Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 49

YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8.

Sequence Control Functions




SECTION 8

CS3000
SEQUENCE and LOGIC
CONTROL FUNCTIONS




CONTENTS


8. Sequence and Logic Control Functions.................................................................. 2
8.1 Introduction................................................................................................................... 2
8.2 Sequence Tables ............................................................................................................ 3
8.2.1 What is a Sequence Table?..................................................................................................... 3
8.2.2 How a Sequence Table Works................................................................................................ 4
8.2.3 Sequence Table Capacity...................................................................................................... 10
8.2.4 Sequence Table Timing........................................................................................................ 11
8.3 Logic Charts ................................................................................................................ 12
8.3.1 What is a Logic Chart? ......................................................................................................... 12
8.3.2 Logic Elements ..................................................................................................................... 13
8.3.3 Logic Chart Capacity and Timing ........................................................................................ 15
8.4 Addressing Tag Data .................................................................................................. 16
8.4.1 Summary of Sequence Control Functions ............................................................................ 16
8.4.2 Process I/O Definition .......................................................................................................... 19
8.4.3 Software I/O Definition........................................................................................................ 21
8.4.4 Regulatory and Calculation Blocks ...................................................................................... 31
8.4.5 Referencing Other Sequence Tables..................................................................................... 35
8.5 Sequence Auxiliary Blocks......................................................................................... 36
8.5.1 Timer Block (TM) ................................................................................................................ 37
8.5.2 Software Counter Block (CTS)............................................................................................. 39
8.5.3 Pulse Train Counter Block (CTP)......................................................................................... 40
8.5.4 Relational Expression Block (RL)........................................................................................ 41
8.5.5 Other Auxiliary Blocks......................................................................................................... 42
8.6 Switch Instrument and Motor Control Blocks......................................................... 43
8.6.1 Operation of the Switch Instrument...................................................................................... 44
8.6.2 Answerback Input Function.................................................................................................. 45
8.6.3 Output Signal Conversion Function ..................................................................................... 45
8.6.3 Answerback Alarm Function................................................................................................ 46
8.6.4 Other Switch Instrument Functions ...................................................................................... 46
8.6.5 Motor Controller Function Blocks (MC-2, MC-3) ............................................................... 47
8.6.6 Operating the Switch Instrument from a Sequence .............................................................. 49

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 1
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8. Sequence and Logic Control Functions

8.1 Introduction

There are several methods performing sequential and logic control functions in the
FCS. These can be summarised as follows:

CS Function Description Equivalent
Sequence Table (ST16) Cause and effects table Ladder Logic
Logic Chart (LC64) Boolean logic circuits Logic Circuits
SFC Sequential Function Charts
SEBOL and CALCUs Description Languages Programming Languages

These control methods are useful in different applications. For example, sequence
tables are useful general purpose sequence and logic control blocks for medium
complexity step sequences and motor interlocks. Logic Charts are best for motor
interlock applications, as they are more easily readable than sequence tables for these
applications.

Sequential Function Charts are used for highly complex batch applications, and may
use a combination of SEBOL and sequence tables as part of its step execution.

SEBOL is usually used as part of SFCs for sequential control, and is particularly
powerful where a significant amount of analog processing is required.

This section describes Sequence Tables and Logic Charts as these use similar methods
for configuration. SFCs, SEBOL and CALCUs are described elsewhere.


TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 2
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.2 Sequence Tables

8.2.1 What is a Sequence Table?

Sequence tables are decision tables, similar in concept to ladder logic diagrams. They
read inputs as conditions, and set actions according to a set of rules. Sequence tables
can be configured to operate in two different ways:

Monitoring Sequence - performs logic control by monitoring all
conditions and setting all actions according to the rules every scan;
Step Sequence - performs logic control one step at a time, where a step is
a predefined set of rules.

The main advantage of Step Sequences over Ladder Logic is the ability to perform
step sequence control easily and efficiently.









Reference: IM 33S1B30-01, Section D2
(Reference Manual, Sequence Control Function)
TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 3
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.2.2 How a Sequence Table Works

A sequence table checks the state of tags.values in the condition rows. These relate to
"Y" and "N" entries in the rules column. If a condition is true, then the corresponding
"Y" will be active (and visa-versa for "N" entries).

The rules column can contain several "Y" and "N" entries in the conditions section. If
they are all true, then the associated actions are executed. Actions are driven by "Y"
and "N" entries in the rules column corresponding to the Action rows.



As a consequence, if there is more than one condition with entries in a rule column,
then this represents an AND gate.

The conditions and actions are addressed in the same way, i.e.,

tagname.item data

where the item and data are status values of a tag, such as alarm, mode, switch setting.
Note that analogues cannot be addressed in a sequence table.

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 4
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
Operations of Non-Step Sequence

In a non-step sequence table, all 32 rules are subject to condition testing, and the
operation is performed according to the conditions. The following shows the
operation of a non-step sequence table.

As for condition testing, a condition is satisfied when all conditions (Y or N)
for the same rule number are true. A sequence table whose rule columns are all
blank is considered true unconditionally.

Operations are executed according to the operation contents of Y or N
described for the rule number whose conditions are satisfied.


When the output timing is specified as Output Only When Conditions
Change, the operation is executed only once when the condition is switched
from false to true. However, if non-latched output is specified for the
operation signal, the operation changes when the condition is switched from
true to false.

When the output timing is specified as Output Each Time Conditions are
Satisfied, the operation is executed during each period as long as the
condition remains true.


When the conditions of multiple rules are satisfied simultaneously with respect
to the same operation signal, if requests for both Y and N are detected as the
resultant operations, the request for Y takes precedence, and the operation for
N will not be executed.

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 5
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
Example of the Non-Step Format Sequence Using the Sequence Table

An example of a sequence that monitors operations to prevent the buffer tank
in the system from overflowing is shown in the following figure. In this
sequence, LI100 (indication block) alarm status is used.







