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Wavelore Instruments Pedal Steel Guitar

v.2.5
Kontakt Edition
User Guide
Welcome!
This help file contains an overview of the Kontakt Edition of the Wavelore Pedal Steel Guitar, version 2.. !eadin" it
carefull# and practicin" the pla#in" methods it descri$es will ena$le #ou to use this powerful virtual instrument in as man#
musical applications as possi$le. Please $e aware that the pedal steel "uitar is a ver# comple% and e%pressive instrument.
&n order to capture as much of it's essence as possi$le in this li$rar#, we had to "ive the Wavelore Pedal Steel Guitar a
de"ree of comple%it# that is compara$le to the real instrument. This means, $asicall#, that #ou'll "et out what #ou put in.
So dust off #our theor# $ooks and read up on as man# aspects of pedal steel pla#in" as possi$le ( especially this
document!!!
En)o#!
Table of Contents
Before you Start: The Concept and Desin of the Wavelore Pedal Steel Guitar!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! "
I# What is a Pedal Steel Guitar$ and %o& Does it Wor'(!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! "
II# %o& Does )ll of That Translate to *IDI and the +eyboard(!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!,
III# -+$ So Sum )ll This Gibberish Up .or *e!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!/
0# What1s 2e& in version 3!,!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!4
3# 5eally 6uic' Start!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 7
"# 6uic' Start!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 00
"!0# Controllers and the +eyboard 8ayout!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 00
9# *ore )bout :;pression!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 0"
9!0# Position Playin!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 0"
9!3# %armonic <ocabulary Tutorials!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 09
9!"# )bout the <oice Guide!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!0/
9!9# Position Playin$ Continued!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 04
9!9!0# 2e& Position Controls in <ersion 3!,!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 07
9!9!3# )uto=Position *ode!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 3>
9!,# Important :;pressive Controls!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 33
9!,!0# The *od=Wheel!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!33
9!,!3# The :;pression Pedal!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!33
9!,!"# The Pitch=Wheel!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 3"
9!,!9# Portamento Time ?CC@,#!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 3"
,# :ditin the Instrument1s Setup!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!3,
,!0# )bout the PitchA<olume Pae!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 3,
,!3# )bout the Pitch=Wheel Pae!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 34
,!"# )bout the +eys&itches Pae!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"0
,!9# )bout the <ibratoADampin Pae!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ""
,!,# )bout the )mplifier Pae!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! "9
,!B# )bout the Temperament Pae!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! "B
,!/# Savin your Chanes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! "B
B# Where to Get *ore %elp!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! "/
)ppendi; ): The Pedal Steel Guitar 2ec'!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! "4
)0# Pedal Steel Guitar 2ec' Diaram!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! "4
)3# Written Pitches Per Strin!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! "7
)"# +eyboard Diarams by 2ec' Position C Primary Strins!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 9>
)9# +eyboard Diarams by 2ec' Position C Secondary Strins!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 94
),# +eyboard Diarams by 2ec' Position C Primary D Secondary Strins
Comparison!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ,/
)ppendi; B: Credits!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! />
Before you Start:
The Concept and Desin of the Wavelore Pedal Steel Guitar
When we set a$out samplin" and pro"rammin" a virtual counterpart to the Pedal Steel Guitar, we were takin" on a
challen"e that no other sample li$rar# developer had taken on to date* To desi"n a virtual instrument that was capa$le of
emulatin" the capa$ilities of a hi"hl# e%pressive instrument+ one with such comple% a$ilities that it seems to def# an# sort
of conventional adaptation into a ,&-& counterpart. .ur challen"e was to create somethin" that put the power of the real
thin" into the hands of the user, such that he or she would $e a$le to se/uence or perform an# passa"e the# liked 0 not
)ust $e a$le to use a finite num$er of prerecorded licks.
&n order to accomplish this "oal, it was necessar# to desi"n the li$rar# in such a wa# that it possessed man# of the
varia$les and su$tleties of the real thin". Since learnin" a virtual instrument of this kind of depth is naturall# a dauntin"
task, it1s $est if we start ri"ht at the $e"innin", with an e%planation of )ust what a pedal steel "uitar is, what it does, and
how, in a nutshell, we1ve adapted its a$ilities to the realm of the ,&-& ke#$oard and se/uencer. The specifics of the ,&-&
implementation are covered in detail in the main help document.
I# What is a Pedal Steel Guitar$ and %o& Does it Wor'(
The $est place to start is with a picture or two*
&n the a$ove picture, notice the pedals suspended on the connectin" $ar $etween the two rear le"s of the instrument, as
well as the levers han"in" down from the instrument1s under$ell#. Each pedal and lever performs a specific function when
operated $# the pla#er 0 namel#, to ti"hten or loosen particular strin"s, resultin" in notes that 2$end3. These mechanisms
make the pedal steel "uitar a ver# uni/ue instrument $ecause the# allow the pla#er to pla# multiple notes simultaneousl#
while chan"in" the pitch of onl# those notes that the# select. 4 pedal steel pla#er has so much control over the individual
notes the# are pla#in" that the# can actuall# $end two pitches in opposite directions at the same time!
The ima"e $elow shows an overhead view of the necks 5#es, there are two of them, $ut we sampled )ust the E6th, or rear
neck, since most models have )ust one neck. &t )ust happens that the particular model we sampled was $uilt for pla#ers
who want to rapidl# switch $etween tunin"s7. 8otice that each neck1s headstock has five tunin" ke#s on either side,
totalin" ten strin"s per neck.
So, from the a$ove ima"es, we know that a pedal steel "uitar is a ten(strin"ed, freestandin" instrument 5rather similar
lookin" in profile to a ke#$oard7, with pedals and levers that affect tunin" chan"es to particular strin"s. 9ere are some
other definin" features*
2Electric3 sound* :ike a t#pical electric 5;(strin"7 "uitar, the sound of the strin"s1 vi$rations is sensed $#
electroma"netic pickups, which transmit the si"nal over an instrument ca$le to an amplifier which produces the
sound heard $# the pla#er and listener.
