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NORTH SENIORS SHORE The local resource guide for seniors and their families ON THE MOVE
NORTH
SENIORS
SHORE
The local
resource
guide
for seniors
and their
families
ON THE MOVE
SUMMER 2014
NORTH SENIORS SHORE The local resource guide for seniors and their families ON THE MOVE SUMMER
The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014 S2
The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014
S2

Dancing with the stars

Crowned for winning first place are Ward 2 Beverly City Councilor Estelle Rand, left, and her partner Walter Osgood at the Dancing with the Stars competition recently held at the Beverly Senior Center. Crowning the couple is activities director Annie Wright.

KEN YUSZKUS/Staff photo

Arnold House Nursing Home and Elder Care

YUSZKUS/Staff photo Arnold House Nursing Home and Elder Care 60 years in Business operated by the

60 years in Business operated by the same family.

We are a licensed private nursing home offering:

• Respite Care

• Long Term Care

• Short Term Rehabilitation • Full Activities Program

• Hospice Care 24 Hour Licensed Nursing Care

• Registered Dietician

• Licensed Social Worker

• In-House Laundry

Please visit us for a comparison before you make your decision. You will be more than pleased.

“We are really a place to come home to.”

You are welcome to visit at any time. So come and tour. We love to show how we are so different from a larger facility.

Our location is 490 William St. Stoneham, MA on the Unicorn Golf course. Phone 781-438-1116 • Fax 781-438-9581 Email - Arnoldhousenh@verizon.net • Website www.Arnoldhouse.info

S3 The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014
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The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014
S3 The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014
Dancing the night away The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25,
Dancing the night away
The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014
S4

ABOVE:

Beverly Mayor Mike Cahill dances with Elaine Caron during the Dancing with the Stars competition held at the Beverly Senior Center.

RIGHT: State

Rep. Jerry

Parisella

dances with

Pearl Aagenas.

KEN YUSZKUS/

Staff photos

dances with Pearl Aagenas. KEN YUSZKUS/ Staff photos Lemon Gem marigold offers unusual foliage, flowers B

Lemon Gem marigold offers unusual foliage, flowers

By Lee Reich

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Marigold is among the most widely planted and, hence, mundane of flow- ers. Yet, I enjoy them as an essential part of summer with their yolk-like blooms and pungent foliage. For those who are bored by marigolds, as well as those who love them, let me intro- duce Lemon Gem and its kin. Lemon Gem is unlike most familiar marigolds. It belongs to a different spe- cies, in fact, from the French or African marigolds soon to open their sunny heads in gardens almost everywhere. Those marigolds you grow for their flowers — large, solid-color pompoms in the case of the African mari- golds (Tagetes erecta) and smaller, sometimes multicol- ored single or double flow- ers in the case of the French marigolds (T. patula). A GEM OF A PLANT Lemon Gem is one variety of the so-called Signet mari- golds (T. tenufolia), which you might grow just for their leaves. The plants are dainty, no more than about 8 inches high, with leaves that have a ferny texture and bright green color. Lemon Gem leaves also reputedly have a lemony aroma, although my nose has never picked it up. The ferny leaves are a perfect background for knit- ting together various parts of a flower bed or mixed border. They would be ideal for a knot garden, the kind of garden that has narrow rows of dense, low-growing plants patterned into a two- dimensional design. Lemon Gem isn’t the only Signet marigold on the block. Look also for Tan- gerine Gem, Red Gem and others. OTHER FOLIAGE MARIGOLDS Speaking of marigold leaves, let’s look for one moment at two other

of marigold leaves, let’s look for one moment at two other Associated Press The small flowers

Associated Press

The small flowers of Lemon Gem marigold, a different species from common marigolds, stare out like stars from a backdrop of ferny foliage.

marigold species notable for leaves. The leaves of Spanish tarragon (T. lucida) have an anise scent and are grown as a substitute for real tarragon where it’s too hot or humid for that plant. Besides its use as flavoring, Spanish tar- ragon has also been recom- mended — in a 16th-century herbal — for hiccups and for crossing water safely. Irish Lace (T. filifolia) is the other species of foliage marigold, this one with lacy leaves not unlike that of Lemon Gem. Irish Lace has a sweet, anise-y flavor, good for tea, as a flavoring or just for nibbling. (No marigold should be consumed in too great a

quantity.) Both Spanish tar- ragon and Irish lace also bear flowers, but tiny white ones hardly worth mention. LEMON GEM FLOWERS Back to Lemon Gem:

Besides being a compact mound of dainty greenery, Lemon Gem does indeed bear flowers. Pretty ones. Each flower is half an inch across, single and lemon yel- low. You might think nothing of them from this descrip- tion, but they pop out pro- fusely through the foliage, each staring out against the verdant backdrop like a star twinkling in the night sky. In my garden, Lemon Gem always stops visitors in their

tracks and elicits the ques- tion, “What is that plant?” Like other marigolds, Lemon Gem is easy to grow.

I sowed seed indoors about

a month ago, but you could

just plant it outdoors now. Sown directly in the garden, the first blossoms are a bit delayed, but marigolds are

precocious, so the plants bloom in just a few weeks anyway. Once blossoming is underway, the show contin- ues into fall. Marigolds are rarely bothered by pests, including deer. Consider planting some seeds of Lemon Gem or the other Signet marigolds, and see how you like them.

S5 The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014 10776459
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The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014
10776459

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The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

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Call (781) 581-1500 for an appointment at one of our two convenient locations:

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We are an independent audiology practice with a wide selection of hearing aid styles and features from a variety of manufacturers to meet your individual lifestyle and budget. Visit us at www.atlantichearingcare.com to check your hearing and see what our patients say about us.

Financing is available. Your insurance may cover some services. Call today.

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and see what our patients say about us. Financing is available. Your insurance may cover some
Respite Care Sometimes the Best Thing You Can Do for Your Loved One is Take
Respite Care
Sometimes the Best Thing You Can Do
for Your Loved One is Take a Vacation!
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Being a caregiver isn’t easy. You naturally want to give your
loved one the best care possible, but it can be a challenge
to balance caregiving with your other responsibilities at home
and work - not to mention fitting in a little time for yourself.
Respite Care is a short-term service aimed at providing
high-quality, individualized, and uninterrupted care to
your loved one in a supportive environment. This ser-
vice allows the caregiver to travel without worry or even
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Please visit www.HealthBridgeManagement.com

S7

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Fruity shrimp cocktail suited for a summer picnic

By Alison lAdmAn

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Most of us know the secret to amazing home- made cocktail sauce — spike some ketchup with horseradish, lemon juice and Worcestershire sauce and you’re good to go. But for summer, we wanted to update this classic companion to chilled shrimp. So we looked to what was sea- sonal and decided to try a strawberry-based cocktail sauce. It ended up being a perfect pair- ing. Like the tomatoes in ketchup, strawberries offer a balance of sweet and acidic. Boost the flavor with garlic, gin- ger and a jalapeno and you have a whole lot of deliciousness.

SHRIMP WITH STRAWBERRY COCKTAIL SAUCE

START TO FINISH: 30 MINUTES, PLUS COOLING SERVINGS: 6

1 quart strawberries, hulled and halved

2 cloves garlic, minced

1-inch chunk fresh ginger, thinly sliced

1 /2 to 1 jalapeno pepper, halved (remove seeds, if desired) 1 /2 teaspoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon ground black pepper

2 tablespoons sherry vinegar

1 tablespoon lemon juice

1 teaspoon sugar

1 pound cooked shrimp, shells removed, chilled In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, combine the strawberries, garlic, ginger, jalapeno (more or less, depending on your heat tolerance), salt, pepper, vinegar, lemon juice and sugar. Bring to a simmer and cook, stirring frequently, for 20 minutes.

to a simmer and cook, stirring frequently, for 20 minutes. Associated Press Strawberries are the special

Associated Press

Strawberries are the special ingredient in this summery shrimp cocktail recipe.

Transfer to a blender and puree until smooth.

Transfer to a bowl and refrigerate until well chilled.

Transfer to a bowl and refrigerate until well chilled. Like the tomatoes in ketchup, strawberries offer

Like the tomatoes in ketchup, strawberries offer a balance of sweet and acidic.

Associated Press

When the cocktail sauce is chilled, divide it between individual serving bowls or glasses and accompany with shrimp. Nutrition information per serving: 120 calories; 15

calories from fat (13 percent of total calories); 1.5 g fat (0 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 115 mg cholesterol; 11 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 6 g sugar; 16 g protein; 270 mg sodium.