The sequence table in the figure shown above monitors the conditions in rule
numbers 01 to 04 simultaneously. Any condition in one of the 4 rules becomes
true, the operation in the same rule will be executed again. The monitoring
continues after the execution.
TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 6
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
Action of Step Sequence

In a step sequence table, the sequence of a phase-step process is divided into the
smallest phase units (steps) of the condition monitoring and operation, then these
steps are executed one by one. In a step sequence table, only step label 00 and the
rule(s) corresponding to the current step number are subject to condition testing and
operation. The following shows the action of a step sequence table.



Step label 00 is executed during each period. Step 00 can only be located at the
start (rule 1) of a sequence table group. Step 00 cannot have a next step label.
The step label is held in the PV. To go to a step, the PV can be changed through
the faceplate of the sequence.
For step sequences, the next execution step label must be described in
THEN/ELSE in order to advance the steps. The step will not be advanced if both
next step labels in THEN/ELSE are blank. If there is no entry for the next step
label, the same step is executed each time, and the sequence does not move step.
The next step specified in THEN is the step to advance when the condition test
result in positive. When all operations for the corresponding rules are completed,
the step proceeds to the next step.
The next step specified in ELSE is the step to advance when the condition test
result in negative. The step proceeds to the next step without executing the
operation rules.
If there are multiple requests for step transition in the same step, the step advances
to the next step label that is described for the smallest rule number.
When a step is advanced, the conditions for the rules are initialized once. In other
words, all the conditions become false with respect to the previous execution.
The timing in which the next step is actually executed after a step is advanced, is
the next scan period.
The same step label can be assigned to multiple rules. In this case, branched
operations can be performed according to the condition.


TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 7
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
Example of a Step Sequence that Uses the Sequence Table

This example shows a phase step sequence that combines the water injection
processing and drain processing.

Sequence Specifications
Push the start button, valve A opens to fill water to the tank. When the tank
is full, switch A becomes ON, the valve is closed.
Push the start button again when the tank is full, then the valve B opens.
When the drain process ends, switch B becomes ON, the valve B closes.







TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 8
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions


In the above sequence table, rule numbers 01 and 02 are step A1.
Rule numbers 03 and up are step A2.
Rule numbers 05 and beyond do not have any description for the condition
rule, operation rule or move-destination step label, so they are not subject
to condition testing nor operation.

Step A1 monitors the conditions for rule numbers 01 and 02 simultaneously. Of rule
numbers 01 and 02, whichever the condition is satisfied will be executed. Executing
the operation of rule 01 does not advance the step, since there is no designation in the
move-destination step label. After executing the operation, A1 resumes monitoring
rule numbers 01 and 02 again. On the other hand, if the condition for rule number 02
becomes true, the operation of rule 02 will be executed, and the step advances to A2
because the move-destination step label has a designation.

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 9
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.2.3 Sequence Table Capacity

The capacity of a sequence table is:

64 Conditions/Actions
32 Rules

By default, the 64 Conditions/Actions are split equally, so that there are 32 conditions
and 32 actions. However, this can be changed though

VIEW Change Number of Signal Lines

in the Sequence Table builder. This can be done in blocks of 8.


The ST16E sequence table extension block

The number of rules is fixed at 32, but a step sequence table can be extended with an
ST16E block to give a maximum of 100 steps.

Procedure for connecting an extension block to a sequence table:

Create an ST16E block and give it a tagname.
In the sequence table (ST16), enter this tagname into the NEXT field.
Move between tables in the builder through VIEW Open Next
Extension Table.

Extension tables can be chained to create a Sequence Table Group, with one ST16
block and several ST16E blocks. The total number is unlimited, but the number of
steps cannot exceed 100.

Note that this does not extend the available conditions or actions. The Conditions and
Actions fields in the extension tables are not configurable.

Reference: IM 33S1B30-01, D2.2.9

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 10
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.2.4 Sequence Table Timing

The sequence table timing is defined by clicking on the timing button on the sequence
table editor.



The options are as follows:

Start Timing - specifies what initiates the sequence table execution:

T - Periodic Execution
O - One Shot Execution
I - One shot, initiated on start up of the FCS (both cold start and restart)
B - One shot, initiated on start up of the FCS (cold start only)

Output Timing - specifies how the actions are performed:

C - Execute actions when the conditions become true (one shot)
E - Always execute actions while conditions are true (continuous)

Scan Period - specifies the scan rate of the function block:

Basic Scan (1 sec)
Medium scan
Fast Scan

Control Period - specifies period of execution between 1 - 16 seconds (only if Basic
scan is selected).

Control Phase - if a control period of greater than 1 second is set, this specifies
where-abouts in that control period the table is executed.
TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 11
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.3 Logic Charts

8.3.1 What is a Logic Chart?

A logic chart is a Boolean logic circuit diagram, in which input conditions drive
output actions through a series of logic elements. Conceptually, a logic chart is
similar to a monitoring sequence table in that all conditions are monitored, and actions
executed according to the logic element rules.

The syntax for the inputs and outputs are the same as for a sequence table, with one
exception. The "H" (latch) bit for Process and Software I/O cannot be used in logic
charts, so that the Set/Resets must be used to achieve latching. See section 8.4 for
more information on setting switch outputs.



The advantage of a logic chart is that they can be viewed in real time on the operator
display, with the lines between elements changing colour according to their state.
Therefore, the operator can visually follow the logic through from conditions to
actions. However, if the logic becomes too complex, a sequence table may be easier
to follow.








Reference: IM 33S1B30-01, D2.3
TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 12
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.3.2 Logic Elements

The actions are connected to conditions via a series of logic elements. The logic
elements are as follows:

AND
(up to 21 inputs)

OR
(up to 21 inputs)

NOT


Latches:


SRS1-R SRS2-R

S 0 1 0 1 Input
R 0 0 1 1
OUT1 Latched 1 0 0 Output
OUT2 Latched 0 1 1



SRS1-S SRS2-S

S 0 1 0 1 Input
R 0 0 1 1
OUT1 Latched 1 0 1 Output
OUT2 Latched 0 1 0


TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 13
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
WIPEOUT

(W. O)

Input S 0 1 0 1
R 0 0 1 1
Output OUT 0 1 0 0



OND - On Delay Timer (*1)
t
OUT
IN


Note, the timer setpoint is set
through the logic chart operator display.




