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a handbook

FOR AUTHORS
1
prepari ng your manus cri pt
f or oxford uni vers i ty pres s
Copyright 2013 by Oxford University Press
Welcome to Oxford University Press India if you are a frst-time author, and welcome back if
you have already published with us. Tis handbook will help you understand the requirements
and responsibilities of OUPI while preparing your manuscript. It will also familiarize you with
the various stages your manuscript will go through.
OUPI was established in 1912 in Bombay (now Mumbai). Afer Mumbai, ofces were opened
in Chennai and Kolkata. With the opening of an ofce in Delhi in 1972, the headquarters of
OUPI shifed from Mumbai to Delhi. OUPIs publishing includes a wide array of educational
and academic resourcesfrom scholarly works, trade and reference books, and higher educa-
tion textbooks to school courses, bilingual dictionaries, and digital resources.
Te purpose of this handbook is to clarify your responsibilities as the author of your book
and ours as its publisher, so that the process of transforming your manuscript into a book proves
efcient and clear, and, most importantly, that it results in a fnished product everyoneespe-
cially youcan be proud of.
With diverse publications aimed at both general readers and specialized audiences, what
binds us is our commitment to publishing work that furthers our missionto support Oxford
Universitys objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education. Each publication
achieves this through diferent means and forms of expression. Some include boxes and graphs;
others make extensive use of symbols; some feature photographs and illustrations; still others
consist of litle other than writen text.
Our authors responsibilities vary considerably from manuscript to manuscript, so this
handbook is meant to be both comprehensive and concise. You will fnd not only elements that
relate directly to your book and the production process it will undergo, but also instructions
that are not directly relevant, which you may feel free to skip over.
Guiding you through this process initially will be the Commissioning Editor who commis-
sioned your project and who will remain a key contact throughout the publishing process and
beyond. Once your Commissioning Editor has deemed the manuscript acceptable and ready
for the next phase, primary responsibility for shepherding your manuscript through to publica-
tion will shif to an Editor.
Tis handbook serves, frst, to inform you how to properly compose and submit your manu-
script and, second, to explain the process that will take it from completed manuscript to fn-
ished book. A frm grasp of both your responsibilities and OUPIs will save time, minimize
mistakes, and contribute to producing a book that will enjoy a long and successful shelf life.
Let me end where I began, by welcoming you to Oxford University Press India. We look for-
ward to our partnership as we publish your book, and to many more such collaborations in the
future to reach readers globally.
WE L C O ME
to Ac ademi c and Gener a l Di v i s i on,
oxf or d uni ve r s i t y p r e s s , i ndi a
Sugata Ghosh
Director: Publishing
Academic and General Division
CONTENTS
checklist for manuscript submission 6
what to expect 8
Delivery, Review, and Acceptance 8
Preparation for Handover to Editorial 8
Handover to Editorial 9
Copyediting 9
Composition/Page Proofs 9
Jacket/Cover Design and Copy 10
Indexing 10
Printing 10
What Contact You Should Expect 12
Overview of the Commissioning Process/Overview of the Editorial Process 14
how to assemble your manuscript 15
Electronic Files 15
Front and Back Mater 16
Chapter Title 17
Headings 17
Footnotes or Endnotes 17
Tables 17
Special Characters 18
Spelling and Punctuation 18
art and illustration submission 19
Submiting Art for ProductionA Quick Reference 21
Artwork from Tird-Party Sources 22
Black-and-White Photographs and Scans 22
Resolution 23
Scans fom Books and Magazines 24
Colour Images to Be Reproduced in Black and White 24
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 4
Colour Images to Be Reproduced in Colour 25
Images fom Medical Scanners 25
Submiting Hard Copies to Be Scanned 26
Artwork You Create 26
Line Illustrations 26
Shading, Tints, Fonts, and Lines 26
Photographs 27
Tips for Taking a Good Photograph 27
Creating Combination Art 28
Labelling 28
Maps 29
Maps You Create 29
Sourcing Photographs 30
tables and boxes 31
Tables 31
Formating 31
Elements of a Table 32
Sample Table 32
Boxes 33
Submission 33
copyright and permissions 34
Material Requiring Permissions 34
Visual Illustrations 34
Tables 35
Text 35
Music Examples 35
Website Material 35
Your Own Previously Published Material 35
Other Works Published by Oxford University Press 36
Material Not Requiring Permissions 36
Material in the Public Domain 36
Ideas and Data 36
Your Own Previously Unpublished Material 36
Te Fair Use Exception 36
Geting Started 37
Making the Request 38
Difculties Obtaining Permissions 39
A Special Note for Scientifc, Technical, and Medical (STM) Authors 39
Afer Receiving Permissions 40
Additional Information 40
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 5
writing tools 41
Dictionaries 41
Major Style Manuals 41
Other Writing and Editing Guides 42
glossary of publishing terms 43
marketing faq 51
royalties faq 53
oxford scholarship online faq 55
permissions request form 59
permissions log 60
author publicity form 61
author checklist 68
oup style sheet 72
guidelines for abstracts and keywords 82
template for abstracts and keywords 86
CHECKLI ST FOR MANUSCRI PT SUBMI SSI ON
before submitting a manuscript, please discuss the
following topics with your commissioning editor:
Submission date
Format (e.g., Microsof Word) and delivery (e.g., fash drive, CD, or e-mail atachments)
Page or word count
Figures: number and fle format
Permissions
Indexing
Ideas for cover art illustration
to submit
Manuscript Elements
Final front mater
Required: Full title page and table of contents; for edited volumes, list of contributors
Optional: Acknowledgements, dedication, preface, author and/or translator note (in case
of translations), timeline, list of abbreviations, list of tables and figures (including line art,
photographs, maps, etc.)
Final and complete manuscript (see pp. 1518 for details)
Each chapter saved as its own fle (text and corresponding notes together in one fle) with
continuous pagination throughout the manuscript
ALL textmain as well as notes and referencesdouble-spaced in Times New Roman
12-point font
Final end mater
Optional: Afterword, Epilogue, Appendices, Glossary, Bibliography, Index keywords
Tables
Do not embed tables within the manuscript but rather supply separately, one table per fle
(see pp. 3133 for details)
Include callouts for tables in manuscript by table number
Figures, including line art, photographs, maps, music examples (see pp. 1928 for details)
Do not embed fgures in manuscript but rather supply separately, one fgure per fle
Include callouts for fgures in manuscript by fgure number
Captions for all tables and fgures, double-spaced and including any required copyright credits
Abstracts and keywords (see p. 17 for details)
questionnaires
Author Checklist Form (available separately here)
Author Publicity Form (available separately here)
legal documentation
List of permissions required for essays/extracts, fgures, and tables
Leters granting permission, with special mention of any that grant permission for
promotional or publicity use. In case of maps, leters stating necessary clearance has been
obtained from Survey of India and Ministry of Defence.
If contributed volume, all contributors agreements
Author Approval Form, in case of an edited volume comprising pre-published essays by the
contributors
Permission from institution (in cases where it has copyright over individual chapters)
administrative information
Details of any upcoming travel plans that could impact production schedules
Full contact information (title/afliation, e-mail, phone number, and mailing address) for
every author/volume editor
If contributed volume, abbreviated contact information (title/affiliation, e-mail, mailing
address) for every contributor
Remember to retain electronic copies of all materials for your records.
QUICK
GUIDE
WHAT TO EXPECT MANUSCRI PT CONTENTS CHECKLI ST
PERMI SSI ONS WRI TI NG TOOLS ART / ILLUSTRATIONS TABLES / BOXES
GLOSSARY MARKETI NG FAQ OSO FAQ ROYALTI ES FAQ
what to expect
Tis section of the handbook focuses primarily on the process that occurs afer your
Commissioning Editor has accepted your manuscript for production. You should feel
free to ask your Commissioning Editor any questions you might have about how pa-
rameters specifc to your manuscript may afect steps in the process.
1. delivery, review, and acceptance
Te time between the signing of your contract and acceptance of your manuscript will
vary depending on the nature of your project. Te frst step will be for you to submit a
full draf manuscript to your Commissioning Editor, who will assess it and discuss next
steps. Next steps may include outside peer review, Series Editor review, and/or devel-
opmental editing, especially if your manuscript was contracted based on a proposal and
before a full frst draf was complete. We encourage our authors to submit manuscripts
that have been carefully prepared and would not require developmental work. How-
ever, in case we feel that the manuscript is worth pursuing post some developmental
work, we could facilitate this. Please note that even with this developmental work, your
manuscript will still undergo professional copyediting during production.
Barring unforeseen delays and projects with special requirements, the publication
process (from submission of the complete and fnal manuscript to receiving the pub-
lished book) for a regular manuscript with an approximate length ranging between
1,00,000 to 1,20,000 words takes 8-10 months. In case of longer volumes or volumes with
special requirements, please discuss the schedule with your Commissioning Editor.
2. preparation for handover to editorial
When your Commissioning Editor has determined that your manuscript is ready for
fnal acceptance, your project will be prepared for handover to Editorial, typically by the
Commissioning Editor and/or his associate. Tis process includes making sure that the
manuscript is complete; that all fgures, tables, and other elements are in proper form;
that required forms have been completed; and that permissions have been cleared. All
of these details must be fnalized before the project can be accepted by Editorial.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 9
3. handover to editorial
In handing your manuscript and all of its accompanying elements to Editorial, your
Commissioning Editor will introduce you to the Head of the editorial team handling
your project. Te Editorial Head is responsible for the overall coordination and man-
agement of the project. He/she will pass the responsibility of day-to-day management
of the manuscript to an Editor, who, until the book has been released to the printer,
will remain your primary contact throughout the production process. Meanwhile, your
Commissioning Editor will continue to oversee the project at all stages and will be up-
dated frequently on your projects progress.
Your Editor will review your materials to ensure that they are complete; evaluate
the manuscripts copyediting, design, and typeseting needs; and prepare a tentative
schedule. He/she will send you an introductory note that provides you with a general
overview of the production schedule your manuscript will follow. Your Editor will
aim to accommodate your schedule as much as possible. However, please understand
that publication dates are announced to sales channels and media well in advance of a
books actual release, so it is critical that you follow the schedule your Editor sets; delays
may lead to lost opportunities to promote and sell your book. If your book has multiple
authors or editors, you will also be asked to confrm which of you is to be the main con-
tact. Your Editor may set up a team phone call, if desired, to give you an overview of the
various steps of the production process and when they will be taking place.
4. copyediting
Your Editor will send your manuscriptalong with any notes on editing that you pro-
vided in your Author Checklistto a professional copyeditor. Your copyeditor will
edit for discipline and house style, consistency, and grammar, but will not fact-check or
edit for content.
Your Editor will send you the queries raised by the copyeditor afer reviewing them.
You need to send your responses to the queries within the timeline as shared in the ten-
tative production schedule. Please note that the copyedited manuscript is not shown to
the author. In case of any substantial rephrasing of sentences, these portions will be run
past you. Tis is your last opportunity to make changes to your manuscript above
the level of corrections to discrete facts or spellings.
5. composition/page proofs
Once you have sent your responses to the queries, the manuscript will be prepared for
typeseting.
Your Editor will provide you with PDF fles of your page proofs when they are ready,
usually four to six weeks afer you have sent the responses to the queries to your editor.
You should then proofread the fles and mark any corrections as per the instructions
your Editor will give to you. OUP strongly recommends that you use Adobe Acrobats
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 10
editing tools to mark corrections directly in the fles. You may also mark up corrections
on a hard copy of the proofs and scan those pages, or make a list of corrections, though
these options are less desirable. You will be given a deadline by which you will need to
return the proofsand the index, if you are responsible for preparing it.
Tis is your last opportunity to make corrections, which must be limited to fxing
discrete facts or spellings and addressing formating problems. You may be charged
Author Alterations (AAs) if you make changes outside of this scope, especially if they
substantially afect line fow. While some formating issues may be corrected at this
point, the overall page design is fnal.
Once your Editor has the corrected page proofs back from you, he/she will work
with the typeseter to revise the pages, in turn checking these to ensure that all appro-
priate changes have been made. You will not see the revised pages unless there are un-
resolved issues.
6. jacket/cover design and copy
Your jacket or cover will be designed by an OUP designer or freelancer either shortly
before or during the production process, and your Editor will send this to you once it
has been prepared and approved by the editorial, design, and marketing departments.
Please note that if your book is part of a series, it may follow a series design. You will
also be asked to review the copy that goes on the back cover/jacket. Your Editor will
consult your Author Publicity Form very carefully for this purpose, so please be sure to
fll this in as completely and thoughtfully as possible. Please contact your Commission-
ing Editor should you have specifc concerns or questions. In case you have any spe-
cifc ideas about the jacket/cover visual, please share these with your Commissioning
Editor at the time of submiting the fnal manuscript itself. While we will consider your
suggestions, the fnal decision on the cover/jacket design rests with us.
7. indexing
If, as in most cases, you are preparing your own index, your Editor will give you detailed
instructions for doing so. Your index will be due afer you have reviewed your page
proofs. If a freelancer has been hired to prepare your index, you will be given time to
review the draf index and make corrections before you return the fnal version to your
Editor. Please note that as per the contract the cost of preparing the index is to be borne
by the author. Tis would range between Rs 1830 per page of the proofs, depending on
the size of the book and complexity of the content.
8. printing
When your Editor has agreed that the fles are fnal, they will be sent to the printer.
Te printing process can take anywhere from three to eight weeks, depending on the
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 11
specifcations of your book. A normal printing schedule is about three weeks, but
lengthier books or books printed in colour may take longer.
Afer the book has been printed, your Editor will send you complimentary copies as
per the contract.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 12
What contact you should expect while writing your manuscript and while it is in production?
When should you get in touch?
contact when oup will contact you when you should contact oup
Commissioning
Editor
To share peer reviews or market feedback.
With deadline reminders for draf and fnal
manuscript submission and on a regular
basis throughout the writing period to
check on progress.
With Author Checklist, Contract and
related paperwork, and Author Publicity
Form
With any change of contact details.