Pla#ed with fin"er picks on the ri"ht hand.
The left hand operates a steel $ar, commonl# referred to as the 2steel3, which slides over the strin"s, $oth
stoppin" them at certain len"ths to produce particular notes, and often connectin" one note or chord to another.
The steel is also rolled or slid $ack and forth over a small distance around the notes pla#ed to produce var#in"
widths and speeds of vi$rato 5pitch fluctuation7. <sed on most instruments, vi$rato imparts an emotive, voice(like
/ualit# upon the sound. Pla#in" a strin" without stoppin" it usin" the steel is referred to as pla#in" an 2open3
strin".
To accommodate the left hand techni/ue of usin" a steel, the strin"s are raised hi"h off the fret$oard. &n fact there
are no 2frets3, per se 0 )ust markers representin" the points at which the slide should $e placed in order to
produce an in(tune sound. Steel pla#ers often pla# 2$etween the cracks3, meanin" that the# em$ellish notes and
chords $# strikin" them at sli"htl# out(of(tune locations, and then slide into the correct position. ,an# variations on
this techni/ue e%ist.
4 volume pedal is often used to create swellin" and fadin" effects, and=or to soften the attack of notes and chords.
>onstantl# chan"in" volume is a ver# common identif#in" trait of steel pla#in", and, to"ether with the instrument1s
control over all aspects of pitch, is one of the reasons that the steel "uitar1s sound is often descri$ed usin" the
term 2li/uid3.
Tunin"* Pedal steel "uitars are usuall# $ased on 2open3 tunin"s, where each strin" is tuned to a note of the same
chord. .ur pedal steel uses E6th tunin", which is, from low to hi"h, as follows*
B3 ?Strin 0>#$ D"$ :"$ .@"$ G@"$ B"$ :9$ G@9$ D@9$ .@9 ?Strin 0#!
The last two notes, hi"hli"hted in red, are nota$le, $ecause the# do not follow the t#pical low(to(hi"h pattern of
most "uitar tunin"s. The# are in fact, lower than the two precedin" strin"s, or more accuratel#, strin" two 5-?@7 is
lower than strin" four 5E@7, and strin" one 5A?@7 is lower than strin" three 5G?@7. !e"ardless of this curiosit#,
when all the pitches are e%amined, it can $e seen that the distances $etween the availa$le notes are fairl# small,
at least when compared to a t#pical "uitar tunin". To compound the alread# comple% issue of strin" spacin", the
pedals and levers allow some strin"s to $e $ent to the same pitch as others, or even past those pitches.
Position Pla#in"* <sin" )ust the 2open3 strin"s of the pedal steel "uitar to"ether with the pedals and levers, it is
possi$le to pla# all the diatonic notes and chords of $oth the E(,a)or scale and the 4(,a)or scale. When the steel
is placed on all ten strin"s at a "iven location alon" their len"ths, the entire tunin" arran"ement 5and its harmonic
possi$ilities7 outlined a$ove is transposed $# a num$er of semitones e/ual to the num$er of the position marker
tar"eted. Aor e%ample, placin" the steel at position marker seven places the instrument in 2seventh position3, and
results in the followin" tunin" arran"ement, seven semitones 5or a perfect fifth7 hi"her*
.@" ?Strin 0>#$ )"$ B"$ C@9$ D@9$ .@9$ B9$ D@,$ )@9$ C@, ?Strin 0#!
When the wide arra# of harmonic and melodic possi$ilities of a sin"le position are considered a"ainst the pedal
steel1s e%pressive powers and its a$ilit# to chan"e positions on the fl# usin" the steel, it $ecomes eas# to see wh#
the pedal steel pla#er has $ecome a valued asset to almost an# kind of musical ensem$le ima"ina$le. ( 9is
instrument represents an almost infinite palette of sonic possi$ilities!
II# %o& Does )ll of That Translate to *IDI and the +eyboard(
We started $# treatin" the capa$ilit# of independentl# $enda$le pitches as paramount. To emulate this a$ilit#, we came up
with two solutions, e/uall# useful in different circumstances, and /uite powerful when used to"ether*
B. &ndependent pitch(wheel operation for each strin"* Some strin"s of the Wavelore Pedal Steel Guitar li$rar# $end a
whole tone with the wheel at ma%imum, others a semi(tone, and still others not at all. This kind of pro"rammin"
makes some of the more common techni/ues of pedal steel pla#in" eas# to emulate on the ke#$oard. Aor
e%ample, it is possi$le to pla# an# ma)or chord, and to $end two of the three notes such that the chord transforms
into another triad with it1s root a fourth hi"her. The reverse is also possi$le. Whether or not #ou understand an#
music theor# at all, #ou1ll reco"niCe the sound. >lick one of the links $elow for an e%ample*
)udio
<ideo
The pitch(wheel $ehavior can $e set to taste separatel# for each strin" in $oth the upward and downward
directions. See Section .2 for directions and applications.
2. 2Portamento3, literall# translated as the 2carr#in"3 of one note to another* &n performance practice, the sound of
portamento depends upon the instrument it is used on+ The classical "uitar pla#er slides his fin"er over a num$er
of frets in one smooth motion, $ut the note onl# chan"es at the passin" of each fret. What we hear in effect is a
fast chromatic scale that still "ives the impression of two connected notes. The pedal steel pla#er1s portamenti are
smoothl# connected notes that pla# all the pitches $etween the semitones. This is a similar sound to a trom$one,
slide "uitar, slide whistle, or voice.
