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User Manual

Unit # 2171

Martinsville

Model # PCFT828I6


Table of Contents
Volume I
I. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION ......................................................................................................... 5
A. Landfill Gas Utility Flare.................................................................................................. 5
B. Control Systems ............................................................................................................. 8
II. QUICK START GUIDE: .......................................................................................................... 14
A. Manual Startup ............................................................................................................. 14
B. Automatic Startup ......................................................................................................... 15
III. CONTROL SYSTEM OPERATION: ....................................................................................... 16
A. Detailed Startup Sequence .......................................................................................... 16
B. Utility Flare FT-3 Automatic Startup Flow Chart ........................................................... 19
C. Operator Interface Operation and Screen Descriptions ............................................... 23
IV. MECHANICAL OPERATION .................................................................................................. 37
A. Drains ........................................................................................................................... 37
V. MAINTENANCE ..................................................................................................................... 39
A. Utility Flare Maintenance .............................................................................................. 39
B. BLOWERS AND FANS LUBRICATIONS ..................................................................... 40
C. Flare Routine Maintenance Schedule .......................................................................... 47
D. Service Contacts .......................................................................................................... 52
VI. TROUBLE SHOOTING .......................................................................................................... 53
A. Flare Alarms ................................................................................................................. 53
B. Possible Alarm Causes ................................................................................................ 54
APPENDIX A CHEAT SHEETS ..................................................................................................... 66
A. Auto dialers .................................................................................................................. 66
B. Chart Recorders ........................................................................................................... 70
C. Controllers .................................................................................................................... 73
D. PLC .............................................................................................................................. 76
E. Timers .......................................................................................................................... 77
APPENDIX B PROPOSAL .............................................................................................................. 78
APPENDIX C - DRAWINGS .............................................................................................................. 79
APPENDIX D MISC. ....................................................................................................................... 80
APPENDIX E EQUIPMENT CUT SHEETS .................................................................................... 81
A. Components List .......................................................................................................... 81
B. Component Literature ................................................................................................... 82




I. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION
The below sections are a general description of flare systems and their associated
equipment. Please refer to APPENDIX B - PROPOSAL and APPENDIX C - DRAWINGS for
further details specific to this system.
A. Landfill Gas Utility Flare
1. Standard Equipment
The following items come standard on all utility flare stacks:
Flare Stack Schedule 40 carbon steel stand pipe with self supporting base
and ANSI 150-lb. flanged inlet.
Burner Assembly The Triton Twister burner assembly is all 304 stainless
steel construction and includes an integral windshield. The Twisters unique
side nozzle design aids in flame stability and provides a 10:1 turndown range.
(Proper blower and drive selection may be required to realize the full 10:1
turndown range). Also includes the Auto Carb, an automatic throttling device
added to the burner design to further improve flame stability. This helps
prevent nuisance shut downs under low flow, high wind conditions.
Igniter Assembly The igniter is a small burner used to light the main
burner. Typically fueled with bottled propane gas, the igniter assembly
consists of a 304 stainless steel burner tube with spark plug ignition and type
K thermocouple for flame confirmation. The spark plug is supplied with high
temperature leads and a transformer in a NEMA 4 enclosure.
Flame Supervision Consists of both a thermocouple and ultraviolet flame
detector used to confirm flame integrity.
Flare system controllers Utility flares use either the Flame-Trol I relay
based or III PLC based control systems. These are technically advanced, fully
automatic flare system controllers specifically designed to obtain the
maximum operating flexibility and efficiency.
Freestanding Support Support base is designed to be anchored to a
suitable concrete foundation, supplied by others, and does not rely upon guy
wires for additional support. Guy wires may be required if concrete foundation
(by others) is not suitable to support free standing flare.
Flame Arrestor This device prevents flame flash back in the event of high
oxygen concentrations in the landfill gas. The standard flame arrestor is
equipped with an aluminum tube bank assembly.
Hinged Stack The flare stacks are typically provided with a hinge to assist
in shipping skid mounted units. Non skid mounted flares are shipped
horizontally and do not require a hinge.
2. Optional Equipment
The following standard options are available on utility flare stacks:
Corrosion Resistance This option should be used when handling landfill
gas which contains more than 1000 ppmv of H
2
S, which is corrosive.
Selecting this option changes the following equipment selection:

Burner construction upgraded from Schedule 10, 304 stainless steel to
Schedule 40, 310 stainless steel.
Flame arrestor tube bank assembly upgraded from aluminum to 304
stainless steel.
Conduit may be upgraded from galvanized steel to PVC coated steel.
Guy Wire Support - Guy wire mounting points for use of guy wires to provide
lateral support from wind loading.
Continuous Pilot An auxiliary pilot may be operated in a continuous fashion
to keep the flare operating under low or intermittent flow conditions. Such
conditions are typical on systems which deliver gas to off-site users. To
reduce propane consumption, continuous pilots are sometimes operated on
landfill gas.
Fuel Enrichment Landfill gas which contains methane at concentrations
below the recommended low limit of 30% (or 300 Btu/scf) may still be reliably
burned by enriching the gas stream with supplemental fuel, such as natural
gas or propane.
3. Standard options are available on blower skids:
Air Compressor The inclusion of a small air compressor and dryer may be
desired when a shut off valve or modulating valve is equipped with a
pneumatic actuator. The air compressor includes an air receiver and the dryer
is a heatless regenerative type.
Blower Bearing Temperature Measurement Blower bearings may have
their temperatures measured to aid in maintenance operations. High bearing
temperature is an indication of lubrication problems or excessive wear.
Blower Vibration Monitoring Blowers may be monitored for excessive
vibration. Vibration is usually caused by out of balance impellers and may
cause premature bearing failure. The vibration monitor is a switch with an
adjustable set point.
Condensate Transfer The condensate collected by the knock out pot
(KOP) needs to be drained occasionally. If the KOP is to be drained to a
location at atmospheric pressure during times of normal flare operation, then
pumps may be required to move the condensate out of the KOP. The
condensate transfer system contains all the necessary pumps, switches,
valves and associated piping to accomplish this task.
Corrosion Resistance This option should be used when handling landfill
gas which contains more than 1000 ppmv of H
2
S, which is corrosive.
Selecting this option changes the following equipment selection:
The KOP would be changed from carbon steel to HDPE plastic.
Process piping is upgraded from Standard Schedule carbon steel to
Schedule 10, 304 stainless steel.
Conduit would be upgraded from galvanized steel to PVC coated steel.

Demister Pad The 20 micron demister pad normally supplied in the KOP
may be replaced with a 10 or 5 micron pad for greater mist capture efficiency.
Capturing smaller particles will result in greater pressure drop across the
demister pad.
Flow Control Flow control is sometimes required when delivering gas to 2
flares or other gas users. Flow control is typically accomplished by using a
modulating damper in one or more of the gas delivery lines.
Gas Analyzer Used to determine concentrations of O
2
, CH
4
, CO and CO
2
in
the landfill gas stream. The analyzers can be used as a diagnostic tool to aid
in running the landfill and the flare system, and are also useful in identifying
gas composition when delivering gas to an off-site gas user. Analyzers are
available to monitor any combination of the above mentioned gas species and
are mounted in a separate enclosure.
Gas Delivery Landfill gas has a high concentration of methane (30% to 60%
vol), and may be considered a valuable fuel source. A gas delivery system
diverts landfill gas from the flare to a gas delivery line at a specified pressure
for use by others. Modulating valves with pneumatic actuators are typically
used to control the gas delivery pressure.
Heat Tracing and Insulation Landfill gas is saturated with water vapor, and
condensate collected in the knock out pot (KOP) and drain lines can freeze
under cold weather conditions. The KOP and drain lines may be equipped
with heat tracing and insulation to prevent freezing.
Pressure Control The well field header may have its pressure (vacuum)
controlled to improve the performance of the landfill as a gas generator.
Pressure control is typically accomplished by using a VFD on the blower
motor.
Process Pipe Coating The inside of carbon steel process piping may be
coated to prevent rust or corrosion. Coatings are best applied to systems with
multiple blowers where one or more blowers may be unused for extended
periods of time. Such unused blowers will act like condensate traps, and the
moisture will promote rust within the associated piping.
Process Pipe Stainless Construction The process piping material of
construction is AISI 304 stainless steel. This material resists most forms of
corrosion, inside and out, and does not need to be painted or coated on either
its inside or outside surfaces.

B. Control Systems
1. Standard Equipment
LFG Specialties offers several standard control systems, each one designed
for a particular product and option selection. Each control system type has its
own list of standard equipment, and PLC based systems have their own
programs unique to their specific applications. The following equipment
comes standard with each indicated Flame-Trol (FT) system.

