the class to study the captured images of the three
!ideo clips in %ask >.
b. 7sk the class to )rite do)n in their notebook )hat they think the
!ideo is about. 7sk the class to predict )hat the
message in the !ideo is by analying the pictures.
c. 7sk the students to take turns in sharing their ans)ers. 2rite on
the board the ans)ers of the students. %ell them that you
)ill go back to their responses after they0!e seen the !ideo clips.
27%$/ 7N= LE7RN
(. #efore the students )atch the !ideo clips+ ask the students to gi!e
their @recipeA for success. 7llo) for !aried ans)ers. 2rite their ans)ers on
the board.
). 'ho) the class the three !ideo clips. Remind the class that as they
)atch they ha!e to take do)n important notes about
the !ideo clips. %ell them that their notes )ould be helpful as they
ans)er %ask C.
1. .oti!ational and inspiring !ideo to success in life
))).youtube.com5)atch3&[k%r>kXuE"RgGdesktop4uri[N
C-)atchNF-!NFd
2. 'uccessful Life E moti!ational !ideo
))).youtube.com5)atch3[ps.bUyDe77I
3. Inspirational !ideo E Just do it
))).youtube.com5)atch3![VRtu=?"t1o

*. -orm small groups. 7llo) each group to discuss the ans)er to %ask
C. Remind each group to )rite their ans)ers on manila paper to be
presented to the class. 6i!e follo) up "uestions )hen needed. 9>B mins.:


LI'%EN %O .78E 7 =E$I'ION
a. 7llo) the students to )ork on the acti!ity )ith a partner. In
accomplishing the task+ remind students to list do)n the message of
&ideos >;F+ )rite the strong and )eak points of each under the pros and
cons bo*. %hen+ ask them to )ork on their o)n in accomplishing the
decision bo* at the bottom. 7llo) for a number of representati!es from
the class to share and e*plain their ans)ers. =ra) out insights from
the class like( co$parin! an contrastin! shoul 'e 'ase
on concrete e#a$ples an soun ieas . It is a help"ul skill in
$akin! soun ecisions% 9CB mins.:


Task F G)B2 )<& 90)/
a. 7sk the students to )ork on %ask H and to make good use of their
decision making skill.
b. Using the playbill and the synopsis or abstract of the play+ ask the
students to decide )hich bet)een the 1hantom of the Opera and 6rease
)ould they )atch.
c. 7sk them to )rite their reasons for their choice in their
notebook. $onduct a class sur!ey of the t)o plays and call
on representati!es from the class to share reasons for their choice.
b. In!ite students to ,oin their groups again and ask them to finalie
their @tipsA or @recipeA for a successful life. #e sure to dra) out from the
students important highlights for the day.
c. %o close the day+ you may ask each student to )rite in their ,ournal
their goal in life and a commitment statement to accomplish that
goal. 9B mins.:


RE7=IN6 /O.E2OR8
96o o!er the literary te*t again( @%he =eath of 7 'alesman+A 7ct
1 by 7rthur .iller:


6. ;resentation 9Your %e*t: 9Cnd day:


Task K% 202B2<TS G)0O-2
d. -or the recall+ ask students about the characters and theme they
remember in the 7ct One of @=eath of a 'alesman.A 7sk them about any
important learning they may ha!e about the play.
e. %ell the class that they may continue on the ,ourney to)ards a
better understanding of the play.
f. Remind them that plays ha!e elements too. 7sk the class )hat
elements of short stories they remember. $onnect that )ith the group
acti!ity they )ill )ork on.
g. %ell the class to go to their group and e*plain to them that they )ill
fill out the needed information on the elements. Each group )ill )rite
their ans)er on manila paper. -acilitate the group discussion.
h. 1rocess the groups0 ans)ers. 1ro!ide feedback to the output of
each group to eliminate misconceptions.
i. 1ro!ide more input on the elements as the students
indi!idually ans)er. %ask O. 7sk follo) up "uestions to dra)
out ideas from the students.
7ns)ers( >. 'etting< C. %heme< F. $haracter< H. $haracter< B. %heme<
O. .ood


90)/ >S% S;O-T STO-/
a. $onnect the pre!ious acti!ity to this task by asking the class ho)
plays and short stories are similar or different from each other.
b. %ell the students to )ork )ith a partner in doing %ask J.
&2CI9;2- T;2 S/BBO0S
b. In the play+ 2illy Loman )ould refer to 7donis as the
embodiment of his children and the stockings )hich represent his
infidelity to Linda. 7sk the students to think about their ans)ers to the t)o
items under this task.
c. 7s soon as they ha!e )ritten do)n their indi!idual ans)er to the
"uestions+ ask them to )ork )ith a partner and discuss their ans)ers. 7sk
them to agree on a final ans)er.
d. =ra) out from the students other symbols used in the play and the
messages that they con!ey. %o end the day0s discussion+ gather
responses from the students about an ob,ect+ idea+ or place that
symbolies an unforgettable e!ent in their li!es.
Reading /ome)ork( Read the 2orst =epression of .odern /istory




7. Enrichment 9Frd day: 9Your =isco!ery %asks:

GO 02SS 4IT; 4O-&S
e. -or priming+ you may ask students about the elements of a play.
$onnect that to the day0s lesson by saying that one important
characteristic of a play is it is meant to be performed. 7sk the class
)ho among them are interested in performing the staging of @=eath of 7
'alesman.A 7sk them )ho among the characters do they )ant to portray.
f. Lead the class to the ne*t task. 7sk them to do )hat0s asked in the
L.. 1ro!ide e*planations to the task. 7sk them to )ork on this for >?
minutes then tell them to be ready for the presentation after)ards.
Remind them to be in character. -eel )hat the characters are feeling
)hen they present the dialogue assigned to them.
g. Inform the groups that they )ill be graded using the rubrics
pro!ided in the L.. Inform the groups that they )ill take turns scoring the
performance of each group.
h. -acilitate the discussion of their performance. =ra) out from the
class important learning on the use of non;!erbal strategies in
communicating. &isit this )ebsite( http(55))).businessballs.com5body;
language.htmUeyes;
body;language for more details.
BI<& T;2 ISSU2S
e. Inform the class that the dialogues of the characters in the play+
the setting and other elements reflect the social condition of the time
)hen the play )as )ritten. 7sk the class )hat )as happening to the U'
economy during the >QH?0s+ the time )hen @=eath of a 'alesmanA )as
)ritten.
f. $onnect that to the reading selection )hich talks about the 2all
'treet $rash and the 6reat =epression. /ere is an e*cerpt of
.iller0s biography that could help e*plain the theme of his play.


$rthur Miller 8 "#OGR$;*Y
7rthur .iller )as born in Ne) York $ity on October
17. >Q>B. /is father+ Isadore .iller+ )as prosperous as a shop o)ner
and a manufacturer of )omen0s coats< ho)e!er+ he lost his fortune in
the stock market crash of >QCQ. %he young .iller )as forced to )ork a
number of odd ,obs to support himself+ including being a farm hand.
%he years after the =epression )ere formati!e years for .iller+ during
)hich the formerly indifferent student began reading on his o)n and
de!eloping a strong social conscience and sense of ,ustice. /e
e!entually entered the Uni!ersity of .ichigan+ )here he began
)riting plays and )orked on the college ne)spaper. 7fter graduating in
>QFD+ he mo!ed back to Ne) York+ )here he continued )riting+
primarily dramas.
g. $all on !olunteers to read each paragraph of the selection. 7fter
the )hole selection has been read+ facilitate the discussion of the
6uide Xuestions.
%he last "uestion caries the theme of the play )hich is
connected to the article. %he 7merican =ream of prosperity and a
good life had !anished )ith the 6reat =epression. %his e!ent left
many 7mericans homeless+ ,obless and )ith shattered dreams.
7llo) for other possible ans)ers in the discussion.




C)US2 R 2FF2CT
a. %he 2all 'treet $rash and the 6reat =epression caused great
problems in U'. One of its effects )as the theme of 7rthur .iller0s play.
b. %ell your students to )ork in group and identify the effects of these
t)o e!ents based on the article. 7sk them to )rite their ans)ers on
manila paper.
c. 7llo) them to present and interpret their ans)ers pointing out the
relationship of the 2all 'treet $rash and the 6reat =epression. 1rocess
the ans)ers of all the groups.


S;)-2 /OU- 9-O;IBITIO<S
a. /ighlight the idea that the 2all 'treet $rash and the 6reat
=epression ha!e their causes and effects. In the ne*t acti!ity+ ask
your students to fill out the table on )hat they can do to be ready for an
economic crisis and )hat they can0t and mustn0t do to )in o!er an
economic crisis. 7sk them do this indi!idually.
b. -acilitate the discussion on .odals e*pressing 1rohibitions. =ra)
out from the students )hat is e*pressed by the underlined )ords in
the sentences. 1ro!ide inputs on .odals of 1rohibitions. Emphasie the
use and importance of using modals of prohibitions.


Remember( $an is a modal often used to ask for and gi!e permission.
It means something is allo)ed and can be done.
#oth cant and mustnt are modals used to sho) that
something is prohibited E it is not allo)ed. Cant tells us that
something is against the rules. Mustnt is usually used )hen
the obligation comes from the person )ho is speaking.
For $ore in"or$ation on the $oals o" prohi'ition( you $ay
*isit th
is
we'site:http:++learnen!lish%'ritishcouncil%or!+en+!ra$$ar
re"erence+$oals8?
US2 /OU- 9-O;IBITIO<S
a. 7sk the class to )ork on this task0s first acti!ity by pair. Use modals
of prohibition properly.
7ns)ers( >. $an< C. $an0t< F. $an+ mustn0t< H. $an< B. .ustn0t
b. %he ne*t acti!ity under this task may be done in groups. 7sk the
groups to )rite do)n fi!e things that performers are prohibited from
doing during their performance and in the same group ask the class to list
do)n props that can be used for the play @=eath of 7 'alesman.A
c. 7sk each group to )rite their ans)ers on manila paper. 7sk all
the groups to post their )ork in front and call on !olunteers to
present their group0s output. 7s one group presents+ let the
representati!e of the other groups check for similarities and differences in
their ans)ers. %his )ill lessen the chance of repetiti!e reports.
d. -or indi!idual )ork+ instruct the class to do %ask >H. -acilitate
this acti!ity by asking the class to recall the presentation done by the
group and the scores you ha!e
gi!en the other groups.
e. 7sk them to )rite to the group about )hat they can impro!e on in
deli!ering their lines or dialogues. /a!e them use the modals( mustn0t and
can0t. 7sk them to )rite their ans)ers in their notebook. $all on !olunteers
to share their )ork )ith the class. 7llo) for reactions from the group
)ritten to.


BI<& /OU- 4O-&S
a. Remind the class that aside from the suggestions of the
group+ there is still a lot to learn about stage production.
b. 7sk students to find the meaning of some terms pertaining to
theater.
7ns)er( >. -alse+ $old Reading< C. -alse+ %ech Rehearsal<
3. -alse. =ress Rehearsal< H. -alse+ 1acing< B. -alse+ -ormal
%heater< O. -alse+ Informal %heater
c. 7sk the students about other theater terms they ha!e learned
aside from those mentioned in the day0s lesson. 7sk ho) these theater
terms can be useful to their stage production.
d. $ap the day0s lesson by dra)ing out from the students
important learnings for the day.




8. EH1ansion 0 Hth day: 9Your -inal %ask:

-2>I24 -24I<& (@H $ins%)
+. #egin the day0s lesson by recalling the ad!ice and
suggestions gi!en about )hat performers are prohibited from doing. %ell
the class that the re!ie)ers of the play )ill al)ays see through )hat is
going on in a play.
,. %ell the class to read the sample high school play re!ie) pro!ided
in the L..
2. 7s soon as they are done+ ask the class their comments about
the play. 7fter gathering enough ans)ers from the class+ tell them to
bring out the group0s play re!ie) that they made the pre!ious )eek.
-. %ell the class to compare and contrast their play re!ie) )ith the
sample high school play re!ie). $all for class representati!es to gi!e
the similarities and differences of the t)o play re!ie)s.
.. List on the board the points for impro!ement the class
identified.
&. %hen+ allo) the class to study closely the sample high school play
re!ie) by filling out the play re!ie) checklist )ith a partner.
3. -acilitate the discussion of the students0 ans)ers. =ra) out from
the class the pointers to consider in )riting a play re!ie). 1ro!ide
inputs. You may !isit this )ebsite for more
information(
http(55)riting.)isc.edu5/andbook51layRe!ie).html
(


TIB2 TO -2>I24
a. 7sk the class to go o!er the play re!ie) they ha!e )ritten on the
play @-riday.A Using the tips learned in )riting a play+ ask
the class to re!ise their )ork.
b. /a!e all the groups include the follo)ing mechanics in
impro!ing their play re!ie)( Introduction+ summary statement+ acting
of the cast and technical aspect of the production like impro!isation+
background music+ props among others.
c. 'ho) the class the !ideo of the play @-ridayA again to help the
students in re)riting their play re!ie). Encourage the class to gi!e their
play re!ie) a catchy title.
d. Inform the class that their )ork )ill be graded using the
same rubric.
e. 7llo) the first group to finish and read their play re!ie) to the
class.


My Treasure 0ynthesis3
d. E*plain to the class ho) they )ill )ork on their @.y
%reasureA acti!ity sheet.
e. 7s soon as the task is understood by the class+ allo) them to )ork
on this acti!ity at home. 7sk the class to )rite this acti!ity in their Journal
of Learning.
f. #egin ne*t )eek0s discussion by calling on a representati!e from
the class to share their ans)ers to this task.