&n s#nthesis, portamento is a feature of man# vinta"e s#nthesiCers and some samplers, and is commonl# referred
to as 2monophonic3, meanin" that onl# one note will sound at a time. Kontakt1s scriptin" processor 5KSP7 allowed
us to emulate this t#pe of ke#$oard $ehavior, in which a note pla#ed while another is held will cause the pitch of
the ori"inal note to $end to the pitch of the new note rather than to sound $oth pitches simultaneousl#.
The pro$lem with this feature was that it prohi$ited chordal pla#in". .ur workaround was to pro"ram a new mode
of pla#in" which allows pol#phonic 5chordal7 pla#in" while treatin" each note as its own monophonic voice. This
was accomplished $# dividin" the ke#$oard up into Cones, each of which represents one monophonic 2strin"3.
Pla#in" in two or more different Cones at once allows pol#phonic pla#in", $ut each Cone can still $e treated
monophonicall# without affectin" the pitch of notes pla#ed in the other Cones. This aspect 0 the a$ilit# to pla#
chords and to choose which notes $end, how fast, and in what direction 0 is the essence of the pedal steel
translated to the ke#$oard.
The ne%t pro$lem that needed consideration was that of position pla#in"* .nce the ke#$oard is divided up into Cones
representin" the tunin" of the pedal steel "uitar1s strin"s and their uni/ue $endin" ran"es, it must $e possi$le to
transpose this entire arran"ement, since a lar"e part of the pedal steel "uitar1s versatilit# comes from its a$ilit# to chan"e
position on the fl#. We recorded each strin"1s entire len"th )ust so that we could implement position chan"es in the virtual
pedal steel. 9ere1s how it was done*
Since all of the availa$le pitches on the instrument transpose one semitone for each position that the steel is advanced,
we ended up providin" an assi"na$le ,&-& continuous controller 5default* >>?@7 to set the neck position of the instrument.
Ke#switches 5ke#$oard notes that do not produce sound, $ut implement a settin"7 are also availa$le for position
switchin". This settin" of position effectivel# advances the points alon" the ke#$oard where one monophonic Cone ends
and another $e"ins, and automaticall# pla#s a sample taken from the correct strin" in the correct position as selected. The
net result is that an#thin" possi$le in open position can $e transposed to new ke#s as lon" as the neck position is
advanced $# the same num$er as the num$er of semitones transposed.
4nother wa# of statin" this rule is* Transpose by X, Advance by X. What works in the ke# of E(,a)or in open position will
work in the Ke# of -(,a)or in tenth position. 5Transpose $# ten semitones, 4dvance $# ten semitones7.
The a$ilit# to perform vi$rato and volume swells were comparativel# eas# to translate to ,&-&, since those e%pressive
factors are common enou"h to most instruments to $asicall# have $een included in the traditional ,&-& 2$a" of tricks3
alread#*
The modulation wheel 5>>?B7 traditionall# performs vi$rato(related functions. We1ve assi"ned >>?B as $oth the vi$rato
depth and the vi$rato speed controller, thou"h #ou have the option of reassi"nin" either or $oth functions to an# >>? #ou
like.
The e%pression pedal 5>>?BB7 is the t#pical controller for volume 5independent of channel volume, >>?D, which should $e
reserved for mi%in" purposes7, and, convenientl#, is most commonl# found in ,&-& hardware confi"urations as a pedal
that rocks 5or 2sweeps37 throu"h the controller1s ran"e of values. &t is convenient $oth for its hands(free operation, and for
its similarit# to the device used $# real pedal steel pla#ers.
We also needed a wa# to 2"lue3 all of these factors to"ether 0 Aor that, we turned to Kontakt1s convolution processin".
&mpulse responses of several amplifiers were recorded at various rever$ settin"s, and throu"h several microphones.
When the ke#$oard tri""ers two notes and $ends one of them, the sum of the sounds is processed throu"h whichever
impulse response #ou1ve selected as active, and the resultin" sound is that of the 2si"nal3 of the steel "uitar, $ein"
processed throu"h the amplifier, room, and mics. <sin" this process and recordin" the "uitar direct 5rather than recordin"
the samples throu"h an amp=room=mic com$ination7 allowed us to make the ca$inet, amp rever$, and room rever$
constant. &f these elements had $een recorded in the samples themselves, the# would 2stretch3 ever# time a pitch was
$ent, and this would sound ver# unnatural.
III# -+$ So Sum )ll This Gibberish Up .or *e
Easicall# what we1ve "ot here is a virtual instrument that is composed of ten su$(instruments 5strin"s7. Each strin" is
assi"ned to a particular ran"e on the ke#$oard, within which that strin" can $e used in an# wa# desired, as lon" as it1s
monophonic. Since #ou can pla# pol#phonicall# $# usin" multiple ran"es at once, and still use portamento for pitch
$endin" independentl# within each ran"e, it follows that #ou can pla# chords with the a$ilit# to $end individual notes.
<sin" a ,&-& continuous controller or ke#switches, #ou can chan"e where the $oundaries of those ran"es lie, allowin"
man#, man# possi$ilities.
Ee#ond that, use #our mod(wheel for vi$rato, #our pitch wheel for some common chordal $ends 5outlined in "reater detail
$elow7, and #our e%pression pedal as a volume pedal. The sum of all these elements is fed throu"h the amp simulation,
and voila 0 a whole world of pedal steel licks at #our fin"ertips!
The instrument1s $ehavior and sound are hi"hl# customiCa$le, and the how(to of doin" so is covered in Section .
0# What1s 2e& in <ersion 3!,
Bufi;es:
B7 A major fix for a problem involving stuck notes; Previousl#, se/uencin" a repetition of a note $efore the first
instance of that note had $een released would cause that note to stick even after $oth notes were released. The
effect was that all notes on the strin" pla#ed would $ecome unavaila$le, since the instrument would tr# to $end
the pitch of the stuck note, even after it had completel# died awa#. There was no workaround save for reloadin"
Kontakt, or restartin" the Kontakt en"ine. &n v.2., not onl# does this pro$lem not occur, $ut a repeated note prior
to release of the first instance will actuall# silence the first instance, in keepin" with the principle that it is onl#
possi$le to pla# one note on an# "iven strin" at a time.