Description FT - 1 FT - 3 FT - 4 FT - 5 FT - 6
Equipment Application
Utility Flares X X X
Enclosed Flares X X
Platform
Relay Logic Based X
PLC Based X X X X
Manual Controls
Hard wired X X X
Soft wired X X
Equipment and Functions
Blower Control X X X X X
Blower Current Monitoring X X
Burn Schedule Timer X X X X X
Chart Recorder X X X X X
Flame Detection X X X X X
Inlet Valve X X X X X
KOP Level Detection X X X X X
Landfill Gas Flow Measurement X X X X X
Operator Display, Text X X X X X
Pilot Ignition X X X X X
Power Quality Monitoring X X X X X
Stack Purge X X
Temperature Control X X
Thermocouple Selection X X



The following are Standard Equipment and Function Descriptions
Relay Logic Based Control Platform: All FT-1 control systems are made up
of more traditional relay logic type control devices. This type of control system
can meet certain requirements, but does not offer the flexibility to be easily
changed, or reprogrammed, to meet unique site specific needs.
PLC Based Control Platform: All Flame-Trol control systems, with the
exception of the FT-1, are controlled with an advanced programmable logic
controller (PLC). A plc controlled system offers the most flexibility, allowing
the system to be changed and programmed to meet unique site specific
needs.
Hard Wired Manual Controls: Manual controls allow the flare to be operated
under the supervision and control of an on-site operator. The automatic plc
control system is completely bypassed. All controls consist of hard wired
selector switches and push buttons.
Soft Wired Manual Controls: Manual controls allow the flare to be operated
under the supervision and control of an on-site operator. The automatic
functions of the plc control system are bypassed. The manual controls,
however, reside within the plc control system. All controls, including selector
switches and push buttons, are graphically represented on the color touch
screen display.
Blower Control: Blowers are started and stopped automatically in response
to user commands and system alarms.
Blower Current Monitoring: The electric current flowing to the blower
motors is monitored to ensure operation within safe limits.
Burn Schedule Timer: This device allows the operator to schedule when the
flare is to operate, either on a calendar basis, or on a Time On / Time Off
basis. This feature is useful when landfills are producing gas at flow rates at
or below the minimum limit of the flare, and continuous flare operation is not
possible.
Chart Recorder: A chart recorder allows for historical process data
recording. Typical recorded variables would be process temperatures and
measured landfill gas flow. A paperless recorder is standard and records data
electronically to memory. This data can be viewed at the recorder, or later
retrieved and analyzed using advanced computer software. A circular paper
type recorder is also available.
Flame Arrester Temperature Monitoring: Flame arrestor is monitored to
detect flame flashback. Flame flashback is a sign of high oxygen levels in the
landfill gas and can damage equipment.
Flame Detection: Flare flame detection is accomplished using both UV light
based detectors and thermocouples. Maintaining a flame within the
combustion zone is important for proper landfill gas combustion, and therefore
a requirement for the flare operation.
Inlet Valve: Electric or pneumatic operated butterfly valve is used to admit
landfill gas to the blower skid. Valve is fail closed to ensure safe operation of
system in event of power or signal failure.

KOP Level Detection: Measures condensate liquid level for high level
conditions which can be damaging to blowers.
Landfill Gas Flow Measurement: Landfill gas flow is measured using a
precision flow meter. Typical measurement is done in standard cubic feet per
minute (SCFM). The measured flow is displayed and can be recorded on a
chart recorder. Flow totalizing is also available. Standard measurement
techniques include thermal dispersion and averaging Pitot tube type meters.
Operator Display, Text: The text based operator display provides basic
access to control functions. All control, alarm and scaling set points are
available for adjustment. Current process conditions and alarm history are
also provided.
Pilot Ignition: All landfill gas flares have a primary ignition system, typically
using a propane gas source. This insures the flare temperatures are suitable
for the proper combustion of landfill gas. A pilot thermocouple is used to
measure temperature.
Power Quality Monitoring: Because electrical power quality can vary at
certain remote sites, monitoring for power dips or surges allows the control
system to safely shutdown equipment before potential damage occurs.
Purge Blower: Purge blowers are installed on enclosed flares, complete with
flow sensing, to safely remove any landfill gas accumulations prior to ignition.
Stack Purge: This function uses a purge air blower to eliminate any
unwanted, potentially dangerous gases from the enclosed flare stack prior to
startup.
Temperature Control: Automatic temperature control is used to maintain a
controlled temperature within the landfill gas combustion zone of an enclosed
flare. A precise temperature controller is used along with motorized louver
dampers to permit cooling air flow.
Thermocouple Selection: Enclosed flares are equipped with three or four
thermocouples which monitor the combustion space temperature. The
appropriate thermocouple to be used as the temperature control thermocouple
is automatically selected based on landfill gas flow rate.





2. Optional Equipment
There are numerous options available for the various Flame-Trol control
systems. Some options are concerned with the control system itself, and
others are used in conjunction with options selected with the flare or blower
skid products.
The table below identifies which options are available on each Flame-Trol (FT)
control system.

Optional Equipment Description FT 1 FT 3 FT 4 FT 5 FT 6
Application Utility Flares X X X
Application Enclosed Flares X X
AC - Air Conditioning X X X X X
AD - Auto Dialer X X X X X
BTM - Bearing Temp. Measurement X X X X X
BVM - Blower Vibration Monitoring X X X X X
CA - Compressed Air X X X X X
CI - Condensate Injection X X
CT - Condensate Transfer X X X X X
CP - Continuous Pilot X X X X X
FC Flow Control X X X X X
FE - Fuel Enrichment X X X X X
GA - Gas Analyzer X X X X X
GD - Gas Delivery X X X X X
HT - Heat Tracing & Insulation X X X X X
ODG - Operator Display, Graphics X X
PC - Pressure Control X X X X X
RDC - Remote Data Collection X X X X X
UPS - Uninterruptible Power Supply X X X X X

The following are optional Equipment and Function Descriptions
AC - Air Conditioning: Available on both control panels and power panels.
Air conditioning may be required when control systems are installed at high
ambient temperature sites. Air conditioning will also be required when control
systems are located at cold sites which necessitated the use of insulation
inside the enclosures.

AD - Auto Dialer: These devices are used to automatically call the site
operator in the event of a flare problem, and indicate the nature of the
problem. Auto dialers are available with 4 to 10 channels (report 4 to 10
different kinds of problems), and may use land line or cellular
communications.
BTM - Bearing Temperature Measurement: Temperature measurement of
the blower bearings can help detect mechanical wear of the bearing assembly
which can assist in scheduling system maintenance.
BVM - Blower Vibration Monitoring: Blowers may be monitored for
excessive vibration. Vibration is usually caused by out of balance impellers
and may cause premature bearing failure. The vibration monitor is a switch
with an adjustable trip point.
CA - Compressed Air: The inclusion of a small air compressor and dryer
may be desired when a shut off valve is equipped with a pneumatic actuator.
The air compressor includes an air receiver and the dryer is a heatless
regenerative type.
CI - Condensate Injection: These systems are used to dispose of collected
condensate by injection into the enclosed flare for thermal destruction. The
system includes the necessary pumps, filters, valves, gauges, spray nozzles
and connecting piping to handle 2 gpm of condensate. A flow totalizer is also
included.
CT - Condensate Transfer: The condensate collected by the knock out pot
(KOP) needs to be drained occasionally. If the KOP is to be drained to a
location at atmospheric pressure during times of normal flare operation, then
pumps may be required to move the condensate against the vacuum present
in the KOP. The condensate transfer system contains all the necessary
pumps, filters and associated piping to accomplish this task.
CP - Continuous Pilot: An auxiliary pilot may be operated in a continuous
fashion to keep the flare operating under low or intermittent flow conditions.
Such conditions are typical on systems which deliver gas to end users. To
reduce propane consumption, continuous pilots can be operated on landfill
gas.
FC Flow Control: Flow control is sometimes required when delivering gas
to 2 flares or other gas users. Flow control is typically accomplished by using
a modulating damper in one or more of the gas delivery lines.
FE - Fuel Enrichment: Landfill gas which contains methane at levels below
the recommended low limit of 30% (or 300 Btu/scf) may still be reliably burned
by enriching the gas stream with supplemental fuel, such as natural gas or
propane.
GA - Gas Analysis: Landfill gas analysis can identify the levels of various
gas species present in the landfill gas. Typical gas species monitored include
oxygen, methane, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. In addition to
monitoring these gases, alarm limits (both hi and low) can be set to warn of
unwanted or unsafe process conditions.

GD - Gas Delivery: Landfill gas has a high concentration of methane (30% to
60% vol), and may be considered a valuable fuel source. A gas delivery
system diverts landfill gas from the flare to a gas delivery line at a specified
pressure for use by others. Examples of landfill gas use include using the gas
to run generators for the production of electricity, or using the gas in an
industrial environment to produce heat. This option includes the addition of a
modulating valve controlling flow to the flare, and a shutoff valve controlling
flow to the gas user.
HT - Heat Tracing: Landfill gas is saturated with water vapor, and
condensate collected in the knock out pot (KOP) and drain lines, or analyzer
sample lines, can freeze under cold ambient conditions. These lines may be
equipped with heat tracing and insulation to prevent freezing.
ODG - Operator Display, Graphics: The graphical operator display allows
for more detailed graphical symbols representing the flare equipment and
process measurements. Advanced alarm capabilities, including alarm history,
also allow easy access to diagnostic information. Set point adjustments are
made using the display touch screen, lending itself to a user friendly operator
interface.
PC Pressure Control: The well field header may have its pressure
(vacuum) controlled to improve the performance of the landfill as a gas
generator. Pressure control is typically accomplished by using a VFD on the
blower motor.
RDC - Remote Data Collection: All data viewable on the Operator Interface
screens are viewable from a remote location. This allows site operators and
managers to view process information and change process set points from
their office. Also, if the unit is equipped with a paperless chart recorder, the
flare process data can be downloaded. This option may be operated with
copper, fiber or wireless broadband communications.
UPS - Uninterruptible Power Supply: Sites with electrical power issues will
be able to ride thru a brief power brown out without incurring a nuisance flare
shutdown. During extended power loss a controlled shutdown is initiated,
protecting the instrumentation from data loss and potential damage. Upon
reestablishing power, the flare will re-start automatically and an alarm will
indicate the system has experienced a power related shutdown.

II. QUICK START GUIDE:
A. Manual Startup
1. Turn the Master switch to the ON position. Place the E-Stop button in the
extended position. Press the Reset button.
2. Turn the Control Mode switch to the Manual position.
3. Turn the Pilot Gas switch to the ON position and then to the Ignite position.
Return to the On position once the pilot gas has been ignited. This can be
confirmed either visually or by a rising pilot temperature.
4. Turn the Inlet Valve switch to the Open position, which will open the valve and
allow the landfill gas to flow to the flare.
5. Turn the desired Blower switch(es) to the Manual position, which will start the
gas blower.
Note: It is VERY IMPORTANT to monitor the landfill gas ignition in the
next step, since large volumes of gas can be sent into the flare. If the
temperature does not change within the time specified, discontinue the
Startup immediately. Then determine why the landfill gas failed to ignite.
BEFORE ATTEMPTING ANOTHER START SEQUENCE IT IS VERY
IMPORTANT TO PURGE ANY GAS OUT OF THE FLARE STACK BEFORE
ATTEMPTING TO START IN ANY MODE OF OPERATION. (Enclosed
flares only)
6. The landfill gas will be ignited. The flame can be confirmed either visually or
by a rising process temperature. The process temperature should begin to
rise in 1 to 2 minutes.
7. Turn the Pilot Gas switch to the OFF position.
8. The utility flare system is now operating in manual mode.
9. The flare can be shutdown by turning the Master switch to the OFF position or
by pushing the E-Stop button.
10. The control system is equipped with a Manual Max Run Timer. This timer is
activated once the system is switched to the manual mode. If the system is
left running for an extended period of time in the manual mode, the timer will
eventually shut the system down.