With details of travel schedules or periods
in which you will be out of e-mail contact.
For clarifcation on any item in the author
handbook prior to submission.
With questions about rights and
permissions.
Editor
To welcome you to the production process
and provide a draf schedule.
To clarify any issues or queries with the
manuscript.
With proofs for checking.
To make any necessary indexing
arrangements (including instructions
for indexing) and to request approval
of draf index (if not created by you)
and typeset index.
To request approval of plate sections.
To share jacket copy and cover design.
With gratis copies on publication.
With any change of contact details.
With details of holidays or periods in
which you will be out of e-mail contact,
in case you are required to check proofs,
answer queries, and so on, while your
title is in production.
With any questions relating to house style
during the production process.
With any requested changes to indexing
plans.
Marketing
Manager
To share a marketing plan for your title.
To share promotional material, coordinate
book events, and so on.
With any change of contact details.
With marketing suggestions.
With details of holiday travels or periods of
non-availability.
With queries about the books presence at
www.oup.co.in and other online retailers.
To advise of any upcoming events or
conferences related to the topic of your title
(as far in advance as possible).
With requests for promotional materials,
such as fyers.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 13
contact when oup will contact you when you should contact oup
Finance
Department
To send the royalty statement for your title With any change of contact details.
With queries or issues, if any, relating to
royalties.
Permissions
Desk
With any queries related to clearing
permissions for third-party material used in
your book.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 14
OVERVIEW OF THE COMMISSIONING PROCESS
Your main contact is your OUP Commissioning Editor
Handover
to Editorial
Contract Approval
Writing
Manuscript
Submission
Manuscript
Content Review
Printing & Binding
Welcome to
Editorial
Resolve
Copyediting Queries
Copyediting
Proofreading
Jacket & Cover
Review
Indexing
OVERVIEW OF THE EDITORIAL PROCESS
Your main contact is your OUP Editor
OUP
Author
LEGEND
Typesetting Jacket / Cover Design
QUICK
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GLOSSARY MARKETI NG FAQ OSO FAQ ROYALTI ES FAQ
HOW TO ASSEMBLE YOUR MANUSCRI PT
Tere are several steps OUP needs you as the author/editor to take before submiting
your fnal manuscript. We ask that you follow these submission guidelines as closely as
possible, as this will facilitate evaluation of your manuscript and will assist your Com-
missioning Editor in determining if your manuscript can be accepted for publication.
a complete manuscript submission includes the following
1. A set of electronic fles for your manuscript, with each chapter (text and notes)
in its own fle.
a. Submit your fles in Microsof Word: Use double spacing, 12-point Times New
Roman, and one-inch margins. Each chapter should be sent in a separate
Microsof Word fle. Contact your Commissioning Editor if you are using any
sofware other than Microsof Word.
b. Number manuscript pages consecutively from the introduction (page 1)
through back mater. Do not start each chapter with page 1. You can use
Microsof Word page numbering to insert consecutive numbers.
c. Be sure each fle contains both text and corresponding chapter references and/
or notes (footnotes/endnotes should be correctly formated using Microsof
Word and should not be manually inserted). Double-space ALL text, body text
and notes alike, including extracts and block quotes.
d. Provide a separate fle for each piece of art, as well as a fle for each table. Do
not embed fgures and tables within the chapter text, but rather insert callouts
for these items in the chapter text. Callouts look like this:
[INSERT FIGURE 1.1 HERE].
Tey should follow a paragraph and be on their own line.
e. Provide a double-spaced caption/credit manuscript, listing the captions you
would like printed beneath each illustration. All of the illustrations in the
manuscript should be submited on a single caption/credit manuscript list,
organized by fgure numbers. Be sure that your captions include any required
copyright credit lines.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 16
f. Please provide a list of your fles. Files should be named according to the
format chapter number_author (e.g., 00_Smith [for Introduction], 01_Smith
[for chapter 1], etc.) and must contain the fnal version of the manuscript,
without track changes or edits.
2. Your manuscript should contain any of the following front and back mater that
you wish to appear in the book.
a. Complete front mater may include the following elements, in the order
listed below:
Title page (required)
Dedication (if any)
Table of contents (required)
Foreword (if any)
Preface (if any)
Acknowledgements (if any)
Contributor list (required, if edited volume)
Abbreviations (if any)
Note on sources (if any)
Chronology (if any)
b. Complete back mater may include the following elements:
Aferword (if any)
Epilogue (if any)
Appendices (if any)
Glossary (if any)
References/bibliography (if any)
c. Please submit all front mater and back mater fles in individually labelled,
separate Microsof Word documents. Te text should be double-spaced and
in Times New Roman 12-point font.
3. If your manuscript contains unusual characters or extensive math/logic/
linguistics/foreign language, please provide a PDF or printout of your fles. Tis
is necessary so that we may confrm that Greek, diacritical marks, math, and other
characters are not being lost in the translation between diferent versions of word
processing sofware.
4. A complete set of fgures (graphs, bar diagrams, etc., should have corresponding
background data in excel format), if any. Please refer to Art and Illustration
Submission on pages 1928.
5. A complete set of tables, if any, electronically. Please refer to Tables on pages
3133.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 17
6. A completed Author Publicity Form.
7. A completed Author Checklist that outlines any specifc copyediting
instructionsstyle used for references, discipline-related terminology that should
not be changed, etc. We essentially follow Te Chicago Manual of Style.
8. Your ideas and suggestions for cover art should be clearly mentioned in the Author
Checklist with any cover art suggestions and images you recommend.
9. Copies of all permissions necessary to reprint text, fgures, or tables in both print
and electronic formats. Please refer to Copyright and Permissions on pages 3440.
10. If your contract stipulates an online module, please provide a book abstract (~250
words) and 510 keywords. Please also provide chapter abstracts for each chapter
(~150 words) with 510 keywords per chapter. We have certain guidelines to help
you with this (available separately here). Te abstracts and keywords should be
provided in a particular format (available separately here).
11. You may submit your manuscript to your Commissioning Editor on a CD or fash
drive. If you prefer to send it via an online Dropbox or by e-mail, check with your
Commissioning Editor to see what options are possible.
when preparing your manuscript, please use the
following formatting guidelines
1. Chapter title: Chapter title and subtitle should be plain and undesigned, with
an extra line space lef before the chapter text begins. An interior design will be
applied during composition.
2. Headings:
a. Please distinguish heading levels when preparing the manuscript.
<1>Main Head
<2>Sub Head
<3> Sub-sub head etc.
b. Do not add extra line spaces between second, third, and fourth level headings
and the text.
3. Footnotes or endnotes:
a. Note numbers should begin at 1 for each chapter.
b. Note numbers should not be used in chapter titles or subheadings. Use
symbols instead.
c. Use Te Chicago Manual of Style or any discipline-specifc consistent style. Please
indicate which style you are following on your Author Checklist.
4. Tables: Use tabs or Microsof Word table function for simple tables; see Tables
on pages 3133 for complex tables.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 18
5. Special characters: Most diacritics for foreign languages are available in Microsof
Word. If those characters are not available, contact your Commissioning Editor to
discuss alternatives.
6. Spelling and punctuation: Use British English spelling and punctuation
throughout (except for previously published primary source materials, which
should appear as in the original), use 'z' spellings. For spelling consistency, please
refer to the Concise Oxford English Dictionary (Tird Edition). For details about
the OUP House Style, please refer to OUP Style Sheet (available separately here).
7. Do not use:
a. Automatic numbering in text for lists
b. Automatic hyphenation
c. Italics or underlining for URLs or e-mail addressesplease remove hyperlinks
d. Underlining or bold for emphasisplease use italics for emphasis instead
e. Justifcationmanuscript format should be ragged right, not right justifed
f. Space bar to indent paragraphstab instead
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ART AND I LLUSTRATI ON SUBMI SSI ON
For the purposes of this handbook, art is defned as all non-textual material, including
fgures, maps, line drawings, illustrations, halfones, and photographs. Please discuss
the number and nature of illustrations with your Commissioning Editor. It is important
that you discuss any changes with your Commissioning Editor prior to submission,
since this might afect his or her ability to accept the manuscript for production. Dif-
ferent requirements will apply depending on the type of art you are including, but one
thing is a constant: assembling your art programme always takes more time than you
anticipate, so it is best to get started as early as possible.
By necessity, this section contains a good deal of technical language. If you come
across an unfamiliar term, it is likely defned in the glossary at the end of the handbook.
Of course, you should also feel free to ask your Commissioning Editor for clarifcation.

Te following list is broken down according to the source(s) of your artwork:
1. Artwork from another source (such as an archive, a previous publication, or a stock
agency) used by permission
2. Artwork you create
3. Maps
Within these categories are three types of art, generally speaking:
a. Line art: Line art is exclusively black and white, without any greyscale.
Examples of line art includes simple maps, charts, and diagrams (so long as
they do not have a dot patern).
b. Halfones: A halfone is the printing process for any continuous tone or
greyscale images. Examples of halfones include black-and-white photographs,
scans of paintings or drawings, and shaded maps and diagrams.
c. Combination: A mix of line art and halfone.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 20
Example of halfone art. Photograph courtesy of Shuterstock.
Example of line art. Reproduced by permission from: Stanislas Dehaene, Te Number
Sense: How the Mind Creates Mathematics, Revised and Updated Edition (New York: Oxford
University Press, 2011).
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 21
Example of combination art (a mix of line art and halfone). Reproduced by permission from
Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, Guruprasad Madhavan, and David Sloan Wilson, eds, Pathological
Altruism (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012).
submitting art for productiona quick reference
1. Do not embed any art within your manuscript.
2. Electronic art should be submited individually as separate fles.
a. Photographic images should be submited as TIFF (preferred) or JPEG fles
at a minimum resolution of 300 dpi. OUP cannot reproduce halfone art from
PDF, PNG, BMP, GIF, PICT, PowerPoint, or Microsof Word fles.
b. Line art should be submited as EPS fles.
3. Figures should be numbered by chapter and fgure number (for example, the third
fgure in chapter 1 will be Figure 1.3) and saved with the fgure number as the
fle name (for example, Figure 1.3.tif ). Photos and printouts should be clearly
labelled by their correct fgure number, not by the fle name that was used during
downloading.
4. Call out all fgures in numerical order in the manuscript at the ends of paragraphs
where you want the art to appear. For example:
[INSERT FIGURE 1.3 HERE]
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 22
5. Prepare fgure captions as a separate Microsof Word fle. Te fle should be double-
spaced and include the corresponding fgure number, caption, and credit line for
all illustrations. (Add the credit lines afer you have received permission to use the
illustrations; please refer to Copyright and Permissions on pages 3440.)
a. Do not include captions directly in the art fle.
6. Supply a disk directory with the art, as well as a print copy of all art on the disk. If
you want the images cropped, please indicate this on the photocopied art and also
draw the crop lines.
artwork from third-party sources
If you are using artwork from a museum, archive, or similar professional source, you
should request that the institution send you a high-resolution scan of the art.
Black-and-White Photographs and Scans
Te electronic scans you secure must be in a resolution that is high enough to repro-
duce well in the printed medium (see Resolution text box below), and must be saved
in an appropriate fle format. To address a common misperception: Images cannot
simply be pulled of the Internet. Images on the Internet typically have only a third
of the resolution required for printing and are most ofen restricted by copyright. (See
Copyright and Permissions on pages 3440 for more information.)
Tis table provides a handy overview of requirements for art submission. Page 27
contains a more detailed version of this table.
resolution acceptable format
Line Art
Files must be either
resolution-independent
or of at least 600 dpi, and
ideally 1200 dpi.
EPS
Halfone
Files must be of at least 300
dpi at the size of intended
reproduction or larger. Higher
dpi values are welcome.
TIFF. Some JPEGs may
also be acceptable.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 23
Resolution
Resolution refers to the sharpness at which digital images display. Te most
common measure of resolution is dots per inch (dpi).
You can determine whether a halfone is of the required dpi by checking the
fle properties of the image and dividing pixel size by the resolution required. For
example, say a halfone is 2400 x 1500 pixels. Divide both numbers (height and
width) by 300 (the resolution needed for printing), and the result is the maximum
number of inches at which the image can be printed in acceptable resolution. In
this example, the electronic size is 8 x 5, meaning the image could be printed up
to 5 in width, space permiting.
Resolution is not a set value, but rather, a variable that is inversely proportional
to visual size. Doubling the visual size of an illustration will reduce its resolution,
as this example shows:
(continued)
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OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 24
It is not possible to enlarge low-resolution images, so check with your Commis-
sioning Editor if you get a result that is much smaller.
Note: Do not artifcially increase the resolution of a photo in a sofware package
like Photoshop. Doing so does not actually increase the printed quality of the
photograph.
For best results, we recommend that you have scans made by a graphic arts service
bureau or by a facility that routinely provides electronic fles for print reproduction.
Scans must meet the following requirements:
scan mode: Scans should be in greyscale or continuous tone mode. However, we
can convert colour scans to greyscale.
minimum size of scan: No smaller than it is to appear on the book page. For ex-
ample, if an image is intended to be printed in the full 5 width available on the page of a
book in the most common trim size of 6- x 9-, then an image must be scanned to
at least 300 dpi at 5 in width. If you have questions about your books trim size, please
contact your Commissioning Editor.
We do not enlarge smaller scans done at less than 300 dpi because the resolution
decreases as the size increases. A scan that is only 1 x 2 at 300 dpi, for example, is not
sufcient for printing.
printouts: For each digital image you supply, we must also have a printout of the
digital fle, printed at its actual size (i.e., 100%), with fgure number recorded on the
back of the printout. Please note any crop lines on the printout if you want to eliminate
part of the image and have permission from its rights holder to do so.
Scans from Books and Magazines
In general, you should avoid scanning previously printed images (such as photos in
books and magazines), as reproducing them may result in an unwanted patern efect
called moir. If a previously printed image is scanned, it should be done professionally
using a descreening technique. Tough this will result in a slight sofening of detail in
the image, it will minimize the efect of moir patern in your book.
