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SHRDC

ANNUAL REPORT 2003

December 2004

SAARC Human Resource Development Centre (SHRDC)


Park Road Shak Shehzad Islamabad, Pakistan
Website: www.shrdc-isb.org.pk E-Mail: shrdc@shrdc-isb.org.pk
CONTENTS Page
No.

Foreword
(i)
1. Introduction 1

-Objectives
-Functions
-Organization
2. Research
4

3. Publications 6

4. Training 9

5. Institutional Events
14

6. Budget and Finance


20
The SAARC Human Resource Development Centre (SHRDC), a regional
institution of South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) has been
functioning in Islamabad, Pakistan since 1998. The main objective of the Centre is
to undertake research, impart training and to disseminate information on Human
Resource Development (HRD) related issues for the SAARC Region.

The importance of HRD is increasingly being realized. It has assumed all the
more significance in the context of changing regional and world environment. The
HRD come to occupy the centre stage in the developmental interventions. The
importance of HRD has been further enhanced as the economic, social and
technological changes of the current century are putting pressure on
governmental and non-governmental organizations to develop human resources
in order to accomplish information and communication technological functions.
Needless to mention that a rich human capital is a prerequisite for a meaningful
exploitation of modern technology and sustainable development.

The Centre has now become fully operational and its activities are receiving
appreciation from all quarters. In 2003, the Centre for the first time implemented
its approved programme of activities since its establishment. The Centre during
2003 has successfully completed three Trainer’s training programmes, published
quarterly HRD News, Information Booklet on SHRDC, Progress Report 1998-2002,
Directory of HRD Institutions in the SAARC countries, and hosted SHRDC Website.

I take this opportunity to express my deep gratitude and special thanks to


the Government of Pakistan for their generous support to the Centre for providing
additional fund for procurement of vehicles, activities related equipment and air
conditioners. I hope, in future, the Government of Pakistan will continue its
support to SHRDC. I express my thanks to the Professional and GS Staff of the
SHRDC for their hard working and support for running the Centre’s activities
smoothly.

I look forward to the fullest cooperation and support of the Member States
in making SHRDC as a Centre of Excellence of SAARC.

Dr.Muhammad Aslam Khan


Director

(i)

SAARC Human Resource Development Centre (SHRDC), a regional


institution of South Asian Association of Regional Cooperation (SAARC) has been
functioning in Islamabad, Pakistan with the objectives to carryout research,
impart training and to disseminate information on HRD related issues for the
SAARC Region.

OBJECTIVES

The main objective of SHRDC is to support the capacity building and


enhance the capacity of HRD functionaries, policymakers and trainers of the
region. The programmes of SHRDC are conducted at the regional level. The
Centre’s goal is to create critical mass for development efforts in South Asia and
enable its people as partners as well as beneficiaries of the development process.

The objectives of the SHRDC are:

 To keep abreast of HRD related research works being conducted in the research
institutions of the region and exchange of experiences within the Member States;
 To conduct research programmes in Human Resource Development (HRD) in the
South Asian Region;
 To provide forum for professional interaction and policy advocacies of HRD for
robust, equitable and sustainable growth;
 To promote capacity strength by extending training to Member Governments
functionaries, policymakers, trainers and development practitioners;
 To provide service and support to the institutions / organizations in the region for
enhancement and exchange of their knowledge and skill within the region; and
 To disseminate HRD information through seminars, conferences,
symposiums and workshops, so as to share experiences for implementation of
HRD programmes at regional level and bring out publications.

FUNCTIONS

The functions of the Centre to achieve its objectives are:

 Stimulate activities through networking of institutions, information and


knowledge;

 Develop linkages with Nodal Points designated by the Member States,


and also with the already existing Institutions in the Region and bank upon their
backup support;

 Prepare directory of research institutions and experts in the area


of Human Resource Development (HRD) in the region;

 Collate HRD data as well as data on Socio-Economic Indicators of the


region;
 Review HRD policies and strategies of the SAARC Member Countries
and undertake need assessments;

 Facilitate exchange of experiences of Member States in the area of


Human Resource Development; and

 Capacity building and impart training to HRD experts, policymakers


and functionaries.

ORGANIZATION
Governing Board
The SHRDC Governing Board comprised of 10 Members, one eminent
expert nominated by each Member State, representative of the SAARC
Secretary General, a representative from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
Government of Pakistan and the Director of the Centre. Director of the
Centre acts as Member / Secretary of the Governing Board. The Board
meets annually in the last quarter of the year.

The Governing Board recommends the Centre’s Programme of Activities


and Budget for approval by the SAARC Standing Committee and Council of
Ministers.

Staff

The Director of the SHRDC is nominated by the Host Government. He


acts as the Executive Head of the Centre under the supervision of the
Secretary General, SAARC. The Centre is having two types of staff.
a. Regionally recruited Professionals
- Deputy Director 1

- Research Fellow 2

- Research Associate 2
b. Locally Recruited General Services Staff

- Admin. & Accounts Officer 1


- Computer Programming Officer 1
- Secretary 2
- Librarian cum Documentation Assistant 1
- Accounts Assistant 1
- Admin Assistant 1
- Data Entry Operator 2
- Receptionist 1
- Driver 2
- Messenger 3
- Gardener 1
- Guard 2
- Cleaner 1
The organizational chart of SHRDC is given at Annex-1.1.

The HRD is a multidimensional issue and requires a multidisciplinary


approach to achieve its goals and to set its objectives. Policymakers, at all levels,
should conduct research, share experience and enhance collaboration for policy
formulation and preparation of strategies. Human resource development means
to include the provision of education, health and welfare coverage and the
establishment of safeguards against unemployment or ill health for the bulk of
population. A substantial part of the research activity must be devoted to the
analysis of problems in the provision of education, health, welfare services and
other related concerns such as employment, income distribution, poverty, rural
development, nutrition, population, environment and demography.

The field of HRD Research is wide. Consensus about the field of HRD is
growing. HRD encompasses adult learning at the workplace, training &
development, organizational development & change, organizational learning,
performance improvement and competence development.
HRD is a research based discipline creating the standards and foundations
for building expertise, intellectual capital, organization design, and work process
that contribute to personal and organizational development. Research also
provide the data to make an accurate diagnosis of root causes. The role of
research in policymaking is unavoidable. Research is a source of carrying out
analysis, evaluation of different policy options and strategies and its impact on
different HRD indicators.

