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HGP 471: Senior Seminar

Spring, 2009

Dr. Lisa-Mari Centeno


LMCENTENO@adams.edu
Office Hours: M-Th, 11-12 and by appointment
ES 332, 719-587-7923

This course examines the subject of revolution in historical and political


perspectives. As this is a seminar course, students are expected to come to
every class prepared to discuss the readings and their own ideas.

Through course assignments and class participation students will:

• Recognize the key events and methodologies used by historians and political
scientists to approach the subject of revolution.

• Formulate an original thesis and conduct extensive research using both


primary and secondary sources on the subject of revolution.

• Critique and revise their work in consultation with me and read their peers’
work and freely exchange ideas to improve the quality of the final paper.

• Produce a high quality 20-25 page final paper.

Required Readings:

Goldstone, Jack. 2002. Revolutions : Theoretical, Comparative, and Historical Studies.


Belmont, CA. Wadsworth Publishing.

Greene, Thomas H. 1990. “In Search of a Theory of Revolution.” In Comparative


Revolutionary Movements. Englewood Cliffs, NJ. Prentice Hall.
(To be distributed in class).

Shayne, Julie D. 2004. The Revolution Question: Feminisms in El Salvador, Chile,


and Cuba. New Brunswick, NJ. Rutgers University Press.

The following articles are available online, or on EBSCO (library database):

DeCaro, Peter A. 2003. “Ho Chi Minh’s Rhetoric for Revolution.” American
Communication Journal 3.3. Available online at:
http://acjournal.org/holdings/vol3/Iss3/spec1/decaro.html

Kaler, Amy. 1997. “Maternal identity and war in Mothers of the Revolution.” National
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Women’s Studies Association Journal, Vol. 9, 1.

Hickman, John and Jonathan Trapp. 1998. “Reporting Romania: A Content Analysis of
The New York Times Coverage, 1985-1997.” East European Quarterly, Vol.
32,3.

Censer, Jack R and Lynn Hunt. 2005. “Imaging the French Revolution: Depictions of
the French Revolutionary Crowd.” American Historical Review, Vol. 110,1.

Tures, John A. 2003. “Economic Freedom and Conflict Reduction: Evidence from the
1970s, 1980s, and 1990s.” The Cato Journal, Vol. 22,3.

Feldmann, Andreas E and Maiju Perälä. 2004. "Reassessing the Causes of


Nongovernmental Terrorism in Latin America." Latin American Politics & Society,
Vol. 46,2.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
(Total = 100%)

Reading Assignments (13 at 4% each) 52%


Thesis 5%
Outline, Bibliography and Citation Format 8%
Literature Review 10%
Peer Review comments 5%
Final Paper 20%

Reading Assignments (13 at 4% each)


Each student will submit 13 assignments that demonstrate that he/she has completed
and critically analyzed the readings. These will also serve as points of discussion in
class. All assignments must be typed unless otherwise indicated. Assignments will be
graded based on the depth of analysis.

1. Prepare two critical points about the Greene piece “In Search of a Theory…”
(handout) and Part 1, sections 1-3 of Goldstone.

2. Prepare two critical points about Part 1, section 4 of Goldstone.

3. Prepare to diagram the revolutionary processes covered in each chapter of Part


2, Sections 5 and 6 of Goldstone. Assignment conducted in class. No need to
type.

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4. Prepare to diagram the revolutionary processes covered in each chapter of Part
2, Sections 7 and 8 of Goldstone. Assignment conducted in class. No need to
type.

5. Prepare to diagram the revolutionary processes covered in each chapter of Part


2, Section 9 of Goldstone. Assignment conducted in class. No need to type.

6. Prepare a thesis and related supporting evidence based on the archival research
conducted in class.

7. Prepare 2 critical points about the following articles: “Reporting Romania” and
“Ho Chi Minh’s Rhetoric for Revolution.”

8. Prepare 2 critical points about the following articles: “Maternal Identity and War”
and “Imaging the French Revolution.”

9. Prepare 2 critical points about the following articles: “Economic Freedom and
Conflict” and “Nongovernmental Terrorism in Latin America.”

10. Prepare 2 critical points about the Introduction to The Revolution Question….

11. Prepare 2 critical points about chapters 1 and 2 of The Revolution Question….

12. Prepare 2 critical points about chapters 3 and 4 of The Revolution Question….

13. Prepare 2 critical points about chapters 5 and 6 of The Revolution Question….

14. Prepare 2 critical points about the conclusion of The Revolution Question….

Thesis (5%)
Each student will submit a thesis statement indicating the direction of his/her research
for the final paper.

Outline, Bibliography and Citation Format (8%)


Each student will submit an outline and comprehensive bibliography of at least 15
sources for her/his final paper. Based on his/her emphasis (history or political science)
each student will also submit her/his chosen citation format in the form of a photocopied
journal or book reference page.