OFFD - Off Delay Timer (*1)
t
OUT
IN








TON - One shot pulse on leading edge (*2)
OUT
IN





TOFF - One shot pulse on falling edge (*2)
OUT
IN




NOTES:

(*1) A logic chart has 32 timers available. The setpoints and current values are
accessible through the tuning panel of the logic chart, and their item names are: STxx
(setpoint time) and PTxx (process time). The timer number (xx) is the number
according to the order in which the timers are placed on the logic chart.

(*2) the pulse width is one scan cycle of the logic chart - normally 1 second)

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 14
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
Comparator - Greater Than or Equal To - CMP-GE



Input IN1 0 0 1 1
IN2 0 1 0 1
Output OUT 1 0 1 1



Comparator - Greater Than - CMP-GT



Input IN1 0 0 1 1
IN2 0 1 0 1
Output OUT 0 0 1 0



Comparator - Equal To - CMP-EQ



Input IN1 0 0 1 1
IN2 0 1 0 1
Output OUT 1 0 0 1


Note: these comparators can be used not only for switch and status inputs, but also
for integer inputs, such as the .SW item of a selector block. They cannot be used for
analog values. The relational expression is still required for logic charts (see section
8.4).

8.3.3 Logic Chart Capacity and Timing

The capacity of a logic chart is:

32 Conditions
32 Actions
64 Logic Elements

The timing of a logic chart is the same as that of a sequence table. See section 8.2.4
for more details.
TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 15
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.4 Addressing Tag Data
8.4.1 Summary of Sequence Control Functions

List of sequence related function blocks and their uses:

Description System Name Category Use Connections
Timer TM Sequence Elements 1 Standard Timer OP Command
BSTS Condition
Valve faceplate SIO-xx Switch Instrument Control pumps and valves from
sequences
CSV Command
PV Feedback
Motor faceplate MC-2/MC-3 Regulatory Manual
Loaders
Control pumps and valves from
sequences
CSV Command
PV Feedback
Digital I/O %Znnuscc Not a function block Contact Inputs/Outputs PV

Common
Switches
%SWnnnn
%GSnnnn
Not a function block Internal Flags
Global Flags
PV
Relational
Expression
RL Sequence Elements 2 Compare analog values in a
sequence
X01 X16
Data Set BDSET-1L
DSW-16
Batch Data Hold data for relational
expression
DT01 DT16
SD01 SD16
Switch SW-33 Regulatory Calculation
Auxiliary
3 Position, 3 Pole switch SW
Switch SW-91 Regulatory Calculation
Auxiliary
9 Position, 1 Pole switch SW
Operator Guide %Ognnn Not a function block Operator Guide PV.NON



Timers

To drive a timer:

Tagname.OP. START


WAIT
Y = Start the timer
N = Stop the timer

Y= Pause the timer
N= Restart the timer

To check the timer status:

Tagname.BSTS. CTUP
PALM
Y = timer has expired
Y = timer has reached pre-alarm setpoint

Timer configuration values (tuning panel)

PH
DL

PV
DV
Timer setpoint
Timer pre-alarm setpoint

Current timer value
Time left


TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 16
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
Valve and Motor Faceplates

To drive a valve or motor:

Tagname.CSV. 0
1
2

P0
P1
P2
Y = Close Valve / Stop Pump
Y = Stop valve travel (only for 2 contact/ 3 position output)
Y = Open Valve / Start Pump

Y = Set CSV to 0 / N = Set CSV to 2
Y = Set CSV to 1
Y = Set CSV to 2 / N = Set CSV to 0

To monitor a valve or motor

Tagname.PV.



Tagname.ALRM
0
1
2

ANS+
ANS-
Y = Valve Closed/Pump Stopped
Y = Valve travelling
Y = Valve Opened / Pump Running

Y = Failed to Open/Start
Y = Failed to Close/Stop

Valve and Motor Faceplate configuration values (tuning panel):

MTM
SIMM

MODE
Answerback Masking Timer
1 = Simulation Mode (forces PV = MV)

AUT = Sequence Control
MAN = Operator Control


Digital I/O, Common/Global Switches and Sequence Messages

To drive a digital output or flag:

Tagname.PV. L

H
Y = Non-latch on

Y = Latch on
N = Turn off

To monitor a digital input or flag:

Tagname.PV. ON (or 1)


OFF (or 0)
Y = On
N = Off

Y = Off
N = On

To drive a Sequence Message (eg, Operator Guide):

%OGnnn.PV.
%PRnnn.PV
%Rennn.PV
NON Y = On


TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 17
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
Relational Expressions

To monitor comparisons between analogues:

Tagname. X01.
.
.
.
X16.
GT
GE
LT
LE
EQ
NE



Batch Data usage in Relational expressions:

BDSET-1L
Tagname. DT01
.
.
.
DT16

DSW-16
Tagname. SD01
.
.
.
SD16


Setting Switches in Sequences:

Tagname.SW. 1,2,3, etc Y



TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 18
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.4.2 Process I/O Definition

Sequences can perform condition testing of both Digital Inputs and Digital Outputs,
and drive Digital Outputs directly.

Digital I/O can be addressed by their tag, or by their system address (%Z), and by the
tag item "PV", as follows:

Tag.PV
%Znnusmm.PV



Condition Testing:

The format for condition testing of input or output status is:

TAG.PV.ON/OFF
or
TAG.PV.1/0



Status Manipulation:

A contact output can be set on and off in the same way, i.e.:

TAG.PV.1 Y set the contact output on
TAG.PV.0 Y set the contact output off

However, this requires two entries in the sequence table or logic chart to turn
on and off. Therefore, other values can be set to the PV which allow the
contact to be turned on and off using the Y and N on a single entry.


TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 19
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
Latched Output:

TAG.PV.H - when the Y condition is true, then the output is set ON.
When the Y condition is no longer true, it stays on.
When the N condition is true, the output is set OFF.

Nonlatched Output:

TAG.PV.L - when the Y condition is true, then the output is set ON.
When the Y condition is no longer true, it goes OFF.
There is no N condition.
