Note: The flare system should not be left operating unattended in manual mode as
all system permissives and safety shutdowns are bypassed.


B. Automatic Startup
1. Check the pilot temperature control set points.
The control system uses two signal outputs which are used to sequence
events during start-up. These are:
a. Blower-On Temperature - Factory set to 300 F. This is the
temperature at which the blower will be started and the header valve
opened.
b. Pilot-Off Temperature - Factory set to 400 F. This is the temperature
at which the pilot gas solenoid will be closed, shutting off the pilot.
2. Check the Pilot Timer set point.
The purpose of the Pilot Timer is to specify a set period of time to allow the pilot
system to attain the pilot-off temperature. For instance, if the Pilot Timer has
been set at five minutes and the pilot-off temperature is set at 400 F, the pilot
will have five minutes to heat the thermocouple to 400 F. If the pilot system
fails, due to an exhausted pilot gas supply or other reasons, to attain the pilot-off
temperature in the time period allotted the entire system will shutdown.
3. Check the Ignition Timer set point.
The purpose of the Ignition Timer is to control the sparking period of the spark
plug during start-up. This timer has been set at the factory at fifteen seconds
which allows a constant sparking action by the igniter for this period of time.
This should be adequate time to purge the pilot gas line of air and ignite the pilot
gas. This timer should never need to be altered.
4. Turn the Master switch to the ON position and press the Reset button. Place
the E-Stop button in the extended position.
5. Turn the Control Mode switch to the Auto position. The control system will now
run through the automatic start-up sequence.
Once the automatic startup is completed, all permissives and shutdowns of the
system are activated. For operation of the system beyond this point refer to the
Control System Operation section of this manual.



III. CONTROL SYSTEM OPERATION:
A. Detailed Startup Sequence
1. Pre-Start Checklist
The following lists startup conditions that must be met to permit an automatic
startup sequence of the enclosed flare system:
a. Master switch in the ON position
b. E-Stop button in the extended position
c. Absence of any alarm conditions - The red flashing alarm beacon
(located on top of the control panel) and the operator display will
indicate if there are any alarm or fault conditions present. All fault
conditions must be cleared to permit a start sequence.
d. Inlet valve in the closed position
e. Pilot temperature below the Blower-On set point
f. Absence of any flame
g. Control Mode switch in the Auto position

2. Ignition (Pilot) Cycle
The ignition cycle establishes an initial flame and heat source to generate
adequate temperature prior to introducing the flow of landfill gas.
A pilot gas source, in conjunction with automatic spark ignition, is used to
establish the initial flame. Propane is typically used for the pilot gas source.
The Ignition Timer set point is adjustable (typically 15 to 30 seconds.) A pilot
thermocouple is used to monitor the pilot gas flame and is used to determine
when to start the gas blowers (Blower-On set point) and open the header
valve, allowing the flow of landfill gas. The pilot temperature measurement is
also used to determine at what temperature (Pilot-Off set point) to discontinue
the use of the pilot gas.
The Pilot Timer is used to indicate pilot system malfunction or failure and is
user adjustable (typically 5 minutes.) If the pilot temperature does not reach
the Pilot-Off set point before the Pilot Timer times out, a pilot fault will occur.

3. Combustion of Landfill Gas
Landfill gas is drawn from the landfill and sent into the flare stack for proper
destruction using gas blowers.
Once adequate heat in the stack (for proper combustion) has been reached,
determined by the measured pilot temperature, the gas blowers are started
and the header valve is opened. This event is determined by the Blower-On
set point (typically 300 F) which can be adjusted to meet process
requirements.

Blower startup and header valve position are monitored to ensure proper
equipment operation. A blower auxiliary fault or header valve fault will occur if
abnormal operation or positioning is detected.
After the combustion of landfill gas has begun, flame detection and low
temperature detection are enabled.

4. Continuous Monitoring
Once the combustion of landfill gas has begun, certain conditions must be met
to ensure proper combustion under safe operating conditions.
Ultra violet flame detection (UV eye) monitors the presence of a flame in the
wind break. In the event the flame is extinguished, the pilot ignition system
will try to re-ignite the flame. Failure to re-ignite will result in a flame fault
and the appropriate shutdown actions will occur.
The landfill gas flow, typically measured in standard cubic feet per minute
(scfm), is also monitored, recorded, and displayed to indicate proper flare
operation. High gas flow alarming is also in place to insure the gas flow does
not exceed the capacity of the flare stack, which may result in and unsafe
operating conditions and equipment damage.


5. Automatic Re-start
The flare will automatically attempt a re-start under the following fault
conditions:
a. Low temperature shutdown
b. Flame failure shutdown
c. Pilot Failure shutdown
An automatic re-start will occur after the Down Timer has elapsed and the
temperature has dropped to allow for a safe startup. A re-start consists of the
same sequence of events as a typical startup, beginning with the purge cycle.
A re-start limit, typically 3, is also used to limit the number of re-starts that can
occur before a successful startup has been accomplished. If the number of
restart attempts reaches the limit, the system will shutdown and operator
attention is required.


Control
Power
ON?
E-Stop on
front panel
extended?
Fault
Messages
present?
Turn Control Mode
Switch to Auto
1
Check Fault
Messages.
Troubleshooting
may be necessary.
F
Pull E-Stop
button on front
panel out.
Turn Control
Power Switch
ON at front
Yes
No
Utility Flare FT-3
Automatic Startup Flow Chart
Yes
No
No
Yes
B. Utility Flare FT-3 Automatic Startup Flow Chart

Pilot Gas
ON?
Blower On
and Header
Valve
Open?
Igniter
ON?
1
Igniter will spark for the
duration of the ignition cycle
time. Pilot gas will remain on
until Pilot Off Temperature has
been reached or Pilot Cycle
time has elapsed.
Blower will start and Inlet
Valve will open once the
Blower ON Temperature has
been reached.
Any Fault
Messages?
Blower On
Temp
Reached?
Pilot Gas
Off?
Any Fault
Messages
?
Pilot Off
Temp
Reached?
2 F
F F
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No

2
Flare temperature should
continue to rise, with
combustion of landfill gas
only. Flame detection is
now enabled.
Flare Low
Temp
Reached?
Any Fault
Messages
?
After successfully
exceeding the low
temperature setting, the
flare has started and
should run within normal
operating conditions.
Flare temp
maintained
under
control?
Any Fault
Messages
?
Temperature control
loop may need to
be tuned for current
conditions.
F
3 F
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
No

3
Vacuum /
Flow
maintained
under
control?
Any Fault
Messages
?
Flow / Pressure
control loop may need
to be tuned for current
conditions.
Auto Startup
Complete
F
Yes
No
N
Yes


C. Operator Interface Operation and Screen Descriptions
1. MAIN

Blower Cmd
KOP
0.0 % Inlet
0.0 A
1
Closed
Scr eens
MAIN
No Flame
0 F
Flar e
Pilot
Gas
0 F
Pilot
0 F Pr ocess
No Fault s
Logging Off
0.00"W.C.
Inlet Prs
Outlet Prs
0.00"W.C.

This operator screen is a general informative screen indicating the flare
operation and process conditions.

2. SCREENS
Blower 1
Low Temp
Flame Pilot Inlet
Logon
Logoff
Flar e Tr end
SCREENS
Main
###########
Syst em
Day Timer
VFD In PID In Pr s In Tr end
Out Pr s Flar e Cntr l
Tools Blw 1 Br ng

This operator screen is simply a Main Menu of all the operator screens
available. These pushbuttons will navigate to the configuration screen of
interest.



3. PILOT



This operator screen contains configuration input for the pilot / ignition cycle.
The pilot cycle establishes an initial flame and heat source before igniting
landfill gas.

a. Pilot Cycle Time: This time delay set point (min) is the amount of
time allowed for measured pilot temperature to reach the Pilot Off
temperature before a pilot fault will occur.
b. Blower On: This pilot temperature set point (deg F) determines when
the landfill gas blower (s) will start.
c. Pilot Off: This pilot temperature set point (deg F) determines when
the pilot cycle is complete.


4. INLET VALVE



This operator screen contains configuration input for the landfill gas Inlet
Valve. The inlet valve position is monitored with limit switches to insure
proper operation.

a. Fail Open / Closed Fault Delay Set point: This time delay set point
(sec) is the time allowed for the inlet valve to open or close, depending
on commanded position, before an inlet valve fault will occur.
b. Inlet Open Delay Set point: How long to wait prior to opening the
inlet valve. Typically used with parallel gas extraction systems where
several appliances extract gas off of a common header. When suction
is applied to the header and another appliance opens its header valve,
reverse flow may occur temporarily until the suctions between the
systems stabilize. This delay allows the prime mover to build some
speed / suction prior to opening the valve, limiting the opportunity for
reverse flow.

5. BLOWER 1



This operator screen contains configuration input for the landfill gas blower (s).
Each blower is controlled automatically and monitored to insure proper
operation.

a. Low / High Amp Fault Monitoring: These set points refer to the
blower running amperage. The blower running amperage should
remain between the low and high set points for proper operation.
b. Low / High Amp Fault Delay: These time delay set points (sec)
determine how long the blower running amperage can be outside of
the defined limits, high or low, before a blower fault will occur.
c. Aux Timer Set point: This time delay set point (sec) is the time
allowed for the blower to start when commanded to start. If the motor
starter auxiliary contact does not provide feedback that the blower has
started a blower fault and will occur.
d. Sequence Timer Set point: This time delay set point (sec)
determines the time between blower start commands, when multiple
blowers are used. This only applies when more than one blower will
run at the same time.
e. Amps Scaling: These set points are used to adjust the controller
instrumentation to match the blower current transmitters. These
should only be adjusted at the factory or by qualified personnel.