The third meeting of the Governing Board of SHRDC suggested that Centre
should concentrate on training activities in the first year of launching its
programme of activities and carryout research activities gradually in subsequent
years. In view of the above, the Centre initiated this research related activity in
the year 2003.
i) Database Development on Macroeconomic Profiles and Human
Resource Development Indicators in the SAARC Region.
Database Development on Macroeconomic Profiles and Human
Resource Development (HRD) Indicators in the SAARC Region
A comprehensive database on HRD’s basic indicators and its institutional
framework of the SAARC Member States is a long felt need of Policymakers,
Analysts, Development functionaries, administrators and academics of the
Region. The basic objective to develop the database is to cater the need of HRD
information that facilitates in formulation of HRD Policies, Planning of HRD
development programmes and effective management of the system/ models
adopted for the improvement of HRD. In line with this objective, SHRDC has
planned to develop this database to strengthen the capacity of the Centre and to
help formulate HRD related Policies and Programmes in the region. Database is a
basis for undertaking research, evaluation and analysis of impact of different
policy option on different indicators. The Programme aims to collect necessary
national level data annually to cater the needs of HRD information and data in the
region.
The main objective of this programme is to develop a database on
macroeconomic profiles and HRD indicators in SAARC member countries and
disseminate on line to the end-users in the region. The specific objective is to
suggest policy guidelines on HRD in the Member Countries through a
comprehensive research report based on the comparative analysis on selected
indicators of HRD. The database covers the period from 1990-2002 and the main
indicators are: Macro Economic Profiles, education, health, demography, gender,
poverty, public expenditure, food security, nutrition; natural resources,
environment; and energy. The SAARC Member States require uptodate, reliable
and consistent data on social and human development in order to formulate its
HRD policy. The information for database is being collected through a structured
questionnaire through identified nodal points of HRD in each Member State. The
Centre will update the database regularly each year and publish through SHRDC’s
website as an online publication.
SHRDC has a modest publication programme on issues of HRD in the form
of newsletter, information booklet, reports, directories etc. In addition to that the
SHRDC is planning to launch an important periodical publication the SAARC
Journal of Human Resource Development (SJHRD).
During the period under review the following publications were brought out
by the SAARC Human Resource Development Centre (SHRDC):

• Two issues of Newsletter “HRD News” i-e. June-September,


2003 and October-December, 2003.
• The other publications are: Information Booklet-“SHRDC An
Introduction”, “SHRDC Progress Report 1998-2002” and
“Directory of HRD Institutions in SAARC Region”.
HRD News
The SHRDC’s Newsletter is a quarterly publication of the Centre which
contains information on the Centre’s activities, new developments in the socio-
economic fields, HRD news and reports, announcements of Centre’s research &
training programmes and feature articles on HRD issues.
SHRDC an Introduction
The booklet provides information on SAARC Human Resource Development
Centre (SHRDC)’s objectives, functions, organization, terms of reference,
programme of activities and the available facilities in the Centre.
Progress Report 1998-2002

The Progress Report gives detail of the activities and functions performed
by the Centre during the period of July 1998 to December 2002. The activities of
the Centre mainly focussed in this report were development of Centre’s physical
infrastructure, terms of reference, service and financial rules and salient features
of the meetings of the SHRDC Governing Board and implementation of the
decisions of the Board.

Directory of HRD Institutions in SAARC Region

The SAARC Members Countries are investing a large sum of their budget on
improvement of human capital in agriculture, industry and service sectors. Today,
specialization has reached to the extent that there are research & development
and training centres exclusively or partly engaged in the improvement or
development of human resources in the SAARC Region. These could form a large
regional network of HRD Institutions/ Organizations. Despite this, the resources of
one institution in most of the cases remain unknown to another due to
inadequate information sources. There is a long felt need of policymakers,
development practitioners, analysts and academician to build a network of HRD
institutions in the region to build up a partnership for socio-economic
development and implementation of HRD related programmes in the South Asian
Region. In the absence of such work SHRDC has brought out a Directory of HRD
Institutions in the SAARC Countries.

The directory, though not comprehensive, provides information on the


existing HRD related institutions in the region, their programmes and capabilities
of human resources in each institution. The directory will pave the way to develop
interactions and linkages and exchange of knowledge and experiences among the
institutions in the area of interests. The information for this Directory has been
collected through a structured questionnaire from SAARC Member States. The
Directory has been published and circulated amongst the Member States. The
Directory will require updatation at a later stage.
Training on HRD related issues is an important function of the Centre. The
training programmes of SHRDC are designed to meet the requirements of the
target groups which include trainers, policymakers, planners and development
practitioners. In the year 2003, the Centre conducted two weeks three training
courses:

i) Poverty Alleviation through HRD


15-28 September. 2003

ii) Gender & Development


6-9 October. 2003

iii) Vocational and Technical Education Training: A means of HRD


9-22 December. 2003

The training courses were structured in a way to sensitize the participants


about importance of the issues and to deepen as well as to update the knowledge
and understanding on the issues. The courses were designed in a way that these
could enhance the ability of the participants to contribute in the process of
development.

Poverty Alleviation through HRD

SHRDC arranged the first ever training course on “Poverty Alleviation


through HRD” in Islamabad from 15-28 September, 2003. The overall objective of
the training programme was to strengthen the ability of the participants to
formulate policies and design programmes to alleviate poverty in their respective
countries by enhancing their knowledge on different aspects of poverty.

The wide range of topics were covered in training course including Poverty
& HRD, Poverty Measurement & Trends, Tools for Participating Community
Empowerment for Poverty Alleviation, Approaches to Income Generation, Poverty
Monitoring & Evaluation and SAARC Initiatives on Poverty Alleviation. For
acquainting the participants with the Pakistan’s Poverty Alleviation Programmes,
three study visits were arranged: Visit to i) Projects of National Rural Support
Programme (NRSP), Murree, ii) Micro Finance Projects in Kalar Kahar; and iii)
National Commission for Human Development (NCHD) Projects in Mardan. These
visits enabled the participants to have the project specific experiences on Poverty
Alleviation in Pakistan. The participants presented their country reports
considering the aspects of country specific Poverty Alleviation Policies and
Programmes. A total of sixteen participants attended the course, two participants
from Bangladesh, Maldives, Nepal, Sri Lanka, one from Bhutan and seven from
Pakistan of which two were observers. The list of participants is at Annex-4.1.

Dr. Nasim Ashraf, Minister of State/Chairman, National Commission


for Human Development with the participants of training
course on Poverty Alleviation.
The Training Programme was inaugurated by Dr. Nasim Ashraf, Minister of
State/Chairman, National Commission for Human Development (NCHD)
Islamabad, Pakistan who was the chief guest of the ceremony.