Colour Images to Be Reproduced in Black and White
Tese can either be given to OUP for scanning or should be scanned in RGB or
greyscale mode. If you are scanning from 35 mm slides, it is very difcult to get a crisp
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 25
scan with a desktop scanner. It is best to have these done by a facility that has a profes-
sional slide scanner, and it is especially important to scan at the minimum print quality
size and resolution stated above.
Colour Images to Be Reproduced in Colour
In limited cases, books may include colour art to be reproduced in colour. If your Com-
missioning Editor has approved colour reproduction, you should keep these points in
mind:
Artwork must show how colour is to be used.
Use colour for the purposes of adding educational value to artwork, rather than just
to add visual appeal.
Ensure use of colour is systematic.
If you are submiting rough drawings or photocopies of source material for
typeseters or illustrators to work from, annotate the hard copy to show how colour
should be used. Alternatively, use a coloured pencil, pen, or crayon to physically
mark up how colour should be applied.
Markups do not have to be perfect, but such guidance will be invaluable in helping
the typeseter or illustrator produce artwork that meets your requirements and
expectations, with the minimum of redrafing.
If you are preparing electronic roughs (in Microsoft Word or PowerPoint, for
example) either add colour directly into the electronic image or mark up a hard
copy of the electronic image (as per hand-drawn or photocopied roughs).
Images from Medical Scanners
Medical artwork, such as X-rays and MRI scans, are designed to generate images for
on-screen use and ofen cannot be sent in at high resolution (300 dpi). You can ensure
the best quality scans by saving the fles as TIFF or EPS fles. Do not send scans in Mi-
crosof Word or PowerPoint format as these programs reduce quality.
Tips to consider:
Sourcing high-resolution images is ofen difcult. If no other option remains but to
use a low-resolution version, some print quality will be lost, and it is important to
send in images at the best quality possible for optimal clarity on the printed page.
Discuss with your Commissioning Editor whether meaning will be lost if colour
medical images, like CT scans, are reproduced in black and white.
Consider the use of colour with your Commissioning Editor for items such as
arrows, asterisks, and labels against the background they will be printed on. For
example, would a white asterisk be easier to see on a gray background?
Always ensure patient identity is obscured in images provided.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 26
Submitting Hard Copies to Be Scanned
If digital scans are not available, we may be able to scan hard copies you provide. Be-
cause the scanning process causes some loss in sharpness, these hard copies must be
in pristine condition. Your Commissioning Editor will be able to judge whether or not
hard copies can be used to prepare fles of the quality needed for printing. Do not scan
such hard copies yourself, but rather send these to your Commissioning Editor and
OUP will have them professionally scanned.
artwork you create
Line Illustrations
If you are creating line illustrations for your manuscript, please use a program such
as Adobe Illustrator, Corel Draw, or Macromedia Freehand, since these programs
produce vector fles that can be manipulated at any resolution. (Vector fles are reso-
lution independent.) If you are creating line illustrations in other programs, such as
Microsof Word or Microsof PowerPoint, they cannot be used for the printed book.
If this is the case, please check with your Commissioning Editor about what options
exist to create print-quality line illustrations.
Shading, Tints, Fonts, and Lines
Only four tints of the same colour can be distinguished in any one black-and-white
diagram. If more than four tints are required, use paterns instead.
Be consistent. Adopt the same styles in terms of shading and types of lines used for
curves, arrowheads, and so on.
Use OpenType or Type 1 fonts, not TrueType fonts, to create labels. Do not apply
style atributes to your fonts; use Times Roman Italic, for example, rather than
italicizing Times Roman. Te same principle applies to boldface.
Do not use hairline rules because they disappear when printed; half-point rules are
a good standard.
Do not create your art in colour unless the art is to print in colour in your book.
When saving to an EPS format, remember to embed both the printer and the screen
fonts. In addition, save your EPS files with Picture Preview, which allows the
typesetter to view the art as it is brought into the page.
OUP cannot fx typos, alter labels, or delete screens from your art fles.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 27
Photographs
You may take photographs yourself, or with the help of a photographer, or you can
source them from a third party, for which permission will need to be obtained. If you
are a skilled photographer and will be taking photos for the interior of your book, they
will need to meet the same resolution requirements as all other illustrations. Tey
should be shot at a minimum resolution of 1500 x 1500 pixels for a standard 6- x 9-
book printed in black and white. An oversize book being shot in colour requires sizes
equivalent to an 8 x 10 image at 350 dpi, or 2800 x 3500 pixels. Please contact your
Commissioning Editor for any questions on the trim size of your book.
You must have writen permission from anyone in the photograph. Contact your
Commissioning Editor for a consent form template.
tips for taking a good photograph
Use a digital camera with at least 10 megapixels and an accurate lens. (A camera
phone will not do, even if it does have over 10 megapixels, because the lens is not of
high enough quality.)
Set your camera to the largest possible file size.
When shooting, check that:
Te lighting is bright, but that there are no strong shadows.
Te background is clear and the camera is steady.
Te photo just shows what you intend it tothere are no distracting elements in it.
When photographing objects on a surface, ensure that the surface is clear of texture
and marks. Use a white surface for all objects unless they are transparent or pale, in
which case use a contrasting but neutral colour.
file
type
image
mode
image resolution at
reproduction size
Line or created art
1 colour
EPS greyscale 6001200 dpi
Halfone/photo
1 colour
TIFF,
JPEG
greyscale 300 dpi
Line/halfone combination
1 colour
EPS greyscale 300 dpi
Line or created art
4 colour
EPS CMYK 6001200 dpi
Halfone/photo
4 colour
TIFF,
JPEG
CMYK 300 dpi or higher
This table shows image resolution and formatting requirements.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 28
Creating Combination Art
You can use both line art and a photograph in one piece of artwork. Supply an elec-
tronic fle with the high-resolution photograph along with a drawing showing how you
would like the artwork to appear in the fnal text.
Labelling
Labelling should be minimal and must be consistent with stylistic conventions
used in the text. In general, OUP titles use sans serif leters for fgure labels, with an
initial capital for the frst word only (sentence style).
Check that the labels correspond with those cited in the fgure legend and text.
Note that this may mean that you need to relabel artwork taken from other sources.
If you wish to use italic and bold, indicate this clearly when drawing your rough
sketch.
Be consistent with your use of italic and bold.
All labels on the x and y axes in graphs should show the relevant units in parentheses.
If the relative position of labels is important, indicate this clearly when drawing
your rough sketch.
Make good use of the area around the artwork you are labelling. Space the labels
carefully so they are not crowded.
A properly labelled figure
Credit: Steve Savage. Te Art of Digital Audio Recording: A Practical Guide for Home and
Studio (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011).
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 29
maps
In case you wish to include some maps in your manuscript, there can be two approaches:
1. Maps to scale to be included.
Please note that in case you wish to include maps to scale, necessary clearances
would have to be obtained by you for the following:
(a) External boundaries: Tese will have to be cleared with the Survey of India,
Dehradun.
(b) Internal scrutiny: Clearance to be obtained from the Ministry of Defence, New
Delhi.
2. Maps not to scale to be included.
In this case, the maps would be treated as fgures. Please remember that this option is
used only in cases where maps are being used for representative purposes only. In ad-
dition to referring them as fgures and not maps, a disclaimer needs to be carried on
the copyright page stating clearly that the maps included in the book have not been
cleared with the necessary authorities for boundaries, etc., and that these are being
used for representative purposes only.
In case of maps to scale, you may source the map from an existing source or get a car-
tographer to recreate the map. However, in both these cases, the necessary clearances
must be obtained.
Maps You Create
If you need original maps created for your book, you may do so by arranging for the
services of a cartographer. You need to provide a base map(s) that show all of the in-
formation you want on the map, including cities, states, rivers, atractions, etc. While
geting the maps recreated, please keep the following guidelines in mind:
Use a dedicated art sofware program like Macromedia Freehand or Adobe Illustrator
to create your maps. Such programs can save art as EPS and TIFF fles, which word
processing programs cannot do. Dedicated art packages ofer a versatile array of options
for drawing lines, for indicating diferent types of terrain, and for adding type labels.
Avoid hand-drawn maps.
Keep the map simple and relevant. Te information presented in the map should
enhance and correspond to material found in the text and yet be self-contained. Te
spellings of all labels should be consistent with the spellings in the text.
When labelling features on your maps, it is customary to set country names in full
capital leters, cities and towns in cap/lowercase, and rivers and oceans in italic cap/
lowercase. Sans serif fonts like Helvetica and Verdana work best.
Do not position text over lines that indicate boundaries and borders, or over
crosshatching or screens. Set all type in a similar and appropriate size, and
remember maps will be sized and likely reduced to ft the book page, with
appropriate margins.
Avoid the use of hairline rules or rules that are too thick; a half-point rule is a good
standard.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 30
Be consistent in your use of different types of rules. For instance, if you are using a
half-point rule to indicate the eastern coastline, do not switch to a one-point rule
for the western coastline.
sourcing photographs
Where can I source good quality photographs?
Some government organizations and individuals give away photographs free of charge.
Te organizations are ofen subject-specifc, so it is worth investigating what is avail-
able in your subject area. Always check what acknowledgment these sites require you
to include; this information is always printed in the caption. In addition, there are some
stock agencies from where you can source visuals at a nominal cost and some which are
slightly expensive sources.
htp://www.indiapicture.in
htp://www.masterfle.com
www.getyimages.in
OUP has a valuable and extensive photo resource available free at www.oup.captureweb
.co.uk. Captureweb contains commissioned photos and royalty-free images that have
been bought by OUP and can be used free of charge. To view the site, register frst as a
new user. Afer choosing an image, download a low-resolution photo (right-click and
choose Save As or Ctrl, click, and then Save As). Keep a record of the asset number.
Tis is an excellent resource, which is continually updated with new royalty-free images
and commissioned photo-shoot images.
Tere are many subscription-based royalty-free photo libraries where you pay a fee
to download either a set number of credits or as many as you require within a certain
time limit.
Do not download high-resolution photographs for your cover or jacket before check-
ing them with your Commissioning Editor, as you will be charged and no refund is
available. Instead, save a low-resolution version, along with the ID number, and pass
this on to your Commissioning Editor to discuss with Marketing and Design.
Some photo libraries require you to register before viewing images, but this is
common practice, and it is quick and free.
QUICK
GUIDE
WHAT TO EXPECT MANUSCRI PT CONTENTS CHECKLI ST
PERMI SSI ONS WRI TI NG TOOLS ART / ILLUSTRATIONS TABLES / BOXES
GLOSSARY MARKETI NG FAQ OSO FAQ ROYALTI ES FAQ
TABLES AND BOXES
tables
Tables are meant to organize, display, and summarize information in order to reinforce
the readers understanding of material presented in the main text.
Please indicate the approximate location for each table in the manuscript itself. Te
simplest way to do this is to insert a table callout within the text, set of by spaces
above and below the callout (regular double-spacing). For example:
[Insert Table 2.1 here]
Formatting
Tables should be formated according to the following specifcations so that OUP can
set the table:
1. Double-space all text.
2. Save each table in its own electronic fle and name the fle according to table
number rather than table title. For instance:
CORRECT Table2_1.doc
INCORRECT Populationgraph1997.doc
3. Number tables sequentially within each chapter. (For example, Table 1.1, Table 1.2,
Table 2.1, Table 2.2, and so on.)
4. Try not to overdesign tables. Keep them as simple as possible by avoiding
unnecessary rules, lines, etc., inside the table. Do not use vertical rules or grey
shading.
5. If you need to cite the source of your table, include a credit line in the form of a
footnote to the table. (See also Copyright and Permissions on pages 3440.)
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 32
Elements of a Table
1. Table Number and Title: Each table should have a title in addition to its number.
Tis should be as brief as possible.
2. Brief Column Headings: Keep column headings as short as possible (for example,
use % rather than per cent) but do not abbreviate headings so that they become
unintelligible. Use the column heading to specify units that measure all gures in
that column but not all gures in the table (in which case the unit becomes part of
the title).
3. Row Titles and Main Body of Data: Make sure that the table data in each column
align with the correct column heading.
4. Table Source: Explanations of how the data were obtained, source information,
etc., should be placed at the botom of the table.
Sample Table
Table 2.1.
Running speed over 200 m and standing long jump distance of a randomly selected
group of people.
Participant Speed (ms
-1
) Distance (m)
1 10.53 2.38
2 11.16 1.83
3 9.54 2.04
4 15.77 2.0
5 12.82 1.74

Total 59.82 9.99


Average 11.96 1.998
Source: Adapted from Smith & Cheng (2007). Reprinted with permission from Main
Street Publishing 2007.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 33
boxes
Greyscale boxes can be used to highlight features or specifc information within a chap-
ter, such as:
Tematic highlights
Practical application of a point being discussed
Additional explanation and detail
Proles of key gures
Summaries of key research
Summaries of key debates and critiques
Relevant articles from newspapers and magazines
Case studies or case problems
Lists
Anecdotes
Definitions
You and your Commissioning Editor should discuss and agree on your use of boxes in
advance.
Submission
Mark beginnings and ends of boxes clearly by callout. (i.e., [START BOX] and
[END BOX]). Do not actually draw a box around the text; our typeseters will do
this according to the text design for your book.
Double-space all text and use 12-point Times New Roman. Do not use italics or
boldface except to agree with conventions that you have adopted in the main text.
If your book includes more than one type of box, be sure to label the box type as
well as the title of each particular box.
Place a callout for the box near its optimal location, and on its own line, such as:
[Insert Personal Refections Box 3.4 near here]
QUICK
GUIDE
WHAT TO EXPECT MANUSCRI PT CONTENTS CHECKLI ST
PERMI SSI ONS WRI TI NG TOOLS ART / ILLUSTRATIONS TABLES / BOXES
GLOSSARY MARKETI NG FAQ OSO FAQ ROYALTI ES FAQ
COPYRI GHT AND PERMI SSI ONS
Copyright plays an important role in the publication process. As an author it is impor-
tant for you to understand your rights and responsibilities in relation to the copyright
inherent in your own work and the work of others. Tis section of the handbook will
give you a brief overview of the basic guidelines to keep in mind.