(0 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 115 mg cholesterol; 11 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber;

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The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Make preparations now in case storms strike

By AlAn J. HeAvens

THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER (MCT)

We’ve barely got- ten over winter’s misery and already are being reminded about hurricane preparedness. Yet the season officially started June 1, so perhaps a few tips from the American Bankers Association are in order:

Assemble an emer- gency kit, which should include first- aid supplies, a flash- light, extra batteries, at least three days of nonperishable food

and water, towels, and a supply of nec- essary medications. Stay informed of a storm’s path and progress by monitoring Wireless Emergency Alerts by text message and having a battery- powered radio or TV available. Develop a family communications plan. Know how you will contact one another; how you will get back together, if sepa- rated; and what you will do in different

situations. Having a plan can eliminate stress and confusion. Before a storm, contact your local American Red Cross

route to get there, and be sure to check whether your local emergency shelter allows animals.

emergency personnel. Protect financial documents. In the

A working flashlight and extra batteries should be among the items in your emergency kit.
A working flashlight and extra batteries should be among the
items in your emergency kit.

to locate the shel- ter nearest you, or download its “Shel- ter Finder App.” Identify the safest

Secure your home. Outdoor furniture and other objects can pose a potential haz- ard. Turn off propane tanks and other utili- ties as instructed by

event of a disaster, you will need identi- fication and financial documents to begin the recovery process. Safeguard important

documents in a bank safe-deposit box, on computer stor- age devices (USB drive, CD/DVD), and/or waterproof containers.

SUTTON HOME FOR WOMEN

The Sutton Home is an elegant and stately ten-bedroom lodging home for women which offers the following amenities and quality residential services:

Spacious & sunny rooms

24-hour staffing

Three meals daily

Utilities (except telephone)

Cable

Stair lift

Medication reminders

Security

Maintenance

Off-street parking

Laundry & housekeeping services

3/4-acre yard for outdoor enjoyment

Sun rooms & porches

Close to shopping and major medical facilities

Close proximity to major highways and public transportation

Daily companionship and socialization

This unique alternative living arrangement is now being offered on a short- and long-term basis at

$2,100.00 monthly

offered on a short- and long-term basis at $2,100.00 monthly IF YOU LIVED HERE, YOU’D BE

IF YOU LIVED HERE, YOU’D BE ENJOYING THE “COMFORTS OF HOME”

LIVED HERE, YOU’D BE ENJOYING THE “COMFORTS OF HOME” Contact: Barbara Amos, Director, for more information.

Contact: Barbara Amos, Director, for more information.

SUTTON HOME FOR WOMEN

7 Sewall Street, Peabody, MA 01960 978-531-0815 or barb.amos2@gmail.com www.suttonhomeforwomen.com

The Sutton Home for Women is a nonprofit organization

S9

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

So you can stay independent at home Count on the trusted leader in home care

So you can stay independent at home

Count on the trusted leader in home care

Living independently means I can take care of myself at home. With just a little help with personal care and household chores from HomeCare, Inc. I know I’ll enjoy the comfort and security of my own home for a long time.

HomeCare, Inc, one of the not-for-profit agencies associated with Home Health VNA and Merrimack Valley Hospice, offers a full range of services such as personal care assistance, transportation, companion visits, private duty nursing care, homemaking and more. For more information or to learn about the full continuum of care offered by our agencies, visit HomeHealthFoundation.org or call 800-933-5593.

visit HomeHealthFoundation.org or call 800-933-5593. The Leaders in Home Health and Hospice Care

The Leaders in Home Health and Hospice Care

Lawrence|Lowell|Peabody|Newburyport | North Hampton, NH

S10

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Colon cancer screening said to help after age 75

By Lauran neergaard

AP MEDICAL WRITER

WASHINGTON — How old is too old for a colo- noscopy? A surprising number of people older than 75 haven’t ever been screened for colon cancer — and researchers recently reported that it’s not too late for them to get caught up. Some may even consider screening into their 80s. Colon cancer screening is powerful, credited not only with saving lives. The Amer- ican Cancer Society recently calculated that over the past decade, new cases of colon cancer dropped significantly among middle-aged and older adults, thanks largely to increasing use of colonos- copies that allow removal of precancerous growths before tumors have time to form. Some things to know about the latest research on colon cancer screening.

WHO SHOULD BE SCREENED?

National guidelines rec- ommend regular checks starting at age 50 and going up to age 75. Nearly two- thirds have been appropri- ately screened for colon cancer, according to the lat- est government estimates.

WHAT ABOUT OLDER AMERICANS?

Those guidelines don’t recommend routine screen- ing after age 75. After all, a colonoscopy that delivers good news isn’t supposed to be repeated for 10 years, because it takes so long for those precancerous polyps to become dangerous. But the guidelines don’t address the 23 percent of Americans over 75 who somehow missed out on screenings when they were a bit younger, before a colon

The American Cancer Society recently calculated that over the past decade, new cases of colon cancer dropped significantly among middle-aged and older adults.

check in your 50s and 60s had become the norm. The study examines if it’s worth starting screening so late, when most people already have at least a few other health problems, such as heart disease, that could affect whether detecting an early-stage colon cancer prolongs life.

THE FINDINGS

Researchers at Erasmus University in the Nether- lands and New York’s Memo- rial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center used computer mod- eling to compare the poten- tial effects of different colon checks on 10 million previ- ously unscreened people

ages 76 to 90. Someone who’s very healthy should consider some form of screening up to age 86 — but even a per- son with severe health prob- lems could benefit from a first-time check up to age 80, the team reported in Annals of Internal Medicine. In the healthiest patients, a colonoscopy was the most effective choice up to age 83, while a stool test was the better choice for 85- and 86-year-olds, the research- ers found. The results are a bit sur- prising, said Dr. Richard C. Wender, the American Can- cer Society’s chief of cancer control.

“Our sense was, if we’re going to screen beyond age 75, it should only be in very healthy people,” said Wender, who wasn’t part of the new study. “This model,

I think, will help us give

clearer advice to the public.”

THE BIGGER MESSAGE

About 137,000 Americans will be diagnosed with

colorectal cancer this year, the cancer society esti- mates. About 50,000 colon cancer patients will die. Upper-age limits aside, public health officials say not enough of the 50-and- older crowd get potentially lifesaving checks. The can- cer society’s new campaign aims for a screening rate of 80 percent, up from two- thirds, by 2018. “If you’re polyp-free at 70, we have so dramatically reduced your likelihood of

a death from colon cancer,

you probably don’t need to

ever think about it again,” Wender said.

THE CHOICES

With a colonoscopy, doc-

tors use a long flexible tube

to examine the colon and remove any polyps. While only needed once a decade,

it can be uncomfortable and

is the priciest option. Studies show a home stool

test done every year can be equally effective. (A third choice, sigmoidoscopy, uses

a tube to examine the lower

colon but isn’t common in the U.S.) In the new study, stool testing was a better value for the oldest patients because it targets larger polyps “that have a shorter period of time before they become a real threat,” Wender explained. But individual choice matters: “There’s a test out

there for everybody,” he said.

CHESTNUT WOODS

Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center (formerly Hammersmith)

Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center (formerly Hammersmith) Rated Deficiency Free In 2014 By The Dept Of Health

Rated Deficiency Free In 2014 By The Dept Of Health

Types of Care:

Respite Care- Cardiac Care-Orthopedic Care Stroke Recovery- Pulmonary Care Wound C are- Dement ia Care-Palliative Care Hospice Care- Diabetes Care- Nutrition Care Physical and Occupational Therapy - IV Therapy Pain Management - Hemodialysis Care

Chestnut Wo ods Rehabi litation and Healthcare Center 73 Chestnut Street Saugus, MA 01906-1605 Admissions Fax: 781-658-2494 Email: admissions@ChestnutWoodsRehab.com Call us at 781-233-8123 www.chestnutwoodsrehab.com

Call us at 781-233-8123 www.chestnutwoodsrehab.com Welcome to a new way of caregiving. Now part of the

Welcome to a new way of caregiving.