Acting Director, Dr. M. Zahangir Kabir in his welcome address, pointed out
that the poverty is wide spread in South Asia and the countries in the region have
committed themselves to alleviate poverty. However, those commitments have
not been converted into realities. The challenge, therefore, facing South Asia is to
translate the commitments into action plans and achievements. In this context,
SHRDC’s this regional training course on “Poverty Alleviation through HRD” is a
step towards achieving the SAARC’s cherished goal to alleviate poverty from the
South Asia.

Course Coordinator Mr. S. Ejaz Ali Wasti highlighted the objectives of the
training course. He mentioned that the South Asia having 23 percent of the world
population is the planet’s poorest region. About 540 million or 45 percent of the
region’s population are living below the poverty line. He explained that this
training was a move towards achieving the long term objective of poverty
alleviation in the region.

The Minister of State/ Chairman of NCHD Dr. Nasim Ashraf in his inaugural
address mentioned that the South Asia is the poorest region in the world even
below the Sub-Saharan Africa. It houses 25 percent of the people of the world and
the future generation of this region depends on the courage of the leaders of the
South Asia. At the Millennium Summit in 2000, 189 countries including all SAARC
countries signed the summit declaration and showed commitment to fulfillment of
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Among other, the MDGs goal is to reduce
the poverty half by 2015.

Dr. Nasim Ashraf also said that in paradigm of poverty alleviation, the most
critical element is education which has been shown by the experiences of those
countries that have gone ahead in improving the human capital. However,
poverty is a multidimensional problem and the most serious form of poverty is the
poverty of opportunity. He was of the view that if we can create equal
opportunity, all other forms of poverty including poverty of income can be
addressed.

The chief guest also mentioned that integrated and holistic approaches are
necessary in poverty alleviation efforts. Economic growth, education, health and
empowerment are totally interlinked. For example, child mortality is affected by
the level of income, access to safe drinking water and sanitation, education and
other health interventions. He further added that the quality of governance and
overall social functioning can influence both growth and poverty.

At the end of his inaugural speech the Chairman, NCHD mentioned that
poverty can only be reduced by truly empowering people by giving them decision
making rights backed by constitutional/legal support. There is tremendous human
potential in this region and peace is essential to utilize available human
resources. He emphasized on sharing of best practices and learning from each
other for the solution of common problem. He expressed hope that this training
programme would be really useful for the participants to perform their
responsibilities back home.

Mr. Iftikhar Hussain Shah, Director (SAARC), Ministry of Foreign Affairs,


Government of Pakistan chaired the concluding session of the training course.
After recitation from the holy Quran, the Acting Director of the Centre, Dr.
M.Zahangir Kabir in his closing remarks said that the participants had hectic
schedule during this two weeks long training programme and they did not have
rest for even a single day. He expressed that the Centre’s best wishes will always
remain with the participants for their entire life. He requested the participants to
keep in touch with the Centre so that collective efforts could be made possible to
work together to solve the problems which were discussed and interacted during
the training program.

Mr. Iftikhar Hussain Shah, gave away the certificates to the participants. In
his concluding remarks, he expressed his belief that all the participants must
have benefited from the course. He hoped that they benefited not only from
resource persons but also from each other. He added that training like this is a
participatory learning process and participants have developed a network of their
own. He mentioned that this is the first training course organized by the Centre
and in future the Centre would be able to develop a wide network of the experts
in the SAARC Region.

The Director (SAARC) mentioned that wide spread poverty problem in the
region is because of gross negligence in the area of human resource development
though the Region has very talented human resources. The region has failed to
galvanize human resources in the development process. The pace of technologies
innovation and scientific development depend on the development and
accumulation of human capital. In comparison to developed countries the
situation in South Asia is very disappointing. The major reason for this is
negligible investment in the field of human resource development. This is the
field where governments and societies of the region need to take action. At the
same time, the SHRDC can do a lot in this regard through training and research.
At the end, he complimented the staff member and the Acting Director of the
Centre for their initiatives and for successful completion of the first ever training
course of the SAARC Human Resource Development Centre.
Gender and Development (GAD)
SHRDC conducted the second training course of the year 2003 on ‘Gender
and Development (GAD)’ in Islamabad from 6-19 October. The objectives of
the training course were to strengthen the abilities of participants to carry out
critical analysis of gender issues; to evaluate gender mainstreaming in the
development process and formulate country specific strategies and programmes
to maintain gender equality, in order to achieve the Millennium Development
Goals (MDGs) in South Asia.

A wide range of topics were covered in the training course, including


Gender and Development Policies and Strategies in South Asia; Comparative
Analysis of GAD in South Asia; GAD and Natural Resource Management; Gender
Analysis Framework; Micro-finance for Women Entrepreneurs; and GAD and
Governance in the South Asian region. Two study visits were arranged for the
participants to project sites of (i) National Rural Support Programme (NRSP) in
Muree and (ii) Sarhad Rural Support Programme (SRSP) in Abbotabad to get the
project-specific experiences of Pakistan. Participants in their country reports
reflected GAD policies, programmes and strategic options.

Twenty three participants two each from Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives,


Nepal and Sri Lanka; one participant from India and twelve participants from
Pakistan including two observers attended the training course. The list of
participants is at Annex-4.2.

H.E. Mr. F. A. Shamim Ahmed, High Commissioner of Bangladesh is


addressing the Inaugural Ceremony of the GAD
training course.
H E Mr. F. A. Shamim Ahmed, High Commissioner of Bangladesh in
Islamabad was the Chief Guest at the Inaugural Ceremony. Speaking on the
occasion Mr. Ahmed said that though women in South Asia work from dawn to
dusk, their economic contribution is scarcely acknowledged at the national level
and their access to health, education and other facilities lags far behind than that
of men. He also said that much is required to be done to reduce the gender gap
and achieve greater improvement in South Asian women’s economic and social
status. Within the dynamism in world economic order, particularly globalization
and Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the public-private partnerships, new
institutional frameworks, reforms in pro-women law and governance are some of
the measures he suggested to put the emphasis on mainstreaming gender and
development in South Asia.

The High Commissioner of Sri Lanka in Islamabad and Chairman of the


SHRDC Governing Board, H.E. General C.S. Weerasooriya was the chief guest at
the concluding session. He distributed the certificates. In his concluding remarks
the Sri Lankan High Commissioner pointed out that Gender and Development in
the South Asian region should be given the highest priority in the development
agenda, because nearly 643 million female population live in the South Asian
region. Finding out opportunities and other options within the South Asian region,
will be a major challenge for policymakers. He elaborated that to getting into
mainstreaming gender and development, each member country of SAARC should
formulate multi-dimensional, clearly targeted, pro-women policies and
programmes, including pro-women education, health, skill development, building
assets and infrastructure.