You may wish to include materials in your manuscript that are owned by third par-
ties, such as quotations, excerpts, or images. While it is your responsibility to request,
procure, and, if necessary, pay the copyright owner a fee for permission to use these
materials, this section of the handbook will help ease this process for you. Your Com-
missioning Editor will be able to provide guidance as well.
Your frst step will be to determine which materials in your manuscript require per-
mission. As author, you are in the best position to know whether you borrowed or
quoted from other sources, and to identify those instances. Most, but not necessarily
all, of these materials will require permission from the copyright holder. Crediting the
source of copyright-protected material is not an acceptable substitute for formal writ-
ten permission from the rights holder.
Te guidelines described below are meant to help you determine when you will need
to contact rights holders to obtain permission, and then, how to do so.
material requiring permissions
Illustrations, tables, text, and music examples created by others, and which do not qual-
ify as fair usea copyright law doctrine that is outlined in this section of the hand-
bookare the most common materials that require permission.
Visual Illustrations
Visual illustrations, including photographs, paintings, line drawings, graphs, maps,
cartoons, or other types of images, almost always require permission from the copy-
right holder. Te creator of the illustration is the copyright holder, unless this creator
assigned rights to another party, such as the publisher of a periodical or book in which
the image appears.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 35
Tables
Reprinting a table is also likely to require permission. Usually, rewording or rearranging
the elements of a table is not enough to render the table sufciently original to obvi-
ate the permission requirement; if the table you use is essentially identical to someone
elses without the substantial addition of new material, you must request permission
from the copyright owner.
Text
Copyrighted text includes not just text from published books and articles with formal copy-
right notices, but also unpublished materials such as leters, sketches, and drafs, even if these
are not formally registered with the Copyright Ofce, India. As you identify sections of your
manuscript that might require permission from a copyright owner, look especially for:
1. Quotations from plays, songs, or poems that do not qualify as fair use.
2. Quotations of any length from leters, whether or not the leter was formally
published. In most cases, the author of the leter retains the copyright, regardless of
the person to whom the leter was addressed or who actually possesses the leter.
3. Quotations from books, newspapers, magazines, journal articles, or other
published prose works that do not qualify as fair use.
While in many cases shorter quotations do not require permission clearance, there may
be circumstances when you must secure permission for shorter quotations as well, de-
pending on the length of the original text and the context in which the quote appears in
your work. If you have any question as to whether a quotation requires permission, talk
with your Commissioning Editor.
Music Examples
Reprinting music examples that do not qualify as fair use requires permission from the
copyright holders, most typically music publishers. Lyrics and musical compositions
are ofen copyrighted separately from one another, so including lyrics with musical no-
tation may require two separate permissions from two diferent sources.
Website Material
Content from a website may also be copyright-protected; unless the owner of the con-
tent appearing on the website explicitly sets forth in writing that no permission is re-
quired for use of the material, permission must be obtained.
Your Own Previously Published Material: Even if you use material from your own
previously published work, you will most likely need to ask permission to reproduce
it in subsequent works. An exception may be if you retained the publication rights to
the previously published work or have other applicable licenses granted by the copy-
right owner to reuse the work. If your previous work was formally published, it is
likely that the publisher owns the copyright to the work and is the appropriate party
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 36
to approach for permission. Read the agreement you signed with the journal and/
or book publisher carefully to see if you need to request permission formally and/or
see the website for the journal for more information.
Other Works Published by Oxford University Press: Because every unit of publish-
ing (e.g., full book, chapter from a book, journal article, encyclopedia entry) is a sepa-
rate work with its own intellectual property identity, you must obtain permission from
OUP's central Rights & Permissions desk to reproduce previously published work,
even though OUP is the publisher. For any queries and guidance, do get in touch with
our Rights and Permissions Head, Sumita Roy, at sumita.roy@oup.com.
material not requiring permissions
You are not required to obtain permission for the use of material from these four gen-
eral categories.
Material in the Public Domain
Material that never was or no longer is protected by copyright belongs to the public, so
permission is not required for its use. If you are reproducing material that is very old,
you may well fnd that its copyright has expired. Keep in mind that while copyright may
have expired for older works, particular translations or editors annotations of these
works may still be copyright-protected, and therefore require permission.
Ideas and Data
Ideas and data cannot be copyrighted, although the form and organization in which the
author expresses them can be.
Your Own Previously Unpublished Material
Graphs, charts, maps, tables, etc., which you create for your own use but that have not
been formally published or assigned to anyone else to publish are original materials and
do not require permission. You also do not need permission to reproduce photographs
that you have taken, provided such photographs are not themselves of copyrighted
images. However, photographs that you did not take yourself, even if they are in your
possession, require permission from the photographer.
the fair use exception
If the material you wish to reproduce falls within the parameters of the fair use doctrine
of copyright law, you are not required to obtain permission for it. Fair use is a copyright
law doctrine that establishes exceptions to the general rule that the reproduction of
copyright-protected material always requires permission. Te doctrine is intended to
balance a creators ownership rights of his or her work with the freedom of expression.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 37
While the law does not provide hard and fast rules for making a fair use determination
with respect to any particular use, there are four criteria to consider in deciding whether
a use is fair. Te guidelines below are intended to help you decide whether your use of
a limited amount of copyright-protected material may qualify as fair use.
The Four Factors to Consider
1. Te purpose and character of the use: Consider whether the use is of a commercial
nature (less likely to be fair use) or if it is for non-proft educational purposes. Also
consider whether, and to what extent, you may have transformed the copyright-
protected material.
2. Te nature of the copyrighted work: Te reproduction of factual material, such
as information from a biography, is more likely to be considered fair use than an
artistic or creative work, such as a poem. Also, the reproduction of work that has
not yet been published is less likely to be considered fair use.
3. Te amount and substantiality of the portion used: Consider both (1) the amount
of the work that you use in relation to the whole; and (2) whether the portion you
intend to use goes to the heart of the work.
4. Te efect of the use upon the potential market: Consider whether your use of the
copyright-protected work might afect demand for the original work, or lessen its
value. Most importantly, ask yourself whether your use of the content will deprive
the creator of income.
Do not be daunted by the concept of fair use or the four criteria. A number of web-
sites provide helpful and dependable information about fair use in laymans language,
with reference to specifc examples and cases.
Additionally, many scholarly societies have developed useful and well-reasoned
codes of best practices with respect to the fair use doctrine. It is worthwhile to research
whether any scholarly societies you belong to have developed such guidelines.
Finally, if you are still not sure whether your use of someone elses material consti-
tutes fair use, consult with your Commissioning Editor.
getting started
Te next step will be for you to identify the copyright holder and request writen per-
mission to use the material in your manuscript. Usually the copyright holder will be
the creator of the material (in other words, the artist or author), but this is not always
the case. A creator may assign her or his ownership rights to another party, such as a
publisher. Te best starting point in locating the copyright holder, however, is usually
the creator.
Check frst for copyright notices on the materials themselves, as these are a useful
starting point in identifying likely copyright holders. Te copyright holder is not
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 38
necessarily the author or artist of the work you are quoting from, but may instead be the
publisher or another institution such as a museum or archive. A copyright is sometimes
held by the author while the publishing, distribution, and subsidiary rights are held
by the publisher. Tus, even if you are the author of the work from which you want to
quote, you will need to apply for permission from the publisher to use your material.
Tis is true even if the copyright holder is OUP.
A basic rule of thumb: If you are reproducing or quoting from unpublished material,
start your permissions request by asking for permission from its creator or the creators
estate. If you are reproducing or quoting from published material, start by asking its
publisher.
Start early. Obtaining permissions can take months and they must be fnalized before
you send your fnal manuscript to OUP. Your Commissioning Editor will not be able
to assign your manuscript to the Editorial unless all permissions have been cleared; so
it is best to contact copyright holders as soon as you decide to use copyright-protected
materials. It is the author's responsibility to clear permissions and pay permission fees,
if required.
Making the Request
When you request permission, provide as much information about your book as pos-
sible, including its title, your name as author, the nature of your work, and OUP as
publisher. Many copyright holders will also wish to know the tentative price of and dis-
tribution plan for your book; your Commissioning Editor will be able to provide this
information to you. You should also include sufcient information for the rights holder
to identify the material you wish to reproduce. For example, if you are quoting from
a published book, mention the books title, author(s), year of publication, publisher,
ISBN, and the page number(s) on which the material appears. If the material originally
appeared in a journal, include the journal name, volume number, and issue number. It
may help to expedite the permissions process if you also include a copy of the original
material with your request.
When you request permission to reprint, make sure that you request non-exclusive
worldwide rights for all publication formats, including electronic, for all printings and
future editions and for all languages. If you do not do this, OUP will not be able to
license translation rights or consider future editions. Please note that in case the copy-
right is jointly held by two or more parties, you need to clear permission with all of
them. If you have questions about this, ask your Commissioning Editor.
Available at the end of this handbook and separately are a sample permissions leter
and a permissions log you may use to keep track of responses to permission requests.
Should that standard permission form not adequately address the needs of your proj-
ect, please ask your Commissioning Editor for assistance. Your Commissioning Editor
will be able to provide you with template permission releases for the use of interviews,
surveys, and photographs, among other materials you might wish to use.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 39
If the material you wish to reproduce is from a previously published source, send
the request to the permissions department of the publisher. While doing so, please
make sure that you have identifed the original source correctly. Tere is a possibility
that the copyrighted work has simply been reproduced in the source you are referring
to. In such a case, look for the details of the original source of the item (extract, essay,
table, illustration, etc.) you wish to usetypically provided in acknowledgements/
credit lines/copyright noticesand contact the original publisher. You will fnd that
many publishers maintain websites dedicated to processing permissions requests; it is
fne to use these rather than OUPs template leter, provided that you explicitly request,
and receive in writing, permission for all of the uses described in the sample leter that
follows (i.e., non-exclusive world rights to reproduce the material in the book and in
its future editions, in all languages and all formats including electronic). If you come
across any permission that does not allow for all these uses, check with your Commis-
sioning Editor. If the publisher does not control the rights you request, the publisher
should be able to tell you who the copyright holder is and how to reach him or her.
Difficulties Obtaining Permissions
What if a copyright holder has gone out of business, cannot be found, or does not re-
spond to requests for permission? Te material still remains protected by copyright;
unfortunately, the mere existence of communications demonstrating your atempts to
reach a rights holder is insufcient to protect you. Do not give up! Many authors have
found that persistence pays of. You might try politely checking with the rights holder
by alternative means a few additional times, or contacting third parties who might be
able to establish contact with the rights holder. Similarly, materials for which no rights
holder can be found, commonly known as orphan works, remain protected by copy-
right regardless of the extent of your eforts. Speak with your Commissioning Editor
if you believe that material you wish to include in your manuscript is an orphan work.
Finally, if you feel that the efort required to procure permission to use a particular
piece of material outweighs its value to the manuscript, speak with your Commission-
ing Editor, especially in cases where the copyright holder has gone out of business. He
or she will be able to help you determine whether the material is important enough to
warrant the additional efort.
A Special Note for Scientific, Technical, and Medical (STM) Authors
OUP is part of the International Association of Scientifc, Technical, and Medical Pub-
lishers (STM), which involves acknowledgment of shared interest with other academic
publishers, specifcally regarding permissions guidelines. Te STM Guidelines note
that requests for small portions of text and a limited number of illustrations should be
granted on a gratis basis for signatory participants, and further describe a more auto-
matic process that eliminates the need for requests to be transmited (some signatories
have chosen this route, others continue to request express permission requests). Te
Guidelines apply to both book and journal content, and facilitate reproduction in fur-
ther editions or in other media, such as in online form.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 40
OUP recommends and encourages that, if possible, you only use fgures and tables
from participating STM publishers, as non-participants ofen levy expensive permis-
sion fees for the reproduction of material.
A table listing participating publishers and terms can be found at
htp://www.stmassoc.org/permissions-guidelines/
After Receiving Permissions
It is your responsibility to ensure that you receive all the signed and completed forms
for each permission you need and to pay any fees associated with such permissions. It
is a good idea to retain a record of having made the payment, whether as a cancelled
check or otherwise. Once you have done so:
Check the permissions documents carefully and transcribe all required credit line
information either into the front mater for the copyright or acknowledgements
page or into the captions manuscript.
Let OUP know if any copyright holder has granted permission with specifc
conditions, such as that an image be produced at only page size, or not be
cropped. Use the Author Checklist or the Permissions Log at the time you submit
your manuscript.
Send a full and complete permissions file to your Commissioning Editor. The
permissions file should include the permissions originals (signed) and the
completed Permissions Log. Of course, be sure to keep copies of everything for
your own files.
Additional Information
It is not possible for this handbook to address every permissions scenario. If you fnd
yourself scratching your head, consult with your Commissioning Editor. We also sug-
gest consulting these sources:
Chapter 4 of Te Chicago Manual of Style, which provides a more comprehensive
discussion.
Permissions, A Survival Guide: Blunt Talk about Art as Intellectual Property, by Susan
Bielstein (Chicago, 2006)
Reclaiming Fair Use: How to Put Balance Back in Copyright, by Patricia Aufderheide and
Peter Jaszi (Chicago, 2011)
Indian Copyright Act, 1957 (available at htp://copyright.gov.in/Documents/
CopyrightRules1957.pdf )
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WRI TI NG TOOLS
In general, OUP follows Te Chicago Manual of Style as a guide for editorial ques-
tions, but defers to series or discipline style for reference and citation. We ask that
you follow the style most common in your discipline and that you use it consistently
throughout your manuscript. You may also wish to consult the writing tools listed
below; this list is not intended to be comprehensive but rather to ofer some guid-
ance as you write and revise.
dictionaries
Concise Oxford English Dictionary, 12th ed. Oxford University Press, 2011.
Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary, 8th ed. Oxford University Press, 2010, available
at htp://oald8.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/?cc=global
Oxford English Dictionary, available at htp://www.oed.com/
major style manuals
Te Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010.
New Hart's Rules: Te Handbook of Style for Writers and Editors. New York: Oxford
University Press, 2005.