Now part of the highly reputable Marquis family of health services, Chestnut Woods (formerly Hammersmith) and Blueberry Hill Rehabilitation and Healthcare Centers provide post-acute short term and comprehensive long-term care. It’s our unwavering goal to create the most medically advanced and nurturing environments to ensure optimum rehabilitative outcomes and the highest quality of life. It’s what sets Marquis care centers apart. And it’s why we invite you to take a tour, visit with our compassionate caregivers and experience our difference.

our compassionate caregivers and experience our difference. BLUEBERRY HILL Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center Highest
our compassionate caregivers and experience our difference. BLUEBERRY HILL Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center Highest
our compassionate caregivers and experience our difference. BLUEBERRY HILL Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center Highest

BLUEBERRY HILL

Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center

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Highest State Rating For Consistent Assignment Program

Types of Care:

Respite Care-Cardiac Care - Orthopedic Care Stroke Recovery - Pulmonary Care Wound C are-D ementi a C are-Palliative Care Hospice Care - Diabetes Care-Nutrition Care Physical and Occupational Therapy - IV Therapy Pain Management - Hemodialysis Care

Blueberry Hill Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center 75 Brimbal Avenue, Beverly MA 01915 Admission Fax: 978-268-5213 Email: admissions@BlueberryHillRehab.com Call us at 978-927-2020 www.blueberryhillrehab.com

S11

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Adult Foster Care of the North Shore provides financial and emotional solutions to families

Adult Foster Care of the alone, she decided to start

her own program in Massachusetts. With a grant

they have been providing from the Robert Wood

financial and emotional Johnson Foundation, she

solutions to families in need

of care for a disabled or the North Shore.

chronically ill loved one Since 2001, Adult Foster

(clients). Many Adult Foster Care clients are already living with a parent, child or other family member who

qualifies asacaregiver. between them and other

similar companies is that,

with compassionate and even though they share the

diligent caregivers. In 2000, Dr. Cynthia Bjorlie quit her private practice of 17 years and opened Adult Foster Care of

the North Shore. She took If you are interested in

Others are placed in homes

started Adult Foster Care of

North Shore is a one of a kind organization. Since 2001

Care of the North Shore has grown from a staff of one to 28 and from one client to 350 clients. The difference

same mission, they actually live the mission. They live it out in a more compassionate and people-focused way that produces great results.

becoming a paid caregiver for a disabled family

this brave leap after she read an article in the NY Times

called “Foster Seniors,” a member or qualified

program that was in New Jersey. Having always been interested in the care of people who cannot manage

disabled adult, visit AdultFosterCareNS.com or call today at 978-281-2612.

About the Program:

This innovative program provides caregivers with a monthly payment for taking care of a disabled or ill adult. Caregivers are special, dedicated people who may take care of a family member or a new friend and welcome them into their own home.

Caregivers are reimbursed up to $1,800 monthly for personal care services. Each and every caregiver is supported by Adult Foster Care's professional staff that helps train the individual regarding the personal care needs of their clients. Adult Foster Care carefully and selectively matches clients with caregivers to ensure compatibility.

Adult Foster Care of the North Shore provides the following financial and emotional support:

Financial Support: Through MassHealth a monthly tax-free stipend is given to the caregiver.

Health & Social Support: Clients and caregivers are assigned a nurse and care manager who visit the homes regularly. Staff members can answer questions about health issues and serve as a resource for medical training, education and needed interventions. There is always someone on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

General Resource Support: Other vital resources offered include:

Adult Day Health Programs

Specialized work and community support programs for those with developmental delays

Mental health counselors

Guardianship and health care proxy information

Transportation services

health care proxy information • Transportation services “My mother was in bad shape with Alzheimer’s and

“My mother was in bad shape with Alzheimer’s and I did not want to put her in a nursing home.

Adult Foster Care of the North Shore provided me with a support team and through MassHealth monthly compensation for caring for my mother. They changed my life.”

– Sharon, Caregiver to mother

for my mother. They changed my life.” – Sharon, Caregiver to mother Visit AdultFosterCareNS.com • 978-281-2612
for my mother. They changed my life.” – Sharon, Caregiver to mother Visit AdultFosterCareNS.com • 978-281-2612

Visit AdultFosterCareNS.com • 978-281-2612

S12

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Take the train to the Grand Canyon

By John Marshall

ASSOCIATED PRESS

GRAND CANYON, Ariz. — The drive to the Grand Canyon’s South Rim is easy enough. Get to Flag- staff and it’s only about 90 miles across Arizona’s high country. But why take a car when you can ride a train, espe- cially one like the Grand Canyon Railway? Traveling down the same tracks as the pre-automobile original, the Grand Canyon Railway is like a two-hour trip through history: a scenic, informative and entertaining ride from a his- toric Route 66 town to one of world’s greatest natural wonders. “One of our customers described it as more than just a train ride,” said John Lovely, conductor for the Grand Canyon Railway. “We give you an experience com- ing to the Grand Canyon, then going home.” When the Grand Canyon Railway was established in 1901, it immediately became the most popu- lar route to the canyon’s South Rim, smoother and less dusty than rickety stagecoaches. The railway opened the canyon to the entire world, ushering in millions of tour- ists to one of the seven natu- ral wonders of the world. The railway carried count- less dignitaries through the years, including U.S. presi- dents Taft, Eisenhower and both Roosevelts, along with kings and queens, actors and actresses. Once the automobile era began, interest in the train waned. It shut down in 1968. In 1989, Max and Thelma Biegert sank their life savings into resurrecting the railway and restor- ing depots at the starting point in Williams and at the Grand Canyon village. Carrying 225,000 riders a year, the Grand Canyon Railway is now once again a popular route to the South

Railway is now once again a popular route to the South Associated Press The exterior of

Associated Press

The exterior of Lookout Studio, a historic century-old structure near Grand Canyon Village on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon in Arizona. Lookout Studio is one of a number of attractions available for sightseeing at the South Rim.

Rim, a throwback to a bygone era accentuated by Wild West characters and musicians who tell stories and sing songs during the ride. “It’s a much more enter- taining ride than just driv- ing in your car,” said Bruce Brossman, Arizona regional director of sales and mar- keting for Xanterra Parks and Resorts. Starting in Williams, the last Route 66 town to be bypassed by Interstate 40, the train travels 65 miles to the village of Grand Canyon, with about 2,000 people at the South Rim of the canyon. The train has a variety of cars, from the 1923 Harriman-style coach cars to glass-domed cars and a luxury parlor with private bar. The fare includes fruit, pastries and coffee in the morning, and snacks and a champagne toast on the way

in the morning, and snacks and a champagne toast on the way Associated Press The Grand

Associated Press

The Grand Canyon Railway, shown here at its depot in Williams, Arizona, runs daily round-trip to the Grand Canyon’s South Rim. The railway has been running since 1901, carries 225,000 people a year and offers history, sightseeing, scenery and entertainment.

back. A cafe car has food and drinks for purchase. The train travels from the

Ponderosa pine forests sur- rounding Williams across the high desert plains, then

climbs to the pinion pines of Grand Canyon National Park. Along the way, there

IF YOU GO

GRAND CANYON RAILWAY:

http://www.thetrain.com. Departs Williams, Arizona, for the South Rim of the Grand Canyon daily at 9:30 a.m., returning at 3:30 p.m. GETTING THERE: Williams, Ari- zona, is about three hours north- west of Phoenix, 30 miles west of Flagstaff on Interstate 40. COST: Round-trip train tickets start at $62 for Pullman Class up to $209 for Luxury Parlor. Hotel and train packages start at $206. WHERE TO STAY: The Grand Canyon Railway Hotel in Williams is located at the railway depot, allowing guests to walk to the train. The South Rim has four hotels, from the historical El Tovar Hotel on the upscale end to cabins and rooms with shared bathrooms at Bright Angel Lodge. Rates range from $75 a night at Bright Angel to $25 at El Tovar. Reservations in summer are essential. WHERE TO EAT: Williams has numerous restaurants downtown, walking distance from the depot, and the railway hotel features a pub and a buffet-style restaurant. At the South Rim, there’s a food court at Maswik Lodge, a fine dining/steakhouse restaurant at Bright Angel Lodge and upscale dining at El Tovar.

are views of the 12,000-foot San Francisco Peaks, the highest point in Arizona, and wildlife, including antelope, wild turkey, bald eagles, coyotes, skunks, bobcats and mountain lions. Before boarding in Wil- liams, riders are treated to a Wild West shootout in a cor- ral next to the depot. Once the train starts rolling, the conductor and attendants tell stories and provide facts about the train, the canyon and towns at both ends of the line. Wild West and Native American musi- cians stop into each car to perform, and just so you’re prepared, there’s a train robbery on the way back to Williams. There also are seasonal themed rides. The train

S13

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014 Associated Press LEFT: The exterior of
News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014 Associated Press LEFT: The exterior of

Associated Press

LEFT: The exterior of Hermits Rest, a historic century-old structure west of Grand Canyon Village on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon in Arizona. RIGHT: The Grand Canyon Railway on its daily run between Williams, Arizona, and the Grand Canyon’s South Rim.

stops at a pumpkin patch leading up to Halloween; the Polar Express during the holidays is the most popular trip, featuring hot chocolate, Christmas

characters and songs, along with a stop at the North Pole to see Santa. The train runs daily, leav- ing Williams at 9:30 a.m. and returning at 3:30 p.m. That’s

enough time to get a few hours at the South Rim, but if you want to spend more time sightseeing, you can stay at one of four hotels in Grand Canyon Village and

return by train on a differ- ent day. Attractions near the vil- lage include 100-year-old historic structures called Hermits Rest and Lookout

Studio, both designed by Mary Coulter. Free shuttles and guided bus tours are available from the village to different parts of the canyon.