Teachers Guide
Module E
Lesson E
______________________________________________________________
Ciscernin3 Future O//ortunities


B. 7ssessment 1lan
1re assessment is gi!en at the start of Xuarter H and the post assessment at
the end of Xuarter H.
C. Resources
1. .aterials
a. copies of graphic organiers
b. !ideoclips of appropriate ad!ertisements
c. !ideo of =eath of 7 salesman+ 7ct > from Longman /igh
'chool0s =rama $lub
d. cartolina+ manila paper+ permanent markers
2. E"uipment
a. 1ro,ector
b. Laptop
c. speaker


D. 7cti!ities
". #ntroduction 0Your 6oal+ Your Journey+ Your Initial %asks3
1. /a!e the class )atch the !ideo !ersion of =eath of 7 'alesman+ 7ct I
from Longmont /igh 'chool =rama $lub found in
))).youtube.com5)atch3![*=gpe&F=JVE. 9>? mins.:
2. 7fter )atching+ guide the class in guessing the e!ents that )ould happen
after 7ct >. %his may be done in group. 1ro!ide the materials that each
group )ould need. 9B mins.:
3. 7s each group presents+ ask them for the reasons for their
ans)ers. 9B mins.:
Tas, @& Ta,e idesU
1. $onnect the pre!ious acti!ity to this one by saying that in plays+ there are no
interruptions. %here are no ad!ertisements sho)n after each scene. 7sk the class if
they en,oy )atching ads too. Remind the class that+ )hile )e )atch and listen to
ads )e ha!e to discern facts from opinion.
2. %hen+ read to your class a political campaign ad!ertisement. %ell them to listen
for facts and determine the biases from the ads by )orking on
the chart belo). 9C? mins.:


-ull te*t of the ad( http(55en.)ikipedia.org5)iki5.orning4in47merica



ItKs morning again in 7merica. %oday more men and )omen )ill go to )ork
than e!er before in our countryKs history. 2ith interest rates at about half the record
highs of >QD?+ nearly C+??? families today )ill buy ne) homes+ more than at any
time in the past four years. %his afternoon O+B?? young men and )omen )ill
be married+ and )ith inflation at less than half of )hat it )as ,ust four years ago+
they can look for)ard )ith confidence to the future. ItKs morning again in
7merica+ and under the leadership of 1resident Reagan+ our country is prouder and
stronger and better. 2hy )ould )e e!er )ant to return to )here )e )ere less than
four short years ago3
%he ad )as )ritten and narrated by ad man /al Riney+ )ho also )rote and
narrated ReaganKs resonant T #ear in the )oods T ad 9titled T#earT: as )ell as
his T7mericaKs #ackT ad. %o many+ his rich+ a!uncular !oice represented
)holesomeness and authenticity.L>M #ernie &angrin of /al Riney G 1artners )as the
7rt =irector of the ad+ )hich )as directed and filmed by John 1ytka of Le!ine51ytka
1roductions
Tas, I& 1ea, :ith 'eelin5sN 0@- mins&3
1. $all on !olunteers from the class to read the sample scene pro!ided in
the L.. Remind the class to check )hether the @tipsA are follo)ed by the
!olunteers.
2. Lead the class in the discussion of )hat should be obser!ed )hen
deli!ering lines in a play+ 2hat does ,uncture include+ and ho) important is
using the right ,uncture in performing in a play.
3. 7fter this+ allo) each group to choose one scene or e!ent from the play
that they )ill practice and later on present to the class.
4. Each group is gi!en three minutes to practice and t)o minutes to
present. 7d!ise them to obser!e proper ,unctures.
5. Orient the class on using the rubrics for oral presentation. 6roups
take turns scoring each group as assigned by the %eacher.
1eer 'coring Rubric
T*E$TRE $RT
4 1ts
3 1ts .eets E*ceeds
E*pectations E*pectations
2 1ts
.inimally .eets
E*pectations
1 1t =oes
Not .eet
E*pectations
;roKection
'peaks so lines
are clearly
understood





EH1ression
1uts
e*pression into
their lines ;
bring life to the
character.
=oes more
than ,ust read
lines from
script.





Oral
.eli!ery
-la)less
deli!ery
using
proper+ stress+
intonation and
,uncture at the
precise
4


Lines are
al)ays clear
and
understadab le
4


1uts e*pression
into his5her lines.
1erforms the
entire time )hile
presenting ;
e!en )hen
not doing
lines.


Outstanding use
of proper+
stress+
intonation and
,uncture at the
right dialogues
)hich aid in the
better
understandi ng
of the
3


.ost of the lines
are clear and
understandab le
3


1uts e*pression
into most of
his5her lines+
1erforms most
of the time )hile
presenting ;
e!en )hen
not doing
lines.


.ost of the time
proper+ stress+
intonation and
,uncture are
used at the right
moment )hich
aid in the better
understandin
2


'ome of the lines
are clear and
understandab le
2


1uts some
e*pression into
his5her lines.
1erforms some
of the time
)hile
presenting ;
e!en )hen
not doing
lines.


-e) of the times
proper stress+
intonation and
,uncture are used
at the right
dialogues )hich
made it difficult to
understand
1


=id not speak so
lines are clear
and
understandabl e
1


=id not put !ery
much e*pression
into his5her lines.
2hile presenting+
not using non;
!erbal
communicatio
+.


%here is no use
of proper stress+
intonation and
,uncture all
throughout the
deli!ery of the
lines )hich makes
it difficult to
understand

moment )hich
aids in the better
understandi ng of
the play
play g of the play the play the play







6. /a!e one group to present )hile the rest )ork on it as an
assignment.


II. ;resentation 0Your TeHt3 01 hour30@nd day3
#efore beginning the day0s acti!ity+ allo) for a recall of the pre!ious
lesson or presentation of acti!ities not finished on the first day.


%ask H. %ime for %heater 9>? mins.:
1. /ere are some theatrical terms discussed in the pre!ious )eeks.
7llo) your students to define each based on ho) they ha!e
understood them. You may also pro!ide concrete e*amples to aid their
understanding.
a. =ress rehearsal is the final fe) rehearsals ,ust prior to opening
night in )hich the sho) is run )ith full technical elements. -ull
costumes and makeup are )orn.
b. $old reading means is a reading of a script done by actors )ho
ha!e not pre!iously re!ie)ed the play.
c. %ech rehearsal Rehearsals )here technical elements such as
sound and lighting are added to the sho).
d. 1acing is the tempo of an entire theatrical performance.
e. Informal theatre focuses on small presentations+ such as one taking
place in a classroom setting. Usually+ it is not intended for public !ie).
f. -ormal theatre focuses on public performance in the front of an
audience and in )hich the final production is most important.
g. Impro!isation is a spontaneous style of theatre through )hich
scenes are created )ithout ad!ance rehearsal or a script.
h. .elodrama is a dramatic form popular in the >D??s and
characteried by an emphasis on plot and physical action 9!ersus
characteriation:+ cliff;hanging e!ents+ heart; tugging
emotional appeals+ the celebration of !irtue+ and a strongly
moralistic tone.
i. .ime is an incident art form based on pantomime in )hich
con!entionalied gestures are used to e*press ideas rather than
represent actions.
'. .usical %heater is a type of entertainment containing music+
songs+ and+ usually+ dance.
2. 'ome of the unfamiliar )ords )hich could be "uite unfamiliar to your
students are listed here. It0s important that you ha!e the list of difficult
)ords and their meaning before letting your students )ork on this acti!ity
as you need to !alidate their ans)ers right a)ay. Encourage your students
to use the dictionary or go online through the &isual %hesaurus. 9>? mins.:
>. .ercurial E "uick and changeable in temperament
C. 'entiment E tender+ romantic or nostalgic feeling
F. 7gitation E disturbance+ annoyance
H. Idealist E one )ho sees the best in things< a dreamer<
unrealistic
5. 7!idly ; enthusiastically+ )ith great interest
6. Enthralled E held spellbound< capti!ated
7. Insinuates ; becomes introduced gradually
8. Incipient ; beginning to e*ist
9. Liable ; likely at risk of e*periencing something unpleasant
10. Incarnate ; personified+ gi!en a human form
11. Laconic ; using fe) )ords
12. %repidation ; state of alarm or dread
13. =ispel ; to rid one0s mind of
14. 1hilandering ; engaging in many lo!e affairs
15. Remiss ; not attending to duty+ negligent+ careless
16. 'ubdued ; made less intense+ toned do)n+ softer
Tas, <& ;lot the E!ents 0@- mins&3
Let your class do the %hink 1air 'hare strategy in this acti!ity. 6i!e them time to
ans)er this on their o)n. 7fter three minutes+ tell the class to find a partner to
compare ans)ers and agree on their ne) ans)ers. %hen+ inform the class to go
to their respecti!e groups to come up )ith their final ans)er. $all one group to
present their ans)er to the )hole class. Remind the other groups that they may
check their ans)ers against the group that is reporting. 7 group )hich has a
totally different ans)er may also be gi!en chance to present and e*plain their
)ork.
7rrange the e!ents according to ho) they happened in the play. 2rite first for the
first e!ent+ second and so on.
E!ents Order
%ired from an unsuccessful sales trip+ 2illy Loman
returned to his home one night. >
s
2illy has the habit of talking to himself in the
kitchen. 2hile he is doing this+ #iff and his younger
brother /appy )ho happens to be also !isiting
remember their gro)ing up years together. %hey talk
about their father0s babbling too )hich al)ays lead
to 2illy0s dissatisfaction o!er )hat happened to
#iff0s life career.
C
n
d
2illy talks about a successful sales trip but Linda
makes him admit that his trip )as not successful. 7s
Linda consoles him+ 2illy engages in yet another
daydream+ he hears the laughter of his mistress
)hom he has gi!en brand ne) stockings.
F
r
d
/e continues )ith his flashback+ this time )ith Linda
in the kitchen mending her stockings. %his angers
2illy and orders Linda to thro) her stockings a)ay.
H
t
h
In yet another flashback+ young Linda enters and
meets #en )ho talks about his tra!els and his
fortune in 7laska. 2illy continues the daydream )ith
$harley and #ernard telling him that #iff and /appy
ha!e stolen lumber. #en lea!es but 2illy continues
to talk to him.
B
t
h
$harley comes in ha!ing heard the noise. %hey play
cards together )ith $harley offering him a ,ob. 2illy
calls $harley #en se!eral times )hich agitated him.
$harley lea!es.
O
t
h
Reality sets in+ Linda finds 2illy outside. .other and
sons discuss 2illy0s condition+ scolds #iff for
arguing )ith his father. #iff tells her 2illy is a fake
but does not e*plain )hy. Linda tells them that 2illy
has tried to kill himself. /appy rebukes #iff for not
making it big in the business )orld.
J
t
h
2illy yells at #iff. /appy tries to change the topic by
suggesting that he and #iff enter the sporting goods
business. 2illy likes the idea and gi!es #iff tips on
ho) to be successful at it.
D
t
h



Tas, =& %no: Your ;ur1oseN0@- mins&3
1rocess the ans)ers of your students in this acti!ity. #e sure to gi!e them
appropriate follo) up "uestions to help them ans)er the "uestions. %his may also
be gi!en as ad!anced assignment so that they could ha!e time to research
on the literary techni"ue used by the author.
1. One of the ma,or characters in the play+ 2illy Loman did some
daydreaming and slipped back to the past in the middle of a present
con!ersation )ith his family. It happened in se!eral scenes in the play. 2hat
do you call this type of literary techni"ue3
4ikipeia e"ines Flash'ack as a literary techni:ue that takes the
narrati*e 'ack in ti$e "ro$ the current point%
)lthou!h the play happene in ,ust GF hours( the "lasch'ack an
ayrea$in! o" the $a,or character( 4illy 0o$an prolon!e the e*ents in
the story%
The "lash'ack also $ae the reaers unerstan where the characters are
co$in! "ro$( why they act the way they i an why they treat each other
like that% It $akes us connect the e*ents in the past to the present% To
realize that our situation in the present is shape 'y what happene in our
past is one insi!ht a'out this play% This is achie*e throu!h the "lash'ack%
2. 2hat is the pre!ailing mood in the play3 =escribe it.
)ll throu!hout the play( the "eelin! o" $elancholy an saness are *ery
o$inant%
The way 4illy an Bi"" treat each other is alreay saenin!%
4illy5s re!ret o" not !oin! with his 'rother Ben in )laska an his nee "or a
"ather "i!ure in his li"e $ake the play $ore serious%
4illy5s "rustration o*er his chilren particularly( Bi"" who use to 'e so well8
like in their co$$unity 'ut ene up without a sta'le ,o' an a career(
the "all o" his )$erican &rea$%
4illy5s in"ielity to 0ina% ;e ha an a""air with a wo$an in Boston%
()llow "or aitional escription o" the saness in the play%)
3. 2hat are the symbols used by the author in 7ct >3 2hat do these
symbols stand for3
Stockin3s which represent 4illy5s in"ielity to 0ina also represent the
ti$e when 4illy coul a""or the !oo thin!s in li"e%
The car which 4illy 0o$an lo*e in the past 'ut in the present he
espises% This also allues to the econo$ic conition o" the "a$ily% 4illy is
on co$$ission 'asis in the present an $ost o" the ti$e he co$es ho$e
without sellin! anythin!% )in! to his 'uren is the "act that his car is
!i*in! up on hi$%
4. 2hat is the theme or message of the play pre!alent in 7ct >3
Success is so$ethin! one has to work on% It can5t 'e achie*e throu!h
!oo looks an a likea'le personality%
7llo) for !aried ans)ers.
5. %he author+ 7rthur .iller )rote the play during the height of 7merican
capitalism+ )hat do you think is his purpose for )riting =eath of a 'alesman3
It has been said that .iller )ould )ant his readers to see the
@7merican =reamA in =eath of 7 'alesman.
.iller chose the ,ob of salesman carefully for his 7merican =reamer.
7 salesman does not make his5her o)n product+ has not mastered a
particular skill or a body of kno)ledge+ and )orks on the empty substance
of dreams and promises. 7dditionally+ a salesman must sell his5her
personality as much as his5her product. 2illy Loman falsely belie!es he
needs nothing more than to be )ell liked to make it big.

