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TOPIC 1

INTRODUCTION TO
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT (IC)
CLO1

EE603
CMOS Integrated Circuit Design
Prepared by: Mohd Noralimi
1.1
The Evolution in Integrated Circuit
Transistor Revolution
Circuit
Integration
Year of
Technology
Components
per chip
Examples
Discrete
Components
(no integration)
Prior to 1960 1 -
Small Scale
Integration (SSI)
Early 1960s 2 to 50
NAND, NOR logic
gates
Medium Scale
Integration (MSI)
1960s to early
1970s
50 to 5,000
Adders, multiplexers,
decoders, counters
Large Scale
Integration (LSI)
Early 1970s to
Late 1970s
5,000 to 100,000

Memories,
microprocessors
Very Large Scale
Integration (VLSI)
Late 1970s to
Late 1980s
100,000 to
1,000,000
Ultra Large Scale
Integration (ULSI)
1990s to
present
> 1,000,000
MOSFET Technology
The MOSFET is the dominant device used in
ULSI circuits.
The dominant technology MOSFET is CMOS
(complementary MOSFET) technology, in which
both n-channel (NMOS) and p-channel (PMOS)
are provided on the same chip.
Theyre 5 type:
1. Pmos
2. Nmos
3. Cmos
4. Vmos
5. BiCmos.
Moores Law in predicting IC integration and
device feature size.
Gordon Moore (INTEL), 1964
prediction that the number of transistors on a chip
would double every 18 months (Moores Law).

Moores Law in predicting IC integration and
device feature size.
A key contributor to Moore's law is the ability to
fabricate wafers with a reduction in the device
feature size and an increase in the number of
transistors on a chip with the introduction of each
new product generation.
Moores Law important because it leads to smaller
microchip packaging and in which leads to smaller
commercial products (Ex. portable electronic
products such as the smartphones and tablet
computers).
Evolution in DRAM chip
capacity
Die Size Growth
4004
8008
8080
8085
8086
286
386
486
Pentium proc
P6
1
10
100
1970 1980 1990 2000 2010
Year
D
i
e

s
i
z
e

(
m
m
)

~7% growth per year
~2X growth in 10 years
Die size grows by 14% to satisfy Moores Law
Power Density
4004
8008
8080
8085
8086
286
386
486
Pentium proc
P6
1
10
100
1000
10000
1970 1980 1990 2000 2010
Year
P
o
w
e
r

D
e
n
s
i
t
y

(
W
/
c
m
2
)

Hot Plate
Nuclear
Reactor
Rocket
Nozzle
Power density too high to keep junctions at low temp
1.2
The issues in digital integrated
circuit design
The issues in digital integrated
circuit design
Microscopic Problems
Ultra-high speed design
Interconnect
Noise, Crosstalk
Reliability, Manufacturability
Power Dissipation
Clock distribution.

Everything Looks a Little Different
Macroscopic Issues
Time-to-Market
Millions of Gates
High-Level Abstractions
Reuse & IP: Portability
Predictability
etc.


and Theres a Lot of Them!
1.3
The Quality Design Metrics of a
Digital Design
The cost of an integrated
circuit
EE141 Digital Integrated Circuits
2nd
Introduction
14
Cost of Integrated Circuits
NRE (non-recurrent engineering) costs
design time and effort, mask generation
one-time cost factor
Recurrent costs
silicon processing, packaging, test
proportional to volume
proportional to chip area
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2nd
Introduction
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NRE Cost is Increasing
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2nd
Introduction
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Die Cost
Single die
Wafer
From http://www.amd.com
Going up to 12 (30cm)
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2nd
Introduction
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Cost per Transistor
0.0000001
0.000001
0.00001
0.0001
0.001
0.01
0.1
1
1982 1985 1988 1991 1994 1997 2000 2003 2006 2009 2012
cost:
-per-transistor
Fabrication capital cost per transistor (Moores law)
EE141 Digital Integrated Circuits
2nd
Introduction
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Yield
% 100
per wafer chips of number Total
per wafer chips good of No.
= Y
yield Die per wafer Dies
cost Wafer
cost Die