The canyon is one of those places you truly can’t appreciate until you’ve been there, and the Grand Can- yon Railway offers a great way to get there.

INDEPENDENT LIVINGCENTER of the NORTH SHORE and CAPE ANN, INC. Do you have long-term care

INDEPENDENT LIVINGCENTER of the NORTH SHORE and CAPE ANN, INC.

Do you have long-term care questions? We have information about your possible OPTIONS!

Service and Advocacy for an Independent Life”

We will guide you through your questions about living in the community with your chosen services and/ or supports and having more than just the option of living in a nursing home, such as:

n

Can I live in the community safely and independently?

n

What services and/or assistive devices/home modifications are available to support me in living in my home?

n

Does my current insurance cover any services and/or assistive devices/home modifications? If not, what funding, loans or donations may be available?

n

Can I privately pay for services or assistive devices/home modifications?

n

Can I go toarehabilitation facility or temporarily to a nursing home and then return to

my own home? During your decision-making process, the Independent Living Center of the North Shore and Cape Ann, Inc., (ILCNSCA) will share with you information and support. The Options Program is funded by your state and federal tax dollars. Options is a program of the Aging and Disability Resource Consortium of the Greater North Shore (ADRCGNS), a collaboration of aging services agencies and the ILCNSCA, working together to provide smooth access to information and services by all persons seeking long-term services and supports, regardless of age, disability, or income. ILCNSCA serves individuals of all ages,

all disabilities, family members and caregivers through the Options Program and those living with significant disabilities through its Independent Living Program. We are here to guide you to live as independently as you choose through services and advocacy for an independent life.

ILCNSCA • 27 Congress Street, Suite 107 • Salem, MA 01970 • 978-741-0077 www.ilcnsca.org • E-mail: optionsprogram@ilcnsca.org • www.facebook.com/ilcnsca

S14

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

CHESTNUT WOODS

Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center (formerly Hammersmith)

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Now part of the highly reputable Marquis family of health services, Chestnut Woods (formerly Hammersmith) and Blueberry Hill Rehabilitation and Healthcare Centers provide post-acute short term and comprehensive long-term care. It’s our unwavering goal to create the most medically advanced and nurturing environments to ensure optimum rehabilitative outcomes and the highest quality of life. It’s what sets Marquis care centers apart. And it’s why we invite you to takeatour, visit with our compassionate caregivers and experience our difference.

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S15

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Research shows yoga an effective stress-reliever

By ShelBy

Sheehan-Bernard

MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE (MCT)

Whether it’s a looming deadline, missed bill pay- ment or family conflict, stress is everywhere. According to a 2012 study by the American Psycho- logical Association, about 80 percent of those sur- veyed said their stress level had increased or stayed the same over the past year. And finding ways to cope with it is a constant challenge. “As a society, we don’t have effective stress-reduc- tion techniques. As the pace of life is increasing, so too does stress,” explains assis- tant professor of medicine and associate neurosci- entist at Harvard Medical School and author of The Harvard Medical School Guide’s “Your Brain on Yoga” Sat Bir Singh Khalsa. The impacts of stress are far-reaching, from non- physical symptoms such as irritability and anger to physical symptoms such as fatigue and weight gain, which is why researchers like Khalsa are studying the effects of regular yoga practice as a method for controlling stress and other negative emotions. “Research has validated that yoga can help indi- viduals cope with stress more effectively and can provide an uplifting effect on mood,” says Khalsa. The evidence isn’t just anec- dotal, as Khalsa and his team have used brain imag- ing to see the physiological changes in action. He says the primary mechanism for these changes is the practice of mindfulness, a ritual exer- cise of focusing attention on your breath and your body. “When you do a meditation task, whether it’s a mantra or focusing on breathing or a sensation, you are con- trolling your attention,” he explains.

you are con- trolling your attention,” he explains. File photo Researchers say practicing yoga consistently can

File photo

Researchers say practicing yoga consistently can help people better cope with stress.

This is counter to how the brain responds when it’s uncontrolled. Known as mind wandering or rumi- nating, it tends to produce negative content, says Khalsa, making individu- als particularly vulnerable to anxious or depressive thoughts. “You’re usu- ally not thinking about how great life is in these moments,” he says. “Your mind is working in a stress- ful survival mode, which releases stress hormones into the body.” Instead of trying to elimi- nate stress — an impossible task in modern society — a consistent yoga practice can help develop resilience to it. While some may argue that you’re either born Type A or you’re not, Khalsa argues that it’s a skill that can be developed: “The brain is plastic, and meditation is no different than learning how to juggle. You don’t just change your behavior; you actually change the struc- ture of your brain.” Laura Malloy, a licensed clinical social worker and certified yoga instructor who is director of yoga programs at Massachusetts General Hospital’s Benson Henry Institute for Mind

Body Medicine, sees this change occur firsthand with students who attend her classes. Both patients of the Benson Henry Institute and medical professionals at the hospital, Malloy’s students are particularly suscep- tible to stress, anxiety and depression. “These people are expe- riencing a lot of stressors, whether it’s an illness or a demanding job as a caregiver to those who are sick,” Malloy explains. “Yoga is really a mind-body practice that tries to bring focus back to breathing and mindfulness to the present moment, and it really helps them refresh and be less reactive.” So, how much yoga is needed to see a benefit? According to Khalsa, there are both short-term and long-term benefits. The short term can occur after a class or even a set of yoga postures, allowing for a temporary sense of calm- ness and elevated mood. The long term can occur over weeks or months of consistent practice, even if it’s just 10 minutes a day. This is when changes are established in your brain and you develop resiliency

to stress — so the reduced stress response will con- tinue even after your prac- tice ends. Malloy deems this the “carryover effect,” and she says her students report that it occurs after between two and six weeks of consistent practice. Like all things that need practice, says Khalsa, it really matters how much time and level of effort you invest to receive the greatest benefits. The good news is that the meditative component can be practiced anywhere. “You just need to focus (or meditate) on what you’re doing. It doesn’t have to be with your eyes closed,” he says. Malloy, a self-described “recovering Type A person- ality,” says that when she began her yoga practice about 20 years ago, she worked on relaxation when stuck in traffic. “I recog- nized parts of my body being tense, having nega- tive thoughts and holding my breath,” she explains. “Through weekly prac- tice, I started relaxing my shoulders more and just allowing the thoughts to leave my mind for that period of time.”

 

YOGA NEWBIE? THINGS TO KNOW

So, you finally made it to a yoga class. Congratulations! I bet you

never taken a class that hasn’t included it.

have a lot of questions about what just happened. Here are a handful of things I remember finding kooky about yoga, and some others that friends and students have mentioned.

Sometimes, you’ll take savasana during class, too. It’s a resting pose, allowing your body to soak up the work of the challenging poses you just did, and it gives you an excuse to find complete relaxation in the

„

“Namaste?” — Nama say what? At

the end of almost all yoga classes, the teacher will offer a brief thanks

middle of your day, something we can all use.

„

“Why do I have to take off my

and goodbye, saying “Namaste.” The class then says it back.

shoes and socks?” — Most studios don’t want your dirty flip-flops

 

A

friend of mine was surprised by

tracking in the outside world, but even if they did, trust me, you don’t want to be doing postures with shoes on. You can wear socks if you insist, though many teachers (including me) will warn you about the chance of slipping and sliding all over your mat, potentially leading to injury. You don’t want to accidentally slip into full splits, do you? Didn’t think

this exchange, suggesting that we were all in some cult. But really, the Sanskrit word namaste is an often- used salutation between people in India. It means “I bow to you.” You don’t have to say it back if you don’t want to. No pressure. Sometimes, I say it silently, when I’m too whooped or relaxed to even open my mouth.

„

“That’s not any English I’ve

so.

ever heard.” — If it sounds like the teacher is talking in a foreign lan-

„

“The teacher keeps touching me.”