Read more at(
http:++the'estnotes%co$+'ooknotes+&eathIO"I)ISales$anISu$$ary+
&eathIO"I)ISales$anIBiller?H%ht$l
3. Enrichment 0Your .isco!ery Tas,s301hr&30Ird
day3 Tas, =& Justi2y #deas 01< mins&3
1. #efore you let your students read the !ideo transcript of 7merica0s
1resident #arack Obama+ gi!e them background on the conte*t of the
message.
/e ga!e this message of hope and support to the L6#% youth )ho are
struggling )ith being bullied as part of the It 6ets #etter pro,ect on October
C?>?.
2. $onnect this lesson from the pre!ious acti!ity by pointing out that
7merica has changed from the )ay 2illy Loman has seen it in the =eath
of 7 'alesman. You may also ask the class about #iff+ /appy
and #ernard. -rom the three young men in the play )ho do they think is
most likely to be bullied.
3. 1rocess your students0 ans)ers in the "uestions for this acti!ity.
7llo) for !aried ans)ers.
Tas, ?& )alidate #n2oN01-mins&3
7ns)ers to the acti!ity(
1. ' C. - F. ' H. -


1. 'earch this )ebsite for additional information on the critical
e!aluation of arguments in an article(
http(55academic.cuesta.edu5acasupp5as5H?F.htm
2. -or additional acti!ity+ tell your students to go o!er Nelson
.andela0s speech in the pre!ious lesson and identify statements that are
factual or those )ith sub,ecti!e content.
3. Let your students remember that -acts are statements that can be
!erified or pro!en to be true or false. 'ub,ecti!e content is any material
that in!ol!es ,udgment+ feeling+ opinion+ intuition+ or emotion rather
than factual information.
4. Em1hasiMe the need to learn ho: to Kud5e or distin5uish
Det:een 2actual and suDKecti!e statements& This s,ill is im1ortant
in choosin5 leaders to run our country4 ma,in5 :ise decision in
Duyin5 1roducts and many others&


Tas, C& .irect the #ndirect :ay 01- mins&3
1. 1rocess the ans)ers of your students. 6uide them in ans)ering the
"uestions about changing direct to indirect 9reported: speech. 7llo) for
!aried e*planations.
2hat made sentences 7 different from sentences #3
'entences 7 are all e*amples of =irect statements )hile
sentences # are indirect statements or reported statements.
2hat is their similarity3
%hey mean the same thing. 2e often gi!e direct or indirect
statements )hen )e ha!e to gi!e information about )hat people
say or think.
2hen do )e use sentences 73 sentences #3
'entences 7 or =irect statements are used )hen "uoting
someone or )hen saying e*actly )hat someone has said. It is
sometimes called "uoted speech.
/ere )hat a person says appears )ithin "uotation marks 9T...T:
and should be )ord for )ord.
'entences # are indirect statements or reported speech used )hen
reporting about )hat has been said by the speakers. %his doesnKt
use "uotation marks to enclose )hat the person said and it doesnKt
ha!e to be )ord for )ord.
2hen reporting speech the tense usually changes. %his is
because )hen )e use reported speech+ )e are usually talking
about a time in the past 9because ob!iously the person )ho spoke
originally spoke in the past:. %he !erbs therefore usually ha!e to
be in the past too.
2. -or more information on the rules of changing direct to reported
speech+ you may !isit this )ebsite(
http(55))).learnenglish.de5grammar5reportedspeech.html


Tas, O& ;ractice the direct and indirect :ays 0@< mins&3
1. Let your students )ork on this acti!ity )ith a partner. -acilitate the
dra)ing out of the rules on changing direct to indirect statements from the
class. 1ro!ide additional input and e*amples to concretie the rules.
Incorrect
Mia said that she :anted to :atch the 1lay&
Incorrect
LanMe said that he :as 5oin5 :ith you&
$orrect
;auline said she sa: the 1lay :ith "rayden yesterday&
Incorrect
Ni,o said he and his Mommy :ould :atch the 1lay in Resorts
/orld
$orrect
Grandmother as,ed :hat :e could learn 2rom the 1lay

'ome #asic rules in =irect and Indirect 'peech
'ource( http(55))).learnenglish.de5grammar5reportedspeech.html
Tense chan5e
7s a rule )hen you report something someone has said you go back a tense(
9the tense on the left changes to the tense on the right:(
.irect s1eech #ndirect s1eech
;resent sim1le
'he said+ TItKs cold.T
_ 1ast simple
'he said it )as cold.
;resent continuous
'he said+ TIKm teaching English
_ 1ast continuous
'he said she )as teaching
English
online.T online.
;resent 1er2ect sim1le
'he said+ TIK!e been on the )eb
since >QQQ.T
;ast 1er2ect sim1le
_ 'he said she had been on the )eb
since
>QQQ.
;resent 1er2ect continuous
'he said+ TIK!e been teaching
English for se!en years.T
;ast 1er2ect continuous
_ 'he said she had been teaching
English
for se!en years.
;ast sim1le
'he said+ TI taught online
yesterday.T
;ast 1er2ect
_ 'he said she had taught online
yesterday.
;ast continuous
'he said+ TI )as teaching earlier.T a 1ast perfect continuous 'he said she had been
teaching earlier.
;ast 1er2ect ;ast 1er2ect
teaching for fi!e minutes.T been teaching for fi!e minutes.
.odal !erb forms also sometimes change(
.irect s1eech #ndirect s1eech
:ill
'he said+ TIKll teach English online
tomorro).T
_ )ould 'he said she )ould teach
English
online tomorro).
can
'he said+ TI can teach English
online.T
could
_ 'he said she could teach English
online.
must
'he said+ TI must ha!e a computer
to
teach English online.T
had to
_ 'he said she had to ha!e a
computer
to teach English online.
shall
'he said+ T2hat shall )e learn
today3T
should
_ 'he asked )hat )e should learn
today.
may
'he said+ T.ay I open a ne)
bro)ser3T
mi5ht
_ 'he asked if she might open a ne)
bro)ser.
INote ; %here is no change to< could+ )ould+ should+ might and ought to.
.irect s1eech #ndirect s1eech
TI might go to the cinemaT+ he
said.
/e said he might go to the
cinema.
You can use the present tense in reported speech if you )ant to say that
something is still true i.e. my name has al)ays been and )ill al)ays be Lynne
so(;
.irect s1eech #ndirect s1eech
SBy na$e is 0ynneS+ she said.
She sai her na$e was
0ynne%
You can also use the present tense if you are talking about a future e!ent.
.irect s1eech 0eHact Guote3 #ndirect s1eech 0not eHact3
S<e#t weekQs lesson is on reporte speechS+ she said. S
he sai ne#t weekQs lesson will 'e on reporte speech%
2. 6i!e this acti!ity as a home)ork for the class. 7ns)ers to this
acti!ity are pro!ided here.
a. #iff said he ,ust couldn0t focus on his ,ob.
b. 2illy said he )as tired to the death.
c. Linda replied your mind )as o!eracti!e and adding that the
mind )as )hat counts.
d. 2illy said he had )orked a lifetime to pay off a house but no) there
)as nobody to li!e in it.
e. 2illy said+ @Not finding yourself at the age of FH is a disgraceIA
f. Linda said+ people had to mo!e some)here.
g. /appy said+ @E!erybody around him is so false that he is
constantly lo)ering his ideals
h. 2illy said the )orld is an oyster+ but you couldn0t crack it open on a
mattress.A
i. Linda said a small man could be ,ust as e*hausted as a great man.
'. Linda said @%here is more good in 2illy than in many other people.A

4. EH1ansion 0YOUR '#N$L T$%301 hr&30Eth day3
%ask >?. 1lay G Re!ie)I
1. %his a group acti!ity. 7d!ise the groups or the teams to assign
the parts of the play re!ie) to the members of the team.
2. #efore the class )atches the !ideo+ discuss5re!ie) the content of
each part of the play re!ie). Remind the class that they ha!e
done all the three parts already e*cept for the conclusion.
1ro!ide input on the parts. %his )ebsite might be of help(
http(55)riting.)isc.edu5/andbook51layRe!ie).html


3. Inform the class that their play re!ie) )ill be graded using this
rubric from
http(55))).rcampus.com5rubricsho)c.cfm3sp[trueGcode[%BFF
OJ
;lay Re!ie:
EHceeds
tandards
1- 1ts
Grade Le!el
7 1ts
"asic
5
1ts
"elo: "asic
3 1ts
Understandin
5
E*ceeds
'tandards
%he group
has at least
> paragraph
that
summaries
the
important
story
elements of
the play.
%hey gi!e
details and
ha!e
remembere
d characters
names+
setting+
problem
and
ho) it )as
sol!ed.
6rade
Le!el
7t least >
paragraph
that
summarie
s the
important
story
elements of
the play is
gi!en
#asic
1roblem and
solution ha!e
been
identified.
#elo)
#asic
No
e!idence
of the
understandi
n
g of the play
)as gi!en.
O1inion
E*ceeds
'tandards
Not only
clearly
stated
6rade
Le!el
6i!en
opinion of
the play
#asic
Opinion )as
gi!en and
e*plained
)hy.
#elo)
#asic
Opinion )as
gi!en )ith
no
real reason.

opinion+ but used
connotati!e
!ocabulary to
stress the point
)hen
describing
F reasons
)hy they
did or did not
like it.
and ha!e at
least F clear
reasons )hy.
Elements o2
1lay
E*ceeds
'tandards
Elements of
the play
)ere
described in
great detail
and
criti"ued
them
9dialogue+
scenery+
acting+
costumes+
etc.:
6rade
Le!el
$ertain
elements of
the play
)ere
described
and
criti"ued
9dialogue+
scenery+
acting+
costumes+
etc.:
#asic
.entioned
different
elements of a
play9dialogue
+ scenery+
acting+
costumes+
etc.:
#elo)
#asic
-ailed to list
or mention
elements of
a
play
Con!entions
E*ceeds
'tandards
2ork is free
9or almost
free: of
grammar
and spelling
errors.
6rade
Le!el
2ork has
fe)
grammar
and
spelling
errors.
#asic
2ork needs
editing for
many
grammar and
spelling
errors.
#elo)
#asic
2ork has
many errors
in grammar
and spelling
and it
interferes
)ith
meaning.

/ere are some tips for )riting play re!ie)s from
http(55)riting.)isc.edu5/andbook51layRe!ie).html
2riting the Introduction
%he introduction should include the follo)ing(
? %he title of the play+ the name of the play)right+ and any pertinent
historical information regarding them 9other similar )orks from this
period3 by this )riter3:.
? %he name of the director+ the place and date of the production you
attended+ and the name of the production company 9again+ do you kno) of
any pre!ious )ork by this company3 this director3:.
? %he thesis of your re!ie)+ )hich should include 9possibly in more than a
single statement: the follo)ing(
7 general impression of the relati!e success or failure of the
production+ based on )hat you actually sa) and on your initial
impression of ho) the play should ha!e been performed.
9Note that e!en if the production did not e*actly coincide )ith your o)n
conception of the play+ you should not feel obliged to condemn the
performance outright. #e open;minded and )illing to )eigh pros and
cons.:


2riting the 'tatement and 'ummary
? Include a brief thematic summary 9but not a plot summary: of the play+ and
support that summary )ith concrete e!idence from the te*t.
? You can include this summary in the introduction
2riting the #ody of the 1aper( %he Re!ie)
? Remember that in the body of the paper you are obliged to deal
specifically )ith each element of the production that you mentioned in
the introduction and thesis.
? In order to gi!e your re!ie) a tight internal logic and cohesi!eness+ you
should also discuss these elements in the order that you outlined in the
introduction. 'uch points of discussion might include the non;technical 9acting+
directing: and5or the technical 9lighting+ scenery+ costumes: aspects of the
production.
? .escriDe+ #nter1ret4 $nalyMe4
E!aluateA %his part of the paper re"uires the most thought and
organiation and conse"uently recei!es
the most attention from your reader. 7fter you ha!e finished describing
important elements of the production+ proceed to e!aluate them. In the
e!aluation+ you are gi!en the opportunity to attack as )ell as commend the
performance< if the production fails to ans)er "uestions that you feel need
ans)ers+ then say so. If the "uestion or problems are relati!ely
minor+ ignore them. =onKt "uibble at the e*pense of missing the more
important concerns.
2riting the 'ummary and $onclusion
? Your conclusion should not merely recapitulate your thesis in a
mechanical )ay.
Rather+ you should try to sho) )hy your response to the play is !alid and
significant+ based on )hat you ha!e described in the body of the paper.
=o not add any significant ne) material+ but donKt be afraid to lea!e your
reader )ith something to think about.
http(55)riting.)isc.edu5/andbook51layRe!ie).htm
4. 2atch the !ideo of =eath of 7 'alesman+ 7ct > 9Longman /igh
'chool =rama $lub: at
))).youtube.com5)atch3![*=gpe&F=JVE


5. Remind your students that they may use the sample play re!ie)
found in the L. discussed in Lesson B.


MY TRE$URE
1. %his acti!ity may be part of a home)ork.
2. $heck for your students0 learning or difficulties by letting them do
the F;C;> chart. -acilitate the acti!ity. %his is an indi!idual acti!ity. You may
allo) for a !olunteer to share their )ork if there is still time. %his may also
be gi!en to the students as part of their home)ork and must be
)ritten in their Journal of Learning.
Teachers Guide
Module E
Lesson <
______________________________________________________________
Recti02in3 OneEs Mistakes


B. Resources
1. .aterials
a. =o)nloaded !ideo clips for !ie)ing and listening te*t
b. 1ictures of materialism symbols e.g. lu*ury houses+ money+ etc.
c. 1ictures5 symbols of pork barrel
2. E"uipment
a. lap top
b. =L1
c. O/1
C. 7cti!ities


YOUR JOURNEY
$hange is the only occurrence that remains constant in the )orld. %his change
being ine!itable brings forth immeasurable surprises that someho) and
sometimes lead to mistakes. $onse"uently+ you as a teacher play a !ital role in
rectifying these )orldly sins through the pro!ision of right a!enue for learning and
de!elopment of skills of the youth today.
$oncepts and acti!ities )hich are pro!ided in the learners0 modules for this )eek
should be discussed+ e*ecuted+ and conducted for your students to become
asserti!e by taking a stand pertaining to a critical issue that affects their decision
as a learner and as an indi!idual citien. &alues )hich fore!er linger in their midst
should be re!ealed and emphasied to enhance their thinking capacity and
emotional stability.


Your Goals
%o help your students enhance their kno)ledge and de!elop their skills+ you
must let them(
1. take a stand on critical issues brought up in the material !ie)ed.
2. ,udge the rele!ance and truthfulness of the ideas listened to.
3. ,udge the rele!ance and )orth of ideas+ soundness of author0s reasoning+
and
the effecti!eness of the presentation.
4. use the appropriate pitch+ stress+ ,uncture+ and intonation.
5. analye literature as a means of understanding unchanging !alues in
a changing )orld.
6. determine tone+ mood+ techni"ue+ and purpose of the author.
7. change direct to indirect speech and !ice E !ersa.
8. familiarie technical !ocabulary for drama and theater 9like stage
directions:
9. compose a play re!ie). 9make a play bill:

YOUR #N#T#$L T$%
'%7N=IN6 U1 -OR 6OO= 9>? minutes: ; day>
'ee %ask > @Your Initial %asksA
a. 'ho) the students the photos and then let them ans)er the "uestions
pertaining to the ads.
b. 7sk !olunteers to share their )ork to the class.

REL7%IN6 %/E %RU%/ 9>? minutes:
'ee %ask C @Your Initial %asksA
a. 1lay a recorded ne)s article and then+ tell the learners to take note of the
important details.
b. Instruct them to fill E out the table of the facts mentioned in the te*t.
c. 1rocess the ans)ers
Note( 1lease do)nload !ideo clip article about %he /igh 1rice of .aterialism
from http(55))).youtube.com5)atch3![o6abFDp8sc)Gfeature[youtube for
the students to !ie).
Or
Read the follo)ing te*t for the students to listen to.


Con!ersion4 rene:al

.anila 7rchbishop Luis 7ntonio $ardinal %agle challenged go!ernment
leaders in!ol!ed in the anomalies to undergo con!ersion and rene)al.
@%here is corruption e!ery)here. If pro!en+ there should be con!ersion from
those )ho committed it+A %agle said o!er Radio &eritas.

%he cardinal earlier said that the pork barrel scam )as a form of in,ustice+
saying that @instead of gi!ing )hat is due to others and to the country+
resources are being denied from them.A
@2e do not only lack lo!e for others but )e also lack a sense of ,ustice+A he
said during $aritas .anila0s 6enerosity $onference on 'unday.