Vocational & Technical Education and Training (VTET): A Means of HRD

During the period under report, SHRDC conducted the third training course
on ‘Vocational & Technical Education and Training (VTET): A Means of
HRD’ in Islamabad from 9-22 December, 2003. The main objectives of the
training course were to strengthen the abilities of participants to identify the
importance of vocational and technical education & training (VTET) policies and
programmes as means for improving human capital through skill development in
the countries of South Asia. It would assist the increased workforce to plan how to
get more opportunities in the changing environment because of regionalization
and globalization processes.

A wide range of topics were covered in the training course including


Vocational and Technical Education Policies in South Asia; Issues and Constraints
in VTET in South Asia; VTET as a mean for Rural Development; Nexus between
VTET and Poverty Alleviation in South Asia; Gender Perspectives of VTET in South
Asia; Globalization and its likely impacts on VTET and VTET for Physically Disabled
and Mentally Retarded People. Three study visits were arranged for the
participants, (i) National Institute of Science and Technical Education (NISTE),
Islamabad, (ii) Swidish-Pak Institute of Technology Gujrat (Pakistan) and (iii)
Tarnab Agricultural Farm, Peshawar. Based on these visits, a workshop was
conducted where the participants had an opportunity to discuss issues in great
detail and had submitted their findings. Participants of the training course
presented their country reports on VTET policy, programmes and options applied
to improve human capital in their respective countries.
H. E. Mr. Pushkar Man Singh Rajbhandari, Royal Nepalese
Ambassador is speaking on the inaugural session of VTET training
course.
A total sixteen participants two each from Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives,
Nepal, and Sri Lanka and Six participants from Pakistan participated in the VTET
training course. The list of participants is at Annex-4.3.

H.E. Mr. Pushkar Man Singh Rajbhandari, Royal Nepalese Ambassador, in


Islamabad was the Chief Guest at the Inaugural Ceremony of the Training Course.
On this occasion, Mr.Rajbhandari said that creating employment opportunities for
increased workforce in South Asia will be the major challenge for the next decade,
in view of the regionalization and globalization processes. He elaborated that
solutions must come within the South Asian region through improving the human
capital in the region. He described the experiences of VTET in Japan, Korea,
Taiwan, India and Singapore where polytechnic institutes, vocational schools,
institutes of technical education and technical colleges were prominent in the
Vocational educational system. In those countries a positive environment has
been created which is conducive to investment and improvement in VTET in the
development process. He also mentioned that South Korea and Taiwan placed
high priority on special vocational education at an early stage of industrialisation
process, which created new impetus in the overall development process in these
countries. In that context, he emphasized that improving VTET through capital
investment and technology is one of the viable options, which will eventually lead
to create opportunities for the South Asian workforce and alleviate poverty and
thereby achievement in Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) could be possible.

Dr M.Zahangir Kabir, Acting Director of SHRDC, distributed the certificates


amongst the participants of the training course. In his concluding remarks he
explained that VTET in the South Asian region should be given the highest priority
by the policymakers in their policy agenda in order to improve the human capital.
He requested the participants to use the knowledge they gained to develop
policies and programmes of VTET and formulate strategies to improve human
capital in their countries.
During the year 2003 following events have taken place in the SHRDC.
Acting Director attended Preparatory Committee Meeting of SAARC
On the invitation of the Secretary General SAARC, the Acting Director,
SAARC Human Resource Development Centre (SHRDC) Dr. M. Zahangir Kabir
attended the Meeting of the Preparatory Committee of SAARC held at Kathmandu,
Nepal on 8th July, 2003. The Acting Director of SHRDC made a presentation before
the Committee on SHRDC’s Programme of Activities and Budget for 2003 as
recommended by the Third Meeting of the SHRDC Governing Board.

Fourth Meeting of the Governing Board (GB) of SHRDC


The Fourth Meeting of the Governing Board of SHRDC was held at
Islamabad on 17-18 October 2003. Mr. Javed Sadiq Malik, Secretary, Planning and
Development Division, Government of Pakistan and the Chairman of Governing
Board of SHRDC opened the meeting. He appreciated the initiatives taken by
SHRDC regarding its programme of activities for the year 2003 and made
remarks that Government of Pakistan will provide support and cooperation to the
Centre for the benefits of the region. The meeting was attended by members of
Governing Board from Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and
Sri Lanka and the SAARC Secretariat. The names of the members of Governing
Board are given at Annex-5.1.

Fourth Meeting of the Governing Board in Progress


Mr. Amjad Hussain B. Sial, Director, SAARC Secretariat in his remarks said
that Human Resource Development is a prerequisite of developing any other
social sector. Our society could not be changed unless we make a serious
endeavour to bring about a qualitative change in Human resources. The SAARC
Region has to go a long way in creating opportunities for development of full
potential and talent of the people. As regards, the budget of the Centre-2004, we
are happy to note that more emphasis has been given on programme of activities
as decided by the Fourth Session of the Standing Committee.

In accordance with the SAARC practice of rotation of Chairpersonship in


alphabetical order the representative of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri
Lanka, was elected as Chairperson of Governing Board by acclamation. All the
members of the Governing Board congratulated the newly elected Chairman and
thanked the outgoing Chairman for his valuable contributions.

Dr. M. Zahangir Kabir, Acting Director of SHRDC presented a brief report on


the programme of activities of SHRDC 2003, and a detailed report on the
implementation of the decisions of Third Meeting of Governing Board of SHRDC.
The Acting Director said that the Centre has now become fully operational and its
activities are receiving appreciation from all quarters. Dr. Kabir expressed his
deep gratitude and thanks to SAARC Member States and especially the
Government of Pakistan for their generous support to the Centre for providing
additional fund for procurement of vehicles, training related equipment and air
conditioners. The Board reviewed the programmes completed in 2003 and
expressed their satisfaction for smooth implementation of the SHRDC’s
programme of activities and improvement in its performance.

The Governing Board recommended the following Regular/ Ongoing


Programme of Activities and New Programmes of SHRDC for 2004 for approval of
SAARC higher bodies:

Regular/ Ongoing Programme of Activities for 2004


1. Database Development on Macroeconomic Profiles and HRD
Indicators
2. Training of Trainer’s (ToT) Programme of SHRDC
a. Population, Environment and Development
b. Labour and Employment
c. Good Governance
3. Computer Mediated Communication of Information
(i) Hosting and Updation of SHRDC website, Access to Internet and
their Operation;

(ii) Upgradation of hardware/software and accessories, other


component like electronic publication in CD ROM form and
maintenance of hardware and software.