Nonlatched Output
Latched Output
FALSE TRUE
FALSE TRUE FALSE
N Condition
Y Condition

Flashing Output:

TAG.PV.F - when the Y condition is true, then the output is toggled
ON/OFF once per second. When the Y condition is no
longer true, then the output stops flashing but is held
ON. When the N condition is true, then the output is set
OFF.












1 sec
Flashing Output
FALSE TRUE
FALSE TRUE FALSE
N Condition
Y Condition
TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 20
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.4.3 Software I/O Definition

Just like process inputs/outputs, software inputs/outputs can be referred to or set from
a function block or other application function. Software inputs/outputs are virtual
inputs/outputs that are provided by the FCSs internal software.

Two types of software inputs/outputs are available: an internal switch, which is
used to exchange logical values between function blocks or other application
functions; and a message output, which is used to inform the occurrence of an
event.

The organizational structure of software inputs/outputs is as shown below.


Figure 8.1 Structure of Software Inputs/Outputs


*1. Global switches are only available in CS3000.


TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 21
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.4.3.1 Identification of Software Inputs/Outputs

Software inputs/outputs are identified by their element serial numbers. The
classification of element numbers for the CS 3000 is shown below.

%XXnnnn

where:
%XX: Software input/output element identifier. Varies according
to the type of software input/output signal.
nnnn: Serial numbers. Some software input/output elements do not
have serial numbers.

Software input/output element numbers of CS 3000 are shown in the table
below.


Table 5.2 Software Input/Output Element number of CS 3000

Name Element
Number
Element Number Convention
Common switch %SWnnnn nnnn: Serial no.(0001 to 1000) (SFCS)
nnnn: Serial no.(0001 to 4000) (LFCS)
Annunciator message output %ANnnnn nnnn: Serial no.(0001 to 0500)
Print message output %PRnnnn nnnn: Serial no.(0001 to 0200)
Operator guide message output %OGnnnn nnnn: Serial no.(0001 to 0200)
Sequence message request %RQnnnn nnnn: Serial no.(0001 to 0200)
Supervisory computer event message output for PICOT %M3nnnn nnnn: Serial no.(0001 to 0100)
Signal event message output %EVnnnn nnnn: Serial no.(0001 to 0200)
SFC/SEBOL return event message output %RE -


TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 22
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.4.3.2 Common Switches (%SW)

Common switches are internal switches used by various control functions to
save the shared logical values in an FCS. The logical value of a common
switch is not directly output to an external FCS, but are used by various
control functions in an FCS for condition testing and status manipulation.
Common switches in the CS 3000 with the following element numbers may
be freely defined by users.

SFCS: Common switches with element number %SW0200 to
%SW1000
LFCS: Common switches with element number %SW0200 to
%SW4000

Common switches with element number %SW0001 to %SW0199 are fixed
as system switches. They are used to indicate the different statuses of the
FCS. Only a few of switches can be defined by users.

Condition Testing and Status Manipulation for Common Switches

The syntax form for common-switch condition testing and status
manipulation is similar to process I/O and is shown below.

Condition Testing

Condition testing involves testing a signal against the sequence table
via the ON/OFF status of a common switch assigned to represent the
signal. The syntax form for condition testing is shown below.

%SWnnnn.PV.ON/OFF (tagname can be used)

%SWnnnn: Element number
ON/OFF: Either ON or OFF must be specified.

Status Manipulation

Status manipulation involves changing the ON/OFF status of a
common switch from the sequence table. Two types of condition
signal outputs are available: a latched type and a non-latched type.
The syntax form for status manipulation is shown below.

%SWnnnn.PV.H or %SWnnnn.PV.L
nnnn: Element number
H: Latched type
L: Non-latched type

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 23
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions

Common Switches reserved for System Status

Common switches (element numbers: %SW0001 to %SW0199) are fixed as
system switches with fixed functions. The statuses of these common switches
can be referred to by users. Only the data for common switches %SW0001
to %SW0007 that are used as station start ID switches in a CS 3000 LFCS,
are written by users.

A list of the system common switches in a CS 3000 LFCS is shown below.


Table 5.2 System Common Switches in CS 3000 LFCS



*1: If the RIO power supply is configured in a single loop circuit, the value of %SW0022 is always 1.


TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 24
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.4.3.3 Global Switches (%GS)

Global Switches are identical to Common Switches except that they are read
by the entire network. For example, if %GS100.PV is set on by FCS01,
%G10001.PV will be seen as on in FCS02, etc. The format for global switch
addressing is as follows:

Condition: %GSnnnl1.PV.1 ON/OFF status reference
%GSnnnll.PV=BAD Data status reference
nnn - element number
ll - station number (omissible for local station)

Action: %GSnnn.PV.H or L sets the switch on

For detailed information about Global Switch operation, see the section on
Common Switch.






8.4.3.4 Annunciator Message Output (%AN)

An annunciator is a software switch that when set on, provides a process
alarm on the operator display. This is useful in such applications where
digital inputs or communication inputs need to be alarmed. It also allows a
process alarm to be generated due to a combination of events.

When the alarm occurrence status changes, the annunciator message informs
the HIS of the occurrence or recovery of the message. When an alarm occurs,
the alarm symbol will flash to prompt the operator for acknowledgment. The
alarm symbol will stop flashing once it has been acknowledged.

It is possible to define the alarm priority level for each annunciator message
output. The change in state of annunciator message outputs varies according
to their particular alarm priority level.

The relationship between alarm priority levels and state changes is as
follows.

High-and medium-priority alarms: Lock type state change
Low-priority alarms: Non-lock type state change
Logging alarms: Self-acknowledging type state change


TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 25
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
Condition Testing and Status Manipulation for Annunciator Message

The syntax form for annunciator message condition testing and status
manipulation is shown below.

Condition Testing

%ANnnnn.PV.ON/OFF -----Condition testing

%ANnnnn: Element number (or tagname)
ON/OFF: Either ON or OFF must be specified.