%agle called on -ilipinos to turn their back from greed by @letting the !alues of
fairness and generosity reign in their li!es.A

/e urged the faithful to be sensiti!e to the needs of the less fortunate.
=I66IN6 =E%7IL' 9'6=: ;H? minutes
'ee %ask F @Your Initial %asksA
a. =irect the students to form small groups to come up )ith a panel of
discussant to tackle the issues in task C @Relating the %ruthA.
b. Use the data that you gathered from this acti!ity in digging for the
rele!ance and truthfulness of the ideas presented.
c. =iscuss the guidelines for conducting a panel discussion. %his )ill
prepare the class in their future play production.
d. 7fter the discussion+ assign each group a task. %he follo)ing are
the suggested group tasks(
6roup >and C; panel discussion
6roup F and H; obser!ers
6roup B; criti"ues of the obser!ers
e. Inform the class regarding the rubrics to be used in e!aluating
the students0 outputs for them to be guided in doing the acti!ity. $RI%IXUIN6
ONE0' '%YLE 9'6=:; >? minutes day C
'ee %ask H @Your Initial %asksA
a. %ell the class to summarie their obser!ation by taking do)n of the
strong and )eak points of the group performers before the start of
the panel discussion.
b. Let them )rite their obser!ations in the note pad prepared for this
acti!ity.
c. 1rocess the obser!ation of each group.
d. 6i!e feedbacks for impro!ement and for the scaffolding of the skills
essential in the future tasks.


YOUR TE(T
%2I'%IN6 %/E .E7NIN6 9=yads: >? minutes
'ee task BAYour %e*tA
a. 7llo) the students to interpret the meaning of e*pressions taken
from the te*t.
b. $all !olunteer students to share their outputs.
c. 1rocess the ans)ers.


1RE17RIN6 %O RE7=
'ee task O @Your %e*tA
a. 7llo) the students to brainstorm on the ans)ers to the
preliminary
"uestions.
b. Remind them that brainstorming is good to be able to solicit
ideas.


EV1LORIN6 %/E %EV%; >? minutes
'ee task JAYour %e*tA
a. Instruct the students to read the 7ct II of the @=eath of a
'alesmanA by 7rthur .iller.
b. Remind them to take note of the details of the play and the
elements such as the tone+ mood+ and the author0s techni"ue in
)riting.


YOUR .#CO)ERY T$%


-IR.IN6 ONE0' 7$%' 9>? minutes:
'ee task D @Your =isco!ery %asksA
a. /a!e the students assess )hether the character0s action is
,ust or un,ust.
b. 1rocess the ans)ers by asking follo) Eup "uestions.
c. Use the follo)ing "uestions to lead the students for better
understanding of the te*t read.
6uide Xuestions(
1. 2hy do you think /o)ard fired 2illy3
2. 2hat could be the reasons of /o)ard0s refusal to gi!e
2illy a ,ob5position in their company in Ne) York3
3. =id $harley0s generosity help 2illy o!ercome his
problems3
4. 2hat do you think+ #iff and /appy should ha!e done
)hen 2illy broke off in the restaurant3
5. 2hat gentle )ay of telling 2illy that suicide is not the
solution to a problem can you suggest3
6. 2ould you be happy if you lie3 /o) )ill you deal )ith the
guilty feelings ,ust because you lied )ith your lo!ed
ones3
7. 2hat glory )ill bring you if you fulfill your parents dream3
E*plain.
8. 2hat is the importance of assuring your lo!ed one or
family of your support and lo!e3
9. 2hat is the importance of earning a degree or of
becoming an educated person3 =oes education affect your
future3 /o)3 %o )hat e*tent3
10. =o you belie!e in the saying @%here is more success and
happiness in humility3 E*plain


=E%ER.ININ6 %/E %ONE+ .OO= 7N= %/E 7U%/OR0'
%E$/NIXUE 9C?minutes:


'ee task Q @Your =isco!ery %asksA 9=yads:
a. =iscuss the difference bet)een the tone and mood.
b. Let the learners state the tone and mood by letting them
)rite the ans)ers in the callout bo*.
c. 1rocess the ans)ers.
d. 7fter processing the ans)ers+ remind them about the
different literary techni"ues used by the author in )riting.
e. %ell them to identify the pre!ailing literary techni"ue used by
the author in the te*t read.
f. /a!e them share their ans)ers )ith a partner.
g. $all some !olunteers to share the output to the entire class.
h. 6i!e feedbacks


RE'%YLIN6 %/E 2RI%E E U1 9F? minutes: ; day F
'ee task >? @Your =isco!ery %asksA
a. =iscuss the mechanics of changing direct to indirect
discourse. 9F? minutes:


=irect5Indirect 'peech
2e may report the )ords of a speaker in t)o )ays.
1. =irect 'peech
2e may "uote the actual )ords of the speaker. %his method is called =irect
'peech.
2. Indirect 'peech
2e may report )hat he said )ithout "uoting his e*act )ords. %his method is
called Indirect 'peech or Reported 'peech.
EHam1leA
=irect( $linton said+ @Iam !ery busy no).A
Indirect( $linton said that he )as !ery busy then.
=irect ( /e said+ @ my mother is )riting letter.A
Indirect( /e said that his mother )as )riting letter.
/o) to change =irect to Indirect 'peech3
It )ill be noticed that in =irect 'peech+ )e use in!erted commas to mark off the
e*act )ords of the speaker. In Indirect 'peech )e do not use the in!erted
commas.
It )ill be further noticed that in changing the abo!e =irect 'peech into Indirect
speech+ certain changes ha!e been made
%hus(
i. 2e ha!e used the con,unction Rthat0 before the Indirect 'tatement. ii.
%he pronoun @IA is changed to @/EA. 9%he 1ronoun is changed in 1erson: iii.
%he !erb @amA is changed to @)asA.
i!. %he ad!erb @no)A is changed to @thenA.
Rules 2or chan5in5 .irect into #ndirect 1eechA
A. 2hen the reporting or principal !erb is in the 1ast %ense+ all the
1resent %enses in the =irect 'peech are changed into 1ast %ense.
a. 7 simple present tense becomes simple past tense.
EHam1leA
=irect ( /e said+ @Iam un)ell.A
Indirect( /e said that he )as un)ell.
b. 7 present continuous tense becomes a past continuous.
B. c. 7 present perfect becomes a past perfect(
7re you clear about the con!ersion of =irect to Indirect 'peech3
EHam1leA
=irect( /e said+ @I ha!e passed the e*amination.A
Indirect( he said that he had passed the e*amination
d. 7s a rule the simple past tense in the =irect
'peech becomes the past perfect tense in Indirect
'peech.
EHam1leA
=irect( /e said+ @/is horse died in the night.A
Indirect( he said that his horse had died in the . night.
NO%E(
%he shall of the future is changed into should.
%he )ill of the future is changed into )ould.
%he can and may of the future are changed into could and might respecti!ely.
7re you clear about the con!ersion of =irect to Indirect 'peech3
http(55))).english;for;
students.com5=irecttoIndirect'peech.htmlUchitika4close4button



b. 7llo) them to change direct and indirect speech and !ice E
!ersa.
9F? minutes:
c. 1rocess the ans)ers
=I&ER'I-YIN6 %/E LINE'
'ee task >> @Your =isco!eryA

a. =i!ide the class into small groups+ then from each group+
dra) at least t)o names of the members to recite one of the lines taken from task
Qa.
b. =irect the lucky members the particular emotion )hich they should
con!ey.
c. %ell them to obser!e appropriate pitch+ stress+ ,uncture+ and
intonation as they recite the lines.


$O.1RE/EN=IN6 %/E %EV%
'ee task >C @Your =isco!ery %askA
a. Instruct the students to ans)er the "uestions pertaining to the selection
read.
b. 1rocess the ans)ers for clarity.
=E%ER.ININ6 %/E $/7R7$%ER'0 =E'IRE.
'ee task >F @Your =isco!ery %askA
a. Remind the students that not all desires should be dealt )ith+ and then
direct them to identify the kind of desire )hich the characters from @=eath of a
'alesmanA tried to pursue using the pointers enumerated in the te*t.
b. Let them dra) a symbol or icon for each character0s desire at the left side+
then opposite the name allo) them to )rite the desire and its type.
c. /a!e them use the graphic organier indicated belo). JU=6IN6
ONE0' =E'IRE
'ee task >H @Your =isco!ery %askA
a. %ell the students to decide indi!idually )hether the desire they
enumerated in task >F should be pushed through or not by )riting the draft in their
notebook.
b. 7fter finishing their draft+ ask them to go to their group members to
brainstorm on the best desire as )ell as the !alues that )ill be de!eloped
if this )ill be realied.
#EIN6 7$XU7IN%E= 2I%/ %/E 2ORL= O- 1L7Y
'ee task >B @Your =isco!ery %asksA
a. Let the students familiarie the play ,argons through the matching
type acti!ity.
b. %o make the acti!ity more e*citing and interesting+ di!ide the class into
small groups.
c. 7ssign each member of the group to ans)er an item in a form of a board
game.
d. $heck the ans)er e!ery after each item. Record the score of each group
on the board for them to be a)are of their status.
d. Repeat the process until all the items are ans)ered.
e. Recognie the )inners.