4. Monitoring Backstopping Support to Programmes, Interaction


between SHRDC and Relevant Institutions in SAARC countries;
5. HRD News – Quarterly Newsletter

6. SHRDC Annual Report

SHRDC’s New Programmes for 2004

1. SAARC Inventory of HRD Best Practices.

2. SAARC Symposium on Regional Capacity Development Collaborative


Framework for Human Development;

3. SAARC Journal of Human Resource Development (SJHRD).

4. Directory of HRD Experts in SAARC Region,


5. Regional Workshop on Development Strategies and Employment
Problem in SAARC Region;

6. Acquisition of Publications and Reports in the area of HRD from


SAARC Member Countries;

7. Distribution of SHRDC Publications, Information Collection &


Communication;

8. Comparative Analysis of Macroeconomics and Human Development


Indicators in the SAARC Region.

The Governing Board reviewed the Audit Report of the year 2002 of SHRDC
and actions taken by the Centre in line with the Auditor’s recommendations. The
Board adopted the Report of the 4th Meeting of the Governing Board alongwith
Budget 2004 unanimously. On behalf of Members of the Governing Board,
Mr.Achyuta Pada Goswami, member from Bangladesh made vote of thanks.

Meeting of the Selection Committee of SHRDC


The meeting of the Selection Committee was held on October 19, 2003. The
Committee selected seven General Services Staff for SAARC Human Resource
Development Centre.

Dr M.Zahangir Kabir, Acting Director, SHRDC attended SAIC Workshop.


Dr. M. Zahangir Kabir, Acting Director SHRDC participated in a regional
workshop on “Role of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) for
Poverty Alleviation through Agricultural Development in SAARC Countries”,
organized by SAARC Agricultural Information Centre (SAIC), Dhaka on 22-23,
October, 2003. In addition to that he visited premier HRD institutions in
Bangladesh like Bangladesh Academy of Rural Development (BARD), Bangladesh
Institute of Development Studies (BIDS), Bangladesh Rural Development Board
(BRDB), Rural Development Academy and SAARC Agricultural Information Centre
(SAIC).

18th SAARC Charter Day Celebration


SAARC Human Resource Development Centre (SHRDC) celebrated the
SAARC Charter Day on 8th December 2003 in Islamabad. The day marked the
eighteenth anniversary of the signing of the Charter establishing the South Asian
Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC). On this occasion SHRDC has
organised a discussion forum on “Human Capital Formation and its Impact on
Poverty Alleviation in the SAARC Region”.

Mr. Salman Bashir, Additional Secretary (Asia & Pacific), Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, Government of Pakistan was the Chief Guest. In his inaugural remarks Mr.
Salman Bashir, said that Pakistan is looking forward to hosting the Twelfth SAARC
Summit in Islamabad in January 2004. We are confident that the Islamabad Summit
will be able to impart a fresh dynamism in cooperation under the SAARC auspices.
The Government and people of Pakistan will accord a warm welcome to delegates
from SAARC Member States. We will do our utmost to ensure that the SAARC
enterprise is renewed, with greater vigour, to achieve its full potential, in accordance
with the aspirations of the peoples of this region and the SAARC Charter. HRD is,
indeed one of the needs of the hour. The Islamabad based SAARC Human Resource
Development Centre (SHRDC) has made a splendid start by designing new HRD
programmes for the year 2004. This Centre can play an important role in enabling
member states to share each others experiences and in pooling their rich resources
to impart requisite skills to make economic and social development a reality,
Additional Foreign Secretary added.
Mr. Salman Bashir, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
addressing the Discussion Forum on SAARC Charter Day
Mr. Bashir also said that the SAARC Charter enunciated and obliged the SAARC
Member States to respect the principles of sovereign equality, territorial integrity,
national independence, non use of force and non-interference in the internal affairs and
committed them to peaceful settlement of all disputes. The vision of the founding
fathers of SAARC encapsulated the aspirations of over 1.4 billion people of South Asia
for peace and progress.

Dr. M. Zahangir Kabir, Acting Director SHRDC in his welcome address


explained that the SAARC, which was born in Dhaka with the signing of its Charter
18 years ago by the leaders of the seven South Asian Countries in 1985, has
come a long way since then. Member countries have been able to lay down a firm
foundation to strengthen cooperation within the region for the betterment of their
peoples. SAARC as a regional organisation has provided the much needed
institutional framework for cooperation in a region which on the one hand is
bound by a common cultural heritage and on the other marked by diverse socio-
economic features. The Acting Director, SHRDC also added that since its
establishment, for the first time this Centre is implementing as many as eleven
approved programme of activities in the year 2003. The Centre is also expected to
undertake regionally important fourteen useful research and training programmes in
the year 2004.

Dr. Mushtaq A. Khan, Director, Centre for Research on Poverty Reduction and
Income Distribution (CRPRID), Islamabad, Pakistan delivered the keynote speech. He
elaborated that the South Asia is the home of world’s 23 percent population and this
is the region where most of the world poor resides as well. Though the region is
striving hard to break the shackles of poverty and also is making economic progress
as well, but the absolute number of poor are still increasing due to uneven
distribution of the fruits of prosperity inter-regionally as well as nationally. Taking the
conglomerate perspective of development into consideration, and using the Human
Development Indicator (HDI) of UNDP, it is observed that all the SAARC Countries
have shown an upward trend in case of economic growth but the pace of rising
development seems to be breaking down.

Dr. W. G. Somaratne, Research Fellow, SHRDC in his concluding remarks


described that within the dynamism in world economic order, South Asia has to
achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) particularly, eradicating extreme
poverty and hunger, realising universal primary education, promoting gender equality
and empowerment of women, improving maternal health, reducing child mortality
and ensuring environmental sustainability. Achieving these MDGs will be the greatest
challenges for South Asia.

SHRDC Website Launched


SHRDC has launched its website (www.shrdc-isb.org) on 8
December, 2003. Mr. Salman Bashir, Additional Secretary (Asia & Pacific), Ministry
of Foreign Affairs, Government of Pakistan launched the SHRDC website by clicking
on computer. Mr. Bashir gave his best wishes for every success in future endeavors
of SHRDC. The key components included in the website were: Genesis of SHRDC,
Research Programmes, Training programmes, Professionals joined, Publications, and
SHRDC events and News.

Mr. Salman Bashir, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Foreign


Affairs, Government of Pakistan launching the SHRDC
website
Monitoring Backstopping Support to Programmes, Interaction between
SHRDC and relevant Institutions in SAARC Countries
Under this Programme, Dr. M. Zahangir Kabir, Acting Director visited India
on Study Tour from 13-21 December 2003. The objective of the study tour was to
build close links with prominent institutions in HRD in India to discuss and to
identify the future research and training needs of SHRDC. Dr. Kabir during his visit
also visited Self Employed Women’s Association (SEWA), Indian Council of
Agricultural Research (ICAR), Planning Commission of India, Ministry of External
Affairs, and Institute of Applied Manpower Research (IAMR). He met Dr. P. Das,
Deputy Director General (ICAR); Dr. S. P. Gupta, Member of Planning Commission;
and Mr. Prabhu Dayal, Joint Secretary (SAARC).