Academic
MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 6th ed. New York: Modern Language
Association of America, 2003.
Law
Te Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation, 19th ed. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Law
Review Association, 2010.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 42
other writing and editing guides
Bernstein, Teodore M. Te Careful Writer: A Modern Guide to English Usage. New
York: Free Press, 1999.
Bielstein, Susan M. Permissions: A Survival Guide. Chicago: University of Chicago
Press, 2006.
Burchfeld, R. W. (ed.). Fowlers Modern English Usage, 3rd ed. New York: Oxford
University Press, 2004.
Fishman, Stephen. Te Copyright Handbook, 11th ed. Berkeley: Nolo, 2011.
Garner, Bryan A. Garners Modern American Usage. New York: Oxford University
Press, 2003.
Germano, William. Geting It Published: A Guide for Scholars and Anyone Else Serious
about Serious Books, 2nd ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008.
Gordon, Karen Elizabeth. Te Deluxe Transitive Vampire: Te Ultimate Handbook of
Grammar for the Innocent, the Eager, and the Doomed. New York: Pantheon, 1993.
Hart, Jack. Storycraf: Te Complete Guide to Writing Narrative Nonfction. Chicago:
University of Chicago Press, 2011.
Jassin, Lloyd J., and Steven C. Schechter. Te Copyright Permission and Libel Handbook:
A Step-by-Step Guide for Writers, Editors, and Publishers. New York: Wiley, 1998.
Johnson, Edward D. Te Handbook of Good English. New York: Pocket Books, 1991.
Te New York Public Library Writers Guide to Style and Usage. New York:
HarperCollins, 1994.
Skellin, M. E., and R. M. Gay. Words into Type, 3rd ed. Englewood Clifs, N.J.: Prentice
Hall, 1986.
Strunk, William, Jr., and E. B. White. Te Elements of Style, 3rd ed. New York:
Macmillan, 1979.
Truss, Lynne. Eats, Shoots and Leaves, Special Indian Edition. Profle Books, 2004.
Turabian, Kate L., John Grossman, and Alice Bannet. A Manual for Writers of Term
Papers, Teses, and Dissertations, 6th rev. ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press,
1996.
Te World Almanac and Book of Facts 2009. New York: World Almanac/Pharos
Books, 2008.
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GLOSSARY OF PUBLI SHI NG TERMS
aa (author alteration) A change made in page proofs that is chargeable to
the author. Publishers usually absorb a percentage of those AAs. (Oxfords allowance is
10% of composition costs.)
abstract A summary of the contents of a book, chapter, or article.
backlist A generic term for books more than a year old.
back matter (bm) Te parts of the book that follow the main text: appendices,
notes, glossary, bibliography, references, index. Tis is also known as end mater (EM).
bound proofs A copy of the page proofs received from the typeseter, bound up
with the appearance of the fnal book. Bound proofs can be used to show a book at a
conference, when fnal copies are not available. Te text of bound proofs can be subject
to change.
callout An instruction in the manuscript to insert a non-text element such as a
photograph, illustration, or table in a specifc place.
cap/lc Abbreviation for capitalizing the frst leter of every main word within a
heading and lowercasing the rest; also known as title case. For example: Author Guide-
lines Glossary is set as cap/lc.
caption Short descriptive phrase, also called a legend, that describes a fgure or table.
cip data Book cataloguing data provided by the Library of Congress, which ap-
pears on the copyright page.
composition Seting type and formating or composing page layout. Also known
as typeseting.
compositor A skilled professional who is responsible for transforming a manu-
scripts into page proofs following the specifcations of the designer.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 44
contributor list A list of all contributors in a multi-contributor book, most
ofen appearing in the back mater and including afliations.
copy Tis can refer to any quantity of text, from the descriptive texts used in market-
ing and promotional literature, to the entire manuscript. It may refer to text in print or
electronic form.
credit line Te wording that acknowledges the original source for a fgure, table,
article, or portion of a work. It is usually put at the botom of a table/illustration, and as
a footnote for extracts/essays. Te credits may also be set as a separate section, placed
in the front mater, or incorporated into the copyright page.
delegates Te Delegates are academics of reputeappointed in major subject
areas to advise closely on the Indian publishing programmewho must approve all
books published by OUP India before the contract is signed.
dpi (dots per inch) A measurement of the resolution of a printed image. Te
higher the number of dots per inch, the higher the quality of the printed image. A desk-
top laser printer can output at 300 to 600 dpi or higher; most fgures should be at least
300 dpi to be acceptable, but that can vary depending on fnal size due to efective reso-
lution. For example, output from a 150 dpi fgure that is to be reduced 50% is acceptable
and has an efective resolution of 300 dpi (because it will reach 300 dpi in reduction). A
printers imageseter is 2450 to 3600 dpi.
dust jacket Paper covering for a hardbound book, wrapped around the binding.
It was originally meant to be protective; now it is merely decorative and is used to draw
the readers atention to the book.
editor Te OUP editor who manages a manuscript through to book publication.
Te Editor coordinates with the Head of the editorial team and the production team.
Te Editor and the Editorial Head handling the project are the authors main con-
tacts throughout the production process.
electronic art Also known as digital art, this refers to any image that is sup-
plied as a computer fle; usually TIFF, JPEG, or EPS fles.
em dash A long dash that sets of a phrase from the rest of a sentence.
en dash An in-between dash used in number ranges or between equal partners (for
example doctorpatient relationship). It is longer than a hyphen, but shorter than an
em dash.
epigraph A quote from prose or a poem used as a decorative element, usually fol-
lowing the chapter title, sometimes following a heading in the text. An epigraph or
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 45
several epigraphs together are also sometimes placed on a separate page in the front
mater (along with their sources).
eps (encapsulated postscript file) Tis format captures line art elec-
tronically, which can then be stored and transferred into other systems for composition
or printing. Art can be reduced or enlarged, but not edited, if it is an EPS fle.
fpo (for position only) Describes photocopies or prints of halfones used
for position only on text mechanicals ready for printing. Also used to describe low-
resolution scans in an electronic page fle. Te compositor may use this term, when
awaiting higher resolution fgures from the author.
flush left; flush right In composition, aligning all lines of type at the lef
or at the right text margin.
folio Page number, usually found at the top of the page above the text, aligned with
the running head. Drop folios fall at the botom of a page.
font Te complete collection of leters, numbers, and symbols of a typeface in a par-
ticular style; also used to describe all sizes and weights of a typeface (e.g., roman, italic,
semibold, bold).
front matter (fm) Preliminary pages in a book preceding the main text. Pagi-
nated with roman numerals, as opposed to arabic numerals, which are used for the main
text. Front mater pages include (but are not limited to) half-title page, title page, copy-
right page, dedication, foreword, preface, acknowledgements, and table of contents.
frontispiece An illustration appearing in the front mater, usually facing the full
title page.
ftp site (file transfer protocol) A standard network protocol used to
transfer fles from one host to another host over the Internet. An FTP site is not a web-
site because its data cannot be displayed like a webpage.
galley A small, sofcover version of uncorrected proofs made by Publicity for trade
catalogue titles that are sent to major media in advance of publication.
halftone A reproduction of continuous-tone artwork such as a photograph, which
converts the image into dots of various sizes.
hard copy Te printout from an authors word processing disks; the manuscript.
heavy edit A copyedit that, in addition to the points addressed in a standard edit,
introduces substantial revisions to the authors text, including signifcant rewriting
and/or restructuring for clarity, style, and correct English idiom.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 46
hierarchy of heads A numbering or letering system of coding (1, 2, 3 or A,
B, C, for example) that ensures that the levels of heads and subheads within each chap-
ter are ordered correctly.
high resolution (high-res) A digital art fle that is at a resolution suitable
for printing in a book: typically 300 dpi or higher for photographs in TIFF format, and
600 dpi or higher for line art in EPS format.
initial cap/lc Abbreviation for capitalizing only the frst leter of the frst word
in a head and lowercasing the rest of the leters. For example, Author guidelines glos-
sary is set as initial cap/lc.
isbn (international standard book number) A thirteen-digit number
that identifes the language of publication of a book, its title and publisher, plus a check
digit. It is ofen used in combination with a barcode. It is a unique identifer for a book.
issn (international standard serial number) An eight-digit serial
number that identifes the title and country of publication of a magazine or journal. It
refers to the complete run of a publication, not an individual issue. Used in combina-
tion with a barcode.
jpeg A fle format for images using the fle name extension .jpg. Tis is the most
common fle type produced by digital cameras. Publishers prefer TIFF fles to JPEG
fles since TIFF fles have beter resolution.
justify In composition, seting all lines of type to a specifed length, aligning at
both the lef and right sides. A book page is commonly set justifed.
key-in In composition, to retype the authors words into a computer to create an
electronic fle.
keymark Codes marked by the copyeditor to call out elements of the manuscript
requiring type specifcations by the designer and formating by the typeseter. Tese
are usually mnemonic letered codes: CN for chapter number; CT for chapter title;
<H1> for frst-level head; EXT for extract. (Tis coding is now included in the elec-
tronic manuscript instead of a hard copy.)
keyword A word that represents a main concept explored in a particular work,
used to help readers fnd material through searches.
lc Abbreviation for lowercase.
leading In composition, the distance between lines of type, measured in points.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 47
light edit A copyedit that makes minimal changes to an authors text. Suitable
only for manuscripts that are unusually clean and have received signifcant editorial at-
tention prior to handover to Editorial.
line art Black-and-white line illustrations such as graphs, pie charts, bar graphs,
fow charts, and simple line illustrations are all line art fgures.
low resolution (low-res) Output from a laser printer that prints at 300 dpi
or less. Tis can refer to hard copies of art or photos. Tis output is not fne enough to
reproduce well in printing. Low-resolution prooffrom a 300 dpi printeris not ac-
ceptable for printing. Minimum output for hard copies that need to be scanned is from
a 600 dpi printer.
manuscript (ms) In composition, the authors original copy. Once handwriten
or typed, now a manuscript is generally a hard-copy printout from the authors word-
processing fles. Sometimes also called a typescript.
opentype Te most current font development (identifable by their .otf fle exten-
sions), this format uses the highest PostScript technologies in a single font fle that can
be used cross-platform on both Windows and Mac machines. Tis format allows for an
almost limitless number of characters in each font, plus advanced typographic controls.
original art Refers to any original photographic print or slide. Can also be an
original drawing or map. Tese must be scanned at high-resolution to be used in print-
ing the book.
orphan In composition, the frst line of a paragraph that is set as the last line of a
page or column and is not considered good composition. See also widow.
output resolution Te resolution of an output device (a laser printer or a
scanner) is measured in dots per inch. Te higher the resolution, the beter the quality
of the image.
page makeup Also referred to as Page Layout or Page Composition. In composi-
tion, the arrangement of lines of type and art into pages following a designers specifca-
tions. It encompasses all elements of the page including the page margins, text blocks,
images, object padding, and templates used to defne positions of objects on the page.
page proofs Typeset pages formated as they will appear in the printed book, usu-
ally sent electronically to be viewed on a computer screen.
pagination In composition, the process of performing page makeup electroni-
cally. Pages were once made up manually by skilled paste-up people, who cut apart
galleys of type and pasted up mechanicals at a light table. Todays compositors are no
less skillful in fowing text and correctly placing fgures and tables.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 48
pdf (portable document format) A fle format provided by Adobe Sys-
tems. Adobe Reader is a free sofware application you can download onto your com-
puter in order to view documents as PDFs.
pe (printers error) A mistake in galleys or page proofs that is chargeable to
the compositor.
pica A unit of measure in composition. One pica equals about 0.167 inch. Picas are
used to measure type lines and book pages (e.g., a type page of 27 x 45 picas).
point A unit of measure in composition. Tere are 12 points to a pica. Type size and
leading are measured in points (e.g., 10/12 Times Roman means 10-point type on 12
points of leading).
postscript (p. s. ) A digital printing language that, in conjunction with typeset-
ting sofware, is used to describe the appearance and layout of documents containing
high-resolution text and graphics. PostScript fonts can be enlarged to any size without
loss of quality, on-screen and when printed. Tese fonts will print the exact same way
from diferent PostScript-compatible printers and will look the same across the Win-
dows and Mac platforms. PostScript is still acceptable in the design/publishing felds,
but such fonts are being superseded by the OpenType format.
printer-ready files Files sent from the compositor to the printer, usually
PDF fles. Te compositor prepares the fles to the printers specifcations.
proofreading Reviewing the proofs word for word to catch any errors intro-
duced in writing, copyediting, or composition.
proofreader marks A system for marking corrections to page proofs. Tis
is the best way to mark up page proofs. A list of proofreader marks is available at
htp://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_proof.html.
recto Te right-hand page of a book, magazine, etc. Page 1 is always a recto page,
and rectos always bear the odd-numbered folios. Opposite of verso.
reflow Occurs when the page layout or line breaks are changed from the original
typeset pages, due to editing corrections. Refow requires careful proofreading to be
certain no material (including graphics) has been omited in the updated document.
reprint Any printing of a book, subsequent to the frst edition, that involves litle
or no change to that edition.
running foot A line of copy, usually a book, part, or chapter title, positioned
below the text area on a book page.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 49
running head A line of copy, usually a book, part, or chapter title, positioned
above the text area on a book page (and sometimes as a footer). Te folio is ofen posi-
tioned on the same line.
sans serif A typeface in which the leters have no serifs (e.g., Helvetica, Optima,
Gill Sans). See also serif.
serif Te short strokes at the ends of main stems of leters; also the typefaces that
are characterized by these leters (e.g., Times Roman, Garamond, Baskerville). Most
books are set in serif type.
specs Te type specifcations for a books design; instructions to the typeseter from
the editor/designer for seting up the books interior pages. Also known as type specs.
spread Two facing pages of a book (i.e., a lef-hand and a right-hand page). Good
bookmaking requires that a spread be balanced so that one page does not have more
lines of type than the page facing it.
standard edit Te usual level of copyedit, which addresses grammar, spelling,
punctuation, and consistency but does not include fact-checking, restructuring, or sig-
nifcant rewriting.
stet An instruction to let the copy stand as originally typed in the manuscript, or as
originally set in the page proofs.
style sheet Te guidelines that the copyeditor uses in editing a manuscript, ofen
including the style and usage choices throughout. It might list, for example: United
States (noun), US (adjective). It will usually also include examples of the reference
style used.
tearsheet Pages removed from a book or previously published material, used for
typeseting a new edition or a reprint of a book.
testimonial A quoted recommendation or endorsement of a book, atributed to
a person of infuence in a particular feld, which appears in promotional materials and/
or the back cover of the book itself.
tiff (tagged image file format) A graphics fle format for saving bitmaps
at high resolution that allows images to be imported into a compositors paging system
and the printers electronic prepress system.
track changes An editing tool in Microsof Word that allows document changes
to be made to the original text.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 50
truetype A widely used font format (generally identifable by the .tf fle exten-
sion) that can be found pre-installed on both Microsof Windows and Mac computers.