YOUR '#N$L TE(T 9day H:
1lay #ill .aking
'ee task >O @Your -inal %askA
a. #efore letting the students create a playbill+ discuss
comprehensi!ely the mechanics in making it. Refer to the
guidelines belo).
b. 7fter the discussion+ sho) them the sample play bill )hich is
also found in the module.
2hat is a 1laybill3
Is a poster or piece of paper that ad!ertises a play.
1rocedure in .aking a 1laybill
1. Gather the in2ormation. 2ithout the information+ you only ha!e bland
design pages. %his information includes(
o 2ho plays )hat character
o 2ho needs to be thanked
o 2ho the play is directed by
o 2ho )rote the play
o 9If it applies: 2ho )rote the music
o 9If it applies: 2ho directed the orchestra
o 2hen and )here the performances are
o 2ho is presenting 9performing: the play
2. "rainstorm. 7ll plays ha!e themes. 2hether itKs co)boys+ detecti!es+
hippies+ or stars+ itKll be the base of the designing process.
3. Choose the siMe. -or most off;#road)ay plays+ a simple playbill can
be designed. %his is usually H pages of design fitted onto > piece of
paper. %he front and back co!ers on one side+ )hich )ill be the outside of
the playbill+ and the thank youKs and cast page on the other side+ )hich )ill
be the inside of the playbill. %his is usually the best option if you ha!e a lo)
budget. If you ha!e a bigger budget and ha!e a lot of things to co!er+ you
can add more pages as you see fit. 92e )ill co!er the simpler design for
no).:
4. "e5in small& %he beginning is sometimes the easiest if you ha!e a lot
of ideas+ but you )ant to start out )ith the simplest and easiest of
pages to get you into the mood. %his page is the Back Co*er + or the
$uto5ra1hs ;a5e.
o Open up your graphics design program 9e*( 6I.1+ 1hotoshop+
1aintshop+ etc.: and start a ne) page )ith the dimensions(
O>C9)idth: * JQC9height:. %his is the standard sie of printing paper
con!erted into pi*els. #e sure that the background is )hite.
o You )ant to use a simple+ small+ space;sa!ing design to put
along the bottom of the page. Open up a ne) layer+ and set it to
KtransparentK. %his sa!es you the hassle if you need to update
anything bet)een no) and the performance.
o $hoose your design. 7ny colour can be used+ but if itKs a !ery
bold design+ you might )ant to set it to J?N opacity. %his makes
it less of an eye;sore and more !ie)er;friendly.
o %he te*t. You )ant to use a fancier font than 7rial+ but you )ant
it to remain subtle and readable. 'ee tips for a free te*t
do)nload )ebsite 9completely safe:. Your program should
automatically bring up a ne) layer for the te*t+ but if it doesnKt create
a ne) layer before adding the te*t. %he te*t should be a large sie+
but be sure to keep it at the top of the page and space;sa!ing. %he
autographs page is made so that audience members can get the
cast to sign it for them. %hat means you need a lot of room. If need
be+ increase the space bet)een letters until the )ord T7utographsT
fully co!ers the span of the top )ithout you ha!ing the increase the
sie. 9#y increasing the spacing bet)een letters+ you can make the
)ord gro) )idth; )ise )ithout gro)ing length;)ise. 7 !ery useful
feature.:
o If you )ant+ you can add in smaller )ords at the bottom
T=esigned by( Your nameT+ but some designers+ choose not to
for the humble aspect.
o 'a!e the image in the format of your program. -or e*ample+
6I.1 C.?Ks format is( .*cf. Be sure to sa*e it in your pro!ra$Qs
"or$at so that you can eit it later i" neee.
o 'a!e the image again+ this time in your desired format 9.,pg+ .gif+
.png+ etc.:.
o YouKre done the first pageI
5. Cast ;a5e& %his is by far the most complicated page. It seems easy
enough at first+ sure+ but it is deceitful. You forget names+ characters+
misspell names. 'ome people like their name spelled a certain )ay+ and
sometimes people drop out. %he e*tras are constantly changing all )hile
youKre trying to make more room on the pageI %read carefully+ my friend+
for you tread on a minefield.
o 6et the list of names. You can ask the director+ co;director+ or
anyone in charge for this. ItKd be )isest to ask if they ha!e a list
of )ho plays )ho. #e sure to confirm this list )ith multiple
persons. 9It ends up )rong most of the time.:
o Open up your graphics program. $reate a ne) image )ith the
dimensions( O>C * JQC. #e sure that the background is )hite.
$reate a ne) transparent layer.
o 'tart )ith the background design. It doesnKt ha!e to be !ery
flashy+ or e!en there if you )ish+ because the cast page is all about
the cast and that pretty much co!ers the entire page. /o)e!er+ if
you do choose to make a background+ lo)er the opacity as you see
fit so that it doesnKt out flash the )ords in front of it. 7s I am doing a
detecti!e play )ith a smaller cast 9>D people:+ I made it look as
if the cast page )as part of a ne)spaper and at the bottom I
had a bit of the ne)spaper Tripped offT to gi!e it an authentic feel.
2hen you ha!e a smaller cast+ you usually ha!e a space at the
bottom. You can fill this )ith a design.
o %he title. 7t the top of the page+ o!er to the left side+ add the
te*t. %his can be as simple and straight for)ard as T%he $astT
or+ if youKre !ery creati!e and the opportunity arises+ ad,ust it to the
theme of the play. E*amples( %he 'uspects 9detecti!e:+ %he 6roo!y
6ang 9hippies:+ %he Riders 9co)boys:+ %he 'tars 9/olly)ood:.
%his te*t can be the same sie and font as that of the autographs
and thank you titles+ as this gi!es it a nice
consistency+ but it doesnKt ha!e to be. 9 NOTEA You )ill most
likely not be playing )ith the letter spacing+ as )e )ant this te*t to
reach a little more than half )ay across the page. If it doesnKt
)ith the spacing at normal+ ad,ust it. &o not let the te#t reach all
the way across the pa!e= It is !ery important+ as if you do this+
itKll look !ery a)k)ard.:
o 'tart another te*t layer underneath the title. It usually starts at
about half )ay do)n the title te*t+ or at about the "uarter )ay point
on the page+ but this can be ad,usted to the te*t length and )hat
you find most appealing. %his te*t )ill be smaller than the title te*t+
and perhaps a lighter !ersion of the title colour. It can
be a different font if you )ant. It )ill usually read T9in order of
appearance:T+ T9in order of speaking:T+ or T9in alphabetical
order:T+ but youKll ad,ust it to the order. 'ee tips for additional
information about the cast pageKs te*t.
o No) it is time to add the cast. On the left side of the page+ a
little do)n from the bottom of the te*t at the top+ begin a te*t layer.
2rite do)n all the names of the characters in the play+ starting a
ne) line as you finish each. No)+ if youKll be adding the ...Ks leading
from the character name to the actorKs name+ youKll only be adding
one te*t layer. #e sure to balance out the te*t so that all the names
line up on either end 9this can be done by adding an e*tra K.K or
taking a)ay an e*tra K.K: but if it ,ust doesnKt line up e*actly+ s)itch it
so that it aligns not left but center.
o If you are not doing the ...Ks leading to each name+ you )ill ha!e
to start a ne) layer after you finish typing the characters. %his layer
has to start directly across from )here you started the last layer. #e
sure to start it near the middle so that you ha!e room to type longer
names. Edit it so that it aligns not left but right. %hen type out the
names of the actors )ho play the character directly across from
their name.
o $heck this o!er. Read it through to check for errors in spelling+
and then read it again+ comparing it )ord for )ord against the
list you ac"uired. $heck again that all the characters are there+ and
check another time that all the cast is there. $ompare the cast page
you ha!e to the cast page in the script+ and then compare the cast
page in the script to the characters on your image. %his seems
e*cessi!e+ but it must be done. I checked my cast page o!er again
and again+ and I thought it )as good. %urns out I completely forgot a
character.
o 'a!e this page )ith the e*tension of your program 9-or
e*ample+ 6I.1 is( .*cf:.
o 'a!e this page again )ith the e*tension you )ish to use 9.,pg+
.gif+ .png+ etc.:.
o 1rint out the cast page and sho) it to a fe) people in charge.
7fter this+ get the entire cast to check it o!er. %he cast )ill ha!e
the best eye+ as they are the ones on the page and theyKll notice if
their name or character is misspelled or missing.
o If it all passes appro!al+ you are done the cast pageI
6. Than, YouVs. You are half )ay finished designing your playbill. No)
itKs time to complete the inside by )orking on the %hank YouKs.
o -irst find out )ho you ha!e to thank. Usually+ you thank the
actors+ choreographers+ technical cre)+ the director and co;
director+ the place )hich you are performing in+ the place you
practiced in 9)hich sometimes is the same place you perform:+ and+
finally+ the audience. .ost likely your thank yous )ill be slightly
different. You ha!e to thank the actors and 9if it applies: the people
)ho dro!e them. You must thank people )ho handled the
technical aspects and those )ho designed the set. %he director+ of
course+ and anyone else )ho )orked )ith them 9$o;director+ stage
director+ etc.:. %he place you practiced at and performed+ as )ell as
)here you got your costumes. If it applies+ )ho choreographed the
play and )ho )rote the music. -inally+ your audience+ because
really+ )hat is a play )ithout the audience3
o Open your graphics program+ and create a ne) image )ith the
dimensions( O>C * JQC. .ake the background )hite+ then create
a ne) transparent layer.
o .ake the te*t layer. If you )ant consistency+ youKll ha!e the
same font and sie as you had on the cast and autographs page+
but it doesnKt ha!e to be this )ay if you donKt )ant it to be. 'tart the
layer at the top of the page. 2hat you type is up to you+ but make it
similar to T%hank youT+ T2eKd like to thank..T+ or T7 thank you to..T.
7d,ust the letter spacing until it reaches across the span of the
page.
o 7dd the %hank YouKs. You should keep a simple+ readable te*t
at a reasonable sie for this. #e sure that if your program does
not start a ne) layer )hen you add te*t+ that you add a ne) layer
before adding more te*t.
o $reate a ne) transparent layer. %here )ill most likely be a
space underneath the thank youKs. If this is the case+ youKre step
)ill be easy. $reate the design underneath the te*t. Lo)er
opacity to J?N so that it is !ie)er;friendly.
o /o)e!er+ if there isnKt a space underneath+ you ha!e to go back
to the layer you first added in the beginning. 9No+ it )asnKt a mistake
formed by the habit of typing Kadd ne) transparent layerK. %here
)as a point to it.: 6etting back to that layer might !ary from program
to program+ but trusting that you kno) your program )ell+ go back
to that layer. If your program is like 6I.1+ you )ill go to the
bottom layer then go up a layer. You can design from here )ithout
co!ering the te*t you ha!e ,ust typed.
o $reate your design. It should be related to the theme of the
play. $lo)ns do not belong on a playbill relating to pirates.
Lo)er the opacity to your taste. Remember+ you )ant the te*t to
pop out from the design.
o 'a!e this page )ith the e*tension of your program 9-or
e*ample+ 6I.1 is( .*cf:.
o 'a!e this page again )ith the e*tension you )ish to use 9.,pg+
.gif+ .png+ etc.:.
o YouKre finished the thank;you pageI
7. The 'ront Co!er. 1ossibly the hardest part in the designing process is
the front co!er. %he $ast 1age is complicated+ but can be con"uered )ith
lots of re!ie) and checking. %he -ront $o!er re"uires creati!ity+ and itKs
likely to stump you.
o $onsider your theme again. 2hat can relate to this theme3 -or
e*ample+ I ha!e a detecti!e theme. 2hat related to it3 I might )rite
cities+ cases+ cops+ 1olaroid0s+ fedoras+ ne)spapers. =o you think I
might )rite co)s3 7bsolutely not. %he -ront $o!er has to reflect the
play+ and a co) )ill not say Kdetecti!eK to the audience.
o Open your graphics program. $reate a ne) image )ith the
dimensions( O>C * JQC. .ake the background )hite and create
a ne) transparent layer.
o =esign. 'o long as you stick to the theme+ you can create
anything on the front co!er. =onKt hold back. #old and beautiful are
the designs of the co!er. .ake it so eye;catching itKs breath; takingI
You really ha!e to rely on your creati!ity here. I cannot teach you
ho) to do this. If needed+ get the opinion of a friend+ preferably
someone artistic. Just remember to lea!e some )hite space for the
information.
o $reate a ne) te*t layer. ItKs time for the title te*t. %his can go
any)here on the front co!er+ so long as it stands out+ as unlike
the titles of the pre!ious pages+ it doesnKt ha!e to al)ays be at the
top. .ake sure the te*t is big+ bold+ and eye;catching. ItKs the title of
the playI It has to be the most eye;catching )ords on the playbill.
o $reate another ne) te*t layer. 7dd the other basic information.
%his should be a plainer+ simpler font+ )hich )ill be smaller than
the title. Information such as T=irected by bT+ T2ritten by bT+ and
T1erformed by bT )ill go here.
o You might ha!e to put the performance information on here as
)ell. 'uch things like the performance dates+ times+ and )here
it is at. You can probably discuss this )ith someone in charge if you
feel itKd be best if this )asnKt on it. 'eeing as it is a playbill+ it
shouldnKt be necessary.
o 'a!e this page )ith the e*tension of your program 9-or
e*ample+ 6I.1 is( .*cf:.
o
'a!e
this
page
again
)ith
the
e*tension you )ish to use 9.,pg+
.gif+ .png+ etc.:.
o YouKre done the -ront $o!erI
o Good KoD I You are done your playbill. Email the designs to
)hoe!er needs them 92hoe!erKs checking them+ printing them+
etc.:.
8. #2 you are 1rintin5 them yoursel24 De sure the order is as 2ollo:s(
Outside ; 7utographs page on the left+ -ront $o!er on the right )hen
looking directly at it. Inside ; %hank YouKs on the left+ $ast page on the right
)hen looking directly at it. It looks best if you print it in -ull #leed. %ake
note that normal printer paper )onKt usually handle the playbill+ as it )ill
sho) through the other side. -old it in half to complete the playbill.
9. Good :or, and hereVs ho1in5 itVs an amaMin5 1er2ormanceI
am1le ;layDill(
















http(55))).)ikiho).com5=esign;a;1laybill


.y %reasure 9>? minutes:


a. Emphasie the !alues of faithfulness+ patience+ respect+ and
lo!e )hich the particular characters sho)ed in the te*t. %ake note that
it0s a human nature to commit mistakes and to fall short in fulfilling our
duties and responsibilities. On the other hand+ the offender has the
obligation to e*press remorse from the one being offended by asking
for forgi!eness.
b. .oti!ate the students to e*press their respect and lo!e to their
parents in spite of their short comings.
c. Let them dra) a symbol or cut and paste photos.
d. %o emphasie these !alues ha!e them )rite their thoughts and
plans to !isualie them.
Teachers Guide
Module E
Lesson =
______________________________________________________________
Takin3 a Stand


B. Resources
1. .aterials
a. !ideo clip of an 7merican &alue 'ystem or Listening %e*t
b. sample poster blurbs
c. photos of a funeral+ a happy gathering+ a happy family
2. E"uipment
a. Lap top
b. =L1
c. O/1
C. 7cti!ities


YOUR JOURNEY
'imultaneous )ith the sophistication of technology is the change in
beha!ior+ preferences+ and moral standard due to the influence of the outside
forces. %he accessibility to the global fashion poses danger to our youth
because not all the time the elders are around to guide them in their pursuits. 7s
a C>st century teacher+ your responsibility is to e*tend guidance and
assistance to the learners.
In this lesson+ you ha!e to emphasie that e*pressing an opinion about an issue
is !ery difficult for there are times that one0s ideas are against a trend or culture.
/o)e!er+ due to its necessity+ he5she is forced to push through it because of
the belief that his5her position has to do )ith the )elfare of the ma,ority. One
has to take a stand no matter ho) unpopular it is because doing so brings
an incomparable change. &aried tasks are pro!ided to prepare him5her in
embracing inno!ations through a more comple* tasks. /is peers as )ell as
the society )ill influence him5her to become kno)ledgeable and skillful in the
)orld of stage play production for a better appreciation of a realistic
literary arts and craftsmanship. 7s a result+ one )ill be trained to make
decisions and take a stand about something that has to do )ith his5her future
performances.
Your Goals
-or the enhancement of the kno)ledge and honing of one0s skills+ the follo)ing
are to be realied.
1. take a stand on critical issues brought up in the material !ie)ed.
2. ,udge the !alidity of the e!idence listened to.
3. ,udge the rele!ance and )orth of ideas+ soundness of
author0s reasoning+ and the effecti!eness of the presentation.
4. analye literature as a means of understanding !alues in a
changing )orld.
5. dra) similarities and differences of the featured selections in
relation to the theme.
6. get familiar )ith the technical !ocabulary for drama and
theater
9like stage directions:
7. use )ords to e*press e!aluation.
8. compose a play re!ie). 9make a poster blurb:
9. use appropriate multi E media resources appropriately+
effecti!ely+ and efficiently.

YOUR #N#T#$L T$%
7''E''IN6 %/E %R7I%0' &7LUE 'ee
%ask>AYour Initial %asksA


Instruct the students to )atch the !ideo clip pertaining to a !alue
system and then+ let them fill E out the grid )ith details e*tracted from the
material !ie)ed. =o)nload the material from P
http(55))).youtube.com5)atch3![d*dp"lE2/4k
or
Read the te*t aloud for the students to listen to.
Listening %e*t(
-orum criticies European;7merican !alue system
#y .ichelle .c$ollum
7riona =aily 2ildcat
U&& li2estyle decimatin5 the en!ironment4 $merican #ndian s1ea,er
says
/e started )ith a prayer.
T6randfathers+ great spirits+T said .ala 'potted Eagle 1ope. T/elp us to see
each otherKs hearts+ to be able to open them up+ to stop )hat keeps us from
being one people.T


%he prayer asked 1opeKs 7merican Indian ancestors to help all nations to unify
and heal the earth from the 2estern !alue system that he said is killing it.
/e argued that 7merican Indian !alues are ultimately better for T.other
EarthT than those imposed on the land by European;7mericans.
#ecause of 2estern culture+ to*ic pollution is ruining the planet+ the 2estern
family system is !ery unstable and indi!idualsK relationships )ith the earth is non;
e*istent+ 1ope said.
T7t one time )e all had one teacher ; .other Earth. %he earth taught us to li!e in
harmony and only take )hat )as gi!en. #ut )hen you take all the time+ you begin
to take things for granted+T 1ope said.
1ope+ an elder of the 2estern 'hoshine and $herokee tribes+ came from Oregon
yesterday to discuss such 2estern issues as anti;)haling la)s and genetically
altered foods.
7nti;)haling la)s+ 1ope e*plained+ ha!e good intentions in trying to sa!e the
en!ironment and its )ildlife+ but they are decimating communities ; like the
.akah+ a tribe li!ing on the Olympic 1eninsula in 2ashington+ )hich depends on
)hale for food.
T9%he acti!ists: ne!er took into account )hat it )ould do to the nati!e !illage.
%hey had no food+ nothing+T 1ope said. T'ome of the )omen had to resort to
prostitution.T
'uch culture clashes are the reason the department of 7fricana 'tudies and the
Nati!e 7merican 7cti!ities #oard sponsored the talk.
%hey )anted to make students are a)are of the !alue systems associated )ith
those )hom 2estern culture defines as minorities.
T%here is fundamentally a common thread that runs through the e*periences and
cultures and heritage of most indigenous peoples around the )orld. %his includes
the 7frican people too+T said Julian 8unnie+ acting director of 7fricana
studies.
T2e are not the minority in the )orld< )e are actually part of the )orldKs ma,ority.
It is this Euro;centric !ie) that is the minority !ie)+ )hich tends to
impose its minority !ie)s.T
8unnie said the capitalistic Euro;centric society has created stigmatied races like
7frican 7mericans and 7merican Indians. 1opeKs talk ga!e the audience+
consisting of F? people+ an altruistic alternati!e to that )ay of life by
proposing a unified earth )here Euro;centrism and the greed of corporations
)ould end.
1ope criticied the .onsanto $orp.+ )hich creates sterile seeds altered to include
pesticides in their genes. %he corporation+ 1ope said+ )as killing the en!ironment
and greedily controlling farmers )ho had to buy the companyKs seeds e!ery year.
%he ma,ority of a flock of >?+??? monarch butterflies )ere killed )hile
migrating across the continent )hen they happened to feed on genetically altered
pollen from #iotech corn+ 1ope said.
#iotech corn is one of the corporationKs most contro!ersial products+ but the
company claims their products are not only safe+ but also better for the
en!ironment because they promote the "uality of human life around the
)orld.
Research from $ornell Uni!ersity+ ho)e!er+ states that HH percent of monarch
lar!a eating #iotech pollen;coated lea!es died after four days. %he .onsanto
$orp. dismisses the $ornell Uni!ersity research as in!alid.
TItKs funny ho) our !alues can misguide us in )hat )e do+T said 7ndrea 2illiams+
a creati!e )riting and English senior. TI canKt belie!e those people out there are
making seeds so they can ha!e control o!er all the po)er and all the money and
all the food. ItKs ridiculous that people go so far.T
2hile he may ha!e started the discussion )ith a prayer+ 1ope ended it )ith a
)arning.
TIf 92estern people: had the right !alues+ they )ould not ha!e started this+T 1ope
said. T.other Earth )ill only take so much.T
http(55)c.ariona.edu5papers5QH5>HB5?>4B4m.html


a. =irect the learners in making a stand as to the right disposition in order
to attain a better change.
b. 1rocess the abo!e acti!ity+ and then allo) them to proceed to the ne*t
task by di!iding them first into a small group.
c. %ell them to brainstorm on the !alid action+ acceptable rites5traits+ and
!alid reasoning to be adapted by the group in order to establish a happy and
progressi!e family and community.
$/7R7=IN6 7 2OR=
'ee task CAYour Initial %asksA
a. =i!ide the class into small groups.
b. Instruct the students to choose a leader.
c. 1rior to this acti!ity prepare the )ords 9e.g. respect+ serenity+ faithfulness+
fame+ fortune+ and support: )hich should be used for the groups0 charade.
d. 2rite the suggested )ords on strips of paper and roll them. 1ut them in a
bo* for the dra) lots.
e. /a!e each leader of the group pick one for them to prepare for the group
charade.
d. 7llo) all the groups to brainstorm the necessary actions )hich they ha!e
to employ.
e. 7sk them to present in the class and to be ready for the feedbacks )hich
their classmates and teachers )ill gi!e them.