Dr. W. G. Somaratne (Research Fellow) and Mr. Najam us Saqib (Research


Associate) of SHRDC visited Sri Lanka on a Study Tour, on 13-17 December 2003.
The objective of the study visits was to build close links with prominent
institutions in HRD and review the policy, programmes and strategic options
designed in HRD in Sri Lanka to identify the future research and training needs of
SHRDC. They visited most prominent HRD institutions in Sri Lanka including
Ministry of Education, Human Resource Development and Cultural Affairs, Hector
Kobbekaduwa Agrarian Research and Training Institute (HARTI), Ministry of
Samurdhi (Poverty Alleviation), Samurdhi Authority of Sri Lanka, Sri Lanka
Institute of Development Administration (SLIDA), Rural Development Research
and Training Institute (RDRTI), National Human Resource Development Council
(NHRDC), National Institute of Technical Education (NITE), National Education
Commission (NEC), and Department of Census and Statistic (DCS) in Sri Lanka.

Mr. Ejaz Ali Wasti (Research Fellow) and Mr. Kiran Rupakhetee (Research
Associate) of SHRDC visited Bangladesh on a Study Tour under the SHRDC
programme of activities of 2003 during the period from 26-31 December 2003.
The objective of the study tour was to build close links with prominent institutions
in HRD and review the policy, programmes and strategic options designed in HRD
in Bangladesh to identify the future research and training needs of SHRDC. They
visited prominent HRD institutions in Bangladesh including Bangladesh Academy
for Rural Development (BARD) Planning Commission, Planning and Development
Academy, Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies (BIDS) Bangladesh Public
Administration Training Centre, Bangladesh Civil Service Academy, Department of
Women Development and an NGO Gonoshasthay Kendro and discussed the issues
related to HRD in Bangladesh.

The main source of Centre’s funding is the contribution by the SAARC


Member States according to the agreed Cost Sharing Formula for the SAARC
Regional Centres.

a) Capital Cost Expenditure:

The SAARC Regional Centre’s expenditure on physical infrastructure,


initial furnishing, procurement of machines, equipment and vehicles is borne by
the host government. In case of SHRDC, the host government Pakistan has
provided such basic initial facilities.
b) Institutional Cost Expenditure:
Institutional Cost Expenditure of SHRDC includes all expenses
associated with the recurring expenditure like payment of salaries, living and
other allowances utility charges and hospitality of the Meeting of the SHRDC
Governing Board.
c) Programme Cost Expenditure:

The Programme Cost Expenditure of SHRDC includes all expenditures


on programme of activities such as training, research and dissemination of
information.
Budget 2003
The Third Meeting of the Governing Board of SHRDC held in Islamabad
on December 13-14, 2002 recommended a total budget of US$ 343,320 for the
year 2003 of which US$ 187,820 as the Institutional Cost Budget and US$
155,500 as Programme Cost Budget. The Budget was approved by the SAARC
Standing Committee in its Special Session held at Kathmandu, Nepal on July 9-10,
2003.
During 2003, a total amount of US$ 243,218.52 was spent against the
total allocated amount of US$ 343,320 showing a 70.84 percent utilization of the
total allocated budget. The expenditure on the Institutional Cost was to the tune
of US$ 128,638.89 against the allocated budget of US$ 187,820 showing a 68.49
percent utilization of the allocated budget. The details of Institutional Cost Budget
allocated and expenditures incurred are given in Table-1 and Figure-1.

Table-1

Institutional Cost Budget and Expenditure 2003


(Values in US$)
S.No Particulars Budget 2003 Exp. US $ Unspent
1 Allowance to Dir & Professionals 98120.00 69970.64 28149.36
2 Salaries & Allowance to GSS 41200.00 25917.38 15282.61
3 Travel Cost & Per diem 3500.00 1395.96 2104.04
4 Utilities Services & Maintenance 8000.00 7504.44 495.56
5 Printing, Stationary & Reproduction 6000.00 4025.20 1974.80
6 Local Hospitality for GB Meeting 8000.00 6113.86 1886.14
7 Vehicles Fuel & Maintenance cost 7000.00 2280.92 4719.08
8 Contingencies 16000.00 11430.49 4569.51
Total 187820.00 128638.89 59181.10

Figure-I: Institutional Budget and Expenditure 2003


Institutional Cost Budget Utilization
120000

98120.00
100000

80000
69970.64
Budget 2003
Exp. US $
60000

41200.00

40000
25917.38

16000.00
20000 11430.49
8000.00
7504.44 8000.00 7000.00
6000.00 6113.86
3500.00 4025.20
1 2 3 1395.96 4 5 6 7 2280.92 8
0
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Categories as in above table

The expenditure on the Programme Cost was amounted to US$


114,579.62 against the allocated budget of US$ 155,500 showing a 73.68 percent
utilization of the allocated budget. The head wise details of Programme Cost
Budget allocation and expenditure incurred are given in Table-II and Figure-II.

Table-2

Programme Cost Budget and Expenditure 2003


(Values in US$)
Budget Exp. Unspen
S.No Particulars 2003 US$ t
1 Data base Development 2000.00 0.00 2000.00
2 HRD Directory 4000.00 2505.57 1494.43
3 Training Programme - I 40000.00 26644.28 13355.72
4 Training Programme - II 40000.00 33058.21 6941.79
5 Training Programme - III 40000.00 31048.92 8951.08
6 Preparation of Training Modules 1500.00 0.00 1500.00
7 Access to Internet Website updation 1500.00 1203.41 296.59
8 Purchase of Hardware Software 8500.00 8045.26 454.74
Monitoring and Backstopping
9 Support 10000.00 8742.82 1257.18
10 SHRDC Newsletter 5000.00 1712.97 3287.03
11 SHRDC Annual Report 2000.00 763.57 1236.43
12 Information Booklet 1000.00 854.61 145.39
114579.6
Total 155500.00 2 40920.38
Figure-II: Programme Cost Budget and Expenditure 2003

ProgrammeCostBudgetUtilization
45000
40000.00 40000.00 40000.00
40000

35000 33058.21
31048.92

30000
26644.28

25000 Budget2003

20000 Exp. US$

15000
10000.00
10000 8500.00
8045.26
8742.82

5000.00
5000 4000.00
2505.57
2000.00 1500.00 1500.00 1712.97 2000.00
12 03.41 763.57 1000.0
80
54.61
0.00 0.00
0