Status Manipulation

%ANnnnn.PV.H or %ANnnnn.PV.L

%ANnnnn: Element number (or tagname)
H: Occurrence/recovery of a latched annunciator message
L: Occurrence/recovery of a non-latched annunciator message

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 26
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions

8.4.3.5 Print Message Output (%PR)

Print message outputs print the data corresponding to an event that occurred
in the process. This function is mainly used to record the event that occurred
in a process by printing them on paper.

Specification

The syntax form for a print message output specification is shown
below.

%PRnnnn.PV.NON ---- To output a print message
%PRnnnn.PV.m ---- To output a print message with an integer
constant

%PRnnnn: Element number
m: Integer constant (-32768 to 32767)

Contents

Print message data can be output in either of the following formats.

Print message
Prints a comment and up to three process data items in
consecutive order.
Print message with integer constant
Prints a comment, an integer constant and then two process
data items in consecutive order, when an integer constant is
designated as the condition signal.

The contents of the print message output can be specified in the
Printout Message Definition Builder as follows.

Message: Up to 80 alphanumeric characters
Data: Tag name.data item name (and the number of subscripts)
Format: Zero suppression, M format, N format (or a conversion
format) Up to 8 alphanumeric characters. When the data exceeds
the number of digits specified, only the part that fits the specified
number of digits is displayed. N (number of digits after decimal
point)

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 27
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions

8.4.3.6 Operator Guide Message Output (%OG)

Operator guide message outputs alert the operator to the operator guide
window in real-time situations.

Specification

The syntax form for an operator-guide message output specification is
shown below.

%OGnnnn.PV.NON -----To output an operator guide message

where nnnn = Operator Guide number

Contents

The contents of an operator guide message output can be specified in
the Operator Guide Message Definition Builder as follows.

Message: Up to 70 alphanumeric characters
Color: Display color of character strings in operator guide
messages (Default color: white (W))
Related Window Name: Name of linked window

Designation of Output

Operator guide messages and data are output to the following
destinations.

Displayed in the operator guide window
Generates an electric sound.
The mark of the operator guide flashes in the operator
guide window
Output to a printer.
Logged into a file.

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 28
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions

8.4.3.7 Sequence Message Request (%RQ)

Sequence message requests enable the operator to start or run the HIS
functions from an FCS.

Specification

The syntax form for a sequence message request specification is shown
below.

%RQnnnn.PV.NON -----To output a sequence message
request

%RQnnnn: Element number

Contents

The following HIS functions can be called by sequence message
requests.

Start user program
Trend start/stop
LED flashing/ON/OFF
Calling up windows
Execute the function assigned to function keys


8.4.3.8 Supervisory Computer Message Output for PICOT (%M3)

The supervisory computer message output for PICOT (%M3) is used to pass
the FCS event to the FCS Data Setting/Acquisition Package (PICOT)
(PHS6710) in the HIS.

Specification

The syntax form for a supervisory computer message output for
PICOT specification is shown below.

%M3nnnn.PV.NON -----To output a supervisory computer
message output for PICOT

M3nnnn: Element number


TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 29
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.4.3.9 Signal Event Message Output (%EV)

Signal event message outputs enable a function block to inform the SEBOL
control function of event changes.

Specification

The syntax form for a signal event message output specification is
shown below.

%EVnnnn.PV.k -----To output a signal event message

%EVnnnn: Element number
k: Parameter (0 to 65535)


8.4.3.10 SFC/SEBOL Return-event Message Output (%RE)

The output of SFC/SEBOL return-event messages enables a function block
to inform the SFC block or SEBOL block of event changes exerted by the
SEBOL program.

Specification

The syntax form for a SFC/SEBOL return-event message output
specification is shown below.

%RE.PV.k ---- To output a SFC/SEBOL return-event
message.

k: Parameter (0 to 65535)

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 30
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.4.4 Regulatory and Calculation Blocks

The status of regulatory and calculation blocks can be monitored and operated in a
sequence table or logic chart. A list of all status operations is given in the following
sections of the Reference Manual (IM 33S1B30-01E):

D2.2.10, Page D2-42: Condition Signal Description
D2.2.13, Page D2-76: Action Signal Description

Some of the more important ones are discussed here.

Block Mode (MODE)

The mode of a controller, or other regulatory control block can be monitored and
changed through a sequence using the MODE data item as follows:

Tagname.MODE MAN Y

If this is a condition then if the tag is in Manual, then this condition is true. If it is
an action, then the mode of the tag is set to Manual.

The modes that a controller can be set to or referenced are described in section
A5.1.1 of the Reference Manual and are as follows:




TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 31
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
Alarm Status (ALRM)

The alarm status of a controller or other regulatory block can be monitored using
the ALRM item as follows:

Tagname.ALRM HI Y

If the tag is in HI alarm, then this condition is true.

The alarm status that can be referenced are described in section A5.3 of the
Reference Manual and are as follows:



TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 32
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
In addition to monitoring the alarm status, it is possible to mask and cancel alarms
through the action area of the sequence table.

The difference between masking and canceling alarms is that masking only stops
the alarm from appearing on the alarm line on the operator display, and giving an
audible alarm. It can still be detected in a sequence that is monitoring an alarm
status. Canceling alarms turns off alarm detection for that alarm.

The various options are as follows:

Item Value Description
Tagname.AF Alarm status
(as above)
Cancel alarm
Tagname.XAF IOP Cancel IOP alarm detection
Tagname.AOFS Alarm status
AOF
Mask alarm
Mask all alarms
Tagname.AFLS AFL Group acknowledge alarms

Note: Y causes the alarm to be disabled or masked.
N causes the alarm to be re-enabled.

Example: to mask LO alarm detection of FIC100

FIC100.AOFS LO Y

Reference: Reference Manual,
Section D2.2.13, Page D2-75

Data Status

Data status is the information that represents the reliability of data. The data
obtained from the I/O module is passed from one function block to another with
its data status information. This is held in the PV and can be monitored in the
sequence table according to the following examples:

FIC100.PV =BAD Y the input is BAD
FIC100.PV =CAL Y the block is in CAL

See section A5.4 of the Reference Manual for a list of all the data status values.