Literature Review (10%)


Each student will submit a 5 page critical review of the major research sources for
his/her final paper. This review will become a section of the final paper.

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Peer Review Comments (5%)
Each student will submit comments on and suggestions for each of his/her peers’ rough
drafts.

Rough Draft
The rough draft should be near complete, meaning that it should approximate the page
number requirements of the final draft, be proofread and otherwise close to its final
form. I will not accept a final paper without an approved rough draft. The rough draft
must be submitted to turnitin.com. The reference number for this course is
2556962, and the enrollment password is centeno (lower case).

Final Paper (20%)


Each student will conduct in-depth research and compose a scholarly paper on a
specific subject chosen from the broad theme of revolution. Papers must contain 20-25
pages of text, appropriate appendices and references (not included in the text page
length requirement). Papers must be submitted to turnitin.com. Please see writing
standards below.

Writing Standards

Please see the HGP Writing Assessment Rubric at:


http://faculty.adams.edu/~ercrowth/hgprubric.htm

• All papers must be typed in a 12-point font, double-spaced with one-inch margins
and stapled.

• The spell-check is not a substitute for proofreading. Points will be


deducted for sloppy writing.

• Non-scholarly sources, with the exception of newspaper articles and


organizational websites (such as that of the WTO), will not be accepted.
Internet sources should come from sites with URLs ending in .gov or .edu.
Avoid .com sites, with the exception of some online journals such as
foreignpolicy.com.

Never use the dictionary or encyclopedia (including Wikipedia) as a


source.

Plagiarism is a serious offense. According to the College Handbook: “All students are
expected to practice academic honesty. They should refrain from any form of cheating,
plagiarism, or knowingly furnishing false information to the College” (42). Therefore:

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• Any phrases, paraphrases, terms, concepts, facts and/or figures applied from
other sources must be cited correctly. All phrases or sentences that are not in
your own words must be in quotation marks. Note that no more than 15% of your
papers should be quotes.
• Sources must be cited within the text and included in a reference page at the end
of your work.
• Plagiarism will result in a failing grade for the assignment in question or for the
class based on the seriousness of the infraction.

Additional Information:

• Tardiness: DON’T BE LATE!! If some unavoidable situation (alien abduction,


etc.) forces you to be late please do not disturb the rest of the class as you enter.
Perpetual tardiness will be penalized with a 3% reduction of the final grade
for each infraction.
• All written assignments are due on their respective due dates at the beginning
of class.

o Penalties for late assignments:


 Absence and assignment submitted at end of class:
Deduction of one letter grade.
 Further deduction of one letter grade after each 24 hour
period.

• Constructive discussion in an academic setting requires respectful conduct.


Please turn off cell phones and beepers while in class (see me for exceptions).
Do not engage in private conversations, read the newspaper, or study for another
class while I or another student has the floor. After a warning, I will deduct 3
points for each infraction from the final grade of any student who behaves
disrespectfully in class.
• You are advised to keep copies of all your graded work in the event of calculation
errors. Grades cannot be changed without proof of error.

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Schedule

1/13 Introduction to the course.

1/15 Part 1, sections 1-3 of Goldstone and Greene piece “In Search of a
Theory….” (handout).

Critical Points due


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1/20 Part 1, section 4 of Goldstone.

Critical Points due

1/22 Part 2, sections 5 and 6 of Goldstone.

Exercise in Class

1/27 Part 2, sections 7 and 8 of Goldstone

Exercise in Class

1/29 Part 2, section 9 of Goldstone.

Exercise in Class
Thesis due

2/3 Research “How-tos” with Brooke the Librarian.

Meet in Library

2/5 “Reporting Romania” and “Ho Chi Minh’s Rhetoric.”

Critical Points due

2/10 Archival Research.

Meet in Library

2/12 Archival Research.

Meet in Library
Archival Thesis due

2/17 Snow Days.

2/19 “Imaging the French Revolution” and “Maternal Identity and War.”

Critical Points due


Outline, Bibliography and citation format due

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2/24 “Economic Freedom and Conflict” and “Nongovernmental terrorism
In Latin America.”

Critical Points due

2/26 Introduction, The Revolution Question….

Critical Points due

3/3 Chapters 1-2, The Revolution Question….

Critical Points due


Lit. Review due

3/5 Chapters 3-4, The Revolution Question….

Critical Points due

3/10 Chapters 5-6, The Revolution Question….

Critical Points due

3/12 Conclusion, The Revolution Question….

Critical Points due

3/16-3/20 Spring Break.

3/24 and 3/26: Class cancelled due to conference.

3/31 Senior Exit Exams.

Rough draft due, copies for everyone

4/2 Senior Exit Exams.

4/7 Present, Peer Review.

4/9 Present, Peer Review.

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4/14 Draft conferences.

4/16 Draft conferences.

4/21-4/30 Revolutions in Film

Final Papers due on 4/28

5/4 –5/8 Finals

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