These are called assists or adjust-

guage, it’s because she is. Often, the teacher will call out yoga poses in both the English and Sanskrit versions. Warrior one is virabhadrasana one. Mountain pose is tadasana. Postures are known as asanas, which means to sit in a way that is steady and comfortable. You’ll begin to learn and translate the asana names before you know it. Eka means one, pada means foot. Therefore, you’ll know anything eka pada involves one foot in the air or

ments. They’re meant to either gently correct your alignment in a posture or encourage the body a little deeper into a pose. Sometimes, their only pur- pose is to make a human connection through the power of touch. And you can opt out any time you want — just tell the teacher before class or let

her know if she asks at the beginning of class. Assists can happen through class, even during savasana, when a teacher might rub your temples or squeeze your toes.

behind your head, for example. I kid!

„

“Um, the people around me are

„

“Om? Are you getting me into a

breathing really loudly. Are they OK?” — That’s ujjayi pranayama, oth- erwise known as victorious breath. Pranayama is another Sanskrit word that means breath work, which can be a big part of a yoga class. Prana translates as life force, and ayama means extension, so extension of the life force. Isn’t that a great word for breathing? Ujjayi is done through the nose

cult again?” — No. Sometimes, yoga classes begin and end with chant-

ing, and that can mean repeating the phrase “om” or other numerous longer Sanskrit phrases. A techni- cal, historical explanation would be long, and yes, some chants do include the names of Hindu gods and goddesses, so they could be considered religious.

 

I

like to chant simply because it

no mouth breathing. The exhale

feels good in my body, much like singing or humming does, and the

involves constricting the back of the mouth, so the breath is loud. It sounds like ocean surf — or Darth Vader for “Star Wars” fans. The ulti- mate goal is to carry the ujjayi breath all the way through class, until sava-

sound the oms or chants create sounds beautiful. Think about the word “amen,” intoned after a hymn in church. Notice a similarity?

„

“What’s this thing that we do

sana. So, let your neighbor’s breath be a reminder to keep up your own.

— Jen Mulson,

at the end of class where we just lie there?” — That’s savasana, also

known as corpse pose, and I’ve

 

THE GAZETTE (COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO.) (MCT)

S18

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Councils on Aging

A directory of North Shore resources

„ BEVERLY COUNCIL ON AGING

90 Colon St.

Beverly, MA 01915

978-921-6017

www.beverlyma.

gov/departments/

council-on-aging

„ BOXFORD COUNCIL ON AGING

4 Middleton Road Boxford, MA 01921

978-887-3591

www.town.boxford.ma.us/

Pages/BoxfordMA_COA/

index

„ DANVERS COUNCIL ON AGING

25 Stone St.

Danvers, MA 01923

978-762-0208

www.dcoa.org

„ HAMILTON COUNCIL

ON AGING

299 Bay Road South Hamilton, MA 01982

978-468-5595

www.hamiltonma.gov/

Pages/hamiltonma_coa/index

„ IPSWICH COUNCIL ON AGING

25

Ipswich, MA 01938

978-356-6650

www.town.ipswich.ma.us

Green St.

„ MARBLEHEAD COUNCIL

ON AGING

10 Humphrey St.

Marblehead, MA

01945-1950

781-631-6737

www.marblehead.org

„ MIDDLETON COUNCIL

ON AGING

38 Maple St.

Middleton, MA 01949

978-777-4067

www.townofmiddleton.org/

Pages/MiddletonMA_COA/

index

„ PEABODY COUNCIL ON AGING

79 Central St.

Peabody, MA 01960

978-531-2254

www.peabodycoa.org

„ SALEM COUNCIL ON AGING

5

Salem, MA 01970

978-744-0924

www.salem.com

Broad St.

„ SWAMPSCOTT COUNCIL

ON AGING

200 Essex St. Swampscott, MA 01907

781-596-8866

www.town.swampscott.

ma.us

„ TOPSFIELD COUNCIL ON AGING

8 W. Common St.

Topsfield, MA 01983-1425

978-468-5529

www.topsfield-ma.gov/coa/

„ WENHAM COUNCIL ON AGING

10 School St.

Wenham, MA 01984

978-468-5533

www.wenhamma.gov

10 School St. Wenham, MA 01984 978-468-5533 www.wenhamma.gov Isn’t she Lovely State Sen. Joan Lovely dances

Isn’t she

Lovely

State Sen. Joan Lovely dances with John Dario during the Dancing with the Stars competition held at the Beverly Senior Center May 20.

KEN YUSZKUS/

Staff photo

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S19
The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014
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S20

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Answers to common canning questions

By AndreA Weigl

THE NEWS & OBSERVER (RALEIGH, N.C.) (MCT)

Sugar and safety: Those are the two big concerns of home cooks when it comes to canning. When people even think about making their own jams or pickles, they expe- rience what I call “recipe shock” about the amount of sugar required. (For exam- ple, a traditional strawberry jam recipe calls for five cups of mashed fruit and seven cups of sugar.) Many people these days want to limit sugar, either because they are diabetic or for weight control. When it comes to food safety, canning scares many people because of one threat: botulism. They are too afraid to even try can- ning their own food for fear of making their loved ones sick. If you understand the science behind safe canning practices, you will know how to eliminate that risk and can without fear. I heard these concerns again and again these last several months at events for my first cookbook, “Pickles & Preserves: A Savor the South Cookbook.” With strawberry season in full swing and peach season not far off, here are answers to your most common canning questions with an assist from fellow canning cook- book authors, food scientists and home economists.

SUGAR

Q: Why do recipes for jam, jelly and preserves call for so much sugar? A: Sugar does more than provide flavor. It plays a key role in getting the jam to set as well as preserving color and texture and extending shelf life. “It’s important to recog- nize that jams and jelly are candy. You are essentially candying the fruit to pre- serve it,” explained Sherri Brooks Vinton ( http://

pre- serve it,” explained Sherri Brooks Vinton ( http:// Without the correct amount of sugar, homemade

Without the correct amount of sugar, homemade jam may not set, will not have that bright, glossy color and ideal texture or last as long once opened.

File photo

sherribrooksvinton.com/ ), author of the best-selling “Put ‘em Up” canning books and the recently released, “Put ‘em Up Preserving Answer Book: 399 Solutions to Your Questions.” Without the correct amount of sugar, Vinton explains, the jam may not set, will not have that bright, glossy color and ideal tex- ture or last as long once opened. Q: Can I make jams or pre- serves with less sugar or no sugar? A: Yes. There are low- methoxyl pectins on the market that allow you to use less sugar, Splenda and other sweeteners. Low- methoxyl pectins rely on calcium, rather than sugar, to get jams and preserves to set. Look for low-sugar, no- sugar pectins by Ball or Sure-Jell, which can be used to make jam with lower quantities of sugar, Splenda or honey. Vinton and Marisa McClellan, author of the popular Food In Jars blog ( http://foodinjars.com/ ) and two preserving books,

recommend a product called Pomona’s Universal Pectin

(http://www.pomonapec-

tin.com), a commercial pectin packaged for home use. Available online and at Earth Fare, Williams- Sonoma and Whole Foods stores, Pomona’s comes with two packets: one of pec- tin and another of calcium that is mixed with water before it is added to the fruit. Because the calcium helps the jam set, recipes using Pomona’s can use less sugar. and two preserving books, recommend a prod- uct called Pomona’s Uni- versal Pectin ( http://www. pomonapectin.com ), a com- mercial pectin packaged for home use. Available online and at Earth Fare, Williams- Sonoma and Whole Foods stores, Pomona’s comes with two packets: one of pec- tin and another of calcium that is mixed with water before it is added to the fruit. Because the calcium helps the jam set, recipes using Pomona’s can use less sugar. Vinton has two books with recipes that call for Pomo- na’s: “Put ’em Up,” and “Put

’em Up Fruit.” In addition, Pomona’s makers recently published a cookbook, “Preserving With Pomona’s Pectin,” by Allison Carroll Duffy. Q: Can I make sweet pickles with less sugar? A: Yes. But using less sugar or a sugar substitute will produce a softer pickle, Vinton notes. Reducing sugar or replacing it with Splenda in a traditional recipe is unlikely to work. Instead, look for low-sugar pickle recipes or ones that call for Splenda. Q: Why can’t I just replace sugar with Splenda? A: Fletcher Arritt, a food science professor at N.C. State University, explains that sugar and Splenda react differently with water when making jam, jelly, preserves or pickles. Sugar binds itself with the water, making it less available to microbes that can cause spoilage or make someone sick. Splenda does not bind as well with water, increas- ing the risk of microbial activity. Q: What about making jams and preserves with other

sugar substitutes or artificial sweeteners? A: Cooks can use honey, maple syrup, agave syrup and stevia with Pomona’s pectin or low-methoxyl pectins. The key is finding trusted recipes that call for such ingredients. Vinton advises against using artificial sweeten- ers, such as aspartame and sucralose, because they become bitter when cooked and create an off flavor.