It is also possible to set some data status. The main application is for putting a
function block into CAL as follows:

FIC100.PV =CAL Y put the block into CAL
FIC100.PV =CAL N takes the block out of CAL

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 33
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
Switches

Regulatory and calculation blocks have various switches available to them, and these
can be set and read by a sequence. Some of these are on/off type switches, and others
are selector switches which are set to a number of integer values. The most used ones
are described here.

See Reference Manual, Sections D2.2.10 and D2.2.13 for a full list of all the switches
that can be set, and also the individual specification of the function blocks for more
detail on the switch functions (throughout section D of the Reference Manual).

Item Value Description
TSW 0,1 Tracking Switch
PSW 0
1
2
3
No effect
Set output to ML
Set output to MH
Set output to PMV
SW 0 - 16 Switch position (*1)
SEL 0 - 4 Switch position (*2)

Notes: *1 - The SW sets the switch position of the following blocks:
SS-H/M/L (SW=0-4)
AS-H/M/L (SW=0-4)
SS-DUAL (SW=0-3)
SW-33 (SW=0-3)
SW-91 (SW=0-9)
DSW-16 (SW=0-16)
(see page D2-78 and 80 of the reference manual for a complete list)

*2 - The SEL monitors the switch position of the following blocks when they
are in auto select:
SS-H/M/L
AS-H/M/L
SS-DUAL

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 34
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.4.5 Referencing Other Sequence Tables


Referencing a Sequence Table

The condition of another sequence table can be monitored with three data items: SD,
SA and PV.

Item Value Description
R At least one rule in the other sequence table is true Tagname.SD
C The same rule number in the other sequence table is true
Tagname.SA xx Either the condition of step 00 or step xx is true
Tagname.PV xx The referenced sequence table is in step xx



Running a Sequence Table

Item Value Description
Tagname.ACT ON Runs a one shot sequence table
Tagname.SD C One-shot execution of the same rule in the other sequence table
Tagname.SA xx Runs step xx and step 00 of the other sequence table
Tagname.PV xx Forces the other sequence table to step xx

Note: the ACT item is also used to execute a one-shot Logic Charts and Calculation
Blocks.


Reference: Reference Manual,
Sections D2.2.11 and D2.2.14

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 35
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.5 Sequence Auxiliary Blocks

Associated with sequences are function blocks that are used as part of a sequence.
These blocks are:

Timer Block (TM)
Software Counter Block (CTS)
Pulse Train Counter Block (CTP)
Code Input Block (CI)
Code Output Block (CO)
Relational Expression Block (RL)
Resource Scheduler Block (RS)
16 Valve Monitor Block (VLVM)

The timer, counter and relational expression blocks are the most commonly used
blocks, and will be discussed in detail here. The others have specialised applications
and are only summarised briefly here, with reference to the instruction manual.

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 36
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.5.1 Timer Block (TM)

The timer block is used by a sequence to time events. The sequence can STOP, STOP
and PAUSE the timer, and monitor its Block Status (BSTS) for time up (CTUP) and
pre-time up (PALM).

Timer Operation:

When the conditions driving the START become true, the time (PV) starts timing up.
If the conditions become not true in a non-step sequence table, then the timer STOPS.
When the conditions become true again, the timer resets and starts.

When the timer value (PV) reaches the timer setpoint (PH), then the timer stops and
gives a time up status (BSTS = CTUP).

There is also a countdown time (DV) that operates simultaneously. When the timer
starts, the DV starts at PH and countdowns to 0 as PV counts up to PH. When the DV
reaches a countdown setpoint value (DL), a PALM status is given.


Figure 8.2 - Timer Operation
TAG.BSTS
TAG.OP
PALM CTUP
DL
DV PV
PH
WAIT RSTR START START STOP

ACTION
CONDITION
TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 37
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
Timer Parameters:

Units seconds or minutes (set in the builder)
Timer value (PV) 0 - 100,000 secs or minutes
Timer countdown value (DV) 0 - 100,000 secs or minutes
Timer setpoint (PH) 0 - 100,000 secs or minutes
Timer countdown setpoint (DL) 0 - 100,000 secs or minutes

Monitoring Timer status:

Timer status is accessed with the BSTS data item as follows:

CTUP Timeout - PV has reached PH
PALM Pre-timeout - DV has reached DL
RUN The timer is running
STOP The timer is stopped
PAUS The timer is paused

Running the Timer:

The timer is operated in the sequence using the OP data item as follows:

Y Timer Stop command STOP
N No effect
Y Timer Start command START
N Timer Stop command
Y Timer Restart command (after pause) RSTR
N No effect
Y Timer Pause command WAIT
N Timer Restart command

Note 1: setting the START to "N" stops the timer. Therefore the STOP is redundant.
Note 2: setting the WAIT to "N" restarts the timer. Therefore the RSTR is redundant.

Reference: Reference Manual, Section D2.5
TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 38
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.5.2 Software Counter Block (CTS)

The software counter is similar to the timer except that rather than timing, it counts
events set by a sequence. When the number of counts (PV) reaches the setpoint (PH),
the counter status (BSTS) is set to count up (CTUP). It also has a countdown function
with DV and DL.

Counter Parameters:

Count value (PV) 0 - 100,000
Countdown value (DV) 0 - 100,000
Counter setpoint (PH) 0 - 100,000
Countdown setpoint (DL) 0 - 100,000

Monitoring Counter status:

Counter status is accessed with the BSTS data item as follows:

CTUP PV has reached PH
PALM DV has reached DL
STOP The counter is stopped

Running the Counter:

The counter is operated in the sequence using the ACT data item as follows:

ON Y The counter increments by 1 count
OFF Y The counter is stopped

Note 1: When the counter is stopped with the OFF command, when it is restarted
with the ON command, the count is reset (i.e., PV = 0).

Counter Operation:

When the ACT.ON value is activated, the counter (PV) is incremented by 1. When
the counter value (PV) reaches the timer setpoint (PH), then the timer stops and gives
a time up status (BSTS = CTUP). At the same time, the DV value (which initially
equals PV) counts down to zero. When it reaches DL, then a PALM status is given.