As the Windows and Mac versions of TrueType fonts are not compatible, PostScript
(Type 1) and OpenType fonts remain the standard in the typeseting and printing
industries.
typecodes Te coding inserted into the manuscript during copyediting that in-
structs the compositor how to set various elements. For example, chapter titles might
be coded as <CT>, epigraphs as <EPI>, and 1 heads as <H1>. Tese codes are dis-
played as styles.
typesetting Te process of seting material in type, or the format that will be
used in printing (i.e., how your pages will appear in fnal form).
url (uniform resource locator) A web address. URLs appearing in a
manuscript should also include a descriptive name of the site (e.g., US Environmental
Protection Agency: htp://www.epa.gov), and should not be underlined when appear-
ing in print.
verso Te lef-hand page as opposed to the recto, which is the right-hand page. Te
verso always carries an even-numbered folio. Also refers to the reverse side of a sheet.
widow In composition, a single word or less than a full last line of a paragraph at the
top of a page. Widows are not allowed in good typography and are fxed at the composi-
tors expense.
xml (extensible markup language) A coding language added to the text
of a book during composition. XML is used to store all data in a book, to ensure all ele-
ments are present in the data, and to transmit the data to other formats. Currently, most
OUP books are converted to XML during typeseting.
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MARKETI NG FAQ
Your marketing contact will be in touch before your books formal release date to go
over marketing and sales plans with you. Your Author Publicity Form is a key docu-
ment in developing these plans; each and every word will be read and used suitably, so
please complete it in as much detail as possible.
Tis section of the handbook answers some of the most frequently asked questions
about advanced marketing.
1. When will my book become available for advance order online?
In most cases, books will be available for pre-order at nearly all online retailers and at
www.oup.co.in 45 weeks before the publication date.
2. Ive spoted some errors in the online records for my book. What should I do?
Send an e-mail to your Commissioning Editor and marketing contact describing
the errors you have discovered. If your book description has not been fnalized yet,
what appears may be a placeholder, which will be replaced with fnal copy and/
or testimonials. Your marketer will correct any errors in OUP systems, which feed to
accounts such as Flipkart. It may take up to two weeks for changes to go live at online
retailers.
3. Im going to a conference before the book releases. Could you send me some fyers?
Absolutely! Ask your marketing contact for fyers. We can provide some print copies as
well as a PDF. Please send your request at least two to three weeks before the conference
so we have ample time to create and send the materials.
4. How do I order copies of my book with the authors discount?
You may place orders with your authors discount by contacting your Commissioning
Editor at OUP, or directly by emailing your request at anu.talwar@oup.com. Your
author discount is 30% of list price. If you are planning to make a bulk purchase of
100 or more copies at publication, please let your Commissioning Editor or marketing
contact know as soon as possible so we can print accordingly.
5. When will review copies of my book be sent out? Which journals will you send
them to?
Review copies will be mailed shortly afer the books arrive in our warehouse. We reach
out to important newspapers, relevant magazines, and journals in each feld, using your
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 52
Author Publicity Form as a guide. Your marketing contact can provide you with the
marketing plan.
6. What is the diference between release date and publication date?
Publication date is the date your books are received at our warehouse. It takes two weeks
for national distribution, so we set an ofcial release date two weeks afer the publication
date. Promotional campaigns are based on the release date to ensure books are available
when the campaign begins. Publication dates will difer in other countries.
For any queries related to the marketing of your book, please contact
preeti.chaturvedi@oup.com.
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ROYALTI ES FAQ
how are royalties calculated?
Royalties are calculated as an agreed percentage of the net revenue received by OUP
India (i.e., the amount received by OUP India afer giving the discount to booksellers and
taking into account returns) for every copy of the book sold. As the net earnings by OUP
India varies according to the customer, the royalty amount per book sold also varies. Most
of our sales are to booksellers, who receive a discount on our retail price. You will receive
an annual statement showing the number of books sold and the total revenue earned.
when are royalties paid?
OUP Indias fnancial year runs from 1 April to 31 March. Author royalties are paid once
in a yearin September/October and sent to the author along with a statement of roy-
alty (see sample below)
Occasionally the price of a book may be increased within the same fnancial year. On
your royalty statement the diferent quantities sold for each price would be shown. If there
are any returns of the book, that too would be indicated with the help of a minus sign.
statement of royalty for the year ended 31.03.2003
Oxford University Press
IBHO
1st Floor YMCA Library Bldg
Jai Singh Road
New Delhi - 110001
Author Name: AAAAA Benefciary Name: BBBBB
Author Code: CCCCC
S.No. ISBN Title Cur Price Sale
Qty
LEC Gross/
Net
Royalty
%
Royalty
Amount
Tax
%
Tax
Amount
Bank
S.No.
XXX TT INR 69.00 -1848 L N 10.00 -8925.84 31.50 -2811.63 XXX
INR 73.00 75 E N 10.00 383.25 31.50 120.72 XXX
INR 73.00 17293 L N 10.00 88367.23 31.50 27835.67
Total Royalty: Rs 79824.64 Rs 25144.76
****LEC : <L> indicates LOCAL / <E> indicates EXPORT / <C> indicates CONTRCT SALES
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 54
how are royalties paid if i am a non-resident author?
Royalties are remited to non-resident authors at the same time as other authors, i.e., in
September/October every year. You would be sent the royalties electronically in your
local currency for the said amount afer income-tax has been deducted at source and
the necessary formalities completed as per the requirements of the Reserve Bank of
India. We deduct income-tax at the time of crediting royalty in the author's royalty ac-
count, i.e., 31st March, and provide a certifcate of deduction of tax at source as per
provision of law in Form 16 A.
For any royalty-related queries, please contact rajinder.singh@oup.com.
QUICK
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WHAT TO EXPECT MANUSCRI PT CONTENTS CHECKLI ST
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GLOSSARY MARKETI NG FAQ ROYALTI ES FAQ
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OXFORD SCHOLARSHI P ONLI NE FAQ
what is oxford scholarship online (OSO)?
OSO is a vast and rapidly expanding cross-searchable library which ofers quick and
easy access to the full text of a large number of OUP books in biology, business and
management, classical studies, economics and fnance, history, law, linguistics, litera-
ture, mathematics, music, neuroscience, philosophy, physics, political science, psychol-
ogy, and public health and epidemiology, among other subject areas. You will get a
picture of the online programme if you visit www.oxfordscholarship.com. It currently
has 8,613books in 20subject areas and 267sub-disciplines.
what is the purpose of OSO?
Oxford University Presss primary aim in creating OSO is to enhance the dissemination
of our authors works globally. OSO represents an atempt by the worlds largest uni-
versity press to stimulate the migration of important scholarly work in the humanities
and social sciences to an online environment. At a time when many academic publish-
ers continue to explore ways to make their titles available online in a secure and long-
term format, we believe that OSO marks the frst scholar-friendly and fnancially viable
model to be launched. Oxford has consistently proven itself to be at the vanguard of
scholarly presses and we bring the same sense of innovation to OSO.
We believe it is essential to maintainand buildthe profle of specialized schol-
arly works in an online environment. OSO books will, therefore, be searchable online,
alongside journal articles and other online content and thus will be seamlessly inte-
grated into a global body of academic resources. By creating OSO, we hope authors and
researchers will be able to enjoy the benefts of online functionality and access, while
maintaining the key importance of the printed book.
will print sales of my book be affected? if so, how?
Few subjects in the publishing world have been fraught with greater speculation than
the question of whether or not the online availability of a book benefts or detracts from
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 56
its print sales. As is ofen the case in a young feld lacking empirical evidence, much of
this speculation has been fuelled both by the prejudices of the individual speculator,
as well as by an overemphasis on scant anecdotal evidence. A brief history of e-book
publishing in the humanities and social science might serve to shed some light on this
much-contested issue.
In the summer of 1996, MIT Press published William J. Mitchells City of Bits: Space,
Place, and the Infobahn simultaneously in print and in an unrestricted online edition.
In the wake of this closely watched experiment, publishers concluded that simultane-
ous online publication of a new book actually increased print sales. In retrospect, this
increase was most likely fuelled by the novelty factor of the MIT experiment, and the
resultant publicity it generated. In the intervening years, many other trial balloons have
been launched, featuring all sorts of online content, from the most immersive books
(in other words those meant to be read straight through from beginning to end, such as
commercial fction and popular non-fction) to the most extractive (those which are
not read, per se, but from which content and information is selectively drawn). Most re-
cently, the National Academy Press decided to make all of its new titles available online
gratis at the same time the print book is published. Interestingly, none of these experi-
ments have had such a dramatic efect on print sales that any obvious conclusions have
emerged. Were one, for instance, to make a print dictionarythe defnitive extractive
bookavailable online, one would naturally assume that print sales would decline. Yet
even this has proven too simplistic an axiom. Te 20-volume Oxford English Dictionary
(now available online to over 70 million users) has continued to enjoy healthy print
sales, even as use of its online editions has increased. Tat said, research has shown that
increasing access to, and the profle of, academic material online can ofen lead the re-
searcher to the printed book, which is then browsed and ofen purchased. Simply put,
online and print editions at present meet diferent needs of scholars.
Accordingly, OUP views OSO as a form of scholarship complementary to the
printed book. We do not anticipate that online availability will replace the printed
book. However, given the ever-increasing technological sophistication of students
and scholars alike, we will be closely monitoring the print performance of books in
the OSO archive.
how did you arrive at the model for OSO?
Too many online publishing models have been based not on the needs of the user,
but on the ofen overly optimistic projections of the publisher. Tis was particularly
the case during the height of the dot.com years when the mania for aggregating vast
amounts of data online washed away all realism about the demographic limitations of
the audience for academic work.
Determined not to make similar mistakes, Oxford convened numerous research
and focus groups, asking scholars and librarians what they wanted. We atended major
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 57
conferences the world over, soliciting similar input. Drawing on Oxfords experience of
working collaboratively with scholarly societies, the OSO model emerged organically
from this research and these eforts, in direct response to input from future users.
As we develop OSO in the coming months and years, we will continue to seek ap-
propriate feedback and build this into our model for OSO, ensuring that it remains
agile and responsive to the changing needs and demands of its audience.
who is the audience for OSO?
OSO will be purchased exclusively by institutional libraries (not by individuals) but its
success will of course hinge on the degree to which it is used by scholars, students, and
other patrons of the subscribing libraries. Towards that end, we encourage you to both
experiment with OSO should your institution subscribe to it (and perhaps to advocate
to your librarians for a subscription should it not!) and also to spread the world to your
colleagues and students about this service, should you fnd that it lives up to its promise.
why do i need to create keywords and abstracts?
Abstracts and keywords are two of the defning features which will make OSO unique
among online publishing ventures. Tey enhance the way in which researchers can
locate and browse materials, enabling users to search for information with much greater
precision and increasing both the relevance and recall of search results. While we fully
realize that their generation can be time-consuming, and greatly appreciate your assis-
tance in this regard, we strongly believe that no one is beter situated to create the most
accurate and useful keywords and abstracts than the author.
on what basis did you decide on royalties for OSO
authors?
Envisioning OSO primarily as a service to scholarship rather than an engine for rev-
enue, OUP is investing a considerable amount into the start-up of OSO, both with
regard to seed funds and stafng. We do not anticipate that OSO will generate a com-
mercial return in its frst four or fve years, during which period the project will be run-
ning a signifcant defcit.
Since the royalties paid to authors from sales of OSO will be paid in addition to,
rather than in lieu of, royalties on print sales and since we are having to be conservative
with all expensesall the more so given the enormous expense involved in creating a
range of OSO-supporting systems, from access control to quality assuranceour roy-
alty schedule is by necessity similarly conservative.
It should be noted that we hope to be able to ofer combined OSO-plus-print pack-
ages to some of our library customers, whereby institutional subscribers to OSO would
receive discounts on the print versions of titles featured in OSO, thereby stimulating
sales of backlist books and benefting authors by generating additional royalties.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 58
what will happen if there is a new edition of my work?
We have every intention of ensuring that OSO remains a growing archive, continuously
refreshed with new books (some 200 a year). New editions will certainly fgure into this
mix and we will as a mater of course be replacing previous editions with the current
one, but will also continue to make the previous edition available if appropriate.
To Whom It May Concern:
I am preparing a book of approximately __________pages, tentatively titled:
___________________________________________________________, to be published by Oxford
University Press India, in 20_____. I write in order to request non-exclusive world rights to reproduce in my book and
in its future editions, in all languages and formats including electronic, the following material:
PERMI SSI ONS REQUEST FORM
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To:
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_________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________
(If applicable, please provide a glossy print or high-resolution electronic fle of the fgure(s) for reproduction.)
Oxford University Press India is a not-for-proft university press and so I would be grateful if you would consider granting
this use gratis or for a reduced fee.
Please indicate agreement by signing and returning this leter. By signing, you warrant that you are the sole owner of the
rights granted and that your material does not infringe on the copyright or other rights of anyone. If you do not control
these rights, I would be grateful if you let me know to whom I should apply.
Tank you for your consideration.