SAFETY

Q: How can I be sure that I’m following safe canning practices? A: Safety is one of the first topics McClellan, author of “Food In Jars” and “Preserving by the Pint,” addresses when she teaches people how to can. She explains that most jams, jel- lies, preserves and pickles are high-acid foods, which can be safely processed in a boiling water canner with no risk of botulism. “It is impossible for botulism to develop,” McClellan said. “I really stress it just isn’t going to happen.” Let’s cover some basics to explain the science. There

are two types of canning:

boiling water bath canning, which is used to process high-acid foods, such as jams, jellies, preserves and pickles; and pressure canning, which is required for low-acid fruits and veg- etables, meats, poultry and soups. With high-acid foods, processing jars in a boil- ing water bath, which reaches temperatures of 212 degrees, is all that is needed to kill molds, yeasts and bacteria. With low-acid foods, pressure canning is required to reach a tempera- ture of 240 degrees, the level at which harmful bacteria and botulism spores can be killed. The key to safe canning is following professionally tested recipes, such as those from the National Center for Home Food Preserva- tion ( http://nchfp.uga.edu/ ) and from authors you trust. “People are very afraid of preserving their own food,” Vinton says. “They don’t have to be. Just follow the recipe.” Q: What about the risk of botulism? A: Botulism is only an issue when canning low- acid fruits and vegetables, such as green beans, corn, peas or asparagus in salted water, or when canning seafood, meat, poultry, soups or stews. Those foods do not contain enough acid, either naturally or from a pickling brine, to create an environment that is inhos- pitable to botulism spores. Those foods must be pro- cessed in a pressure canner to 240 degrees to kill the spores. Q: Since tomatoes are low-acid fruits, do they need to be pres- sure canned? A: Tomatoes are border- line low-acid fruits and can be made safe to can in a boiling water bath with the addition of citric acid or lemon juice. The rule is to add 1 tablespoon bottled lemon juice or ¼ teaspoon

S21

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

citric acid per pint, or 2 tablespoons bottled lemon juice or 1 /2 teaspoon citric acid per quart. Q: Is it safe to do “open-kettle canning?” A: No. Open-kettle canning is an out-of-date practice in which home cooks would fill hot glass jars with hot jams, fruits and or pickles and brine, and then seal with- out processing in a boiling water bath. Ben Chapman, a food scientist at N.C. State University, explains that processing the jars in a boiling water bath helps kill microbes in the food, vent out oxygen containing microbes and remove as much air as possible from the jars to create a good seal — all essential for produc- ing a safe product. Without that processing, he explains, microbes may be able to grow. Q: My grandmother used to use paraffin to seal her jams and jel- lies. Can I do the same? A: No. Sealing jams or jellies with paraffin does not involve the added

protection of boiling water bath canning that Chap- man describes above. Plus, pinholes can develop in the paraffin to let microbes into the jams or jellies. This is what I tell people who ask about open-kettle canning and using paraffin:

“Just because your grand- mother did it doesn’t make it safe. Your grandparents rode around in cars without seat belts. We know more know about food safety than they did and we should be smart enough to use that knowledge.”

STRAWBERRY JAM TASTE TEST

I conducted a blind taste test with my co-workers comparing a no-sugar strawberry jam made with Splenda and a low-sugar jam made with Pomona’s Universal Pectin. The overwhelming majority preferred the Splenda jam. But those who preferred the low-sugar version cited the Splenda jam’s after- taste as the reason for their

preference. Here’s how to make both jams:

No-Sugar Strawberry Jam:

Combine 6 cups mashed strawberries, 3 /4 cup water and 1 box (1.75-ounce) Less or No Sugar Pectin in a large Dutch oven or saucepot. Bring mixture to a full rolling boil (a boil that cannot be stirred down) over high heat, stirring constantly. Boil exactly 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Stir in 4 cups granulated Splenda. Skim off any foam or clumps of Splenda. Ladle into hot canning jars, filling to within 1 /4-inch of the top. Wipe rims. Add two-piece lids. Process for 10 minutes in a boiling water bath canner. Low-Sugar Strawberry Jam:

Combine 4 cups mashed strawberries with 2 tea- spoons calcium water (cal- cium is included with the Pomona’s Universal Pectin) in a large Dutch oven or saucepot. Stir well and cook over medium-high heat. Measure out 2 cups sugar and 2 teaspoons Pomona’s

pectin in a bowl and set aside. Once fruit comes to a boil, add sugar and pectin. Stir to dissolve, 1 to 2 minutes. Once mixture returns to a boil, remove from heat and ladle into hot canning jars. Fill to within

1 /4-inch of top. Wipe rims. Add two-piece lids. Process for 10 minutes in a boiling water bath canner. Note:

You can use adjust amounts of sweetener used in this recipe from 1 /2 cup to 1 cup honey or 3 /4 cup to 2 cups sugar.

LOW-SUGAR, NO-SUGAR RECIPES

„ The National Center for

Home Food Preservation has links to several reduced sugar recipes. Go to http:// nchfp.uga.edu/, click on Make Jam & Jelly and scroll down to the bottom. For low- sugar pickle recipes, click on Pickles and then Pickles

for Special Diets. (There are also reduced sodium pickle recipes.)

„ Pomona’s Pectin offers

a bunch of recipes at http://

www.pomonapectin.com/

recipes/. It recently pub- lished a book, “Preserving With Pomona’s Pectin,” by Allison Carroll Duffy (Fair Winds Press, 2013).

„ Splenda has several

recipes for jams and pickles

at http://recipes.splenda. com/.

MORE ABOUT SAFE CANNING PRACTICES

„ The National Center

for Home Food Preserva- tion offers a great primer

on safe canning practices at http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/ can_home.html.

„ University of Georgia

Cooperative Extension also sells a cookbook, “So Easy to Preserve,” which publishes the latest U.S. Department of Agriculture recommendations for safe food preservation. A sixth edition of the cookbook is

due in July. They also sell demonstration DVDs. Info:

http://setp.uga.edu/.

„ Ball, maker of many

popular canning supplies, also has a ton of information

on safe canning practices on its website, http://www. freshpreserving.com, and has published two books considered go-to manuals for beginners: “Ball Com-

plete Book of Home Preserv- ing,” (Robert Rose, 2006) and “Ball Blue Book Guide to Preserving,” (Alltrista Consumer Products, 2004).

HOW TO AVOID FRUIT FLOAT

Sherri Brooks Vin- ton’s “Put ’em Up! Fruit,” described the dreaded fruit float that can strike even the most skilled canner. She

explained that there are a few things to prevent fruit floating to the top of the jars: cook jams thoroughly, as dictated in the recipe, to break down fruit’s cell walls, allow jam to rest for 5 minutes before filling jars, do not process jars for longer than recipe says, and once the jars have sealed but are still warm, flip them

over and let them sit for 30 minutes before storing them right-side up.