YOUR TE(T


EV1LORIN6 %/E 2ORL= O- EV1RE''ION'
'ee %ask FAYour %e*tA
a. E*plain to the learners that they are about to finish the play as they )ill be
reading the RRe"uiem0
b. 7fter gi!ing a short background of the play0s culmination+ ha!e the students
e*plore the meaning of e*pressions taken from the te*t by gi!ing their o)n
interpretation.
c. 1rocess the ans)ers of the students.


'8E%$/IN6 7N EV1RE''ION 9IN=I&I=U7L:
'ee task H @Your %e*tA
a. Let the students choose one from the fi!e e*pressions in task F.
b. /a!e them make a sketch or illustration of its real meaning.
c. %ell them to use a short bond paper+ crayons+ pastel+ colored pencil5pen
or any art materials that )ill !i!idly describe the e*pression they ha!e chosen.
d. Inform them to be ready to share their output to the entire class.
e. 6i!e feedbacks
f. Lead the students in reading the te*t silently by raising the "uestion
prompt. 'ee %ask B @Your %e*tA
$/E$8IN6 YOUR $O.1RE/EN'ION
'ee task O AYour %e*t
a. Remind the students about the difficulty of the te*t and the
importance of ans)ering the "uestions as regards it.
b. 1rocess the ans)ers to the "uestions.


JU'%I-YIN6 ONE0' 7$%' 9'6=:
'ee %ask JAYour %e*tA
a. 7fter ha!ing the students read the te*t+ let them discuss in a small
group+ the causes of the characters0 actions or dialogues based on their
understanding.
b. Let them suggest a positi!e disposition )hich they should undertake so as
to establish a good relationship among the members of their family.

YOUR .#CO)ERY


I..ER'IN6 IN%O %/E 7U%/OR0' $R7-%
'ee %ask D @Your =isco!eryA
a. =iscuss comprehensi!ely the merits of kno)ing the author0s craft by
letting them ans)er the "uestions )hich )ill lead to further understanding
of the te*t.
b. Emphasie the !alue of attaining one0s dream )ithout sacrificing the
happiness of our lo!ed ones particularly the acceptance of truth.

.E''76E %2I'%IN6
'ee task Q @Your =isco!ery %asksA


a. Link this acti!ity to the pre!ious one.
b. /a!e the students form another small group.
c. Instruct them to )rite do)n the lesson of the play in poetry style.
d. 7llo) them to practice reading it in chorus.
e. %ell them to present it in front of the class.
f. Encourage them to reproduce the copy of their original poem
for the use of each member of the group.
g. 6uide them in using the rubric indicated belo) to ser!e as their
guide.
h. 6i!e feedbacks after the presentation.



Choral Readin5
;oor
1 1ts
'air
2
1ts
Good
3 1ts
EHcellent
5 1ts
;ronunciation
>
;unctuation










)olume >
Clarity













;hrasin54
Timin5

















Gettin5 into
character
1oor


'tudent
pronounced most
)ords and used
most
punctuation
incorrectly.


1oor


'tudentKs !oice
)as ne!er clear+
and the audience
could not hear
them.



1oor


'tudent )as not
understood by the
audience because
the student sped
through their
lines.





1oor
-air


'tudent
pronounced
some )ords
and used some
punctuation
correctly.
-air


'tudentKs !oice
)as rarely clear+
and most of the
audience could
not hear them.



-air


'tudent needs to
impro!e on timing
and phrasing.
1art5role )as
hard to
understand
because the
student spoke
too "uickly.
-air
6ood


'tudent
pronounced
most )ords and
used most
punctuation
correctly.
6ood


'tudent spoke
in a mostly clear
!oice+ and could
be heard by the
ma,ority of the
audience.
6ood


'tudent used
good timing and
phrasing. 1art5role
)as spoken in a
!oice that )as
usually steady.
'tudent
spoke slightly
too fast.
6ood
E*cellent


'tudent
pronounced all
)ords and used
all
punctuation
correctly.


E*cellent


'tudent spoke
!ery clearly+
and )as heard
by all of
audience.



E*cellent


'tudent used
e*cellent timing
and phrasing.
1art5role )as
spoken in a
steady !oice.
'tudent did
not speak
too "uickly.
E*cellent
'tudent did
not use
gestures+
!oice
fluctuations+ or
facial
e*pressions.
'tudent tried
a fe)
gestures+
!oice
fluctuations+
and facial
e*pressions.
'tudent did
not make
the
audience
belie!e that
they really
)ere the
character.
'tudent
used
some
gestures+
!oice
fluctuations+
and facial
e*pressions
to enhance
meaning of
the part
played.
'tudent
)orked
to)ard
getting
into
'tudent
used
gestures+
!oice
fluctuations
+
and facial
e*pression
s
to enhance
meaning of
the part
played.
'tudent
made
others
belie!e

'EEIN6 %/E O%/ER 'I=E O- 7 $/7R7$%ER
'ee %ask >?@Your =isco!eryA
a. /a!e the student0s reenact the real dream of #iff0s statement.
b. 7fter the reenactment+ tell the class to e!aluate the acti!ity by
describing their feelings and realiation pertaining to the task.
c. .oti!ate them to use the ad,ecti!es suggested for the mo!ies and stage
play0s description or e!aluation.


7fter the abo!e acti!ity+ tell the students to read the te*t about ho) to
die )ith dignity. 7sk them also to be ready to compare this to ho) the
salesman+ 2illy in the play @=eath of a 'alesman E Re"uiem part differ.
=I6E'%IN6 %/E %EV%
'ee task >>AYour =isco!eryA
a. /a!e the students find out ho) they understand the selection by
ans)ering the "uestions to check their comprehension.


$O.17RIN6 7N= $ON%R7'%IN6 ONE0' &7LUE 'Y'%E. 'ee
task >CAYour =isco!eryA


a. Remind the students that 2illy Loman in @=eath of a 'alesmanA died
)ith only his family and a fe) friends attended the funeral.
b. %ell the class to relate 2illy Loman0s funeral to the !alue system of the
7mericans in the play by asking the follo)ing "uestions(
1. 2hat can you say about the !alue system of 7mericans in the
play3
2. /o) do you compare this to your o)n !alue system3
c. 7sk them to identify the possible causes of the differences of the !alue
system mentioned.
d. /a!e them )rite their ideas on the fish bone.
e. Instruct them to indicate on the problem a particular !alue and identify
the ma,or causes and sub causes of their disagreement about it.
f. 7llo) them to E*plain )hat needs to be retained or changed in the
!alue system they enumerated.


-7.ILI7RIZIN6 %/E %/E7%ER0' %ERRI%ORY
'ee %ask>F @Your =isco!eryA
a. %o prepare the learners in a big stage play production+ let them
complete the sentence )ith the technical terms essential for the task.
b. =iscuss the ans)ers for better understanding of the technical terms. 7
RENE2E= $/7R7$%ER
'ee task >H @Your =isco!ery %asksA
a. %ell the class that the characters in the play )hich they ha!e read
are fla)ed+ thus+ there is a need for beha!ioral transformation so as to
establish good rapport among the members of the family.
b. Remind them that transformation in characters0 attitude and beha!ior
should be sho)n through a mini E play.
c. Inform them that the elements of the play should be considered so discuss
these elements before the presentation. 'ee the lecture belo).
c. =i!ide the class into small groups and gi!e them particular tasks to be
accomplished. Use the follo)ing groupings(


6roup >; Role play the scenario of members of the family )ith good
attitudes and beha!ior.
6roup C; 2rite a short script about the scenario to be played by group
>.
6roup F; 1repare the props and sets as )ell as the !enue.
6roup H; 1repare the costumes and make Eup.
6roup B; 1repare the sound track+ lightings+ stage directions+ and acting
=irections.



Lecture .aterial( %heatre
/istory %heatre 7rts
B
Lecture One( Elements of %heatre and =rama %errin 7dair;Lynch


The asic Elements o0 Theatre


'cript5%e*t+ 'cenario+ 1lan(
%his is the starting point of the theatrical performance. %he
element most often considered as the domain of the play)right in
theatre. %he play)right0s script is the te*t by )hich theatre is
created. It can be simplistic+ as in the >Oth century+ )ith the
scenarios used by the acting troupes of the $ommedia dell0 arte+ or it
can be elaborate+ such as the )orks of 2illiam 'hakespeare. %he script+
scenario+ or plan is )hat the director uses as a blue print to build a
production from.
%he 1rocess(
%his is the coordination of the creati!e efforts usually headed up in
theatre by the director. It is the pure process by )hich the
play)right0s )ork is brought to realiation by the director+ actors+
designers+ technicians+ dancers+ musicians+ and any other
collaborators that come together on the script+ scenario+ or plan. %his is
the )orks in progress stage.


%he 1roduct(
%his is the end result of the process of )ork in!ol!ed. %he final product
that results from all of the labors coming together to complete the
finished )ork of script+ scenario+ and plan+ in union )ith all of the
collaborators in the process to create the final product. %his is )hat
the audience )ill )itness as they sit in the theatre and !ie) the )ork.
%he 7udience(
%heatre re"uires an audience. -or all of the arts public is
essential. %he physical presence of an audience can change a
performance+ inspire actors+ and create e*pectations. %heatre is a li!ing
breathing art form. %he presence of li!e actors on the stage in front of
li!e audiences sets it apart from modern day films and tele!ision.




Let us no) look to the person )ho is responsible for the starting point of the
theatrical e!ent. %he initial creator of the script+ scenario+ or plan+ as outlined
abo!e. %his person is the play)right. 7 play)right )orks in that branch of
literature dealing )ith the )riting and producing of plays for the theatre. %he literary
composition that is )ritten specifically for the stage in play format by the
play)right.


The 9laywri!ht


2hat is a play)right3 7ccording to the )$erican ;erita!e &ictionary + @One
)ho )rites playsA.


The poet5s eye( in a "ine "renzy rollin!(
&oth !lance "ro$ hea*en to earth( "ro$ earth
To hea*en7
)n( as i$a!ination 'oies "orth
The "or$s o" thin!s unknown( the poet5s pen
Turns the$ to shapes( an !i*es to airy nothin!
) local ha'itation an a na$e%


%/E'EU'
In ) Bisu$$er <i!ht5s &rea$
2illiam 'hakespeare


/o) plays are )ritten at any gi!en time depends on many factors( the intended
audience and purpose< the play)right0s current !ie)s about the human
condition+ and ho) the play)right percei!es the truth around him. 7 play)right
must understand and kno) the established artistic and theatrical con!entions of
the theatre. 7 play)right must appreciate the )orking procedures+ materials+
and technical aspects of a production. #ecause the
script is the starting point of the theatrical production+ the process through )hich it
comes into being is of primary importance. %here are many )ays to )rite a play.
'ometimes a play)right starts )ith an idea. 7nother play)right may begin )ith a
single character in mind. 'ome play)rights base their )ork on spectacle. 1lays
can be tightly structured or episodic. Regardless of the original inspiration+ the
)ork of the play)right is not ,ust to set forth an idea+ to create characters+ or tell a
story. 7 play)right recreates and restates the human e*periences and the
uni!ersal mirror of mankind.
%he script is the heart of the theatrical e!ent. It must be respected.

Steps o" the 9laywri!ht5s 4ork


1lay)riting and creating drama for each play)right is distincti!ely different.
1lays can de!elop out of any combination of starting points and patterns. %he
processes by )hich drama is created for each play)right can be !aried in the
steps used to create the te*t. #elo) is a simple list in a progressi!e order+ but
order can change depending on each play)right0s characteristic style and
preferences for )riting.


%he basic steps in!ol!ed in the de!elopment of drama include(
1. $oming up )ith %hought5%heme5Ideas to be e*pressed
through the )ork.
2. =etermine the 6enre and 'tyle of the )ork
3. Outlining #asic 7ction of the )ork and $reating 1lot.
4. Establish the 'tructure of the 1lay and O!erall -rame)ork
5. %he =e!elopment of $haracters presented in the )ork.
6. %he $reation of =ialogue and the Language of the
$haracters.
7. $reating .usic( %his can in!ol!e the Rhythm of the
Language or actual .usic $omposition and the Lyrics of the songs.
8. Establishing 'pectacle( %he !isual and En!ironmental
elements of the )ork.
9. Research of 'ub,ect .atter and Rele!ant issues presented in
the play.


Elements o0 Crama
.ost successful play)rights follo) the theories of play)riting and drama that
)ere established o!er t)o thousand years ago by a man named
7ristotle. In his )orks the 9oetics 7ristotle outlined the si* elements of drama
in his critical analysis of the classical 6reek tragedy Oeipus -e# )ritten by the
6reek play)right+ 'ophocles+ in the fifth century #.$. %he si* elements as they
are outlined in!ol!e( %hought+ %heme+ Ideas< 7ction or 1lot< $haracters<
Language< .usic< and 'pectacle.