Sincerely,
_____________________________________
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Permission is granted for the use of the material as stipulated. Signature:_______________________________
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123456
AUTHOR PUBLI CI TY FORM
Oxford University Press
Indian Branch Head Ofce:
YMCA Library Building, 1st Floor, Jai Singh Road,
New Delhi 110 001
Ph: 91-11-43600300 Fax: 91-11-23360897
Tis questionnaire, which we send to all our authors, will reach you
much before your book is due to be published. It is, however,
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so that the publishing process can begin. Te specialist
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used with discretion, but please indicate if there is anything in
particular which we should regard as confdential.
part 1. biographical information
(Tis may be used for preparing the jacket copy and title page of the book, as a basis for catalogue entries and press
releases.)
A. Personal
Author/Editors Full name:
Name as it is to appear on the title page:
Place and Date of Birth: Nationality:
Addresses
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email:
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email:
(continued)
If possible afx a recent colour
photograph here. (While this may
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periodicals request a photograph
to carry alongside a review)
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B. Educational
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Present
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Previous Publications
Forthcoming (Other than the one described in part 2)
(continued)
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 62
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OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 63
We ofen need a shorter description of the book which can be used where space is limited. Could you therefore write
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OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 64
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OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 65
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OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 66
OXFORD IN INDIA
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OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 67
AUTHOR CHECKLI ST
Te following will help ensure there are no errors of omission. Please read it carefully and fll in the details.
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[In case of more than one author/editor, please indicate the order in which names should appear on book cover
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[Please tick () items that will be included in your book and ensure that you have supplied all that is required.]
Frontispiece
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Foreword
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and collected essays]
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Contents
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(continued)
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Appendices
Bibliography
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Index
[In case the book needs an index, will you prepare it?
OR
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If yes, OUP will arrange to compile an index at your expense.
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(continued)
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 69
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(continued)
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please include notes about each contributor, listed alphabetically by last name.
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OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 71
OUP STYLE SHEET
abbreviations
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and
and (not &).
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Tese may follow either individual chapters or the end of the main text.
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If these are at the end of the main text, they can be numbered as Appendix A.1, A.2,
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Byzantine, Middle Ages, but medieval.
Geographical terms such as river, range, mountain, etc., preceded by a proper name,
e.g., Deccan Plateau, Aravalli Range, but the river Ganga.
See compass points.
Use lowercase for subject disciplines (sociology, not Sociology).
With usage of colon: When a colon is used within a sentence, the frst word
following it is not capitalized. When a colon introduces two or more sentences or a
dialogue or an extract, the frst word following it is capitalized.
Initial caps is also used for emphasis. Capitalizing an entire word or phrase for
emphasis is appropriate in rare cases, e.g., in dialoguesmall caps looks less jarring
in these cases. watch out! she yelled.
For headline style capitalization, capitalization in list, and capitalization of hyphenated
terms, refer to the Chicago Manual.
chapter
In cross-references in the text, the correct style is:
In the next chapter (lowercase)
In Chapter 5 (capital)
In references to chapters in other books, it is usual to make chapter lowercase, in
order to make a distinction from the above (e.g., In chapter 3 of her Shakespeare,
Germaine Greer argues).
Te abbreviation for chapter (to be employed in notes and bibliographynot in
running text) is ch..
comma
Te serial or Oxford comma is inserted before and or or in lists of three or more
items:
red, white, and blue.
Use comma before and afer etc. Equivalents such as and so on or and the like are
treated the same way.
et al.: When it follows a single item, no comma is required to precede or follow it,
e.g., Das et al. When it follows two or more items, the preceding comma should be
used while the second comma is optional, e.g., In swept the chair, the treasurer, et
al., to announce their resignation.
Use commas before and afer e.g., i.e.
compass points
When compass points are used to describe recognized geographical areas, they
should be capitalized, e.g., the Far East, unemployment in the North-East. When
the area described is not commonly recognized as a unit, use lowercase (western
France), and use lowercase too for simple directions (Hannibal atacked from the
north). Also, north India and east Utar Pradesh.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 73
cross-references
If there are cross-references to other chapters in the MS, make sure that the chapter
no. and title are correct.
If level heads are not numbered, remove cross-references to them by number. If
possible use the title of the level head (e.g., see the section on Inclusive Growth),
but sometimes even as discussed in a previous/subsequent section may work.
Avoid see below and see above since once the MS is typeset, the portion being
referred to may not be above or below.
Portions quoted from within the same MS should match word by word. Te page
references should be lef as p. 00 while copyediting and flled in at the proof stage.
dates
Our preferred style is 6 August 1949. If day of week is given, then the style is:
Sunday, 25 October 1953.
19923 (not 199293)
Note: the 1960s, not the 1960s.
vIn running text, spell out (e.g.) nineteenth century or 19th century (but 19th cent.
or 19th c. are acceptable in notes).
ad and bc should be marked for small capitals (no full point); ad comes before
the year, bc comes afer it.
e. g.
Lowercase (even if beginning a sentence), full points.
Usually expanded to for example in running text.
em dash
Tis is a short typographical rule measuring the width of an M. (Press ctrl+alt+minus
sign on your keyboard to type em dash.) A sentence should not have more than two em
dashes.
Used to denote a sudden break in thought or sentence structure or interruption in
dialogue. e.g., Will hecan heobtain the necessary signatures?
Used to set of an amplifying or explanatory element. e.g., She concluded that the
plan was bold and unusualbold and unusual in the sense that Te infuence of
three impressionistsMonet, Sisley, and Degascan be seen in her work.
Used to separate a subject or a series of subjects from a pronoun that introduces the
main clause. e.g., Broken promises, pety rivalries, and false rumourssuch were
the obstacles he encountered.
To separate a dependent clause from an independent clause. e.g.,The US academic
fraternityeconomists, sociologists, social psychologists, and demographers
has made very rich and pioneering insights into the study of group-based
discrimination.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 74
en dash
Tis is a short typographical rule measuring the width of an N. (Press ctrl+minus sign
on your keyboard to type en dash.) Te principal use of an en dash is to connect num-
bers and, sometimes, even words.
To connect number ranges (for instance, years, time, or page numbers), e.g., 1968
72, 11.30 a.m.4.30 p.m., pp. 416.
For periods or seasons extending over parts of two successive calendar years, e.g.,
winter of 194445.
Used instead of and, e.g., lovehate relationship; academicpolicymaker;
monetaryfscal.
Used instead of to, e.g., MumbaiDelhi fight; topdown approach.
Used in place of a hyphen in a compound adjective when one of its elements is an
open compound, e.g., postWorld War II.
Note: Te word to, never en dash, should be used if the word fom precedes the frst ele-
ment. e.g., She lived in Bhopal from 1985 to 1992. Similarly, the word and, never en dash,
should be used if between precedes the frst element. e.g.,She worked as an editor with
OUP between November 2002 and January 2007.
epigraphs
An epigraph refers to a quotation that is pertinent but not integral to the text. It may
be set at the beginning of the book (page v if there is no dedication or else page vi).
It may even be used at the beginning of a chapter or a section within a chapter.
Sources to epigraphs should be set on a line following the quote, usually preceded
by an em dash. Tey are usually right aligned with the quote (if verse, with the
longest line).
It is acceptable for the source of an epigraph to be vague or even non-existent (e.g.,
Old Chinese Proverb). If the author is well-known, just the surname will do (e.g.,
Dickens). Title of the book may or may not be mentioned. Page numbers of the
quote or full bibliographical details are not required and should never be queried to
the author.
et al. (meaning: and others )
Roman, full point.
etc.
Roman, full point.
full points
Delete full points from end of contractions where the last leter is the last leter of the
word (Mr, Mrs, Dr, St, eds) and from abbreviations made up of capitals (e.g., BBC).
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 75
Use full points for abbreviations consisting of lowercase leters, and for contractions in
which the last leter is not the last leter of the word (a.m., p.m., Prof., Jan.).
hyphenation
Te frst place to check whether a word should be hyphenated is the dictionary. Some
common rules of hyphenation are given below (for more details refer to the Chicago
Manual):
A hyphen makes for easier reading by showing structure. Words that might be
otherwise misread should be hyphenated, e.g., re-creation.
Hyphens eliminate ambiguity. Although decision making as a noun is not normally
hyphenated, adding one in fast decision-making makes it clear that decisions (not
snap judgement) must be made quickly.
When compound modifers (phrasal adjectives) precede a noun, hyphenation
makes for easier reading, e.g., a well-known example; long-term results; middle-
class values.
Compounds formed by an adverb ending in ly and an adjective/participle (e.g.,
largely irrelevant or smartly dressed) are not hyphenated either before/after a noun
since there is virtually no scope for ambiguity.
ibid. (meaning: in the same place )
Roman, full point
It refers to the same work cited in the note or embedded citation immediately
preceding. It takes the place of the author, title of work, and any other material that
is identical. If the entire reference including the page number is identical, just use
Ibid..
It must never be used if the preceding note/embedded citation contains more than
one reference.
i. e.
Lower case (even if beginning a sentence), full points.
Usually expanded to that is in running text.
italicization
Foreign/Indian words: Dont italicize foreign/Indian words that are mentioned in
the Concise Oxford Dictionarye.g., ex ante, de facto, sui generis, raison dtre,
devi, sati, dosa, brahmin, zamindar, etc. Te italicized foreign/Indian word will be
italicized only in the frst instance in the MS or in a chapterthe later is preferred
in edited volumes. If an entire sentence is in a foreign or Indian language, there is no
need to italicizeinstead put within quote marks.
Do not to italicize well-known names of epics, religious books such as Bible, Quran,
Bhagavat Gita, Mahabharata, Ramayana, Guru Granth Sahib, Torah, Talmud, Old
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 76
and New Testaments, Zend Avesta, and so on. For compendia of such kinds, please
follow this rule: Puranas will not be italicized, but the name of a particular Purana,
i.e., the Vishnupurana will be italicized.
Italicize titles of published books, journals, plays, flms, TV serials, and works of art.
Titles of poems, short stories, articles, etc., should not be italicized.
Italics is used for emphasizing some portion of a text. It is, however, efcient only if
a word or phrase is italicized. Avoid italicizing a whole sentence but never italicize
a whole paragraph. An author may also italicize a word or phrase in quoted text for
emphasis. In such a case, add emphasis mine in the citation. If the italics in the
quote are part of the original, add emphasis original.
Mathematical equations should be in italics. If not, give a global instruction to the
typeseter.
journal titles
Italicize.
Journal titles ofen appear in abbreviated form. Check that the standard
abbreviation has been used and use it consistently. Te full form should be given in
the frst instance or provided in a list of abbreviations.
list of abbreviations
Required only if too many are used or a few are used frequently.
Should be alphabetically arranged.
list of contributors
Tis will appear in edited volumes. It should appear among the preliminary pages or
at the very end of the volume (the Chicago Manual allows both) and be included in
the list of contents.
Te list should be in alphabetical order of surnames.
list of illustrations
Appears in the preliminary pages.
Te list of illustrations may contain such details as brief credits for the material
(Photo: J. Scot), dimensions of a picture (which should be in metric units), or the
present repository (Victoria and Albert Museum). Check with your editor, on how
much is required.
newspapers, names of
Names of newspapers are italicized and in title case. Te defnite article should be
in roman, lower-case: the Guardian, the Observer. Our two exceptions are Te Times
and Te Economist.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 77
note cues
Notes are usually numbered per chapter.
Note cues are usually small superior arabic numerals, and should be marked to
appear outside any punctuation (except, sometimes, parentheses, brackets, and
dashes).
It is vital to check that note cues are consecutive and that each has a corresponding
note in the notes section. Omissions and misnumbering are very common, and
hard to put right at proof stage.
numerals
Use the smallest possible number of fgures in ranges of numbers: 789, 1012; but
11819 not 1189 (i.e., the group 1019 in each hundred, e.g., 1517 and 11517). For
twenties and beyond, 213 (not 2123) and 1319 (not 13139). Roman numerals do
not contract: viviii not viiii.
Similarly for dates: 182436, 1458, but 151116.
Use one of the following rules: 19 in words and 10 onwards in fgures or 199 in
words and 100 onwards in fgures
However, numbers atached to units of measurement should be always given as
fgures: 2,700 kg, 15 per cent.
But where there is a degree of inexactitude, or in a literary context (widely
understood), words may be more appropriate than fgures: Few of us were alive
one hundred years ago.
Commas are usually inserted in thousands (6,000; 23,000).
Use either the lakhcrore system or the thousandmillion one (whatever the
author prefers), but ensure that it is consistently followed
omission marks
Use three spaced pointsto mark omissions in the text.
If the sentence before the ellipsis ends with a full stop, this may be set, closed up to
the text:
She was in a bad mood when she visited the school.
per cent
We prefer to spell out per cent in the text itself (two words), but the symbol %
is appropriate in fgures, tables, notes, and may also be used in the text itself if it
occurs very ofen (e.g., in a statistics book).
quotations
We set single quotation marks, reserving double quotation marks for quotes inside
quotes.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 78
Long quotations (more than about 60 words) are generally displayed, i.e., set as a
separate block, in a smaller type-size.
Te original spelling and punctuation in quotations must be preserved even if
it conficts with practice elsewhere in the typescript. However, query anything
that looks odd (certainly, do not assume that an author has copied a quotation
correctly).
Quotation mark and punctuation:
If a punctuation mark is part of the quotation, it should be placed inside the
quotation mark.
If the punctuation mark relates to the sentence rather than to the quotation, it
should be placed outside the quotation mark.
If the whole of a printed sentence is a quotation, the punctuation should be
placed inside the quotation mark.
If only part of the printed sentence is quoted, the punctuation should be
outside the closing quotation mark.
spellings
Refer to the Concise Oxford Dictionary.
We use British spellings with z spellings. Some words are always spelled with ise
(e.g., advertise, revise, exercise, etc.). Some words are spelt yse not yze (except in
American spelling): analyse, paralyse.
bibliographical references
Bibliographical references should be in a consistent style. For detailed instructions
we refer to one of the following three books: Te Chicago Manual of Style, Harts
Rules, or Butchers Copy-editing. Please cross-check references to see that each
reference makes sense and matches the relevant bit in the main text.