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S22

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

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S23

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

When best-laid retirement plans meet grandbaby

By Dave Tomlin

ASSOCIATED PRESS

PUERTO VALLARTA, Mexico — I was amazed

one recent afternoon when

I called out to my little

granddaughter Elizabeth in another room and she answered, “Mande.” That’s colloquial Spanish for “What can I do for you?” or simply “Yes?” But Eliza- beth isn’t a native Spanish speaker. Neither am I, nor is her grandmother Pam. Spanish is colonizing our household speech because we all live together most of the year in Mexico. Pam and I began planning our retirement here more than a decade ago, while we were both still working. We were going to spend win- ters in Puerto Vallarta and summers in a small cabin we own in the mountains of southern New Mexico. And that’s just what we’re doing. But like most plans, ours had to be adjusted. We never pictured ourselves raising another child as we migrated back and forth. If we had known Elizabeth was to be part of the plan, we’d almost certainly have planned differently. But when our daughter, her mother, gave birth four years ago and then almost immediately re-entered the hospital for a long-term disability that disqualified her for parenting, we had already bought the two homes. We had to make a fast decision, and now Eliza-

beth is ours by adoption. We’re far from alone. According to 2010 census data, about 5.8 million chil- dren — nearly 8 percent of U.S. children — live with grandparents identified as the head of household. Many of those children have

a parent in the household,

too. But an estimated 2.7 million are being raised in the absence of parents by grandparents or other close adults, an increase of 18 per- cent between 2000 and 2010,

adults, an increase of 18 per- cent between 2000 and 2010, Associated Press Dave Tomlin, center,

Associated Press

Dave Tomlin, center, with his wife, Pam Tomlin, right, and their granddaughter, Elizabeth Gibbs, on the beachfront boardwalk with Bahia de Banderas behind them, near their home in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. “While it’s not the leisurely retirement we thought we wanted, in many ways it’s better, starting with the pleasure of watching a beloved child grow up and, through her, participating more deeply in another culture and language,” said Tomlin.

says a 2012 report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. That means many people are remaking their retire- ment plans to include kids on short notice, as we did, and some are bound to be doing it across borders. While it’s not the leisurely retirement we thought we wanted, in many ways it’s better, starting with the pleasure of watching a beloved child grow up and, through her, participating more deeply in another cul- ture and language. Much of that is happening because we enrolled Eliza-

beth in a private Mexican preschool, La Casa Azul. The teachers and the program are terrific, the fees are affordable at about $275 monthly, the parents are mostly delight- ful middle-class nationals,

and Elizabeth’s “amigos” are adorable. Through school events, birthday parties and day-to- day contact during drop-offs and pickups, we have friend- ships and a social life that seem much closer to real life than the more insular and predictable expat lifestyle we imagined. Of course there are trade- offs. We can’t travel as freely as we’d hoped. And as Elizabeth enters her aca- demic grade levels, we’ll be committed to Mexico from late August to late June. That means we’ll swelter through big chunks of the hot, humid months that we’d have spent farther north if we were on our own. Aside from school tuition, we’re repeatedly reminded how expensive children

are. Prices for Elizabeth’s food, clothing, health care, baby-sitting, recreation and entertainment have all risen shockingly from what we remember from our first time around as parents. Fortunately, the shock is reduced in a country where consumer prices are lower than in the U.S. by more than 35 percent. Health insurance is a problem we’re still wres- tling with. But the quality and availability of both pediatric and geriatric medi- cal care in a city like Puerto Vallarta with its big expat community are excellent. There are also rich and var- ied cultural opportunities, though transplants from cosmopolitan Mexico City complain otherwise. We aren’t sure how long

we will have the stamina or appetite for sticking to the migrant path we’ve chosen. One thing we underesti- mated is the physical and emotional effort it takes to uproot ourselves twice a year for the trip north or south to our other home. And of course our ability to live in Mexico is subject always to the hospitality of a foreign government and the peace and security of local conditions. So far, they’ve all been fine in our neck of the woods, but who knows? Finally, there’s the lan- guage barrier. We’ve low- ered it considerably with Spanish lessons and daily practice. Also, in this tourist and expat mecca, a major- ity of the Mexicans we meet speak at least some Eng- lish. But it’s still mentally

exhausting and often humbling to get through a parent-teacher meeting or a cocktail party acting as your own real-time translator. And speaking of humbling, there’s hardly a day that goes by when we don’t find our- selves relying on our 4-year- old to fill in a vocabulary gap or correct a verb tense. On the other hand, it’s hard to match the pleasure of hear- ing Elizabeth’s sweet, famil- iar voice suddenly switch to another idiom when a friend comes over and merge into the perfectly accented babble that surrounds us so much of the time. “Papa,” she calls when she wants me to look at what she and her amigo are doing. “Mira!” “Mande,” I manage, and this time I feel proud.

S24

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Grilled salad: Reason to finally use grilling pan

By J.M. HirscH

finally have found a use for

GRILLED CHICKPEA

AP FOOD EDITOR

one of my six pans. I wanted

Over the years, I’ve received roughly a half dozen of those perforated grilling pans as gifts. You know the ones I mean. They usually have sloped sides and small holes in them. The idea is that they let you cook smaller items on the grill without fear of losing the food between the grates. I’ve never used a single one of them. Not even once. Until now. Maybe it’s because I don’t often grill small things. Or maybe it’s because when I do, I’m lucky enough to get my food to straddle the grates without it falling into the flames. Whatever the rea- son, I never found the need

to try grilling chickpeas for use in a grilled bread salad. Chickpeas are delicious when roasted, so it stands that they also would be delicious when grilled. But even I would have trou- ble keeping these suckers from falling through the grates. Are you one of the few Americans who doesn’t own (and never use) one of these grilling pans? No fear. Just toss the chickpeas with some oil and pop them on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast them in the oven at 450 F for 10 to 15 minutes, or until just starting to brown.

SALAD WITH RED ONION AND SOURDOUGH

to dirty a pan. After all, one of the treats of grilling is no cleanup.

Start to finish: 15 minutes Servings: 6 Juice of 1 lemon

But as I contemplated a

4

tablespoons olive oil, divided

grilled salad, I realized I might

3

cloves garlic, minced

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 /2 teaspoon ground cumin 1 /2 teaspoon kosher salt 1 /4 teaspoon ground black pepper

1 large red onion, cut into thin rounds

1 large red bell pepper, cored and cut into strips 15-ounce can chickpeas, drained

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon smoked paprika

1 loaf (about 19 ounces) sourdough bread, cut into 2-inch croutons 5-ounce container arugula Heat a grill to high. Set a perforated grilling pan on the grill directly over the heat source. In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, the garlic, oregano, cumin, salt and pepper. Set aside. In a medium bowl, combine the onion, bell pepper, chick- peas, garlic powder, smoked paprika and 1 tablespoon of oil,

tossing to coat evenly. When

the grilling pan is very hot,

transfer the mixture to the

pan. Cook, stirring often, until the onions and peppers are lightly browned and tender,

8 to 10 minutes. Transfer the

mixture to a clean serving

bowl. Set aside. In a bowl, toss the croutons with the remaining 1 table-

spoon of oil. Place the croutons

directly on the grill grate.

Cook, turning often, until lightly browned and crisp. Use tongs to transfer the croutons to the bowl of chickpeas and vegetables. Add the arugula, then toss well to slightly wilt

the arugula. Drizzle the dress- ing over the salad, then toss again to coat. Divide between 6 serving plates. Nutrition information per serving: 460 calories; 110 calories from fat (24 percent of total calories); 12 g fat (2 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 0 mg cholesterol; 73 g carbohydrate;

7 g fiber; 5 g sugar; 16 g pro- tein; 970 mg sodium.

7 g fiber; 5 g sugar; 16 g pro- tein; 970 mg sodium. Associated Press These

Associated Press

These chunky sourdough croutons can be toasted right on the grill, too.

16 g pro- tein; 970 mg sodium. Associated Press These chunky sourdough croutons can be toasted
16 g pro- tein; 970 mg sodium. Associated Press These chunky sourdough croutons can be toasted
16 g pro- tein; 970 mg sodium. Associated Press These chunky sourdough croutons can be toasted
16 g pro- tein; 970 mg sodium. Associated Press These chunky sourdough croutons can be toasted

S25

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

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CLUES ACROSS
1. Officer trainee
18.
Sad Portuguese folk song
Answers Page 29
22.
Treaty associate
#
6. District in ancient Greece
23.
Not there
10.
Queen of Sparta
1
24.
Cause to feel # 39 across
14.
Excessively fat
26.
Festivities
15.
Beach guard
27.
Hypothetical original
17.
Chocolate & cherries
substance
dessert
52.
Blotter, inbox etc.
28.
Cost per page
19.
1/100 yen
55.
Impelling forces
29.
White linen vestments
Duct or cellophane
20.
56.
Small spur wheel
30.
Before
21.
Scottish novelist John
57.
Soviet Union
32.
Spelling or Quilting
22.
Act as an assistant
58.
Crystal ball divining
34.
Syrian capital
Engage a worker
23.
59.
Weighing device
35.
Egyptian Sun god
24.
Countertenors
36.
Indian clarified butter
25.
Capacity for activity
CLUES DOWN
38.
Lasso
28.
Heavy steel rope
1. Black-backed gulls
39.
Detectors
30.
Geological times
2. Having sufficient skill
41.
Fishing line weight
31.
Vestment worn by clergy
3. Doyen
42.
Posh & smart
33.
Opposite of work
4. Upper left computer key
43.
Plural of 54 down
34.
Challenges
5. Meteorite glass
46.
Microelectromechanical
36.
TV choral show
6. Runs away to marry
systems (abbr.)
37.
Non-commercial TV
7. Former Italian money
47. Vipers
38.
Delayed
unit
48. One with powers of
39.
State of dishonor
8. Industrial city in Nigeria
foresight
40.
Benne seeds
9.
Poetry form 6 x 6 +
49.
Toronto Ins. Woman’s
42.
American Indian tribe
tercet
Assoc.
(pl.)
10.
More reticulate
50. Film spool
44.
Formerly Persia
11.
Skater Lysacek
51. A small island
45.
The
Ranger
12.
Delta Kappa Epsilon
52. Daman and
,
India
46.
Scaley anteater genus
13.
They
53. Reciprocal of a sine
48.
Pouches
16.
Gazes steadily
54. Mythological bird
49.
Denotes three
The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014
S26

CLUES ACROSS

1.