6. INLET PRESSURE



This operator screen contains configuration input for the flare inlet vacuum
transmitter. The vacuum transmitter measures the amount of vacuum (- IWC)
at the inlet of the flare equipment.

a. High Vacuum Fault Set point: This set point (IWC) is the fault set
point for the measured vacuum at the inlet to the flare.
b. Fault Delay: This time delay set point (sec) determines how long the
measured vacuum can exceed the high set point before a vacuum fault
will occur.
c. Pressure Scaling: These set points are used to adjust the controller
instrumentation to match the vacuum transmitter. These should only
be adjusted at the factory or by qualified personnel.



7. INLET PRESSURE VFD PID



This operator screen contains configuration input for the inlet pressure /
vacuum control loop. By varying the blower speeds using variable frequency
drives (vfds), a steady controlled vacuum can be maintained at the inlet of the
flare equipment. This results in a constant, steady vacuum being applied to
the landfill. The Pv (process variable) represents the measured vacuum.
The Cv (control variable) represents the speed command being given to the
blower (s).
a. Kp, Ki, Kd: These settings are proportional gain, integral, and
derivative tuning parameters. These settings determine the
responsiveness of the controller to the process and should only be
adjusted by qualified personnel.
b. DB-, DB+: These settings are the positive and negative dead band
set points. These affect how the controller responds to a process
deviation from set point and should only be adjusted by qualified
personnel.
c. Slew: This time setting (sec) affects the responsiveness of the
controller to the process and should only be adjusted by qualified
personnel.
d. Set point: This set point (- IWC) is the desired inlet vacuum. The
controller will control and maintain this value.
e. PID Manual Command: This is the controller output command (0
100%) when the control loop is put in manual mode. 0 to 100%
represents zero to maximum blower speed.
f. PID Mode Selection: This button allows the operator to switch the
controller mode from automatic to manual operation. While in
automatic mode, the controller will maintain the desired set point.
When in manual mode the controller output will be fixed at the value
entered for the PID manual command.



8. LOW TEMP



This operator screen contains configuration input for low temperature
monitoring. To insure proper landfill gas combustion, the proper temperature
must be maintained. If the temperature cannot be maintained, a low
temperature fault will occur, resulting in a flare shutdown.
a. Low Temp Set point: This temperature set point (deg F) determines
when a low temperature condition exists, resulting in a low
temperature fault.
b. Reset Temp Set point: If the temperature drops below the low
temperature set point (deg F), resulting in a low temperature condition,
it must then rise above this set point to clear the fault condition.
c. Start Delay Set point: This time delay set point (min) is the time
allowed, during initial flare startup, for the temperature to rise above
the low temperature set point.
d. Shutdown Delay Set point: This time delay set point (min) is the
delay before a shutdown will occur if the temperature drops below the
low temperature set point.



9. FLAME DETECTION


This operator screen contains configuration input for flame detection.
Monitoring for the presence of flame is another method of insuring proper
landfill gas combustion. An ultraviolet (UV) detector is used for this function.
If the flame is lost, a re-light cycle will re-ignite the pilot system in an attempt
to re-establish proper combustion. If unsuccessful, a flame fault will occur.

a. Flame Fault Delay Set point: This time delay set point (sec) is delay
before a flame fault will occur, if the flame is lost.
b. Relight Cycle Set point: This time set point (sec) is the amount of
time the pilot gas system will be used in an attempt to re-ignite the
flare, after the flame has been lost.
c. Flame Test Timer Set point: After a re-light cycle has occurred, a
flame check is done after this time delay (sec) has elapsed.
d. Flame Detect On: This button will enable or disable flame detection.
The text label on the button will indicate Flame Detect On , or Flame
Detect Off.


Note: Flame detection should only be disabled in the event the flame detection
instrumentation is not functioning properly and in need of replacement.



10. FLARE TREND

No Faults
100 F
Fl are Temp
Scr eens
FLARE TREND
--:-- --:-- --:-- --:-- --:--
6000
4800
3600
2400
1200
0


This operator screen contains a graphical trend indicating flare temperature.
This screen does not contain user configurable settings, but shows a brief
history of the flare operating conditions.




11. TIME OF DAY OPERATION



This operator screen contains configuration input for the day timer function.
Flare operation can be scheduled to run during a specific time of day and on
specific days of the week.
a. Active: This button is used to enable or disable the day timer
function. If disabled the flare is permitted to run continuously. The text
label on the button will indicate DISABLED or ACTIVE.
b. Actual / Start / Stop: These time indicators show the actual time, the
flare start time, and the flare stop time. The desired start and stop time
(hr : min) are entered in military (24 hr) time.
c. DAY OF WEEK: These buttons are used to select the days in which
the flare should operate. A button color of GREEN indicates an active
day, RED, indicates an inactive day.

12. SYSTEM



This operator screen contains configuration input for general system settings.
a. Down Timer Set point: This time delay set point (min) is the time that
must elapse before an automatic re-start will occur. An automatic
restart is initiated after the following faults occur:
1) Pilot Fault
2) Low Temperature Fault
3) Flame Fault
b. Restart Counter Set point: This value indicates the number of
automatic re-starts permitted before a system shutdown will occur.
c. Auto Reset Timer Set point: This time delay set point (sec)
determines how long an automatic reset occurs during initial power up
of the control system. This allow for all instrumentation to proper
power up before initiating a flare start up.
d. Maximum Manual Operation Timer Set point: This is the maximum
time (min) in which the flare can be operated in manual mode.
e. Default SPs: This button will only appear if the user is logged in as
operator. This will go to the next screen, DEFAULT SET POINTS,
and allow the operator to restore all user adjustable set points to the
factory defaults.

13. DEFAULT SET POINTS



This operator screen allows the operator to restore all user adjustable set
points to the factory defaults.

14. RUNTIME TOOLS


Variable Inspector
Permits authorized users to review change variables. This provides access to
variables that may not be provided on the OIT screen.

Script Debugger
Authorized users can monitor scripts that are run in the background. This is a
tool typically used during development.

Driver Comms
Allows access to the communication settings. Once the system is functional the
setting typically do not require adjustment.

About Box
Provides information about the program version of the runtime.

Program Revisions
Provides information about the program revision for the runtime.

Edit Users
Allows authorized user to edit log on name, password access level, etc.





15. OUTLET PRESSURE

Outl et Pressure
20.0
0.0
Scaling
0
Raw
Minimum
Maximum
0.0
Scaled
Scr eens
###########
Logon Logoff
High
10.2
1800 Sec
Setpoint
Setpoint
0 Sec
Act ual
Low
0.0
Fault Delay
180 Sec
Setpoint
Setpoint
0 Sec
Act ual


This operator screen contains configuration for the flare outlet pressure
transmitter. The pressure transmitter measures the amount of pressure (+/-
IWC) at the outlet of the flare equipment.

Outlet Pressure Monitoring
a. Low Set point: This set point (IWC) is the fault set point for the low
pressure at the skid outlet. Should the pressure remain below the set
point the fault timer is activated.
b. Fault Delay: This time delay set point (sec) determines how long the
measured pressure can remain low before a low outlet pressure fault
and shutdown will occur.
c. High Set point: This set point (IWC) is the fault set point for the high
pressure at the skid outlet. Should the pressure remain above the set
point the fault timer is activated.
d. Fault Delay: This time delay set point (sec) determines how long the
measured pressure can remain high before a high outlet pressure fault
and shutdown will occur.
e. Pressure Scaling: These set points are used to adjust the controller
instrumentation to match the vacuum transmitter. These should only
be adjusted at the factory or by qualified personnel.







IV. MECHANICAL OPERATION
A. Drains
1. KOP drains, blower drains and piping drains should all be routed back to a
condensate sump.
2. If the sump IS located in the landfill gas supply line feeding the KOP, then it is
at the same negative pressure as the KOP. The KOP drain line should be left
open so that it continuously drains into the sump.
3. If the sump IS NOT located in the landfill gas supply line feeding the KOP,
then it will be at a different pressure than the highly negative KOP. In this
case the drain lines may not drain properly to the sump when the blower is
turned on. The KOP drain lines should be shut while the blower is on, and
temporarily opened to drain when the blower is off. Care should be taken to
check the sight gauge on the KOP to determine the required flare shutdown
schedule for proper draining.
4. Blower drain lines should always be kept open to continuously drain the
blowers.
5. In multiple blower systems, manual isolation valves on either side of the
blower should be opened, and any collected water allowed to drain out, before
starting the blower. Failure to do so may result in damage to the blowers in
the form of bent or broken impellers.



V. MAINTENANCE
A. Utility Flare Maintenance
An LFG Specialties utility flare and controller system requires very little maintenance.
A few preventative maintenance steps should be taken, however, to insure the life of
the flare and proper operation of the system. These steps include:
1. Periodically drain the flare stack, if not piped for continuous draining. The
flare is equipped with a 2" diameter drain port at the base of the stack. Also,
check the drain port for obstructions and clean out if necessary.
2. Maintain the finish on the package equipment by cleaning any scratches or
chipping with a wire brush and repainting with touch-up paint supplied. Note:
no maintenance is required on the stainless steel portion of the flare.
3. Inspect all wiring and connections for any wear and replace as necessary.
4. Inspect spark plug igniter for electrode wear and replace as necessary.
5. Check pilot nozzle for obstructions and clean as necessary. Pilot nozzle is a
small jet, which may require a fine wire, needle or brake cleaner to aid in
cleaning.
6. Check all piping connections for tightness and leaks, replace gaskets as
necessary and re-torque bolts.
7. Check skid and flare alignment, re-shim and level if necessary.
8. For maintenance directions on peripheral equipment, see manufacturer's
instructions in back of this manual.
9. When blower is included in scope of supply:
a. Lubricate the blower and motor bearings as specified by manufacturer
(see lubrication instructions in the blower operation and maintenance
section).
b. Check and adjust tension on drive belts when applicable.
If any problems arise in the operation of your LFG Specialties flare and controller
system that cannot be easily remedied, please notify us immediately for service
advice. If the problem cannot be corrected via phone conversations, a service
representative can be sent to the site to fully investigate and resolve the problem.
All LFG Specialties products are guaranteed for material, workmanship and
performance as outlined in the standard "Terms and Conditions of Sales". The
warranty period is eighteen (18) months from date of shipment or twelve (12) months
from date of start-up, whichever occurs first.
Note: Do not alter the design and/or operation of the LFG Specialties flare and
controller system without consulting with LFG Specialties, as this could result in the
voiding of the equipment warranty.