=
( )
area die 2
diameter wafer
area die
diameter/2 wafer
per wafer Dies
2

t
=
EE141 Digital Integrated Circuits
2nd
Introduction
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Defects
o
|
.
|

\
|
o

+ =
area die area unit per defects
1 yield die
o is approximately 3
4
area) (die cost die f =
EE141 Digital Integrated Circuits
2nd
Introduction
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Some Examples (1994)
Chip Metal
layers
Line
width
Wafer
cost
Def./
cm
2
Area
mm
2
Dies/
wafer
Yield Die
cost
386DX
2 0.90 $900 1.0 43 360 71% $4
486 DX2
3 0.80 $1200 1.0 81 181 54% $12
Power PC
601
4 0.80 $1700 1.3 121 115 28% $53
HP PA 7100
3 0.80 $1300 1.0 196 66 27% $73
DEC Alpha
3 0.70 $1500 1.2 234 53 19% $149
Super Sparc
3 0.70 $1700 1.6 256 48 13% $272
Pentium
3 0.80 $1500 1.5 296 40 9% $417
The functionality and robustness
including the specification
below:
Noise sources in digital circuits
Voltage transfer characteristic
Noise margins
Regenerative properties
Noise immunity
Directivity
Fan out and fan in
The ideal digital gate
Noise sources in digital
circuits

i ( t )
Inductive coupling Capacitive coupling Power and ground
noise
v ( t ) V
DD
EE141 Digital Integrated Circuits
2nd
Introduction
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DC Operation
Voltage Transfer Characteristic
V(x)
V(y)
V
OH
V
OL
V
M

V
OH
V
OL
f
V(y)=V(x)
Switching Threshold
Nominal Voltage Levels
VOH = f(VOL)
VOL = f(VOH)
VM = f(VM)
EE141 Digital Integrated Circuits
2nd
Introduction
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Mapping between analog and digital signals
V
IL
V
IH
V
in
Slope = -1
Slope = -1
V
OL
V
OH
V
out
0 V
OL
V
IL
V
IH
V
OH
Undefined
Region
1
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2nd
Introduction
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Definition of Noise Margins
Noise margin high
Noise margin low
V
IH
V
IL
Undefined
Region
"1"
"0"
V
OH
V
OL
NM
H
NM
L
Gate Output
Gate Input
EE141 Digital Integrated Circuits
2nd
Introduction
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Noise Budget
Allocates gross noise margin to
expected sources of noise
Sources: supply noise, cross talk,
interference, offset
Differentiate between fixed and
proportional noise sources
EE141 Digital Integrated Circuits
2nd
Introduction
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Key Reliability Properties
Absolute noise margin values are deceptive
a floating node is more easily disturbed than a
node driven by a low impedance (in terms of
voltage)
Noise immunity is the more important metric
the capability to suppress noise sources
Key metrics: Noise transfer functions, Output
impedance of the driver and input impedance of the
receiver;
EE141 Digital Integrated Circuits
2nd
Introduction
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Regenerative Property
Regenerative Non-Regenerative
EE141 Digital Integrated Circuits
2nd
Introduction
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Regenerative Property
A chain of inverters
v
0
v
1
v
2
v
3
v
4
v
5
v
6
Simulated response
EE141 Digital Integrated Circuits
2nd
Introduction
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Fan-in and Fan-out
N
Fan-out N
Fan-in M
M
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2nd
Introduction
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The Ideal Gate
R
i
=
R
o
= 0
Fanout =
NM
H
= NM
L
= V
DD
/2
g =
V
in
V
out
Performance issues of a digital
design
Propagation Delays, Rise and
Fall time.
Define the power and energy
consumption