2) Release samples now play at a pitc matcing in!progress slides"bends; Previousl#, if a note was released
durin" a $end, the release sample of that note would alwa#s pla# at pitch, sometimes not matchin" well with the
pitch of the actual note while the $end was in pro"ress. 8ow it is possi$le, for e%ample, to pla# a lon", slow slide
from G?@ to G?, $ut to release $oth notes while the pitch is actuall# a$out midwa#, where the actual release
sample pla#ed will $e that of the pitch at the time of release 5sa#, -7, offset $# a fine tune value which
corresponds to the distance from the nearest semi(tone.
:nhancements:
4 few useful new features have $een incorporated into the v.2. update*
B7 #raditional sustain pedal $%%&'() functionality; Since the instrument1s portamento $ehavior depends so
heavil# upon note(off events as tri""ers for pitch $ends, and since the sustain pedal1s default role is to perform
strin"("roup switchin", traditional sustain pedal functionalit# was omitted from the ori"inal Kontakt version. 4
$utton on the main pa"e of the instrument1s performance view now allows optional activation of the sustain pedal
for the traditional use of holdin" notes. The default strin" "roup switch is still the sustain pedal, and the two
functions can $e used simultaneousl# with "reat results, $ut for independent operation of these features, one can
still re(assi"n the strin" switch >>? as desired. See Section .B for more information.
27 *ptional re!routing of te voice guide to a dedicated output; .ri"inall# onl# possi$le throu"h tedious
navi"ation of Kontakt1s instrument editor, it is now possi$le to re(route the sound of the voice "uide to alternate
outputs of #our sound card. This ma# $e useful if one is usin" the instrument in a live performance settin" and
wishes to hear the voice "uide in a pair of headphones or an on(sta"e monitor mi% without sendin" it over the
mains! See Section .B for more information.
3) +ully definable pitc!weel beavior; Where the ori"inal Kontakt version had pitch(wheel $ehavior modeled
upon the discontinued GF& version, version 2. offers much more user control over how the pitch(wheel acts on
each strin". The pitch(wheel ran"e 5in semitones7 can now $e defined independentl# for each strin", and, within
each strin", can $e set to differin" amounts for the upward and downward directions. !everse $ehavior is
possi$le, where, for e%ample one ma# set a "iven strin" to $end upward on a downward movement of the wheel,
and downward on an upward movement of the wheel. Presets are included for the ori"inal settin"s and a new
enhanced settin", as well as several 2lock3 functions for /uick $atch editin" of the values. See Section .2
@7 Keyswitcable neck positions; Previousl#, it was onl# possi$le to chan"e position usin" the assi"ned ,&-&
continuous controller. Fersion 2. allows the user to define a ran"e of availa$le positions and the ke#switches that
will set them. Foice "uide for ke#switched positions is optional. See Sections @.@.B and .G for more information.
7 Auto!,osition; &t is now possi$le to define a startin" strin" from each of the primar# and secondar# strin" "roups,
and to have the instrument automaticall# set the neck position to place the first note of a passa"e on the "iven
strin". Aor e%ample, if the startin" strin" is set to strin" ten, and, with no other notes held, a EG is pla#ed, the
instrument will automaticall# place itself in twelfth position, since that is the position in which EG will reside on the
tenth strin". &f an A?G is pla#ed, the instrument will set itself to seventh position. This is useful for pla#in" phrases
that repeat at different pitch levels without havin" to manuall# chan"e position $etween repetitions. -etailed
applications are e%plained in Section @.@.2. This $ehavior can $e ke#switched on and off.
;7 Amp #remolo; Tremolo, a useful swellin" and fadin" effect for producin" interestin" "uitar parts, has $een added
to the amplifier section. &t features user defina$le speed and depth controls, as well as the choice of de=activation
method 5Ke#switch, ,&-& >>, 4lwa#s .n, or 4lwa#s .ff7. See Section . for more information.
D7 #emperament; &t is now possi$le to re(tune each strin" of the pedal steel "uitar in order to make it sit $etter
harmonicall# in arran"ements that feature instruments pla#ed in une/ual temperaments. This feature can also $e
used to emulate an out(of(tune "uitar. See Section .; for more information.
3# 5eally 6uic' Start
B7 :oad the instrument into Kontakt* Kontakt 2 users will want to use the file 2WaveloreHPedalHSteelHGuitarH2HHK2.nki3,
whereas Kontakt G users will want to use the file 2WaveloreHPedalHSteelHGuitarH2HHKG.nki3.
27 4ssi"n the followin" ,&-& control sources on #our ,&-& controller*
CC@0 5mod wheel7 ( vi$rato, release sample control.
CC@9 5must $e continuous7 ( neck position.
CC@, 5must $e continuous7 ( portamento speed.
CC@00 5e%pression pedal7 ( real(time volume control
CC@B9 5sustain pedal7 0 Sustain and strin" switchin"
G7 Pla# the ke#$oard. Iou'll /uickl# "et a sense that pla#in" le"ato $etween certain pitches will produce slidin" notes,
where other notes do not slide at all. To find the e%act points where one 2$enda$le3 area ends and another $e"ins, pla# a
connected chromatic scale all the wa# from E$2 to G?@. Arom G?@ to 4; are all one area.
9ere is a color(coded dia"ram of what is "oin" on*
8otice in the le"end that each colored ran"e represents one strin". Just like a real "uitar, #ou can onl# pla# one note on a
"iven strin" at a time. 4n# notes pla#ed to"ether within the same colored ran"e of ke#s will slide from one note to the
ne%t. 4n# notes pla#ed in different colored ke# ran"es will sound to"ether. This ke#$oard arran"ement is influenced
stron"l# $# the pitches of the open strin"s and the pitches that those notes can $e $ent up or down to on a real pedal
steel.