B. BLOWERS AND FANS LUBRICATIONS
MULTI STAGE BLOWER LUBRICATION
(INCLUDES HSI, LAMSON HOFFMAN & GARDNER DENVER)


The Manufacturers recommended lubricant for Grease lubed Blowers is
NLGI #2 .

Mixing of Lubricants is NOT recommended due to the possibility of chemical incompatibility,
which may cause break down of the grease and also cause the formation of sludge or acids
that would destroy the bearings and or equipment.

Signs of chemical incompatibility could be, but are not limited to; watery or soupy
consistency, discoloration and/or foul smell.

Care should be taken to avoid over lubrication which is as much a factor of bearing failure as
is under lubrication, grease contamination or grease incompatibility.

Normal Bearing Temperatures may approach 200 to 230 degrees Fahrenheit; this does not
necessarily indicate a failure and should not immediately be cause for concern.

If the data tag on the unit specifies a particular lubricant type, the tag information will
supersede this written document.

Storage (also includes periods of non use) of the Blower should be in an environment to
prevent condensation of moisture in the bearings/blower. The Blower drive shaft should also
be hand rotated at least 10 revolutions once a week to avoid flat spotting of the bearing and
to keep the grease from possible settling in the bearing which could allow rust. Mark the shaft
to avoid parking it in the same spot when done.

All Landfill Gas Blowers ARE considered to be operating in a harsh environment under
severe conditions when consulting your maintenance schedule for frequencies of lubrication.











A Schedule

Lubrication requires that once a month or every one thousand hours of blower run time, which
ever occurs first. This is considered to the MINIMUM frequency.

NOTE Site specific circumstances may necessitate increased maintenance frequency.

Be sure all appropriate lock out tag out procedures are applied for safety and with the equipment
completely stopped

Remove the lower outside drain plug of the bearing housings, grease should be added
through the upper inside plug hole
If using a zerk style pressure grease gun take care not to force grease into the bearing
too quickly or grease may be forced passed the seal into the blower cavity.
The blower should be warm and at operating temperature when adding grease to the
bearing, while hand rotating the blower shaft.
Consult the appropriate manual for your blower for specific quantity to be added. Operate
the blower for 30 to 60 minutes afterward with the lower plug removed to allow for excess
grease to drain after thermal expansion.
With blower at a complete stop following all local lock-out procedures, replace bottom
plug.

If you notice during this procedure that the grease in the bearing is excessively fouled, you
should increase the lubrication frequency at your discretion.

The gas contents at a particular site may necessitate more frequent lubrication than another
seemingly identical site.

CONSULT THE BLOWER MANUFACTURERS WEBSITE AND STAY CURRENT WITH
ALL TECHNICAL BULLETINS AND POSSIBLE RECALL OR SAFETY INFORMATION












B schedule

Lubrication requires that every six months or every six thousand hours of blower run time which
ever comes first.

NOTE Site specific circumstances may necessitate increased maintenance frequency.

Be sure all appropriate lock out tag out procedures are applied for safety and with the equipment
completely stopped

Remove the bearing covers and clean out all the existing grease by hand, using lint free
cloth.
While turning the blower shaft by hand, install fresh grease to force out (PURGE) old
grease from behind the bearing, wipe off this old grease and fill the bearing cover with the
remainder of the amount of grease specified by the appropriate manual for your specific
blower and reinstall the bearing covers.
Leave the drain plugs out and operate the blower for 30 to 60 minutes to get the grease
and bearing to operating temperature and allow the grease to expand and drain out the
excess, then the plugs may be reinstalled.

NOTE After adding fresh grease the bearing housing may seemingly run warmer than
normal, this should not last longer than a day.














BLOWERS WITH OIL LUBRICATED BEARINGS

The oil used for these blowers is SAE 30WT NON-DETERGENT. The use of any other type
of oil without written approval from the blower manufacturer will void the warranty.

The level of the oil inside the bearing housing is adjusted by the height of the micrometer
adjusting rod under the Trico oil reservoir bottle. This distance is dependent on the model of
the blower and explained in greater detail in the manufacturers manual for your blower.
Consult the manual before adjusting this rod.

The bearing housing may actually hold three or four times the capacity of the Oil reservoir
bottle. After filling the reservoir, be absolutely sure the bottle has stopped bubbling and the
bearing housing is full to the appropriate level. DO NOT ASSUME ONE BOTTLE IS
ADEQUATE! In cold weather this may be difficult to tell as the oil will flow from the reservoir
very slowly.

The Oil Rite Oilers are factory set.

In either case, temperature and humidity play a big role in oil life, even if the blower isnt
consuming oil or isnt running. The oil reservoir breathes and the oil will become
contaminated over time. The oil should be completely drained and replaced at a minimum of
every six months (possibly more often dependent on site specific conditions).


NOTE This is a GENERALIZED document to help make you aware of the requirements of
your blower. Due to the number of different blowers used on flare systems it is your
responsibility to familiarize yourself with the blower manual.















AMERICAN FAN AND AEROVENT CENTRIFUGAL FANS


The Manufacturers recommended lubricant for grease lubed fans is
NLGI #2 .

Mixing of Lubricants is NOT recommended due to the possibility of chemical incompatibility,
which may cause break down of the grease and also cause the formation of sludge or acids
that would destroy the bearings and or equipment.

Signs of chemical incompatibility could be, but are not limited to, watery or soupy
consistency, discoloration, foul smell.

Care should be taken to avoid over lubrication which is as much a factor of bearing failure as
is under lubrication, grease contamination or grease incompatibility.

Normal Bearing Temperatures may approach 200 to 230 degrees Fahrenheit; this does not
necessarily indicate a failure and should not immediately be cause for concern.

If the data tag on the unit specifies a particular lubricant type, the tag information will
supersede this written document.

Storage (also includes periods of non use) of the Blower should be in an environment to
prevent condensation of moisture in the bearings/fan. The fan drive shaft should also be
hand rotated at least 10 revolutions once a week to avoid flat spotting of the bearing and to
keep the grease from possible settling in the bearing which could allow rust. Mark the shaft to
avoid parking it in the same spot when done.

All Landfill Gas fans ARE considered to be operating in a harsh environment under severe
conditions when consulting your maintenance schedule for frequencies of lubrication.

Be sure all appropriate lock out tag out procedures are enforced for safety.

CONSULT THE FAN MANUFACTURERS WEBSITE AND STAY CURRENT WITH ALL
TECHNICAL BULLETINS AND POSSIBLE RECALL OR SAFETY INFORMATION

When lubrication is required, add grease slowly while the shaft is rotating until clean grease
comes out of the bearing. Wipe off excess grease to avoid accumulation of particulate
contamination of the grease.

NOTE. Some fans with a directly coupled motor use a mechanical motor coupling that ALSO
REQUIRES GREASE! Dont forget to grease this coupling also.


Do not allow old grease to accumulate on the bearings, contamination will result destroying
the bearings.

NOTE This is a GENERALIZED document to help make you aware of the requirements of
your blower. Due to the number of different blowers used on flare systems it is your
responsibility to familiarize yourself with the blower manual.





















ELECTRIC MOTORS USED ON LANDFILL GAS BLOWERS AND FANS

Most Electric Motors require periodic lubrication. Motors can be ordered with sealed bearings
that will not accept the addition of grease.

DO NOT ASSUME THAT THE ABSENCE OF GREASE ZERKS ON YOUR MOTOR
INDICATES SEALED BEARINGS.

Some motor manufacturers do not install zerks to avoid OVER lubrication, but still require
periodic lubrication, at which time you will have to install the Zerks. Read the Motor
manufacturers manual or call the Manufacturer directly if you are not sure.

Some larger Motors have weep or drain ports under the shaft. When it is time to lubricate
your motor, these ports MUST be opened. They may be a pipe plug or may be a plate, but
any excess grease must be allowed to drain. When greasing the motor, it should be at
operating temperature and turn the shaft by hand while adding only one pump of grease
SLOWLY. Once every two months.

Be sure all appropriate lock out tag out procedures are enforced for safety.

NOTE This is a GENERALIZED document to help make you aware of the requirements of
your motor. Due to the number of different motors used on flare systems it is your
responsibility to familiarize yourself with the motor manual.