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Categories as inabove table

Annex - 1.1

ORAGANOGRAM OF SHRDC

Director
Admin. & Accounts : Deputy Director Personal Staff :

1. Admin. & Accounts Officer 1. Secretary - I


2. Accounts Assistant 2. Driver – I
3. Admin Assistant 3. Messenger - I
4. Receptionist Personal Staff :
5. Messenger – III
6. Cleaner/Sweeper 1. Secretary - II
7. Gardner 2. Driver – II
8. Guard – I & II 3. Messenger - II

RESEARCH FELLOW – I : RESEARCH FELLOW – II :

(RESEARCH) (TRAINING)

1. Research Associate - I 1. Research Associate - II


2. Computer Programming Officer 2. Data Entry Operator – II
3. Librarian cum Documentation Asstt. 3. Assistant (General and Admin)
4. Data Entry Operator - I

Annex - 4.1

Training Course on
Poverty Alleviation through Human Resource Development
15 -28 September, 2003

Participants

Bangladesh
Mr. Md. Mozzammel Hoque
Joint Chief
Population Planning Wing,
Socio Economic Infrastructure Division,
Planning Commission, Bangladesh.

Mr. Md. Mosharraf Hossain Khan


Deputy Chief
General Economic Division
Planning Commission ,Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Bhutan
Mr. Yad Kumar Pradhan
District Statistical Officer
District Administration, Paro, Bhutan

Maldives
Mrs. Ashiyath Shiuna
Programme Officer (Trainee)
Ministry of Human Resources, Employment and Labour,
Ghazee Building, Male -2005
Republic of Maldives.

Mrs. Fathimath Thasneem


Programme Officer
Ministry of Human Resources, Employment and Labour,
Ghazee Building, Male -2005
Republic of Maldives.

Nepal
Mr. Arvind Kumar Rimal
Section Officer
National Planning Commission,
His Majesty’s Government of Nepal,
Singha Durbar, Kathmandu, Nepal.

Mr. Chitra Bahadur Khadka


Section Officer
National Planning Commission,
His Majesty’s Government of Nepal,
Singha Durbar, Kathmandu, Nepal.

Pakistan

Mrs. Nigar Hasan Siddiqui


Assistant Chief
Room Number 419, P-Block, Pak Secretariat,
Planning and Development Division,
Government of Pakistan
Islamabad, Pakistan

Mr. Muhammad Ayub,


Deputy Chief
Planning and Development Division,
Government of Pakistan, Islamabad, Pakistan

Mr. Shoaib Akhtar


M&E Officer
National Commission for Human Development,
P.M. Secretariat, Block D, Islamabad, Pakistan

Mr. Muhammad Humayun


Additional Secretary
Planning and Development Department,
Government of Balochistan, Pakistan

Mr. Mansoor Qadir Dar


Asst. Chief
Planning and Development Department,
Muzaffarabad, Azad Kashmir
Observer Participants

Ms. Almas Ahsan ul Haq

Ms. Ayesha Ahsan ul Haq

Sri Lanka

Ms. H.M.S.J.M. Hitihamu


Research Officer
Hector Kobbekaduwa Agrarian,
Research and Training Institute,
114, Wijerama Mawatha,
Colombo 07,
Sri Lanka.

Mr.K. Brasil Harrison Perera


Director (Rural Development)
Samurdhi Authority of Sri Lanka,
Sethsiripaya-Battaramulla,
Sri Lanka.
Annex - 4.2

Training Course on Gender and Development


06 -19 October, 2003

Participants

Bangladesh
Mr. Dulal Abdul Hafiz
Director General
Department of Women Affairs
37/3, Eskaton Garden Road Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Mr. Md. Mahbubul Alam


Deputy Secretary
Ministry of Women and Children Affairs
Bangladesh Secretariat Building No. 6
Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Bhutan
Ms. Kuenzang Lham Sangey
Planning Officer
Dzongkhag Administration
Thimpu, Bhutan.

India
Mrs. Meenakshi Sood
Assistant Director
Ministry of Human Resource Development,
Department of Women and Child Development,
Shastri Bhawan, NIPCCD, 5 Siri Instl. Area,
Hauz Khas, New Delhi, 10016,
India.

Maldives
Ms. Aminath Widad
Research Officer (Trainee)
Ministry of Women Affairs and Social Security,
Umar Shopping Arcade, 5th Floor,
Ameer Ahmed Magu Male’
Republic of Maldives.

Ms. Mamdhooha Ali


Research Officer (Trainee)
Ministry of Women Affairs and Social Security,
Umar Shopping Arcade, 5th Floor,
Ameer Ahmed Magu Male, Republic of Maldives,
Republic of Maldives.

Nepal
Mr. Bhimsen Baniya
Section Officer
Department of Women Development
Lalitpur, Nepal.

Mr. Kiran Chandra Shrestha


Under Secretary
Ministry of Women, Children and Social Welfare,
Singha Durbar, Kathmandu, Nepal.

Pakistan
Mr. Mohammad Taimur Khan,
Deputy Director,
Ministry of Women Development,
State Life Building No. 5,
Blue Area, F-6/4, Islamabad, Pakistan

Mr. Hasnat-ur-Rasool
Social Welfare Officer
National Commission for Child Welfare
and Development (NCCWD),
9 – E, Rizwan Plaza, Blue Area,
Islamabad, Pakistan

Mrs. Farhat Sultana


Research Officer
National Council for Social Welfare,
9 – E, Rizwan Plaza, Blue Area,
Islamabad, Pakistan
Ms. Fauzia Nayyar
Senior Teacher
Shah Faisal Special Education Centre for Hearing Impaired
Children (NSEC) H – 9, Islamabad, Pakistan

Ms. Nasreen Ikram


Senior Teacher
National Special Education Centre for Mentally Retarded
Children,
H – 8/4, Islamabad, Pakistan

Mr. Muhammad Shafi


Senior Teacher
National Institute of Special Education,
Street No. 14, Near Rooh Afza Market,
G – 7/2, Islamabad, Pakistan

Mrs. Nusrat Tahir


Senior Teacher
National Institute of Special Education,
Street No. 14, Near Rooh Afza Market,
G – 7/2, Islamabad, Pakistan

Mrs. Mehreen Gilani


Assistant Director
Women Co-ordination Cell (Development)
Women Coordination Cell,
Planning and Development Department,
Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Muzaffarabad

Mrs. Khalida Maqsood


President,
Women Development Organisaiton/
Member of District Assembly
Women Development Organization Chishtian,
District Bahawalnagar.