Reference: Reference Manual, Section D2.6
TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 39
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.5.3 Pulse Train Counter Block (CTP)

The pulse train counter is similar to a timer, except that rather than timing up, the PV
increments according to a pulse input that is soft-wired into the IN terminal.

Counter Parameters:

Count value (PV) 0 - 100,000
Countdown value (DV) 0 - 100,000
Counter setpoint (PH) 0 - 100,000
Countdown setpoint (DL) 0 - 100,000

Monitoring Counter status:

Counter status is accessed with the BSTS data item as follows:

CTUP Timeout - PV has reached PH
PALM Pre-timeout - DV has reached DL
RUN The counter is running
STOP The counter is stopped
PAUS The counter is paused

Running the Counter:

The timer is operated in the sequence using the OP data item as follows:

Y Counter Stop command STOP
N No effect
Y Counter Start command START
N Counter Stop command
Y Counter Restart command (after
pause)
RSTR
N No effect
Y Counter Pause command WAIT
N Counter Restart command

Note 1: setting the START to "N" stops the timer. Therefore the STOP is redundant.
Note 2: setting the WAIT to "N" restarts the timer. Therefore the RSTR is redundant.

Counter Operation:

When the conditions driving the START become true, the counter starts counting up.
If the conditions become not true in a non-step sequence table, then the counter
STOPS. When the conditions become true again, the counter resets and starts.

When the timer value (PV) reaches the timer setpoint (PH), then the timer stops and
gives a time up status (BSTS = CTUP). When the DV counts down to DL, then the
status is given as PALM.

Reference: Reference Manual, Section D2.7
TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 40
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.5.4 Relational Expression Block (RL)

Analog values cannot be referenced in a sequence table. To compare two analog
values in a sequence table, a relational expression is required. This is a function block
with 16 entries. Each entry allows for the comparison of two analog values, and the
nature of the comparison is specified in the sequence table.



This example shows a Relational Expression block with tagname DATA, configured
with 3 entries. An explanation of these entries is as follows:

1. Compares FIC100.PV with the constant 75.0
2. Compares FIC100.PV with DATA01.DT01. DATA01 is a BDSET, and the
first value in it (DT01) is addressed. This is a value that is configurable
through the tuning panel of the BDSET on the operator station, and is a
convenient way of having constants that can be changed online.
3. Compares two live values.

These entries can then be referenced in a sequence table according to the following
syntax:

DATA.X01 GT
GE
LT
LE
EQ
Greater Than
Greater Than or Equal To
Less Than
Less Than or Equal To
Equal To

Where: DATA is the tagname of the Relational Expression
X01 is the entry number (X01 to X16)

Reference: Reference Manual,
Section D2.2.10, Page D2-40

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 41
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.5.5 Other Auxiliary Blocks

Code Input Block (CI)

The encoding function of the code input block (CI) interprets a set of input digital
signals (upto 18) as a code and converts it into an integer value. The converted
integer value becomes the input code value (PV). Since it is a one-shot block,
when it is activated by a sequence, it reads the input once, and the calculated value
is held in the PV until the next time it is activated. The syntax for running the
block is as follows:

tagname.ACT ON Y

There exist two methods for encoding the digital signals: No conversion, which
interprets the contact signal patterns as binary numbers, and BCD conversion,
which interprets the contact digital patterns as binary coded decimal (BCD) codes.

Reference: Reference Manual, Section D2.8

Code Output Block (CO)

This block is the opposite to the Code Input block. The PV (an integer value) is
converted to up to 18 digital outputs, according to the type of encoding that is
selected. It is also one-shot operation.

Reference: Reference Manual, Section D2.9

Resource Scheduler Block (RS)

The resource scheduler block is a complex block that compares the state of 32
inputs with 32 requests, and provides 32 permissions. For instance, if a request is
made to start pump no. 1 (RQ01), then the total number of permissions given is
checked against the maximum allowable (PMH). If this is less than the maximum,
then permission no. 1 (PM01) is set on, allowing the sequence to start that pump.
If the number of permissions is equal to the maximum allowable, the PM01 is not
set on until the number of permission becomes less than the maximum (i.e.,
another pump is switched off).

Reference: Reference Manual, Section D2.11

16-Valve Monitor Block (VLVM)

The 16-valve monitor block (VLVM) handles 16 sets of input signals
independently, performing valve operation monitoring and message output for
each input signal. A set of input signals comprises a combination of a valve
contact output and one (or two) limit switch inputs. Also, when an error occurs in
any set of the 16 sets, the message output can be extracted from the representative
message output terminal (J17).

Reference: Reference Manual, Section D2.12

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 42
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.6 Switch Instrument and Motor Control Blocks

Switch Instrument blocks are function blocks that provide an operator and sequence
interface to valves, motors, pumps and other actuating devices. They provide
facilities to allow a sequence table or logic chart to control the field device easily.


PV
MV

SIO-11 SIO-22

There are several types of Switch Instrument Blocks depending on the number and
types of inputs/outputs to the blocks:

SI-1 Switch Instrument with 1 input
SI-2 Switch Instrument with 2 inputs
SO-1 Switch Instrument with 1 output
SO-2 Switch Instrument with 2 outputs
SIO-11 Switch Instrument with 1 input and 1 output
SIO-21 Switch Instrument with 2 inputs and 1 output
SIO-12 Switch Instrument with 1 input and 2 outputs
SIO-22 Switch Instrument with 2 inputs and 2 outputs
SIO-12P Switch Instrument with 1 input and 2 pulse outputs
SIO-22P Switch Instrument with 2 inputs and 2 pulse outputs


Reference: Reference Manual, D2.4
TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 43
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.6.1 Operation of the Switch Instrument

The digital input(s) are connected to the IN terminal and are converted into a PV
(0,1,2) through the Answerback Input Function. The OUT terminal connects to 1 or 2
digital outputs and is driven by the MV (0,1,2) through the Output Signal Conversion
Function. An Answerback Check Function checks that the input (PV) corresponds to
the output command (MV) after a set time. If not, an Answerback Alarm is generated.