C. Flare Routine Maintenance Schedule
Components Frequency of Service

Daily Weekly
Bi-
Weekly Monthly
Bi-
Monthly
Semi-
annually Annually
As
Needed
Condensate Knock-out Pot
Check liquid level
Drain KOP
Inspect Internal Coating, cover gasket and
clean demister pad
Retighten cover bolts
*Pneumatic Header, if applicable
Check Nitrogen supply
Check Supply Pressure (25 psig)
Check valve performance
Check supply lines for leakage
*LFG Blower
Inspect Foundation & correct deficiencies
Check Conditions of isolation pads
Check blower motor alignment
Check bearing temperature
Check vibration levels
Re-lubricate bearings per specification
Inspect drive belts and flex coupling
Clean ventilation openings of blower motor
Re-lubricate motor bearings
Check wire connection for corrosion &
tightness
Drain any Condensate from housing
Piping
Check all valves for proper operation
Retighten all flange bolt connections
Check all flange gaskets for leakage
Check rubber expansion joints for wear
Check piping alignment
*Flow Meter
Clean flow meter probe
Calibrate flow meter

Components Frequency of Service

Daily Weekly
Bi-
Weekly Monthly
Bi-
Monthly
Semi-
annually Annually
As
Needed
*Flame Arrester
Clean internal bank per spec.
Check back pressure & clean bank assy.
Propane Pilot System
Check propane supply
Check propane supply pressure (5 psig)
*Check solenoid manual override
*Clean solenoid valve per specifications
*Clean pressure regulator vent
Check all connections for leaks

Enclosed flare assembly Daily Weekly
Bi-
Weekly Monthly
Bi-
Monthly
Semi-
annually Annually
As
Needed
Check louver for smooth operation
Check linkage condition & tightness on linkage
connections
Maintain oil level in louver actuator
Check purge blower for proper operation
Clean purge blower motor vents
Check purge blower inlet for restrictions and
clean if needed
Check purge flow switch for proper operation
Lubricate purge blower per specifications
Remove and clean ultra-violet scanner
Check UV scanner for proper operation
Inspect igniter plug, lead-wire, & connections
Inspect condition of tip
Inspect condition of insulation, pins, & keepers
Align and retighten foundation bolts
Check electrical enclosure for moisture
Tighten conduit connections
Check wire connections for tightness &
corrosion
Check paint & touch-up / repaint
Check thermocouple elements

Check pressure, vacuum & temp. gauges
Inspect foundation & correct deficiencies

Flare control panel
Daily Weekly
Bi-
Weekly
Monthly
Bi-
Monthly
Semi-
annually
Annually
As
Needed
*Clean & maintain instruments per
specifications

*Replace recorder chart paper
*Replace recorder pen tip
Check enclosure for moisture
Check wire connections for corrosion &
tightness

Check panel light bulbs
Check emergency shutdown
Check system permissive

















Please refer to the manufactures O & M manual
during any replacement of parts

Cut sheets are included in the LFG manual

* - Maintenance recommendations stated in the user manual, provided by the original equipment
manufacturer should supersede the stated maintenance recommendations. Verify the original
manufacturer O&M recommendations in Appendix E.

Spare Parts Common to Utility and Enclosed Flares

DESCRIPTION LFG SPECIALTIES PART NO. COST
Pilot Gas Solenoid Valve PFS012Y120VEXP $ 343.42
Spark Plug Igniter ESPI64 $ 80.00
Igniter Transformer EIGNTRNS $ 95.00
Thermocouples ETCA14W060SK $ 234.63
(underlined is length in inches) ETCA14W072SK $ 281.06
ETCA14W084SK $ 305.79
ETCA14W096SK $ 338.25
ETCA14W108SK $ 372.40
ETCA14W120SK $ 420.00
Actuator Solenoid Valve PFS014Y120V3B $ 211.65
U.V. Flame Detector EUVSCNRA $ 214.00
Pressure Gauge PFG025H20P $ 227.21
Temperature Gauge PFGT300400 $ 83.95
Vacuum Gauge PFG100-0H2OV $ 227.21
Panel Indicator Light Bulbs EPFTBULB $ 10.00
(box of 10)
Valve Actuator 3-Way PFS014Y120V3B $ 211.65
Solenoid Valve**
KOP Sight Gauge Tube PFSG*** (specify length in inches) $ 2.75/ft
Blower Bearing Grease: HSI blowers $ 46.00






**For Pneumatic Style Header Valves

NOTE: List prices subject to change. Call LFG Specialties for current pricing.

Minimum Order - $100.00
Revised 05/09




D. Service Contacts
1. Mailing Address
LFG Specialties, LLC
16406 US Route 224 E
Findlay, OH 45840-9761
2. Office Support
Proposals and Engineering Support:
Louis Kalani (419) 425-6299
Product Manager
Lee Zink (419) 425-6190
Sr. Applications Engineer
George Morgan (419) 425-6106
Electrical Engineering Manager
Heather Ogg (419) 424-4964
Customer Service Representative
Start-up, Field Service, and Warranty Issues:
Heather Ogg (419) 424-4964
Customer Service Representative
Replacement Parts:
Harry Zernechel (419) 425-6141
Materials Manager
Lori Recker (419) 424-4938
Customer Service Representative
3. Service Technician Support
Ron Silbaugh (419) 957-6696
Kurt Plapp (419) 957-6518
J im Wisinski (419) 957-6519
Troy Childress (419) 957-0157



VI. TROUBLE SHOOTING
A. Flare Alarms
There are three types of alarm conditions that can occur in a Flame-Trol control
system. The first is a Soft Shutdown. In this situation, the flare will automatically try
to restart itself after a user adjustable timer period as set in the Down Timer.
The second is a Component Specific Fault. For example, if the system is equipped
with more than one blower, a Blower X auxiliary fault will only disable Blower X. The
system will continue to operate with any non-faulted blowers.
The third is a Hard Shutdown. In this situation, the system will shutdown
immediately and will only restart if the Reset button is pressed, or if control power is
cycled.

B. Possible Alarm Causes
FT-1 Annunciated Alarms
Alarm Type Alarm Description Possible Cause
1. Flare Shutdown This alarm will occur if the flare shuts down
for any reason. If this alarm light is on with
no other alarm lights lit, then the flare
shutdown on a Low Temp fault. An
automatic restart will follow a Low Temp
shutdown.
Low Temperature Shutdown
(when on alone)
2. Pilot Failure This alarm will occur if the pilot temperature
doesnt reach the Pilot-Off Temperature
within the time specified in the Pilot Timer.
Incorrect temperature set points
Out of propane
Water on spark plug
Ignition transformer
Breaker tripped
Loose ignition wire
Incorrect propane pressure (Low or
High)
Blocked pilot orifice
Equipment Failure
Broken / cracked spark plug
Failed ignition transformer
After Servicing or Replacement
Flow restrictor in propane tank








Alarm Type Alarm Description Possible Cause
3. Flame Out This alarm will occur if flame is not detected
at any time after the pilot temperature
reaches the Pilot-Off Temperature. Timer
TR204 allows for a user adjustable delay
before a Flame Out alarm will occur. An
automatic restart will follow a Flame Out
shutdown.
Header Inlet valve did not open
(low nitrogen / air pressure)
Isolation valve closed (inlet or outlet)
Stuck check valve
High oxygen (air) in gas
Any blockage or restriction in the gas
path
Low flow
High flow (exceeds design conditions)
High methane and moderate to high
flow (within design condition)
Low methane
High wind and low flow
High wind directing flame out of flame
sensor view
Equipment Failure:
UV sensor failure
Open wire to control panel from flame
sensor
Failed burner control or amplifier
Corrosion in sensor socket
4. Inlet Gas High Temp This alarm will occur if the temperature
switch in the base of the flare stack is
tripped. This alarm can occur in both
Manual and Automatic mode.
Excess oxygen in gas
Unusual gas mixture (i.e. hydrogen in
gas)
Gas flow below design condition
Blower off or failed
Equipment Failure:
Open wire to control panel
Bad control relay
Bad temperature switch



Alarm Type Alarm Description Possible Cause
5. High High Condensate Level This alarm will occur if the level switch in
the Condensate Knock-Out Pot is tripped.
This alarm can occur in both Manual and
Automatic mode.
Condensate Drains
Debris in KOP
Build up of debris, silt, mud in the level
switch port
Equipment Failure
Open wire to control panel
Bad control relay
Bad level switch
Incorrect wiring
Level switch not oriented properly
After Servicing or Replacement
Incorrect level switch
6. Blower Failure Blower did not report sufficient amps to
exceed the low amp set point
Broken belt or coupling
Hand valve closed or set too restrictive
Inlet valve did not fully open
Blocked or dirty flame arrester
Stuck Check Valve
Motor overload or breaker trip
Pilot Off Temperature set too low
Too many blowers on for the available
flow
Low amp set point is incorrect
Open wire or amp meter malfunction


FT-3, 4, 5, 6 Annunciated Alarms
Alarm Type Alarm Description Possible Cause
1. Blower X inner bearing temp fault This alarm will occur if the inner bearing
temperature is above the Bearing Temp
Fault set point for the time specified in the
Bearing Inner Temp Fault Delay timer.
Lack of bearing lubrication
Excess Flow
Surge
Misalignment
2. Blower X outer bearing temp fault This alarm will occur if the outer bearing
temperature is above the Bearing Temp
Fault set point for the time specified in the
Bearing Outer Temp Fault Delay timer.
See above
3. Blower X auxiliary fault This alarm will occur if the motor starter or
VFD doesnt indicate operation after being
commanded to start within the time
specified by the Aux Timer.
Motor Start and VFD :
Motor Overload
Phase Loss
VFD Specific:
Over / Under Voltage
Open wire to control panel
Bad starter - VFD
Failed Motor
Equipment Failure :
Overload Settings
After Servicing or Replacement :
Setup parameters (VFD)
Control wiring
Breaker is off
Accel / Decel time to short (VFD)










Alarm Type Alarm Description Possible Cause
4. Blower X high amp fault This alarm will occur if the blower amps are
above the Blower High Amp set point for
the time specified in the Blower High Amp
Fault Delay timer.
Process Conditions:
Excess flow
Water condensate in system
Any significant restriction at the outlet,
such as:
throttled outlet valve, restricted flame
arrestor,
hung up / open check valve
(recirculation between blowers)
Equipment Failure :
Bearing failure in blower or motor
Failed Motor
Bad Level Switch
5. Blower X low amp fault This alarm will occur if the blower amps are
below the Blower Low Amp set point for the
time specified in the Blower Low Amp Fault
Delay timer.
Process Conditions:
Blocked discharge, completely or nearly
completely blocked outlet, check:
Confirm outlet valve is open
Check valve stuck shut
Blocked Flame arrestor
Restricted inlet
Inlet valve throttled or shut
Header valve not opening
(low air / nitrogen pressure)
VFD Specific
Pressure setting too low
Speed command too low (manual set
point)