1. %hought5%heme5Ideas
2hat the play means as opposed to )hat happens 9the plot:. 'ometimes the
theme is clearly stated in the title. It may be stated through dialogue by a
character acting as the play)right0s !oice. Or it may be the theme is less ob!ious
and emerges only after some study or thought. %he abstract issues and feelings
that gro) out of the dramatic action.


2. 7ction51lot
%he e!ents of a play< the story as opposed to the theme< )hat happens rather than
)hat it means. %he plot must ha!e some sort of unity and clarity by setting up a
pattern by )hich each action initiating the ne*t rather than standing alone
)ithout connection to )hat came before it or )hat follo)s. In the plot of a play+
characters are in!ol!ed in conflict that has a pattern of mo!ement. %he action
and mo!ement in the play begins from the initial entanglement+ through rising
action+ clima*+ and falling action to resolution.


3. $haracters
%hese are the people presented in the play that are in!ol!ed in the perusing plot.
Each character should ha!e their o)n distinct personality+ age+ appearance+
beliefs+ socio economic background+ and language.


4. Language
%he )ord choices made by the play)right and the enunciation of the actors of the
language. Language and dialog deli!ered by the characters mo!es the plot and
action along+ pro!ides e*position+ defines the distinct characters. Each play)right
can create their o)n specific style in relationship to language choices they use in
establishing character and dialogue.


5. .usic
.usic can encompass the rhythm of dialogue and speeches in a play or can also
mean the aspects of the melody and music compositions as )ith musical theatre.
Each theatrical presentation deli!ers music+ rhythm and melody in its o)n
distincti!e manner. .usic is not a part of e!ery play. #ut+ music can be included
to mean all sounds in a production. .usic can e*pand to all sound effects+ the
actor0s !oices+ songs+ and instrumental music played as underscore in a
play. .usic creates patterns and establishes tempo in
theatre. In the aspects of the musical the songs are used to push the plot for)ard
and mo!e the story to a higher le!el of intensity. $omposers and lyricist )ork
together )ith play)rights to strengthen the themes and ideas of the play.
$haracter0s )ants and desires can be strengthened for the audience through
lyrics and music.


6. 'pectacle
%he spectacle in the theatre can in!ol!e all of the aspects of scenery+
costumes+ and special effects in a production. %he !isual elements of the play
created for theatrical e!ent. %he "ualities determined by the play)right that create
the )orld and atmosphere of the play for the audience0s eye.


Further Consierations o" the 9laywri!ht
7bo!e and beyond the elements outlined abo!e the play)right has other ma,or
considerations to take into account )hen )riting. %he 6enre and -orm of the play
is an important aspect. 'ome play)rights are pure in the choice of genre for a
play. %hey )rite strictly tragedy or comedy. Other play)rights tend to mi* genre+
combining both comedy and tragedy in one piece of dramatic )ork.

Genre+For$
=rama is di!ided into the categories of tragedy+ comedy+ melodrama+ and
tragicomedy. Each of these genre5forms can be further subdi!ide by style and
content.


%ragedy
%ragedy is an imitation of an action that is serious+ complete+ and of a certain
magnitude. %he tragedy is presented in the form of action+ not narrati!e. It )ill
arouse pity and fear in the audience as it )itnesses the action. It allo)s for an
arousal of this pity and fear and creates an affect of purgation or catharsis of these
strong emotions by the audience. %ragedy is serious by nature in its theme and
deals )ith profound problems. %hese profound problems are uni!ersal )hen
applied to the human e*perience. In classical tragedy )e find a protagonist at
the center of the drama that is a great person+ usually of upper class birth. /e
is a good man that can be admired+ but he has a tragic fla)+ a hamartia+ that )ill be
the ultimate cause of his do)n fall. %his tragic fla) can take on many
characteristics but it is most often too much pride or hubris. %he protagonist
al)ays learns+ usually too late+ the nature of his fla) and his mistakes that ha!e
caused his do)nfall. /e becomes self;a)are and accepts the ine!itability of his
fate and takes full responsibility for his actions. 2e must ha!e this element of
ine!itability in tragedy. %here must be a cause and effect relationship from the
beginning
through the middle to the end or final catastrophe. It must be logical in the
conclusion of the necessary outcome. %ragedy )ill in!ol!e the audience in the
action and create tension and e*pectation. 2ith the clima* and final end the
audience )ill ha!e learned a lesson and )ill lea!e the theatre not
depressed or sullen+ but uplifted and enlightened.


$omedy
$omedy should ha!e the !ie) of a @comic spiritA and is physical and
energetic. It is tied up in rebirth and rene)al+ this is the reason most comedy end
in )eddings+ )hich suggest a union of a couple and the e*pected birth of children.
In comedy there is absence of pain and emotional reactions+ as )ith tragedy+ and a
replaced use of mans intellect. %he beha!ior of the characters presented in
comedy is ludicrous and sometimes absurd and the result in the audience is one of
correction of beha!iors. %his correction of beha!iors is the didactic element of
comedy that acts as a mirror for society + by )hich the audience learns @don0t
beha!e in ludicrous and absurd )ays.A %he types of comedies can !ary greatly<
there are situation comedies+ romantic comedies+ sentimental comedies+ dark
comedies+ comedy of manners+ and pure farce. %he comic de!ices used by
play)rights of comedy are( e*aggeration+ incongruity+ surprise+ repetition+
)isecracks+ and sarcasm.


.elodrama
.elodrama is drama of disaster and differs from tragedy significantly+ in that< forces
outside of the protagonist cause all of the significant e!ents of the plot. 7ll of the
aspects of related guilt or responsibility of the protagonist are remo!ed. %he
protagonist is usually a !ictim of circumstance. /e is acted upon by the
antagonist or anti;hero and suffers )ithout ha!ing to accept responsibility and
ine!itability of fate. In melodrama )e ha!e clearly defined character types )ith
good guys and bad guys identified. .elodrama has a sense of strict moral
,udgment. 7ll issues presented in the plays are resol!ed in a )ell;defined )ay.
%he good characters are re)arded and the bad characters are punished in a
means that fits the crime.


%ragicomedy
%ragicomedy is the most life like of all of the genres. It is non;,udgmental and ends
)ith no absolutes. It focuses on character relationships and sho)s society in a
state of continuous flu*. %here is a mi* of comedy and tragedy side by side in
these types of plays.
Style+Boe+ .is$5
%he shaping of dramatic material+ setting+ or costumes in a specific manner. Each
play )ill ha!e its o)n uni"ue and distincti!e beha!iors+ dress+ and language
of the characters. %he style of a play)right is sho)n in the choices
made in the )orld of the play( the kinds of characters+ time periods+ settings+
language+ methods of characteriation+ use of symbols+ and themes.


&ra$atic Structure
=ramatic structure in!ol!es the o!erall frame)ork or method by )hich the
play)right uses to organie the dramatic material and or action. It is important for
play)rights to establish themes but the challenge comes in applying structure to
the ideas and inspirations. Understanding basic principals of dramatic structure
can be in!aluable to the play)right. .ost modern plays are structured into acts
that can be further di!ided into scenes. %he pattern most often used is a method
by )here the play)right sets up early on in the beginning scenes all of the
necessary conditions and situations out of )hich the later conditions )ill de!elop.
6enerally the )ants and desires of one character )ill conflict )ith another
character. 2ith this method the play)right establishes a pattern of complication+
rising action+ clima*+ and resolution. %his is commonly kno)n as cause to
effect arrangement of incidents.


%he basic $haracteristics of the cause to effect arrangement are(
? $lear e*position of situation
? $areful preparation for future e!ents
? Une*pected but logical re!ersals
? $ontinuous mounting suspense
? 7n obligatory scene
? Logical resolution


1oint of 7ttack
%he moment of the play at )hich the main action of the plot begins. %his may
occur in the first scene+ or it may occur after se!eral scenes of e*position. %he
point of attack is the main action by )hich all others )ill arise. It is the point at
)hich the main complication is introduced. 1oint of attack can sometimes
)ork hand in hand )ith a play0s inciting incident+ )hich is the first incident leading
to the rising action of the play. 'ometimes the inciting incident is an e!ent
that occurred some)here in the character0s past and is re!ealed to the audience
through e*position.


E*position
E*position is important information that the audience needs to kno) in order to
follo) the main story line of the play. It is the aspects of the story that the audience
may hear about but that they )ill not )itness in actual scenes. It
encompasses the past actions of the characters before the play0s opening scenes
progress.


Rising 7ction
Rising action is the section of the plot beginning )ith the point of attack and5or
inciting incident and proceeding for)ard to the crisis onto the clima*. %he action of
the play )ill rise as it set up a situation of increasing intensity and anticipation.
%hese scenes make up the body of the play and usually create a sense of
continuous mounting suspense in the audience.


%he $lima*5$risis
7ll of the earlier scenes and actions in a play )ill build technically to the highest
le!el of dramatic intensity. %his section of the play is generally referred to as
the moment of the plays clima*. %his is the moment )here the ma,or dramatic
"uestions rise to the highest le!el+ the mystery hits the unra!eling point+ and
the culprits are re!ealed. %his should be the point of the highest stage of
dramatic intensity in the action of the play. %he )hole combined actions of
the play generally lead up to this moment.


Resolution5Obligatory 'cene
%he resolution is the moment of the play in )hich the conflicts are resol!ed. It is
the solution to the conflict in the play+ the ans)er to the mystery+ and the clearing
up of the final details. %his is the scene that ans)ers the "uestions raised earlier in
the play. In this scene the methods and moti!es are re!ealed to the audience.


Cate!ories o" 9lot Structure
$limatic !s. Episodic
$limatic 'tructure
". 1lot begins late in story+ closer to the !ery end or clima*
II. $o!ers a short space of time+ perhaps a fe) hours+ or at most a
fe) days
III. $ontains a fe) solid+ e*tended scenes+ such as three acts )ith
each act comprising one long scene
I&. Occurs in a restricted locale+ one room or one house
4. Number of characters is se!erely limited+ usually not more than
si* or eight
&I. 1lot in linear and mo!es in a single line )ith fe) subplots or
counter plots
&II. Line of action proceeds in a cause and effect chain. %he
characters and e!ents are closely linked in a se"uence of logical+ almost
ine!itable de!elopment


Episodic 'tructure
". 1lot begins relati!ely early in the story and mo!es through a
series of episodes
II. $o!ers a longer period of time( )eeks+ months+ and
sometimes years
III. .any short+ fragmented scenes< sometimes an alternation of short
and long scenes
I&. .ay range o!er an entire city or e!en se!eral countries
4. 1rofusion of characters+ sometimes se!eral doen
&I. -re"uently marked by se!eral threads of action+ such as t)o
parallel plots+ or scenes of comic relief in a serous play
&II. 'cenes are ,u*taposed tone to one another. 7n e!ent may result
from se!eral causes+ or no apparent cause+ but arises in a net)ork or )eb of
circumstances


Outline of 1lay)riting
7long )ith the basic understanding of these "ualities the play)right must take the
aspects of unity into great consideration. 7t the center of e!ery play there should
be unity. Unity in play)riting means harmony among the component parts.
Included in the ne*t section of this pro,ect is an informati!e outline that can help a
perspecti!e play)right achie!e unity in their )ork. It also aids in the process of
starting the initial de!elopment of a play and adds credibility to the )ork. 'ome of
these important aspects and considerations listed in the outline ha!e been co!ered
in some detail thus far+ but others should be strongly considered before a
play)right puts pen to paper or hands to keys.


%hese important aspects include the follo)ing(
". Research and 8no)ledge of(
a. %hemes and 'ub,ect .atter E*plored
b. Unity in the 6enre5-orm and $larity of 'tyle5.ode of the
Intended 2ork
c. 8no)ledge of the %ime 1eriod 1resented
d. Research of 7ny other Rele!ant data presented in the play II.
Inspiration(
a. 1ainting51hoto that encapsulates the 2orld of 1lay
b. .etaphor that describes the themes at )ork in a single
sentence
c. 7ny other Rele!ant Ideas of inspiration
III. $oncepts(
a. Xuestions you should be able to ans)er(
i. 2hat does the play represent3
2hat is its theme3 2hy is it important3 2hy does it
deser!e to be )itnessed3 2hat is the moral3 2hat
uni!ersal truth does it illustrate3 2hat e*cites you+ the
play)right+ about the )ork3 2hat aspects of the drama fires
your imagination3 2hat makes you feel ealous and
impassioned3 2hat mo!es you3 2hat about the material
gi!es you a deep feeling of satisfaction3 2hat in the play
makes it )orthy of an audience0s attention3 2hy is it
compelling3
I&. 1redominant Elements( 2hat is the leading element in your
dramatic )ork3
a. %heme; 4aitin! "or 0e"ty by $lifford Odets is a thesis play
directly promoting the theme that the common man )ill continue
to be oppressed until he succeeds in organiing into unions. It is
nearly a propaganda play. $haracter and dialogue ser!e the theme
e*clusi!ely. %he spectacle is limited to a bare stage. %he language
is didactic to the point of preachiness.
b. 1lot;The Ta*ern by 6eorge .. $ohan is a play in )hich the
predominant element is almost e*clusi!ely plot. %he action hurls
itself relentlessly at the audience. $haracter is continuously
subser!ient to plot. %he theme+ crime does not pay+ is apparent from
the beginning+ and the spectacle re"uires on an upstage door and a
)inter )ind 9e*ample of .usic: so po)erful it dri!es all the players to
the )all.
c. $haracter;7ll the plays of $hekho! ha!e the predominant
element of character. One could barely choose plot as the
secondary element. It is also unlikely that one )ould choose language+
because language in $hekho! is intentionally commonplace. %here
is %heme in $hekho!+ but it is subser!ient to character+ it lays "uiet and
lo) in the play and rises gracefully and gently to the surface.
d. 'pectacle;Barnu$ by .ark #ramble and .ichael 'te)art
)on a number of pries in Ne) York+ despite the fact that it has
no plot+ no characters of conse"uence+ and no significant
language< its theme+ at best+ could be stated+ 7 circus causes
s)eat. %he sheer intensity and speed of the spectacle+ the
unrelenting energy+ the nonstop sensation of mo!ement+ sound+ and
color< the surprises+ the acrobatic feats+ dances+ magic+ and
ramata o!er)helmed and gratified audiences.
e. Language;Uner the Bilk 4oo by =ylan %homas is
subtitled @7 1lay for &oices.A It is a demonstration of the most
miraculous parade of )ords in the spoken English. It is poetry at its
most daling. %he theme is !ague at best. 7s for plot+ it is a
patch)ork of incidents in!ol!ing si*ty;four characters in a tiny 2elch
to)n in the course of a summer day. %he characters are sketched+
not de!eloped. %he predominant element in this play is clearly the
most radiant language e!er assembled. 'pectacle )ould ruin this
)ork.
f. .i*tures;.ost commonly you )ill find that the ma,ority of plays
ha!e mi*tures of all of the elements of drama. %he e*amples cited
abo!e are plays demonstrating one predominant element almost to the
e*clusion of the others. .any play)rights tend to utilie a bit of all the
elements. One of the greatest e*ceptions and e*amples of incredible
use of all the elements is the plays of 'hakespeare. %he reason his
plays to)er abo!e all others is that he fuses the elements of theme+ plot+
character+ spectacle+ and language so magnificently. In 'hakespeare )e
can mar!el at the great skill )ith )hich these elements ha!e been
united.