8otice also that there is a different dia"ram for the ke#$oard $ehavior when the sustain pedal is down. 9avin" the pedal
act as a switch allows more real(time access to all ten strin"s worth of samples without havin" to omit or su$stitute
samples.
DonEt play any 'eys&itches ?mar'ed F D G#$ or move CC@9 yetHHH 5ead the 6uic' Start ?and everythin after it# firstHH
,ovin" >>?@ will do two thin"s*
0# Sound a voice, which tells #ou what neck position #ou're in. Iou can silence the voice $# deactivatin" the $utton
la$eled 2Foice Guide .n3. We recommend leavin" it on for now, however.
3# >han"e the current position to the one called $# the voice. With each advancin" position, the colors in the dia"ram
a$ove will advance to the ri"ht $# one semitone, allowin" transposition of phrases from an# ke# to an# other. Aor
e%ample, when >>?@ is moved until the voice calls, 2one3, each strin" of the instrument will then occup# an area whose
hi"hest and lowest notes are one semitone hi"her than in the dia"ram a$ove, as illustrated in this dia"ram*
&t's $est to learn the open position 5the default $ehavior, shown in the dia"ram7 first, and learn the other positions $#
transposin" what #ou know from that. 4ppendi% 4 contains a comprehensive set of ke#$oard dia"rams for all positions
with the pedal up and with the pedal down, and a lar"e part of the rest of this help document concerns the 2how and wh#3
of usin" the different positions. >lick one of these links for a video demonstration* <ideo 0= .ast <ideo 3 = Slo&
Ainall#, use #our mod(wheel for vi$rato, #our e%pression pedal as a volume pedal, and the pitch wheel to $end $etween
the followin" pairs of chords 5in open position7*
Pedal <P* Pedal -.W8
E(,a)or 5up7 4(,a)or E(,a)or 5up7 >?(,inor
4(,a)or 5down7 E(,a)or >?(,inor 5down7 E(,a)or
"# 6uic' Start
"!0# Controllers and the +eyboard 8ayout
B7 :oad the instrument into Kontakt* Kontakt 2 users will want to use the file 2WaveloreHPedalHSteelHGuitarH2HHK2.nki3,
whereas Kontakt G users will want to use the file 2WaveloreHPedalHSteelHGuitarH2HHKG.nki3.
27 4ssi"n the followin" controllers on #our ,&-& controller. The# are or"aniCed $# importance, $ut #ou1ll want them all
eventuall#. Su""estions are included in $rackets for whether the desi"nated control should $e a $utton 5for to""lin"7 or
continuous*
(CC@00 5E%pression Pedal7 4cts as a volume pedal.
(CC@9 5Slider7 >ontrols neck position. 4 controller(activated voice will call the position num$ers as #ou move it.
-mportant .ote/ Throughout this document, we will make reference to open position!" #t is the default state of the
$avelore %edal &teel 'uitar library" To proceed as smoothly as possible through this guide, it will be good practice to
avoid changing the value of this controller from the default value until instructed to do so" #f the controller is moved out of
position, the instrument will not function as e(plained" That is because each position! has a uni)ue set of behavioral
characteristics relating to chords and string bends" #f the e(planations and diagrams below do not match the instrument*s
behavior, please move ++,- until the voice counter says, open!" A more detailed e(planation of the other positions and
their operation is part of the main help document"
(CC@, 5Slider7 Portamento speed control 5also si"nificantl# affected $# velocit#7.
Iou1ll also need a mod(wheel and sustain pedal. These are the features the# control*
*od=&heel:
0# Fi$rato depth. Fi$rato is su$tle, and can $e made more su$tle $# movin" the mod(wheel in c#cles 5sort of like if #ou
used the pitch wheel for simulatin" vi$rato, which is also possi$le7, "ivin" the pitch variation some inconsistenc#. &ts
$ehavior 5depth and speed, control source7 can also $e edited.
3# Kind of release sample pla#ed. ,od(wheel at K(;KLstrin"s muted with the palm, mod wheel at DK(B2DLstrin"s muted
with the pick, for a more noticea$le MclickM. This is useful for addin" some "rit to the performance. Placement of the mod(
wheel at note(off also attenuates the release samples so that #our can influence how audi$le the# are in performances or
se/uences. The palm damps will pla# at full volume with the wheel at Cero, and full# attenuated with the wheel at ;K. The
pick damps will pla# at full volume with the wheel at B2D, and full# attenuated with the wheel at DK. &f the wheel is set
$etween ;K and DK at the time of a note off messa"e, no release sample is pla#ed.
Sustain Pedal:
4ctive=inactive strin"s. The pedal steel "uitar has ten strin"s, several pairs of which overlap in wa#s that make
pro"rammin" their real(time availa$ilit# difficult. To help or"aniCe the chaos, we started $# dividin" the strin"s into two
"roups, MprimaryM and MsecondaryM*
(,rimary strin"s are those which make up an E ,a)or chord when pla#ed open 5without the slide or pedals=levers
en"a"ed7. &n order from lowest pitched to hi"hest pitch, the# are strin"s BK, N, ;, , @ and G 5E2, EG, G?G, EG, E@, and
G?@7. E# default these strin"s are availa$le simultaneousl# with the pedal up.
(0econdary strin"s are those which are not a part of an E ,a)or chord, or strin"s 6, D, 2 and B 5-G, A?G, -?@ and A?@7.
When #ou en"a"e the sustain pedal 5>>?;@7, these strin"s $ecome availa$le where their pitches were onl# availa$le on
the primar# strin"s with the pedal up. &n this state there are different $endin" possi$ilities, which, when com$ined with the
options afforded $# the pedal(up state, offer a ver# hi"h level of harmonic and melodic fle%i$ilit#.