When in manual, the MV is set by the operator clicking on the pushbuttons on the
faceplate. When in auto, the MV is written to by the CSV which in turn is set by a
sequence table or logic chart (see section 8.6.6).

TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 44
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.6.2 Answerback Input Function

The IN terminal only connects to one input. If it is a two input SIO block, then the
next input on the Process Input card is automatically assigned to the second input.

The digital input status is converted to an integer in the PV as follows:

Input Status Number of
Inputs n n+1
PV
ON 2 1
OFF 0
ON OFF 2
OFF OFF 1
OFF ON 0
2
ON ON PERR

These relate to the function block pushbuttons as follows:


MV=2 PV=2
MV=1 PV=1
MV=0 PV=0

8.6.3 Output Signal Conversion Function

The OUT terminal only connects to one output. If there is a two output SIO block,
then the next output on the Process Output card is automatically assigned as the
second output.

The digital output status is converted from an integer (MV) as follows:

Output Status Number of
Outputs
MV
n n+1
2 ON 1
0 OFF
2 ON OFF
1 OFF OFF
2
0 OFF ON
2 ON OFF 2
(pulse type) 0 OFF ON

These relate to the function block pushbuttons as shown above.
TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 45
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.6.3 Answerback Alarm Function

When the output of the Switch Instrument block is changed (i.e. the MV is changed),
a masking timer is started. If the timer times out before the input matches the output
(i.e. PV MV) then an Answerback alarm is given.

Discrepancy Alarm Status
MV > PV ANS+
MV < PV ANS-

In other words, if a request to open a valve or start a pump is issued (i.e. MV = 2) and
the valve fails to open or the pump fails to start (i.e., PV 2), then the ANS+ alarm
status is generated.

The masking timer setpoint (MTM) is set through the tuning panel.

8.6.4 Other Switch Instrument Functions

Tracking Function

If the TSW switch is on, then the output tracks the input, i.e., MV = PV. The
TSW can be set from a sequence, or through a connection to the TSI terminal.

Answerback Bypass

If the BPSW switch is on, then the input is forced to the output, i.e., PV = MV,
and no answerback alarm check takes place. The BPSW can be set from a
sequence, or through the SWI terminal.

Simulation Mode

If the SIMM switch is on, then the input is forced to the output after the masking
timer has timed out, i.e., PV = MV, and no answerback alarm check takes place.
This is very similar to the bypass switch, except for the time function. The SIMM
can be set from a sequence or through the tuning panel.

CAL mode

When the Switch Instrument block is in CAL, then the PV can be set manually,
i.e., the PV is disconnected from the inputs.

Mode Change Interlock Function

When the interlock input is on, then the Switch Instrument is forced to Manual
and cannot be set to Auto. The interlock input is a terminal (INT) to which a
switch or digital input is connected.
TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 46
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
8.6.5 Motor Controller Function Blocks (MC-2, MC-3)

A Motor Control block is similar to a Switch Instrument block, and the above
description holds for a Motor Control block. However, the Motor Control block has
additional features, and these are described here. Note that these blocks are
categorised as Regulatory Control blocks, and not as sequence elements.

The MC-2 is equivalent to an SIO-11, i.e., it is a 2 position block with 1
input and 1 output.
The MC-3 is equivalent to an SIO-22, i.e., it is a 3 position block with 2
inputs and 2 outputs. Note that pulse outputs are also available.

The MC block functional diagram is as follows:



The IN, OUT, SWI, INT terminals have the same function as an SIO block, but there
are also extra inputs:

FB - Feedback Value (FV). This is an analog input and can be connected
directly to a Process Input. There is an indicator on an MC faceplate, and this
is the input to the indicator. It performs only a display function.

TT - Thermal Trip. This is a switch input from the actuator. When ON, it
indicates a TRIP status on the faceplate, and an alarm is generated. It also
forces the output to the CLOSE/STOP position (i.e., MV=0).

IL - Interlock. This is a switch input, either from a process input, or a
software switch driven by interlock logic. When ON, the faceplate indicates
LOCK, and the output is forced to the CLOSE/STOP position (i.e., MV=0).

SWI - Bypass Switch (BPSW). This is the same as the SIO block, but it also
provides Interlock bypass as well as Answerback Check bypass according to
the following table:

BPSW Action
0 No action
1 Answerback Bypass
2 Interlock Bypass
3 Answerback and Interlock Bypass
4 Manual and Tracking
TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 47
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions


Extra configuration values include:

ONCT - Start Count. Counts the number of times a start is requested, i.e.,
whenever MV is set to 2.

ONTM - Operating Time. Times up in seconds whenever the motor is
running, i.e. MV = 1 or 2. ONTH gives the same time in hours, and ONTS is
the seconds units of ONTH.


PV
MV
FV

Reference: Reference Manual, D1.17
TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 48
YOKOGAWA TRAINING Section 8. Sequence Control Functions
TE 33AU1C3-01 8 - 49
8.6.6 Operating the Switch Instrument from a Sequence

The switch instrument can be operated and monitored in a sequence using the PV and
CSV. The syntax is as follows:

To monitor the state of a Switch Instrument block:

0 Y valve is closed/pump is stopped
1 Y valve is travelling
tag.PV
2 Y valve is open/pump is running

To operate the Switch Instrument block:

tag.CSV P0 Y close valve/stop pump (set CSV = 0)
N open valve/start pump (set CSV = 2)
P1 Y stop valve (set CSV = 1)
N no effect
P2 Y open valve/start pump (set CSV = 2)
N close valve/stop pump (set CSV = 0)

Note that to operate a Switch Instrument block from a sequence it must be in AUT.
This can be done in the sequence at the same time as the block is operated as the
following example illustrates:

LI100.ALRM HI Y
LI100.ALRM LO Y



VALVE1.MODE AUT Y Y
VALVE1.CSV P2 Y N





A description of the sequence control is as follows:

If the tank level (LI100) is in HI alarm,
Then put the Switch Instrument (VALVE1) into AUT
And open the valve (set VALVE1.CSV = 2)

If the tank level (LI100) is in LO alarm,
Then put the Switch Instrument (VALVE1) into AUT
And close the valve (set VALVE1.CSV = 0)