For textual and footnote references, provide author, year and page number. For
example,
Morris et al. (1994), p. 134
For a reference immediately following, use ibid.
It makes beter sense not to have all the details of a reference in the endnotes/footnotes
and again in the Bibliography, so please incorporate the desired shortened version in
the notes, and keep the longer version for the Bibliography (at the end of the book) or
References (at the end of the essay, in the case of an edited volume). However, in the
later case, if there are only footnotes/endnotes, and no references, then the complete
reference details should be present in the notes in the frst occurence (subsequent oc-
currences should use a shortened form of the referenceauthor surname, short title of
book/article, and relevant page numbers).
As far as styling of references is concerned, please note that an authored monograph
can have embedded citations (the author-date system or the Harvard style) in text
and endnotes/footnotes, and the complete details in a bibliography at the end of
the mss.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 79
Harvard style:
Authors surname and the year of publication are given in parentheses. Tere is
no comma between the name and the year. Depression is more heterogeneous
in the old than in the young (Blumenthal 1971).
If the authors name occurs naturally in the sentence, only the year is added in
parentheses. Finch (1986) postulated that
When author has published more than one cited work in the same year, use a,
b, c, to distinguish them. As Jones (1994a) has stated. She went on to prove
(Jones 1994b)
If there are two authors, the surnames of both (joined by an ampersand)
should be given before the date. A semicolon is used to separate items.
efects of positive reinforcement (Bohus 1981; De Kloet & De Wied 1980).
Te following are some illustrations of styling references. Serial comma is always used
when the reference has more than one author/editor. Do not apply OUP style to the
title of the reference title. Te punctuation used to separate various elements in a refer-
ence may vary from book to book, so there is no one correct stylemaintaining consis-
tency is the key. No punctuation is italicized unless part of a book/journal title.
Authored Books
Single Author
Chaudhuri, Amit. 1993. Afernoon Raag. London: Heinemann.
Surname, First name. Year. Title of Book. Place of Publication: Publisher.
Multiple Authors
Basu, Tapan, Pradip Data, Sumit Sarkar, Tanika Sarkar, and Sambuddha Sen. 1993.
Khaki Shorts Safron Flags (Tracts for the Times/1). Hyderabad: Orient Longman.
Surname of frst Author, First name of frst Author, First name of second Author,
Surname of second Author, etc. Year. Title of Book. Place of Publication: Publisher.
Edited Volume
Single author
George, K.M. (ed.). 1994. Modern Indian Literature: An Anthology of Plays and Prose.
Delhi: Sahitya Akademi.
Multiple authors
Ashcrof, Bill, Gareth Grifths, and Helen Tifn (eds). 1995 [1989]. Te Empire
Writes Back. London and New York: Routledge.
(Te original publication year, if provided, is given in square brackets.)
Translated Volume
Kemal, Yasher (trans. from Turkish by Tilda Kemal). 1989 [1960]. Te Wind fom the
Plain. London: Harvill Press.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 80
Essay in Edited Volume
Single Author and Single Editor
Masselos, J.C.. 1973. Te Khojas of Bombay: Te Defning of Formal Membership
Criteria during the Nineteenth Century, in Imtiaz Ahmad (ed.), Caste and Social
Stratifcation among the Muslims, pp. 12345. Delhi: Manohar Book Service.
Single Authors and Multiple Editors
Salomon, C. 1991. Te Cosmogonic Riddles of Lalan Faqir, in A. Appadurai,
F. Korom, and M. Mills (eds), Gender, Genre and Power in South Asian Expressive
Traditions. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
Paper in Journal
Single Author
Bouiller, V. 1993. Te Nepalese State and Gorakhnathi Yogis: Te Case of the
Former Kingdoms of Dang Valley, Contribution to Nepalese Studies, 20 (1): 2952.
Multiple Authors
Murty, M. N. and R. Ray. 1989. A Computational Procedure for Calculating
Optimal Commodity Taxes with Illustrative Evidence from Indian Budget Data,
Scandinavian Journal of Economics, 91(4): 655-70.
Unpublished Papers/Mimeographs/Discussion Papers/Working Papers
Chander, P. and L. Wide. 1989. Corruption and Tax Compliance, mimeo, New Delhi:
Indian Statistical Institute.
Website references
Give the website address following the authors name and title of publication. If possi-
ble, give the date on which the site was accessed, because websites are constantly being
updated and changed.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 81
GUI DELI NES FOR SUBMI TTI NG ABSTRACTS
AND KEYWORDS FOR OXFORD SCHOLARSHI P
ONLI NE
Please submit your abstracts and keywords by email as an attachment to
your Commissioning Editor.
book abstract and keywords
Abstract
Te book abstract should be concise, within 510 sentences, around 200 words and
no more than 250 words, and should provide a clear idea of the main arguments and
conclusions of your book. It might be useful to use the books blurb as a basis for the
abstract (as supplied in your Author Publicity Form). Where possible, the personal
pronoun should not be used, but an impersonal voice adopted: Tis chapter dis-
cusses . . . rather than: In this chapter, I discuss . . .
Keywords
Please suggest 510 keywords which can be used for describing the content of the book
and will enable the full text of the book to be searchable online. Tey are equivalent to
terms in an index in a printed work.
Each keyword should be kept short, one word where possible (though two and
three word specialist terms are also acceptable where necessary).
Keywords should not be too generalized.
Each keyword should appear in the accompanying abstract.
A keyword can be drawn from the book or chapter title, as long asit also appears in
the text of the related abstract.
chapter abstracts and keywords
Abstracts
Please supply an abstract for each chapter of your book, including Introductory and
Concluding chapters, giving the name and number of the chapter in each case. Each
chapter abstract should be concise, between 36 sentences, around 120 words and no
more than 150 words. It should provide a clear overview of the content of the chapter.
Where possible, the personal pronoun should not be used, but an impersonal voice
adopted: Tis chapter discusses . . . rather than: In this chapter, I discuss . . .
Keywords
Please suggest 510 keywords for each chapter which can be used for describing the
content of the chapter and will enable the text of the chapter to be searchable online.
Tey are equivalent to terms in an index in a printed work.
Each keyword should be kept short, one word where possible (though two and
three word specialist terms are also acceptable where necessary).
Keywords should not be too generalized.
Each keyword should appear in the accompanying abstract.
A keyword can be drawn from the book or chapter title, as long asit also appears in
the text of the related abstract.
Oxford Scholarship Online can be found at htp://www.oxfordscholarship.com. Te
guided tour available from the home page shows sample book and chapter abstracts
and keywords. Tese are also available for viewing without subscription (see the sub-
ject home page). Some sample abstracts and keywords also appear below.
philosophy
The Act Itself
Book Abstract: Te distinction between the consequences of an act and the act
itself is supposed to defne the fght between consequentialism and deontologi-
cal moralities. Tis book, though sympathetic to consequentialism, aims less at
taking sides in that debate than at clarifying the terms in which it is conducted. It
aims to help the reader to think more clearly about some aspects of human con-
ductespecially the workings of the by-locution, and some distinctions be-
tween making and allowing, between act and upshot, and between foreseeing
and intending (the doctrine of double efect). It argues that moral philosophy
would go beter if the concept of the act itself were dropped from its repertoire.
Book Keywords: action, allowing, consequences, consequentialism, deontological
ethics, double efect, ethics, intention
Chapter Abstract: Tis chapter discusses atempts by Dinello, Kamm, Kagan, Ben-
tham, Warren Quinn, and others to explain the making/allowing distinction. In each
case, it is shown that if the proposed account can be tightened up into something sig-
nifcant and defensible, that always turns it into something equivalent to the analy-
sis of Bennet (Ch. 6) or, more ofen, that of Donagan (Ch. 7). It is argued that on
either of the later analyses, making/allowing certainly has no basic moral signif-
cance, though it may ofen be accompanied by factors that do have such signifcance.
Chapter Keywords: allowing, Bentham, Dinello, Donagan, KaganKamm, making,
Quinn
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 83
religion
Minds and Gods
Book Abstract: Tis book provides an introduction to the cognitive science of reli-
gion, a new discipline of study that explains the origins and persistence of religious
ideas and behavior on the basis of evolved mental structures and functions of the
human brain. Belief in gods and the social formation of religion have their genesis in
biology in powerful, ofen hidden, processes of cognition that all humans share.
Arguing that we cannot understand what we think until we frst understand how we
think, the book describes ways in which evolution by natural selection molded the
modern human mind, resulting in mental modularity, innate intelligences, and spe-
cies-typical modes of thought. Te book details many of the adapted features of the
brain agent detection, theory of mind, social cognition, and others focusing on
how mental endowments inherited from our ancestral past lead people to naturally
entertain religious ideas, such as the god concepts that are ubiquitous the world over.
In addition to introducing the major themes, theories, and thinkers in the cognitive
science of religion, the book also advances the current discussion by moving beyond
explanations for individual religious beliefs and behaviors to the operation of cul-
ture and religious systems. Drawing on dual-process models of cognition developed
in social psychology, the book argues that the same cognitive constraints that shape
human thought also work as a selective force on the content and durability of religions.
Book Keywords: cognitive science of religion, cognition, human brain/mind, human
evolution, natural selection, mental modularity, religious ideas, gods, dual processing
Chapter Abstract: Tis chapter presents an overview of the development and ar-
chitecture of the human brain, and shows what evolutionary history has to do with
the nature of cognition today. Drawing on the perspectives and techniques of evo-
lutionary psychology, it pursues the following questions: (1) Given our ances-
tral world, what kinds of mental structures and functions should we expect to fnd
in the brain, and do we? and (2) What roles do mental structures and functions
formed in the Pleistocene world continue to play in modern minds? In the course
of the discussion, it also outlines contemporary models of the mind from the
blank slate view to the idea of massive modularity and surveys the range of in-
tuitive knowledge (e.g., intuitive biology, intuitive physics, and intuitive psychol-
ogy) and innate cognitive processes that both shape and constrain human thought.
Chapter Keywords: brain development, human cognition, evolutionary psychology,
mental modularity, intuitive knowledge, cognitive constraint
economics and finance
The Contracting Organization
Book Abstract: Among the questions tackled by Simon Domberger in this book are
the following: When should organizations contract out services traditionally produced
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 84
in-house? Is outsourcing another ephemeral management fad, or is it an efcient and
efective means of delivering services and of adding value? What are the characteristics
of strategically sound contracting decisions? And how can organizations prosper from
the outsourcing revolution? Te book is based on over a decade of research and con-
sulting experience, and its conclusions have many practical implications. It develops
an analytical decision-making framework for the assessment of contracting options,
and has relevance in both the private and public sectors. It contains many illustrations
and over 30 international case studies; over 50 companies and public sector organi-
zations are discussed, including Microsof, BP, Marks & Spencer and Samsung. Te
book is divided into four parts. Part I begins by considering the make or buy deci-
sion, and this is followed by a discussion of the shifing boundaries of organizations,
which revisits some of the critical issues underlying the theory of the frm. Part II ex-
amines in detail the benefts and costs of contracting. Part III examines the strategic
aspects of contracting, involving the implementation of actual policies. Part IV looks
at structural change associated with contracting, at the level of both individual sec-
tors and the whole economy. Each chapter has a guide to further reading at its end.
Book Keywords: case studies, contracting out, costbeneft analysis, decision-making,
frms, outsourcing, strategic planning, structural change
Chapter Abstract: Tis chapter and the previous two look at the structural changes that
have resulted from the economy-wide application of contracting out. Te public sector
is perhaps the one that has been most profoundly afected by it, and about which con-
troversy concerning the appropriate scope of private and public production continues
to smoulder. Chapter 11 takes a forward look at contracting trends, not by gazing at a
crystal ball, but by asking whether contracting is a fad. Te chapter also examines the
downsizing phenomenon and the ongoing confusion between its role and that of con-
tracting out. Lastly, it addresses the mater of where and when the bounds of contract-
ing out will be identifed, but fnds no defnitive answer on the basis of current trends.
Chapter Keywords: boundaries, contracting out, downsizing, fads, outsourcing, public
sector, structural changes, trends
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 85
OSO TEMPLATEACADEMI C BOOKS
For the text of your book to be fully searchable alongside other journal and online con-
tenta key feature of OSOabstracts and keywords need to be writen for the book
and chapters within your book. While OUP will absorb all technical and labour costs
associated with the digital conversion of your book, we believe that our authors and
editors are the best people to write the abstracts and keywords. Please also refer to the
guidelines provided for assistance.
Book details
Book title
Author(s)
book abstract and keywords
Please provide a description of your book (about 250 words). Te back cover description is
usually a good starting document.
Please suggest 510 keywords which can be used for describing the content of the book.
chapter abstracts and keywords
Please supply an abstract for each chapter of your book, including Introductory and
Concluding chapters. Please copy / adapt this table for extra chapters.
Chapter number and title
Please provide a concise abstract for the chapter. It should be around 120 words and no
more than 150 words.
Please suggest 510 keywords which can be used for describing the content of the chapter.
Chapter number and title
Please provide a concise abstract for the chapter. It should be around 120 words and no
more than 150 words.
Please suggest 510 keywords which can be used for describing the content of the chapter.
Chapter number and title
Please provide a concise abstract for the chapter. It should be around 120 words and no
more than 150 words.
Please suggest 510 keywords which can be used for describing the content of the chapter.
Chapter number and title
Please provide a concise abstract for the chapter. It should be around 120 words and no
more than 150 words.
Please suggest 510 keywords which can be used for describing the content of the chapter.
Chapter number and title
Please provide a concise abstract for the chapter. It should be around 120 words and no
more than 150 words.
Please suggest 510 keywords which can be used for describing the content of the chapter.
Chapter number and title
Please provide a concise abstract for the chapter. It should be around 120 words and no
more than 150 words.
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 87
Please suggest 510 keywords which can be used for describing the content of the chapter.
Chapter number and title
Please provide a concise abstract for the chapter. It should be around 120 words and no
more than 150 words.
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OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS / A HANDBOOK FOR AUTHORS 88
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