4. Outlining( #eginning+ .iddle+ and End
a. #eginning(
i. 1rologue and or start of play )ith introduction of
characters+ date+ place+ time+ setting+ and e*position and inciting
incident introduced
ii. 1oint of attack+ introduce primary conflict and central
dramatic "uestion
b. .iddle(
i. $haracters pursue ob,ecti!es and encounter obstacles
ii. 7ns)ers sought< goals of characters conflict )ith other
characters
iii. $haracters attempt to o!ercome obstacles and challenges
i!. $haracters plan tactics+ succeed+ fail+ attack+ retreat+
surprise+ and are surprised+ encounter ma,or re!ersals and a
crisis is reached
c. End(
i. $haracters engage in final conflict 9clima* of play: ii.
$haracters main ob,ecti!e achie!ed of lost
iii. $entral dramatic "uestion is ans)ered+ theme or ideas of play
confirmed. Resolution )here order is established.


Conclusion
7rtistic consideration in play)riting re"uires selection and arrangement. 7rt is
skill ac"uired by e*perience+ study+ and clear obser!ations. 1lay)rights must
consciously set about making choices )ith a competent plan and creati!e
imagination. Only then than )e consider the play)rights )ork as a !iable start to
the theatrical process. #efore anyone begins to )rite a play it is important to
understand the medium for )hich you intend on )riting. 2riting for the stage
demands an understanding of t)o fundamentals( the essence of drama and the
nature of theatre.
http(55homepage.smc.edu5adair;lynch4terrin5taNC?B5elements.htm


#E 7$XU7IN%E= 2I%/ %/E '%7R'
'ee task >BAYour =isco!eryA


a. 7ssign other group to present a talk sho) )here all the mini E play actors
and actresses )ill be the guest. $onsider the groupings suggested belo)(
6roup >; guests in the talk sho)
6roup C; host a talk sho) 9prepare "uestions+ comments+ and script to be used in
hosting:
6roup F; act as audience 9prepare possible comments and "uestions to be asked
to the guests.
6roup H; prepare the !enue+ sound+ and other e"uipment
6roup B; act as obser!ers 9prepare obser!ation reports about the hosting
and the guests:
-REE E '%YLE -EE= #7$8IN6
'ee task >OAYour =isco!eryA
a. /a!e the group assigned to obser!e discuss the obser!ations.
c. 6i!e feedbacks for impro!ement.


YOUR '#N$L T$%
#LUR#IN6 %/E %ONE+ .OO=+ 7N= .E''76E O- %/E %EV% 'ee
task>J @Your -inal %askA
=iscuss comprehensi!ely )hat a poster blurb is as )ell as its importance and
usage specifically in a stage play. $onsider the lecture belo).


"lurDs for performances are !ery much like those youKd find on the back
co!er of a paperback or the flap;copy on a hardback. %hey are there to
entice the user to action 88 )hether it be to buy a ticket+ attend a )orkshop+
or fund your theatre.
http(55))).prarts.com5ne)s4!ie).asp*3articleid[>BGLessonI=[C
-or many people+ a 1oster or flyer )ill be their first point of contact )ith a
theatre production. In principle+ these materials should carry basic information
regarding )ho+ )hat+ )here+ and )hen< but also communicate something about
the thrust of the performance itself( its directorial !ision+ its design choices+ its
aesthetic through;line.
7n e22ecti!e 1oster can hold a number of competing ideas )ithin its borders<
distilling+ illuminating and ultimately deepening our understanding of a
production. 2e can accredit Jules $h_ret and /enri de %oulouse;Lautrec for
making the first+ sustained connection bet)een graphic and theatrical arts in their
!ibrant designs for >Qth century 1arisian sho)s. -or many people+ their first
impressions of a theatre piece are still based on encounters )ith graphic design. It
relays factual information+ but the crucial "uestion )e ask either consciously or
other)ise is( R2hat does this image say about this production30 7nd )e should
ha!e a sense of )hat0s in store aesthetically as )ell as thematically.
%he o!erall desi5n o2 a 1oster or flyer should not be seen as tangential to a
theatre production( a supplemental marketing de!ice used to communicate basic
information. Rather+ these materials should be approached as intrinsic to that
production+ and approached )ith a sense of the o!erall aesthetic !ision in mind. 7s
both a )indo) into a production+ and e!entually a record of its taking place+ these
!isual materials are arguably as central as costumes+ lighting and staging to a
production. If )e think of posters and flyers as mere ad!ertising de!ices+ then they
can easily be compromised. Instead+ )e should think of them as acti!e
components )ithin the larger creation+ )hich cannot be easily ignored on the
grounds of cost. 1oor graphic design fails to make
that important initial connection bet)een the performance and the public. It also
suggests that a company does not take its !isual art !ery seriously+ and for a
theatrical culture that needs to continue e*ploring its physical and !isual languages
to match its literary ones+ this is a shame+ and a potentially dangerous one
at that.
http(55))).irishtheatremagaine.ie5blog5,une;C?>>;NCD>NCQ5graphic;
tensions;;)hat;posters;say;about;plays
a 1oster acts as a !isual 1rom1t + a reminder of a sho)Ks e*istence+ usually
peppered )ith a selecti!e array of positi!e press "uotes. #ut a good poster
should be more than ,ust an ad!ert+ more than ,ust a hand;)a!ing plea of T$ome
and see meIT Indeed+ the best designed images )ork on numerous le!els.
7 perfect e*ample is the art)ork for the Royal $ourtKs production of .arius
!on .ayenburgKs %he Ugly One + )hich managed to be as stark+ simple and
)itty as the sho) itself. 7lso memorable of late+ )as the rococo pastiche of a
classic 7thena poster used by %old #y 7n Idiot to promote their update of
$asano!a. %his pro!ed so popular that copies )ent missing from a number of
uni!ersity campuses and Northern 'tage )as forced to print ne) ones.
Indeed this image )ill probably linger longer in the memory than the sho) itself
)hich recei!ed distinctly mi*ed re!ie)s.
#ack to Jeremy /erbertKs )ork for %he Ugly One. 'uccessful in e!oking many
elements of the play+ it also echoed the simple graphic "uality that has run
through all the Royal $ourtKs recent designs. %his is presumably a good thing in
terms of brand uniformity and other things that make marketing departments
happy. %he image speaks to you not ,ust about the play itself+ but offers broader
connotations about the nature of the production and the theatre that is staging it.
%he National %heatreKs posters are a fine e*ample of this. 2ith their black and
)hite photography and striking slanted lettering+ the images are bold and
instantly recogniable as promoting National %heatre productions.
http(55))).theguardian.com5stage5theatreblog5C??J5oct5CO5)hatkin
dofroledoesaposte
a. 7fter the discussion+ ask them to recall the play and then+ let them
make a poster blurb to emphasie its clima*+ tone+ mood+ and message.
b. Remind them that their output )ill be used for their stage play
production.
c. %o guide them in their acti!ity+ sho) them samples of poster blurbs.
My Treasure
a. Emphasie that materialism )ill not bring happiness and
contentment as depicted in the ending of the play. E*plain also that one must
be ready to accept the truth and the conse"uence of our actions.
b. Remind them that e!erybody has an obligation and a dream to
fulfill all they ha!e to do is to )ork hard and be prepared to gi!e
theirsupport .
c. 7fter these reminders let the students suggest a remarkable
contri'ution "or a "a$ily an societal re"or$%
d. ;a*e the$ e#press their ieas 'y co$pletin! the phrases%
Teachers Guide
Module E
Lesson ?
______________________________________________________________


In 0or Greater Challen3es
B. Resources
1. .aterials
a. !ideo of the entire play
c. photos that imply addiction and their conse"uence
2. E"uipment
a. 7udio 1layer
b. Laptop
c. =L1
d. O/1
C. 7cti!ities
#&YOUR JOURNEY 9Introduction:
'ee Learning .aterials
##& Your Goals 9Ob,ecti!es:
'ee O!er!ie) of $ontent and Ob,ecti!es
###& YOUR #N#T#$L T$% 92hat to 8no):
'%7N=IN6 U1 -OR 7 RE7'ON
'ee task>AYour Initial %asksA
a. 'ho) the pictures that imply addiction and then let your class
analye their possible meaning.
b. /a!e them ans)er the "uestions pertaining to the photos.
c. 1rocess the "uestions to lead them to the purpose of the acti!ity
)hich is E;; making a stand.


RE7LIZIN6 %/E 6ENER7L I=E7
'ee task CAYour Initial %asksA
a. 1lay the te*t pertaining to the issues on a play+ and then ha!e the
students state the general idea )hich the material tries to con!ey to
the public.
b. Instruct them to )rite their
ans)er in thethought balloon.
Listening %e*t(
ta5e ;lay Con2rontin5 #ssues #n The Church8 $..#CT#ONA No One
%no:s "ut Me


7==I$%ION( No One 8no)s #ut .e promotes spiritual healing for those
faced )ith tormenting struggles. 7==I$%ION )ill premier 'aturday 7ugust
>F at the .eado)creek /igh 'chool+ Norcross+ 67. /osted by 6ospel
$omedian John 6ray.
Norcross 9 I;Ne)s)ire: July CJ+ C?>> ; Ne!er has a stage play
addressed issues facing church members like 7==I$%ION( No One
8no)s but .e. TI )ant to bring to the forefront issues that confront
church members e!eryday;issues that nobody )ants to talk about but
kno) are thereT says 7ndre 8nighton play )right and producer.
7ndre belie!es it is time for the church to take off its mask and do a)ay
)ith being pretentious.T2e all kno) the catch phrases+ K IKm blessed and
highly fa!ored+K and K%oo blessed to be stressedK but most of that is a
facade and the real issues are not being addressed+T says 8nighton.
/e belie!es that ha!ing that kind of
attitude makes a person feel alone and or isolated as if they are the
only person struggling )ith a particular issue.

T2e need to be real and understand that e!erybody struggles<
8nighton passionately e*pressed. It does not make you any less
spiritual. It makes you human. /e hopefully e*pressed his
con!iction that it is through $hrist that )e can o!ercome any
7==I$%ION.
7==I$%ION( No One 8no)s #ut .e is a confrontational stage play that
addresses the many issues and struggles faced by $hristians( drugs+
pornography+ lo) self;esteem+ and suicide to name a fe). -or instance
%homas /arding is a F> year old former !ice;president of a credit
corporation but lost his ,ob after arri!ing to )ork drunk. /e has been an
alcoholic for o!er F years after losing his son in a kidnapping. /e then
later lost his )ife due to his compulsi!e drinking habits. %hen there
is Nikki 8ennedy;7ge CD;=aughter of 1astor Eli,ah and .oni"ue
8ennedy+ starters of the addiction sessions+ struggles )ith addiction
to cocaine after feeling the pressures of the church 9status "uo: and
ha!ing to be the T$hrist; likeT 1astorKs daughter. TNot e!eryone )ill like
this play and )e do not e*pect e!eryone to like it. #ut )e e*pect people
to identify )ith
it+T says 7ndre.
2ith a glisten in his eye 8nighton )ants his audience to take off
their masks and li!e )ith hope. T7s real as the addictions are+ there is
an e!en greater reality and that is you can be free+T say 7ndre. T2e ,ust
donKt )ant the audience to )alk a)ay only identifying )ith
the struggles but to )alk a)ay )ith the kno)ledge that they can be
free through Jesus $hrist and obedience to the 2ord of 6od.T

8nighton referred to the scripture K2hom the 'on sets free+ shall be free
indeed.K T$hrist is the ans)er to all our problems. Only through $hrist
you can be free;free from the stereotype( once an addict al)ays and
addict. %he only issue )e ha!e to o!er come is the issue of faith. If you
truly belie!e the )ords of $hrist+ you can be set free+T says 8nighton.
T$hristians arenKt that different from any other
human being+ says 8nighton+ T#ut the difference is Jesus $hrist
)ho has gi!en us the ability to o!ercome any 7==I$%ION.T
7==I$%ION( No One 8no)s #ut .e promotes spiritual healing for those
faced )ith tormenting struggles. 7udiences )ill kno) they are not alone
and )ill be inspired to li!e the abundant life through the
po)erful stories presented.
#)& YOUR TE(T 0/hat to ;rocess3
$ONXUERIN6 %/E 2ORL= O- '%76E
'ee task>AYour %e*tA
a. Remind the students about the di!ersity of tasks in a stage play
production and ho) essential for them to )ork collaborati!ely to
attain success.
b. Lecture on the @1roduction 'taff for a 'tage 1lay+ 'tage
management+ =esigning some 1rops+ #locking+ and 'tage =irectionsA.
=I'$O&ERIN6 2/7%0' #EYON=
'ee task CAYour %e*tA

a. Let the learners ans)er the "uestions regarding the lecture to check
understanding as it is imperati!e in choosing for their roles.
b. 1rocess the ans)ers
4. YOUR .#CO)ERY 0/hat to Re2lect and Understand3
.irroring .yself
'ee task >AYour =isco!eryA
a. Instruct the learners to assess their strengths and
)eaknesses.
b. Let them state the traits they )ant to impro!e or e*ploreby
filling out the table as indicated.
$O..I%%IN6 .Y'EL-
'ee task CAYour =isco!eryA
%o check )hether e!eryone has already a chosen roleP
a. Let the class come up )ith the ultimate role they )ant to fulfill
in this year0s endea!or ;;;;; that is making them a part
of a stage play production.
b. /a!e them )rite their final decision by filling out the grid.
)#& Your 'inal Tas, 0 /hat to Trans2er3
RE; &IE2IN6 %/E 1L7Y ;;;; IN%O 7 RE7L 1RO=U$%ION
a. 7llo) a comprehensi!e re E !ie)ing of the entire play @=eath
of a 'alesmanA for the class to ha!e an idea about the o!erall
stage play production.
b. %ell them to take note of the dialogues+ ho) they are
deli!ered+ the blockings+ the setting+ the props and sets+ the costume+
the audio+ the lighting+ and the stage directions )hich they ha!e to
employ.
c. Remind them to practice regularly for the final and actual
stage play.


)##& My Treasure 0ynthesis3
a. 7fter the grand performance+ congratulate e!eryone for a ,ob )ell
done and gi!e your feedbacks.
b. /a!e the students e*press )hat they think+ and feel about their
performance as )ell as their plan in the future.