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Daniel Goleman's five components of emotional intelligence

Emotional Intelligence, as a psychological theory, was developed by Peter Salovey and John
Mayer.
"Emotional intelligence is the ability to perceive emotions, to access and generate emotions so as
to assist thought, to understand emotions and emotional knowledge, and to reflectively regulate
emotions so as to promote emotional and intellectual growth."
- Mayer & Salovey, 1997
The following steps describe the five components of emotional intelligence at work, as
developed by Daniel Goleman. Goleman is a science journalist who brought "emotional
intelligence" on the bestseller list and has authored a number of books on the subject, including
"Emotional Intelligence," "Working With Emotional Intelligence," and, lately, of "Social
Intelligence: The New Science of Human Relationships."
An article on the relation between Goleman and the psychological research communitiy appeared
in Salon, on June 28, 1999.
The Five Components of Emotional Intelligence
Self-awareness. The ability to recognize and understand personal moods and emotions and
drives, as well as their effect on others. Hallmarks* of self-awareness include self-confidence,
realistic self-assessment, and a self-deprecating sense of humor. Self-awareness depend on one's
ability to monitor one's own emotion state and to correctly identify and name one's emotions.
[*A hallmark is a sure sign: since self-awareness is necessary for, say, realistic self-assessment,
that is, without self-awareness no realistic self-assessment, the presence of of realistic self-
assessment is a sure sign (sufficient to conclude that there is) self-awareness.]
Self-regulation.The ability to control or redirect disruptive impulses and moods, and the
propensity to suspend judgment and to think before acting. Hallmarks include trustworthiness
and integrity; comfort with ambiguity; and openness to change.
Internal motivation. A passion to work for internal reasons that go beyond money and status -
which are external rewards, - such as an inner vision of what is important in life, a joy in doing
something, curiosity in learning, a flow that comes with being immersed in an activity. A
propensity to pursue goals with energy and persistence. Hallmarks include a strong drive to
achieve, optimism even in the face of failure, and organizational commitment.
Empathy. The ability to understand the emotional makeup of other people. A skill in treating
people according to their emotional reactions. Hallmarks include expertise in building and
retaining talent, cross-cultural sensitivity, and service to clients and customers. (In an educational
context, empathy is often thought to include, or lead to, sympathy, which implies concern, or
care or a wish to soften negative emotions or experiences in others.) See also Mirror Neurons.
It is important to note that empathy does not necessarily imply compassion. Empathy can be
'used' for compassionate or cruel behavior. Serial killers who marry and kill many partners in a
row tend to have great emphatic skills!
Social skills. Proficiency in managing relationships and building networks, and an ability to find
common ground and build rapport. Hallmarks of social skills include effectiveness in leading
change, persuasiveness, and expertise building and leading teams.


Some questions to test your understanding of these concepts
Links on Emotional Intelligence:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_intelligence
http://www.unh.edu/emotional_intelligence/
http://www.edge.org/q2005/q05_print.html#goleman
http://www.eiconsortium.org/
Answer, but No Cure, for a Social Disorder That Isolates Many
Men, women and emotions - or why he never tells you how hes feeling!
Updated 02/01/09 ZGS
The Impact of Emotional Intelligence on Iranian EFL Learners' Listening Proficiency
The current investigation attempts to determine the impact of Emotional Intelligence (EI) components on listening
proficiency as well as gender differences in some of the significant emotional competencies of EI. To this end, 168
intermediate learners (including 75 male and 93 female) were chosen randomly from among English students of Rodaki
and Shafagh University, Tonekabon. The data was analyzed through SPSS, using ANOVA, MANOVA and F-test. The
results confirmed the significant impact of EI components on listening in male and female. Additionally, by considering
gender through the influence of EI components, it showed that this impact on female learners is greater than male. The
other case is investigating the effect of each EI component on listening comprehension and gender separately. The findings
revealed that Stress Tolerance, Interpersonal Relationship and Flexibility have great impact on listening in male and
female; instead male ought to be stronger to enhance 'Stress Tolerance'.


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Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman
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Emotional Intelligence Quotes (showing 1-17 of 17)
In a very real sense we have two minds, one that thinks and one that feels
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
tags: biology, emotion, inspirational, love, neuropsychology, science, thoughts
40 likes
like
A belligerent samurai, an old Japanese tale goes, once challenged a Zen master to explain the concept
of heaven and hell. The monk replied with scorn, "You're nothing but a lout - I can't waste my time with
the likes of you!"
His very honor attacked, the samurai flew into a rage and, pulling his sword from its scabbard, yelled "I
could kill you for your impertinence."
"That," the monk calmly replied, "is hell."
Startled at seeing the truth in what the master pointed out about the fury that had him in its grip, the
samurai calmed down, sheathed his sword, and bowed, thanking the monk for the insight.
"And that,"said the monk "is heaven."

The sudden awakening of the samurai to his own agitated state illustrates the crucial difference
between being caught up in a feeling and becoming aware that you are being swept away by it.
Socrates's injunction "Know thyself" speaks to the keystone of emotional intelligence: awareness of
one's own feelings as they occur.
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
18 likes
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Feelings are self-justifying, with a set of perceptions and "proofs" all their own.
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
10 likes
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people's emotions are rarely put into words , far more often they are expressed through other cues.
the key to intuiting another's feelings is in the ability to read nonverbal channels , tone of voice , gesture
, facial expression and the like
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
8 likes
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, .
,
,
8 likes
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Our emotional mind will harness the rational mind to its purposes, for our feelings and reactions--
rationalizations-- justifying them in terms of the present moment, without realizing the influence of our
emotional memory.
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
8 likes
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But the rational mind usually doesn't decide what emotions we "should" have !
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
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.

.
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
4 likes
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Fear, in evolution, has a special prominence: perhaps more than any other emotion it is crucial for
survival.
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
4 likes
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When we are in the grip of craving or fury, head-over-heals in love our recoiling in dread, it is the limbic
system that has us in its grip.
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
3 likes
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Anyone can become angry that is easy. But to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at
the right time, for the right purpose, and in the right way this is not easy. ARISTOTLE, The
Nicomachean Ethics
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
2 likes
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[Sharmayne Williams:]...puoi avere tutte le emozioni possibili, ma non devi permettere che siano loro a
manovrarti.
Daniel Goleman, Lavorare con intelligenza emotiva
tags: autocontrollo, emozioni
2 likes
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Los pensamientos obsesivos son la lea que alimenta el fuego de la ira, un fuego que slo podr
extinguirse contemplando las cosas desde un punto de vista diferente
Daniel Goleman, Inteligencia emocional
1 likes
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emotional self-awareness is the building block of the next fundamental emotional intelligence: being
able to shake off a bad mood
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
1 likes
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Emotional aptitude is a "meta-ability" , determining how well we can use whatever other skills we have
, including raw inellect .
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
1 likes
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Hay muchos estudios que corroboran la persistencia de la agresividad infantil en chicos como Jimmy.11
Como ya hemos visto en otro lugar, los padres de los nios agresivos suelen alternar la indiferencia con
los castigos duros y arbitrarios, una pauta que, comprensiblemente, fomenta la paranoia y la
agresividad.
Daniel Goleman, INTELIGENCIA EMOCIONAL
0 likes
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Emotional self-control-- delaying gratification and stifling impulsiveness- underlies accomplishment of
every sort
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
tags: emotional-intelligence, emotional-quotient