Mr. Muhammad Nazir Khan


Assistant Chief
P& D Department, Northern Areas, Gilgit

Ms. Aaliya Tahirkheli


Programme Officer (Education)
National Commission for Human Development,
Prime Minister’s Secretariat, D-Block, Level 2,
Islamabad, Pakistan.

Muhammad Muzamel Hanif


District Program Officer CD/V
National Commission for Human Development,
Human Development Support Unit,
Rahim Yar Khan, Education Complex,
Comprehensive School, Rahim Yar Khan.

Ms. Sajida Taj


Scientist
Social Sciences Institute,
National Agricultural Research Centre,
Park Road, Islamabad, Pakistan

Observer Participants

Farzana Zia

Maria Shafaq

Sri Lanka
Mrs.D.A. Wickramarachchi
Director
Management and Quality Assurance Branch,
Ministry of Human Resources Development,
Education and Cultural Affairs,
Colombo, Sri Lanka

Dr. D.Gamage
Research Fellow
Hector Kobbekaduwa Agrarian,
Research and Training Institute,
114, Wijerama Mawatha,
Colombo 07, Sri Lanka.

Annex - 4.3
Training Course on
Vocational & Technical Education and Training:
A Means of HRD
(December 9-22, 2003)

Participants
Bangladesh
Mr. Mizanur Rahman
Senior Assistant, Secretary
Ministry of Education, Room#1812, Building#6,
Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Mr. A.T.M. Habibullah


Asst. Professor (Mech)
TTTC, Tejgaon, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh.

Bhutan
Thinley Wangchuk
Asst. Principal
National Institute for Zorig Chusum, Kawangjangsa,
Thimphu: Bhutan.

Mr. Yeshey Dorji


Instructor
VTI, Khuruthang, Punakha: Bhutan.

Maldives
Mr. Ibrahim Faisal
Asst. Lecturer
Regional Vocational Training Centre,
Maldives College of Higher Education,
Faculty of Engineering Technology H.DH.
Kulhudhuffushi, Republic of Maldives.

Mr. Mohamed Zuhair


Lecturer
Faculty of Engineering Technology/Maldives College of Higher
Education, Male: Republic of Maldives.
Nepal
Ms. Asha Kumari Shrestha
Instructor
CTEVT Karnali Technical School Jumla, Nepal.

Mr. Krishna Parasad Rijal


Deputy Director
Council for Technical Education &
Vocational Training (CTEVT),
Sanothinic Bhakatpur, Nepal.

Pakistan
Engr. Muhammad Aslam
Sr. Instructor
National Institute of Science and
Technical Education,
Sector H-8, Islamabad, Pakistan.

Mr. Imran Wasim


Instructor (Electrical)
National Institute of Science and
Technical Education,
Sector H-8, Islamabad, Pakistan.

Mrs. Khalida Ijaz


H.O.D (Electronics)
Polytechnic Institute for Women Islamabad,
Pakistan.

Mr. Abdur Rehman


Research Officer Dy Director
AKH National Centre for Rural Dev.
Park Road Chak-Shazad,
Islamabad, Pakistan.

Mr. Muhammad Aslam


Chief Instructor
NTB, Plot 39, Sector H-9,
Islamabad, Pakistan.

Mr. Muhammad Hafeez Kiani


Chief Health/Coordination
Planning & Development Department AJK Govt.
Muzaffarabad Azad Kashmir, Pakistan.

Mr. Barak Ullah Khan


Section Officer
Planning & Development Department,
Govt. of the Punjab Lahore,
Pakistan.

Mr. Faisal Usman


Research Officer
Planning & Development Deptt. N.A’s Gilgit.
Pakistan.

Mrs. Gul Nasreen


Jr. Instructor (Commerce)
Polytechnic Institute for Women,
H-8/1, Islamabad, Pakistan.

Engr. Syed Asif Ali


Deputy Director (Training)
Directorate of Technical Education &
Manpower Training, NWFP,
Hall No. 210-211, Benevolent Fund Building,
Saddar Raod, Peshawar,
Pakistan.

Sri Lanka
Mr. Wijayananda Ellawala
Additional Secretary
Ministry of Tertiary Education & Training, 18,
Ward Place, Colombo-7, Sri Lanka.

Mr. W.D. Jayasena


Deputy Director of Education,
Technical Education Branch,
Ministry of Human Resource Development,
Education and Cultural Affairs, Isurupaya,
Battaramulla, Sri Lanka.

Annex - 5.1

MEMBERS OF THE FOURTH MEETING OF GOVERNING BOARD


OF SAARC HUAMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT CENTRE (SHRDC)
ISLAMABAD, 17-18 OCTOBER 2003

BANGLADESH

1. Mr. Achyuta Pada Goswami


Joint Secretary,
Planning Division,
Ministry of Planning,
Government of Bangladesh,
Dhaka - Bangladesh.

BHUTAN

2. Mr. Dawa Gyaltsnen


Officiating Director,
Department of Human Resources,
Ministry of Labour and Human Resources,
Royal Government of Bhutan,
Thimphu - Bhutan.

INDIA

3. Dr. AVS Ramesh Chandra


Counsellor (Political),
High Commission of India,
Islamabad - Pakistan.
MALDIVES

4. Ms. Rasheeda Ali


Assistant Executive Director,
Ministry of Human Resources, Employment and Labour,
Government of Maldives,
Male` - Maldives.

NEPAL

5. Mr. Ram Krishna Tiwari


Joint Secretary,
National Planning Commission Secretariat,
His Majesty’s Government of Nepal,
Kathmandu - Nepal.

6. Mr. Madhuban Prasad Poudel


Under Secretary,
Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
His Majesty’s Government of Nepal,
Kathmandu - Nepal.

PAKISTAN

7. Mr. Javed Sadiq Malik


Secretary Planning,
Planning and Development Division,
Government of Pakistan,
Islamabad – Pakistan.

8. Dr. Pervez Tahir


Chief Economist,
Planning and Development Division,
Government of Pakistan,
Islamabad - Pakistan.

9. Syed Muhammad Fawad Sher


Assistant Director (SAARC),
Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
Government of Pakistan,
Islamabad - Pakistan.
SRI LANKA
10. H.E. General C.S. Weerasooriya
High Commissioner of Sri Lanka / Chairman Governing Board,
High Commission of Sri Lanka,
House No. 2C, Street No. 55, F-6/4,
Islamabad - Pakistan.
SAARC Secretariat

11. Mr. Amjad Hussain B. Sial


Director,
SAARC Secretariat,
Kathmandu - Nepal.

SAARC HRDC, Islamabad

12. Dr. M. Zahangir Kabir (Member /Secretary)


Acting Director, SHRDC,
Islamabad - Pakistan.