9ere are the active ke# ran"es per strin" when the instrument is in open position 5default >>?@ settin"7*
>lick one of these links to see a video that shows how the ke#$oard Cones chan"e as neck position is advanced*
<ideo 0 = .ast
<ideo 3 = Slo&
Tr# pla#in" an E(ma)or chord with the pedal up. ,ove the pitch wheel upward and notice how the notes of the chord $end.
Pla#in" an 4(ma)or chord and movin" the wheel down will reverse this. 8ow tr# pla#in" a close(voiced E(,a)or chord.
8otice how one note will $end undesira$l#. This is $ecause the secondar# strin"s are what allow this voicin". Press the
sustain pedal and pla# the chord. ,ovin" the wheel up will $end it to a >?(minor chord. Each state allows a different
"roup of options for harmonic and melodic motion usin" le"ato and pitch wheel movement, dependin" on the chords
chosen and the neck position. 9ere a"ain is a ta$le illustratin" the common chordal movements that can $e performed
usin" the pitch(wheel in open position*
Pedal <P* Pedal -.W8
E(,a)or 5up7 4(,a)or E(,a)or 5up7 >?(,inor
4(,a)or 5down7 E(,a)or >?(,inor 5down7 E(,a)or
9# *ore )bout :;pression
The a$ove "uides "ive #ou ever#thin" #ou need to "et a $asic "rasp of how the Wavelore Pedal Steel Guitar works. 4ll
the same, there are man# considerations that will $e important for #ou to make when choosin" e%actl# how #ou will pla#
and use the instrument. Please read the followin" sections if #ou want to know more a$out "ettin" the most out of #our
li$rar#!!
9!0# Position Playin ?CC@9#
We've alread# made mention of pla#in" in a particular 2position3. The position demonstrated so far is the one that
is active $# default when #ou load the instrument, the 2open3 position. .pen position is so(named $ecause its availa$le
pitches are those which are availa$le on a real pedal steel when the slide is not used. When discussin" strin"ed
instruments of an# kind, a strin" that is not stopped with the fin"er, or in this case, a slide, is referred to as an 2open
strin"3. When open strin"s are used in con)unction with those notes that are close to them, the instrument is said to $e
pla#ed in 2open position3. 4s we move up the neck of the "uitar, we advance, one semitone at a time, throu"h positions
one, two, three and so on. Positions are important on strin"ed instruments $ecause different positions will have drasticall#
different sounds. The Wavelore Pedal Steel Guitar has twent#(four positions, plus the open position, for a total of twent#
five, and each one has a different sound as well as different chordal possi$ilities.
Each position has a peculiar arran"ement of strin"s across the ke#$oard. The dia"ram in the !eall# Ouick Start "uide
shows which notes of the ke#$oard are pla#ed on which strin"s in open position. &f #ou have a reasona$le "rasp of the
musical possi$ilities in open position, #ou can start transposin" thin"s #ou've learned so far $# movin" >>?@ $# the same
num$er of semitones as #our transposition.
&f #ou're still not sure what an# of this is a$out, start $# thinkin" of open position as the ke# of E. Technicall#, an# position
can pla# in an# ke#, $ut certain chord pro"ressions and t#pes of movement can lend themselves well to certain positions.
Start with these facts a$out open position*
B7 &n open position, #ou can pla# an# inversion of an E(,a)or chord.
27 &n open position, #ou can pla# an# inversion of an 4(,a)or chord.
G7 &n open position, an# inversion of an E(,a)or >hord can $end to an 4(,a)or chord $# movin" the pitch(wheel up all the
wa#.
@7 &n open position, an# inversion of an 4(,a)or chord can $end to an E(,a)or chord $# movin" the pitch(wheel down all
the wa#.
7 Either of the a$ove two $endin" tricks can $e reproduced $# pla#in" le"ato from G? to 4, and E to >?, or the reverse.
4lternatel#, one can slide )ust one of these notes usin" portamento. Aor e%ample, pla# an E(,a)or chord and hold it while
pla#in" an 4 a$ove the G?. This $ends )ust the G? to 4, resultin" in an E(sus@ chord.
;7 4n# inversion of an E(,a)or chord can slide to an A?(minor chord, or vice(versa, $# pla#in" le"ato from E to A?, G? to
4, and E to >?.
D7 4n# inversion of an E(,a)or chord can $end to a ED chord, or vice(versa $# pla#in" le"ato from G? to 4, and E to -?,
keepin" the common tone, E. .ote/ This voicing of 01 omits the fifth, 2,"
N7 4n# inversion of an 4(,a)or chord can $end to a ED chord, or vice(versa, $# pla#in" le"ato from >? to E, and from E to
-?, keepin" the common tone, 4. .ote/ This voicing of 01 omits the fifth, 2,"
67 ,i%in" le"ato slides with pitch wheel movements can allow interestin" harmonic variations. Aor e%ample
and E 4u"mented triad 5E, G?, >7, can $end to an 4 ,a)or >hord $# raisin" the pitch wheel full# while pla#in" le"ato from
> to E. There are man# such possi$ilities. E%periment!
9!3# %armonic <ocabulary Tutorials
8ow let's take a moment to e%plore some harmonic voca$ular# usin" open position*
Tutorial 1: Playing in open position with the pedal up
,ake sure >>?@ is set to Cero so the instrument is in open position. The wa# the strin"s are mapped to the ke#$oard allows us to
pla# diatonic harmonies idiomaticall#. :et1s start with a simple I-IV pro"ression in E(ma)or. Pla# the followin" e%ample, makin" sure to
pla# the movin" notes le"ato. &t ma# help to use 2 hands. 8ote the octave(tre$le clef meanin" the third space on the staff is middle >.
click ima"e for video
The G? should slide up to the 4 and the E should $end up to the >?. 8ow tr# it a"ain and pla# the second chord as softl# as #ou can.