Dodge truck model

4.

Launch, note or mattress

7.

22nd Greek letter

10.

Elderly

12.

Sheep genus

14.

Swiss river

15.

Pulsate repeatedly

17.

Not gained or won

18.

Red organic pigment con-

taining iron

19.

Mother of Ishmael

20.

Financial gains

22.

Point midway between E

and SE

23.

Strikingly appropriate

25.

Examine with care

28.

Indian for carrying sling

31.

Saddle horse

32.

92860

33.

A field of mowed grass

34.

Animal for heavy loads

39.

Transport, usually in a truck

40. Protoctist

41.

An eagle’s nest

42.

More massive & firm

45.

Public squares

48.

Type of paint base

49.

Daman and

,

India

9. Wrath # 11. Arrived extinct 2 13. Opposite of go 16. Shouts of approval
9.
Wrath
#
11.
Arrived extinct
2
13.
Opposite of go
16.
Shouts of approval
18.
Hailed
21.
Of I
24.
Opposite of starboard
51.
Anesthetized
26.
Past participle of “saw”
54.
55120
27.
Point that is one point N of
56.
A person who inherits
due E
58.
Indian frock
29.
One who examines
59.
Training by multiple
methodically
repetitions
30.
Davenports
60. Dentist’s group
34.
Aegle marmelos fruit
61. Not crazy
35.
About Eurasia
62. Opposed to prefix
36.
Stained with blood
63. Spanish Mister
37.
Tangelo fruit
64. Preceded
38.
Vituperated
65. Obtained
39.
Come to pass
CLUES DOWN
43.
Outer border strip
1. Ripening early
44.
Island in Venice
2. Struck with fear or dread
46.
In the year of Our Lord
3. Combination of two
47.
Impertinence
companies
50.
Not set afire
4.
A person active in party
52.
Afrikaans
politics
53.
European sea eagle
5. River in England
55.
Macaws
6. Flat circular plate
56.
Birthed
7. Pause in a line of verse
57.
Tokyo
8. The thigh of a hog
S27 The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014 For peace
S27
The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014
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S28

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

No summer vacation for network TV; it has big plans

By Scott collinS

LOS ANGELES TIMES (MCT)

LOS ANGELES — The summer blockbusters are coming. And to see them, you don’t even need to get off your sofa. The TV networks are pouring unprecedented amounts of money — and some very creative deal- making — into getting A-list movie writer-producers and actors onto your living-room flat screen during the hot months. On NBC, John Malkovich is starring as the pirate Blackbeard in “Crossbones.” CBS is launching a sci-fi drama, “Extant,” starring Oscar winner Halle Berry and produced by Steven Spielberg. And director Guillermo del Toro is bring- ing his vampire tale “The Strain” to FX with a $9-mil- lion price tag for the pilot alone. Summer used to be net- work television’s dead zone, stocked with repeats and cheap reality shows, and it was a place to bury canceled series. That left an opening for the cable networks, which saw a chance to gain view- ers without having to go up against the networks’ best new shows in the fall, using summer to launch hit programs such as “Mad Men.” CBS fired back last sum- mer with the Stephen King miniseries “Under the Dome,” which did so much better than expected that the network is bringing it back this year with fresh episodes. That success, combined with increasing competition from Netflix, Amazon and other upstart content providers, has upended traditional notions of what constitutes a TV “season.” “You can’t close down for the summer,” said NBC Entertainment President Jennifer Salke. “There’s opportunity year-round.” All the TV sizzle, however, carries significant risks.

All the TV sizzle, however, carries significant risks. Associated Press Halle Berry will star in the

Associated Press

Halle Berry will star in the sci-fi drama “Extant,” a new CBS series that premieres in July.

Networks are shelling out big money for these sum- mer dramas, with Fox’s summertime reboot of “24” with Kiefer Sutherland top- ping $4 million per episode in total production costs, according to industry insid- ers. “Extant” costs nearly that much. That matches the tab for the most expensive shows during the regular season. At the same time, the cable networks are ramp- ing up their own offerings to stay competitive. In addition to FX’s marquee summer project, TNT is rolling out the apocalyptic epic “The Last Ship.” The show’s executive producer is Michael Bay, best known for directing big-budget summer films including the “Transformers” series. “Our goal is to make

watching TNT be like going to a great summer movie,” Michael Wright, the pro- gramming chief of TNT’s parent company, Turner Networks, told media buy- ers earlier this month in New York. “Grab a bucket of popcorn, kick back and let us take you on a thrilling ride.” In an interview, Bay said he had wanted to get involved in TV for a long time but had been “slow and cautious” about mak- ing his move. “This particu- lar idea was batted around quite a bit, and it was really cinematic,” he said of “The Last Ship.” “So, I gave it my all.” Cable networks have long realized, of course, that summer offers a per- fect opportunity to chase new viewers. HBO, for

a per- fect opportunity to chase new viewers. HBO, for Associated Press Director Guillermo del Toro’s

Associated Press

Director Guillermo del Toro’s vampire tale “The Strain” premieres on FX July 13.

example, moved its vam- pire drama “True Blood” from fall to summer start- ing with Season 2 back in 2009. Viewing more than doubled, according to Nielsen, and it became one of HBO’s top-performing shows. Its seventh and final season will air this summer. Those kinds of opportu- nities existed for cable net- works because for decades broadcasters mostly ignored the summer. With longer days and summer vacation competing for viewers’ attention, the networks scheduled mostly repeats between Memorial Day and late September, when the new season started. Over the last decade, they found success with relatively inexpen- sive reality fare, such as

“America’s Got Talent,” “Big Brother” and “So You Think You Can Dance.” Much of the credit for the about-face goes to a surprise hit from last year. “Under the Dome” was adapted from a Stephen King thriller about townsfolk trapped under a giant transparent bubble. The show succeeded, despite a number of tra- ditional hindrances to attracting big audiences. In addition to the summer time slot, there were no high- profile stars, and it wasn’t a cop show or medical drama that viewers would instantly recognize. The series logged an average weekly viewer- ship of nearly 14 million — an impressive figure that prompted CBS to order a second season to

You can’t close down for the summer. There’s opportunity year-round.

NBC Entertainment President Jennifer Salke

a program initially con-

ceived for a single season. “Dome’s” next season rolls out June 30. But it was a clever finan- cial deal that enabled CBS to greenlight the show in the first place. “Dome” was

modeled after formulas that cable networks had exploited: limited runs (typically just 10 or 12 episodes per season), an intriguing concept and the type of marketing drum- beat usually reserved for grander events. “Cable did teach us some lessons: that people are interested in the kind of bigger show that broadcast dramas can do well,” said

Neal Baer, a former writer- producer for “ER” and “Law

& Order: Special Victims

Unit” who’s now behind “Under the Dome.” In an unusual arrange- ment brokered by talent agency WME, CBS hedged its risks by sharing costs with Amazon — exactly the sort of new-media company that usually gives network executives panic attacks because it threatens to encroach on their existing business. Each episode costs about $3 million to produce, with CBS essentially splitting about half of the bill with Amazon. Foreign sales roughly pay for the other half. In exchange, Amazon won the right to deliver “Under the Dome” to view- ers on its website within days of each episode’s broadcast, far earlier than the weeks- or months-long delay that would typically exist. “It was a unique deal that others have copied,” NBC’s Salke said.

S29

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

ANSWERS TO PUZZLES ON PAGE 26

# 1 2
#
1
2

#

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The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014 S30
The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014
S30
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S31

The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014

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www.varinosdental.comNEW LOCATION 185 Hermon Street WINTHROP SAME DAY SERVICE - call us in the morning and

Street WINTHROP SAME DAY SERVICE - call us in the morning and we’ll see you in
The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014 S32
The Salem News • NORTH SHORE SENIORS • Wednesday, June 25, 2014
S32