Alarm Type Alarm Description Possible Cause
6. All blowers off This alarm will occur if no Blower switches
are in the Auto position when the Control
Mode switch is placed in the Auto position.
Motor Start and VFD :
Select blower(s) for automatic operation
7. All blowers faulted This alarm will occur if all blowers in the
system have been faulted.
This message will be accompanied by
other related fault messages.
Locate and correct the faults.
8. Flame monitoring disabled This alarm will occur if flame monitoring has
been disabled.
None required unless flame monitoring
is desired. To restore monitoring go to
the Flame screen and press the
Flame Detect button
9. Flame lost This alarm will occur if the flame is lost any
time after the pilot temperature has reached
the Pilot-Off Temperature.
Low flow
High flow (exceeds design conditions)
High methane and moderate to high
flow (within design condition)
Low methane
High wind and low flow
High wind directing flame out of flame
sensor view
Equipment Failure:
UV Sensor failure
Corrosion in sensor socket
10. Flame not established This alarm will occur if a flame is not
detected when the pilot temperature
reaches the Pilot-Off Temperature.
Header Inlet valve did not open
(low nitrogen / air pressure)
Isolation valve closed (inlet or outlet)
Stuck check valve
High oxygen (air) in gas
Any blockage or restriction in the gas
path
Equipment Failure:
UV sensor failure
Open wire to control panel from flame
sensor
Failed burner control or amplifier
Corrosion in sensor socket

Alarm Type Alarm Description Possible Cause
11. Flame monitoring fault This alarm will occur if the flame monitoring
system detects a flame at a time when no
flame should be present.
Check for gas leaks at isolation valve
Check drains and check valves for
possible bypassing of system
12. KOP high high level fault This alarm will occur if the level switch in
the Condensate Knock-Out Pot is tripped.
This alarm can occur in both Manual and
Automatic mode.
Condensate Drains
Debris in KOP
Build up of debris, silt, mud in the level
switch port
Equipment Failure
Open wire to control panel
Bad control relay
Bad level switch
Incorrect wiring
Level switch not oriented properly
After Servicing or Replacement
Incorrect level switch
13. Flare inlet high temperature fault This alarm will occur if the temperature
switch in the base of the flare stack is
tripped. This alarm can occur in both
Manual and Automatic mode.
Excess oxygen in gas
Unusual gas mixture (i.e. hydrogen in
gas)
Equipment Failure:
Open wire to control panel
Bad control relay
Bad temperature switch
14. Maximum manual operation fault This alarm will occur if the Control Mode
switch is in the Manual position for the time
specified in the Maximum Manual
Operation timer.
Press reset to clear the fault
15. All flare restarts done This alarm will occur if the flare has
attempted the number of restarts specified
in the Restart Counter and failed to achieve
the Low Temp temperature set point.
Determine cause of the failures and
correct



Alarm Type Alarm Description Possible Cause
16. Flare process high temperature fault This alarm will occur if the Thermocouple
#1 temperature exceeds 2000 F. This
alarm can occur in both Manual and
Automatic mode.
Excess flow to the flare
Manual louver improperly adjusted
Louver controller tuning
17. Flare high flow fault This alarm will occur if the flare flow is
above the High Flow Fault set point for the
time specified in the High Flow Fault Delay
timer.
Excess Vacuum at flare inlet
Flow meter error / calibration
18. Power fault This alarm will occur if the power
monitoring relay indicates that the incoming
power is out of tolerance.
Utility Power event
Loose electrical connections
Excess loading of electrical system
19. Inlet X failed open This alarm will occur if the inlet valve
doesnt indicate the closed position when
commanded to close within the time
specified in the Fail Open Fault Delay timer.
Swollen Valve Seat
Electric Valves
Valve battery not charged / charging
Blown fuse
Pneumatic Valves
Blocked exhaust port / vent
Water in valve
Equipment Failure
Failed actuator
Limit adjustment / failed
Open wire from control panel
20. Inlet X failed closed This alarm will occur if the inlet valve
doesnt indicate the open position when
commanded to open within the time
specified in the Fail Closed Fault Delay
timer.
Swollen Valve Seat
Electric Valves
Valve battery not charged / charging
Blown fuse
Pneumatic Valves
No or low air or Nitrogen supply
Water in valve
Equipment Failure
Failed actuator
Limit adjustment / failed




Alarm Type Alarm Description Possible Cause
21. Flare inlet valve failed open When commanded to close, the valve did
not indicate closed within the time allowed.

Swollen Valve Seat
Electric Valves
Valve battery not charged / charging
Blown fuse
Pneumatic Valves
Blocked exhaust port / vent
Water in valve / positioner
Equipment Failure
Failed actuator
Limit adjustment / failed
Open wire from control panel
Failed analog card
Failed positioner
22. Pilot fault This alarm will occur if the pilot temperature
doesnt reach the Pilot-Off Temperature
within the time specified by the Pilot Cycle
Time Set point. An automatic restart will
follow a Pilot Fault shutdown.
Incorrect temperature set points
Out of propane
Water on spark plug
Ignition transformer
Breaker tripped
Loose ignition wire
Incorrect propane pressure (Low or
High)
Blocked pilot orifice
Equipment Failure
Broken / cracked spark plug
Failed ignition transformer
After Servicing or Replacement
Flow restrictor in propane tank




Alarm Type Alarm Description Possible Cause
23. Pilot thermocouple open This alarm will occur if the pilot
thermocouple is determined to be faulty.
Connect a known good T/C to the
circuit and confirm the condition clears
Check continuity of circuit using Ohm
Meter
Repair or replace as necessary
Equipment Failure
Bad T/C Card
24. All process T/Cs are open This alarm will occur if all of the
thermocouples are determined to be faulty.
Locate and repair the T/C circuit failures
25. Thermocouple X Open This alarm will occur if the thermocouple is
determined to be faulty.
Connect a known good T/C to the
circuit and confirm the condition clears
Check continuity of circuit using Ohm
Meter
Repair or replace as necessary








Alarm Type Alarm Description Possible Cause
26. Temperature not made This alarm will occur if the process
temperature doesnt reach the Low Temp
setpoint after the pilot cycle is complete
within the time specified in the Low Temp
Start Delay timer.
Utility Flare:
High flow (exceeds design conditions)
High methane and moderate to high
flow
(any condition that puts the flame
outside windshield)
High wind directing flame away from
T/C
Enclosed Flare:

Preheat position set incorrectly
Wrong T/C selection
All Flares:
Low Methane / High Oxygen
27. Temperature lost This alarm will occur if the process
temperature falls below the Low Temp set
point after the Low Temp set point for the
time specified in the Low Temp Shutdown
Delay timer.
Utility Flare:
High flow (exceeds design conditions)
High methane and moderate to high
flow
(any condition that puts the flame
outside windshield)
High wind directing flame away from
T/C
Enclosed Flare:
Temperature controller tuning
Automatic T/C selection set up
All Flares:
Low Methane / High Oxygen


General Problems
Symptom Cause Solution
1. The flare is consuming an unusually
large amount of propane.
The pilot temperature is taking longer
periods of time to achieve the Pilot-Off
Temperature
Improper thermocouple location
Lower the Blower-On and Pilot-Off
Temperatures.
Place thermocouple in the heat zone for
the pilot
2. Landfill gas flow is significantly below
its usual level.
Landfill gas flow is being restricted. Monitor the vacuum either at the inlet to
the system, or the inlet to an individual
blower. Check that all valves are
appropriately adjusted.
If the vacuum oscillates, check that
there are no condensate blockages in
the well field.
Confirm check valves (if present) are
opening properly.
3. Landfill gas flow is significantly above
its usual level.
Monitor the vacuum either at the inlet to
the system, or the inlet to an individual
blower. Check that all valves are
appropriately adjusted. Also, check the
oxygen content of the landfill gas at the
inlet to the system. High oxygen content
(above 3%) could indicate a leak in the
well field piping that is allowing air into
the system.

APPENDIX A CHEAT SHEETS
A. Auto dialers
1. RACO Guard IT 4 Channel Auto dialer
a. Acknowledging an Alarm from the Front Panel
To acknowledge an alarm from the front panel, move the selector switch
to the DISARMED position, and then return it to the READY position. The
product must Not be in programming mode or presently placing a phone
call, for the alarm to be acknowledged in this way.
b. Clearing an Acknowledged Alarm from the Front Panel
To force a clearing of the acknowledged alarm status in advance of the
time when the alarm reset timer would otherwise do it, select choice [7]
from the top menu, or simply turn the product off and then on again. If
there is still a fault being detected, then after the expiration of the alarm
trip delay, a new unacknowledged alarm will occur with new alarm calls
being placed.
c. Receiving and Acknowledging an Alarm Call
When you receive an alarm call from your Guard-it TM auto dialer, listen
to the message to learn what alarm(s) exist. At certain points in the
message round, a prompting beep will be issued. This is your cue to
press a 9 immediately after the tone to acknowledge the alarm.

2. Guard-it 4 Channel Auto dialer







B. Chart Recorders
1. Yokogawa FX and DX 106 Paperless Chart Recorder

Main Display Screens


Bar Trend Digital



Information Overview Trend History

The six main display screens you will be using on the Yokogawa Chart Recorder
are displayed above. Further more, the Information or Data displayed in these
screens are called groups. The groups are just a way to say which data you want
to see, the displays above shown data gathered from all six channels of the
Yokogawa. They may consist of all six, only one, or any of all of the channels.
The exception to this is the Information screen, which holds data about any
alarms which may have occurred if they have been setup.
The Bar, Trend, Digital & Overview are displaying current data real time.
The Trend History view is used if you want to see what has happened say, last
night after every one went home.
You can get to these screens by pushing the Display/Enter button and then
selecting the view you want.