The notes should $end more slowl#. >>? lets #ou ad)ust how sensitive this feature is. Tr# sta""erin" the 4 and >? or pla#in" one
harder than the other. Tr# pla#in" the e%ample $ackwards. &nversions of the chord pro"ression will also work*
click ima"e for video
The ne%t inversion 5an octave a$ove the ori"inal7 will not work in this position $ecause the hi"hest open strin" is G?. Pla#in" the G?
and E to"ether makes it slide $etween the 2 notes. To pla# this entire e%ample an octave hi"her we1d have to set the position slider to
B2. 8ow let1s tr# some other chord pro"ressions*
click ima"e for video
8otice in the & 0 ii pro"ressions from the a$ove e%ample1s video demonstration that the performances use an unconventional
fin"erin" techni/ue
The idea of $ein" a$le to invert an# pro"ression is a $i" part of $ein" a$le to pla# idiomaticall# on the instrument. &t1s )ust like a
slide pla#er movin" to hi"her strin"s and $ein" a$le to "et the same $ends to work. &t also works for these diatonic
pro"ressions*
click ima"e for video
4lso tr# these secondar# dominant pro"ressions or other chromatic alterations of the pro"ressions we1ve covered so far*
click ima"e for video
4part from $ein" a$le to invert these pro"ressions we can pla# an# of them with several wider voicin"s*
click ima"e for video
4 few more pro"ressions are possi$le this wa# $ut the# create a $end of a minor third, which wouldn1t usuall# happen on a pedal
steel*
click ima"e for video
The o$vious ne%t step is to put some of these chan"es to"ether to make lon"er pro"ressions. There1s a lot of e%pressive a$ilit# $uilt
in for this t#pe of pla#in" so #ou1ll want to practice some of the different techni/ues discussed in the rest of user1s "uide. Tr#
se/uencin" a chord pro"ression and soloin" over it in the hi"her re"ister.
Tutorial 1b: Playing in open position with the pedal down
Pushin" the sustain pedal $rin"s a few more strin"s into the mi%, thus reducin" the $end ran"e of some strin"s, and providin" us with
more harmonic possi$ilities. >lose voicin"s of the V chord and vii $ecome availa$le, as well as all of the diatonic Dth chords. There
are of course fewer possi$ilities for slidin" $etween chords in this mode as the ran"e of each strin" is fairl# small. 9owever, it does
open up some possi$ilities for movin" to and from the V, shown here in their lowest and hi"hest possi$le voicin"s*
click ima"e for video
With smaller intervals $ein" possi$le, we can now pla# close voicin" of the diatonic Dth chords. &n this e%ample the first chord in each
$ar is the simplest voicin" possi$le, and the second chord is the fullest voicin".
.nce #ou have a feel for what's possi$le within open position, #ou can learn to appl# those techni/ues to other ke#s $#
placin" >>?@ in the correct position, and transposin" the music accordin"l#. The most strai"ht(forward e%ample of
transposin" on the Wavelore Pedal Steel is transposition $# an octave*
B7 ,ove >>?@ until the voice counter sa#s, 2Twelve3.
27 Pla# the licks or chord pro"ressions that #ou know from open position, $ut one octave hi"her. Iou'll hear that the part
sounds an octave hi"her, and #ou'll notice that all $ends 5le"ato and pitch(wheel7 work in e%actl# the same wa# as in open
position.
.f course, we can also transpose into other ke#s alto"ether*
B7 ,ove >>?@ until the voice counter sa#s, 2Seven3.
27 Pla# the licks or chord pro"ressions #ou know from open position, $ut transpose them into the ke# of E ,a)or. &f #ou
don't want to pla# the part differentl#, the chances are "ood that #our ,&-& controller has a transpose $utton. Set it to 2PD3
semitones. >onsult #our controller's documentation if #ou're not sure how to do this. 4"ain, #ou'll hear the part, onl# this
time a perfect fifth hi"her than if it were pla#ed in open position.
8ot onl# do the strin"s $end $# the same amounts as the# do in open position, $ut the new pitches #ou pla# will actuall#
tri""er samples that are taken from higher up the length of each string! This is $ecause we sampled all strin"s for their
entire len"ths and confi"ured each position to use the samples from the appropriate ran"e of each strin". .ften, there is
more than one wa# to pla# a note, chord or phrase, and learnin" to reproduce certain licks in multiple positions can "ive
#ou a wider ran"e of choices when determinin" what the instrument will sound like. Aor e%ample*
Pla# an 4 ,a)or chord in open position, then move to fifth position and pla# it a"ain. Same chord, different sound. The
reason is that the same pitches have $een pla#ed, $ut the actual samples pla#ed are different $ased on which strin"s
would have those notes availa$le in a "iven position on a real pedal steel "uitar.
The a$ove e%amples illustrate position control, which is not onl# an important part of "uitar and pedal steel pla#in" in
"eneral, $ut is specificall# one of the features that make this virtual version of the instrument so versatile.
9!"# ) Brief Detour: )bout the <oice Guide
9avin" twent#(five positions assi"ned to a sin"le continuous controller is a simple wa# to make all positions accessi$le,
$ut it can present some pro$lems. The first is the /uestion of how one can practice an# de"ree of precision when
selectin" a position. The answer is the 2Foice Guide3. The voice "uide responds to ,&-& controller messa"es $#
tri""erin" samples of a human voice callin" out num$ers that correspond to the position activated $# the controller's
latest value. Easicall#, if #ou want position twelve, start $# movin" >>?@ toward the middle of it's ran"e. 4s #ou approach
the correct value, the voice counter will call ascendin" num$ers until #ou stop. &f #ou "o too far, comin" $ack down will
also call num$ers, $ut in descendin" order.