As an Operator, You will also need to know how to start and stop the process of
DATA recording, This is done with the start / stop buttons shown above. When
you push stop, it will ask which process you would like to stop, just push enter to
accept. **** NOTE, It is not necessary to stop recording to remove the media,
but it must be replaced before the chart recorder can make its next scheduled file
write.
Most likely the only other function you may be concerned with is down loading or
extracting the recorded data from the media which could be either an ordinary
1.44 Megabyte floppy disc, A One Hundred Megabyte Zip Disc, or a 32
Megabyte Compact Flash Card.
The compact Flash is most common and may be upgraded without any
programming changes to a 512 Megabyte Card, any larger than a 512 will work,
but the extra space is not recognized and it will not be utilized.
The Media can be removed while the Yokogawa is recording, but needs to be
replaced before the Yokogawa can make its next scheduled file save, which may
be every eight hours or once a day.
To remove the Media, open the front door of the Chart Recorder and push the
eject button located to the side of the media, It may now be put into a desktop PC
or a Laptop with the proper hardware adapter so that the files can be extracted
and viewed from the Yokogawa Daq Standard software.
Depending on the Media used, you will need a 3-1/2 inch floppy drive, a Zip
drive, or a compact flash card reader.


C. PLC
1. GE Versamax PLC
a. Backup Battery Replacement
Using a small screw driver, catch edge of battery holder, which is located
on top of the CPU on the left side of the PLC block, and pry upward to
release. Reinstall new battery, Panasonic BR2032 or GE ACC001.
b. Clear PLC Fault Table Using Operation Mode Switch
The CPU Run/Stop mode switch is located behind the module door. This
switch can be used to place the CPU in Stop or Run mode.
If the CPU has non-fatal faults and is in STOP/FAULT mode, placing the
switch in RUN position causes the CPU to go into run mode. FAULTS
are not cleared.
If the CPU has fatal faults and is in STOP/FAULT mode, placing the
switch in RUN position causes the RUN LED to blink for 5 seconds.
While the RUN LET is blinking, the CPU switch can be used to clear the
fault table and put the CPU in RUN mode. After the switch has been in
RUN position for at least second the faults are cleared and the CPU
goes to RUN mode. The LED stops blinking and stays on. This can be
repeated if necessary.
If the switch is not toggled, after 5 seconds the RUN LED goes off and the
CPU remains in STOP/FAULT mode. Faults stay in the fault table.
The LED lights are on the left and are, from top to bottom: Power (PWR),
OK, RUN, FAULT, FORCE, PORT1, and PORT2.

APPENDIX B PROPOSAL


APPENDIX C - DRAWINGS

APPENDIX D MISC.
Datasheet No. : 36874
Design Date : 9/30/2009
Quote/Job No.:
Prepared By : mwells
Customer
Shaw enviromental
Findlay, OH 45840
Project
Site Data
Elevation: 918 ft a.s.l.
Gas Data
MW: 30.026 RH: 0.0%
k : 1.2728 Cp: 0.3087
Gas Pct
Carbon Dioxide (CO2) 50.000
Methane (CH4) 50.000
D
I
S
C
H
A
R
G
E

T
E
M
P

(

F
)
D
I
F
F
E
R
E
N
T
I
A
L

P
R
E
S
S
U
R
E

(
P
S
I
)
STANDARD VOLUME (SCFM @ 60F)
Curve Data
Model
Configuration
Impeller 1
Impeller 2
E
X
H
A
U
S
T
E
R
Impeller 3
Driver
Control Method
Op. Speed [ RPM ]
Inlet Throttling [ valve/%closed]
Bar. Pressure [ PSIA ]
Disch. Pressure[ inWC ]
C
O
N
D
I
T
I
O
N
S
Inlet Temp. [ F ]
Inlet Humidity [ % RH ]
MW / k / Cp
Volume (Std.) [ SCFM@60F ]
Volume (Inlet) [ CFM ]
Inlet Vacuum [ inWC ]
Diff. Pressure [ PSI ]
Power [ BHP ]
P
E
R
F
O
R
M
A
N
C
E
Efficiency [ % ]
Disch. Temp. [ F ]
Pressure Rise [ PSI ]
Turndown [ % ]
Surge Pressure [ PSI ]
Surge Volume [ SCFM ]
S
U
R
G
E
1. Primary Curve
HSI 5203
(1) 5021
(2) 5011
3,904
none
14.215
15.00
100.00
100.0
29.132/1.267/0.3236
1000.0
1316.4
40.00
1.985
21.92
48.69
135.24
1.06
82.58
3.05
174.2
HSI, Inc 7901 Hansen Rd Houston, Texas 77061 Office 713-947-1623 Fax 713-947-6409 Toll Free 800-725-2291 www.hsiblowers.com sales@hsiblowers.com
Print Date: 10/5/2009 ISO 9001:2000 CERTIFIED 1.6.8

APPENDIX E EQUIPMENT CUT SHEETS
A. Components List
COMPONENT / PID# MANUFACTURER MODEL / SERIAL # NOTES
COMPONENT LIST
Utility
6EEGW-2
K8C-9-50-072-K-Z-Q1 72
K8C-9-50-084-K-Z-Q1 84
CBA520-SR80
61-101-1 (Conbraco)
34205032 (Asco)
ASCO MN:VR3C2YAA2NGA
SN:A921608
112C (F.C. Kingston)
8320G184 120VAC
SN:T880454 (Asco)
909-953-001 8"
6"
12"
46-922 I 1/4"
7833K76
1/2"
1/4"
1"
HV-100B, 102A, 104A,
106B, 112C, 112D
Midland Metal Manufacturing Co.
Needle Valves
Ball Valve
HV-100A, 102, 104,
106A, 112A, 112B, 113
HV-510
Value Valve
HV-511 McMaster Carr
Gage Valves
Actuator
Butterfly Valves
FCV-112
HV-107
ABZ (automatic)
Pressure Relief Valve
Check Valve
Filter / Regulator
Position Indicator / Limit Switch
UV Flame Detector
Solenoid Valve
Bettis
BE-203
Honeywell
Pyromation
C7035 A 1031
Gas Handling Components:
Igniter Transformer France
Thermocouple Elements
TE-203
TE-204
Igniter Spark Plug
BB-201
Champion/Crown CA475

T424TS060 XFS SN:G8001725


Set @ 300
F
Flare Inlet Temperature
Switch
TAH-201
Ashcroft
Flare Stack Components:
Air Cock Valve
HV-302
Essex #53
Strainer
STR-300
Titan

EF8210H106B SN:T248871
Shutoff Valve
Solenoid Valve
FCV-301
Asco
HV-300
Model J 7A 0-15 psi

Pressure Regulator
PRV-302
Fisher Type 64/33
Pilot / Igniter System LFG Specialties
Pilot Gas System Components:
Pressure Indicator
PI-302
HV-100 Value Valve
HV-103 Essex
Sharpe
Sharpe
McDaniel
Sharpe
COMPONENT / PID# MANUFACTURER MODEL / SERIAL # NOTES
COMPONENT LIST
61-101-01 1/4"
Model 5203
ON:30684
SN:0909323
SN:S9041933-001 004 25 hp
20 Micron
EJ A 530A
Suffix: EAS4N-02EE/FF1/D1/Z
SN: U1J A01889
EJ A110A
Suffix: EMS4B-92EA/FF1/D1
SN: U1J A01865
96BR-N5
Guard-It GI-4 SN: G 4 channel
QC1030,20,15 30,20,15
EHD2015L 15 amp
EP101ULC02,03,15 2,3,15 amp
EP101ULD03,04 3,4 amp
DAH2001A 200 watt
CR104P
R7849 A 1023
RM7823 A 1016
HFD3060L 60 amp
PSS55A
S20N11S03N 3 kVA
Power Supply Cutler-Hammer
Power Transformer Cutler-Hammer
General Electric
Main Disconnect Cutler-Hammer
Circuit Breakers General Electric
Flame Detector Honeywell
Flame Detector Relay Honeywell
Control Panel Heater Hoffman
Control Panel Lights &
Switches
Alarm Beacon Edwards
Auto-Dialer Raco
Circuit Breakers Cutler-Hammer
Vacuum Transmitter
PIT-100
Flare Control Rack Components:
Landfill Gas Blower
Motor
Reliance Electric
-100-0 w.c.
Mist Pad ACS
Yokogawa
Gauge, Pressure
PI-106, 112
HSI 25 hp
Landfill Gas Blower
PMP-108A
Model A25 0-25 w.c.
Gauge, Temperature
TI-106
Miljoco Model L 0-250 F
McDaniel
Magnehelic 2010-VIT 0-10 w.c. Dwyer
Gauge, Differential
Pressure
DPI-103
8" X 6"
6" X 5"
Unaflex
Flexible Couplings
EJ -107A
EJ -109A
Condensate Knock-Out
Pot Level Switch
LSHH-103
W.E. Anderson (Flotect)
Flame Arrester
FA-113
Shand & J urs 94307-1X1171 SN:08512087 6
KOP-103 24 x 48
L6EPB BS3A SN:A38U
Condensate Knock-Out
Pot
KOP-103
LFG Specialties
Check Valves
CV-510 Conbraco
Pressure Transmitter
PIT-112 Yokogawa
COMPONENT / PID# MANUFACTURER MODEL / SERIAL # NOTES
COMPONENT LIST
VersaMax
IC200ALG430
IC200CPU001
IC200MDD840
IC200ACC003
5686
IC200PWR102
IC754VSL06CTD
HMI-CAB-C82/G
IC690ACC905
IC200ALG630
MC1A400ATJ
MC1AB00ATJ
MP0AAE2
MARN4XXAT
MY4IN
MS10 (light)
RCS2A-6
SDSA1175 Series 001
SVX020A1-4A1B1
C320KGT15
WMS1C06
CE15HN3AB
HFD3050L
DAH1001A
Contactor
Disconnect
Heater (Hoffman)
GO#
Variable Frequency
Drive
Cutler-Hammer
Auxiliary Contact
Breaker
Snubber Circuit R-K Electronics
Surge Protector Square D
Omron
Security Light Lumark
Relays
General Electric (Master Control)
General Electric (Shutdown)
General Electric (Surge Suppressor)
General Electric (Adder Deck)
Thermistor
Thermocouple Module
Programmable Logic
Controller
General Electric
Analog I/O Module
CPU
Digital I/O Module
OIT
OIT Cable
EZ Program Store Device
Modem (US Robotics)
Power Supply