.f course, this workaround mi"ht $e cum$ersome in a live performance situation for two possi$le reasons*
B7 Who wants to hear the voice counters over the front(of(house speakers at a live performanceQQ
27 Ouick chan"es of position can $e difficult even with the aid of the position counters, since the increments $etween
positions are so small.
Aortunatel#, there are solutions availa$le to help use the instrument in a live settin"*
B7 Iou can route the audio produced $# the voice "uide to a different set of outputs, which could $e useful for monitorin"
the voice over sta"e monitors or in headphones, $ut without sendin" the audio to the house speakers. Please see
section .B for instructions on doin" so.
27 ,ost controllers have assi"na$le $uttons that can $e set to send specific values of assi"ned >>?'s. ,an# can also $e
set to 2to""le3, so that one $utton can $e made to send two values alternatel#. >om$inin" one $utton confi"ured in this
wa# with an assi"ned fader can "ive /uick access to four values 5K and B2D usin" /uick movements of the fader toward
its e%tremes, plus the two to""le values chosen for the $utton7. Each additional to""le $utton can add two more /uickl#
accessi$le values.
This techni/ue can $e strate"icall# used for /uick, relia$le chan"es into pre(planned positions. &n se/uencin", one can
confi"ure this automation ahead of time for pla#in" in comple% parts. !efer to #our ,&-& controller=se/uencer
documentation for instructions on how.
G7 The version 2. update includes assi"na$le ke#switches. Iou can now specif# a ran"e of positions and the
ke#switches that will set them, in addition to the standard >>($ased position controller. 4lso included is auto(position
mode, for hands free position control. See sections @.@.B, @.@.2, and .G for details.
9!9# Position Playin$ Continued
.nce familiar with how positions allow different harmonic and melodic possi$ilities, it will $e useful to know )ust how far to
move >>?@ to reach a particular position. This is especiall# true if #ou are se/uencin" position chan"es usin" envelopes
drawn into #our ,&-& se/uencer. To help #ou do this kind of editin", here is a dia"ram illustratin" the >>?@ values that will
put the instrument into an# desired position.
Positions Iero ?-pen# throuh 39$ *IDI CC <alues

9!9!0# 2e& Position Controls in <ersion 3!,
&n addition to the tradition ,&-& >>?($ased a$ilit# to chan"e positions, version 2. now uses assi"na$le ke#switches for
position chan"es. 9ave another look at the open position1s ke#$oard la#out for the primar# strin"s*
8otice in the le"end at the $ottom of the dia"ram that position ke#switches are marked with a red cross+ and that the
default ran"e of position ke#switches spans from 4B to 42. These thirteen ke#s activate the thirteen positions ran"in"
from the open position to the twelfth position. Thus, pla#in" 4B will set the position to open and sound the voice "uide that
confirms the fact. 4t this point, the ke#$oard splits will work as illustrated a$ove. Pla#in" 42, however, will activate twelfth
position, and the ke#$oard splits will end up lookin" like this*
Iou can see from the dia"ram a$ove that the ke#$oard1s split points have moved up one octave. Pla#in", for e%ample, an
E2, will chan"e the position to the seventh, makin" the ke#$oard la#out work as illustrated $elow*
Each position has its own uni/ue ke#$oard la#out for $oth the primar# and secondar# strin" "roups. Aor comprehensive
dia"rams of all positions, see 4ppendices 4G throu"h 4.
9!9!3# )uto=Position *ode
8ow that #ou know the two wa#s to manuall# set the neck position, #ou ma# find it useful in certain situations to use
24uto(Position ,ode3. 4uto(Position ,ode is to""led on $# hittin" the ke#switch located at G?B 5the pink cross in the
illustrations a$ove7.
.nce 4uto(Position ,ode is activated, the instrument will automaticall# set the neck position for #ou each time #ou start a
new phrase. 9ere1s how it works*
B7 4 2startin" strin"3 is selected from each of two menus located on the 2Ke#switches3 pa"e of the instrument1s user
interface. .ne menu represents the startin" strin" for the primar# strin" "roup 5default* strin" @7, and the other
represents the startin" strin" for the secondar# strin" "roup 5default* strin" B7.
27 When no notes are $ein" held on the ke#$oard, the instrument is 2listenin"3 for the first note pla#ed. When #ou
pla# a note, the instrument detects which note is pla#ed, and calculates the position in which that note is pla#ed
on the preselected startin" strin". The instrument remains in that position until a new phrase is $e"un, or until a
manual position chan"e is made. Iou can specif# differin" startin" strin"s for $oth the primar# and secondar#
strin" "roups*
B. &f the primar# strin" "roup is active 5sustain pedal or >>?;@ is at a value of Cero7, the position will $e set to
the one where the first note pla#ed is availa$le on the primar# startin" strin", makin" it possi$le to transpose
licks to hi"her or lower pitch(levels without manual position chan"es. 9ere1s an e%ample*
With 4uto(Position ,ode turned -.., and with the instrument set to open position, pla# an 4(,a)or
arpe""io, as follows* E@, >?@, 4G. 8ow $end the >?@ to a - and $ack $# pla#in" and releasin" -@ while
holdin" the rest of the chord. &t will look and sound like this video demonstration
!epeat this "esture on a E(,a)or 5a whole step hi"her7, $# pla#in"* A?@, -?@, EG, and $endin" the -?@ to
E and $ack $# pla#in" and releasin" E@ while holdin" the rest of the chord. &t will look and and sound like
this video demonstration.
The two phrases are alike in pla#in" techni/ue, $ut the# do not sound alike at all. This is $ecause the split
points in open position do not allow the same $endin" ran"es as those needed to reproduce the phrase a
whole tone hi"her. To $e more specific, the A?@ slides down to the -?@, rather than sustainin" while the
new note is pla#ed. &n order to make this phrase sound like the one a$ove, we must set the instrument to
second position. Tr# manuall# settin" the position to position two, and tr# the lick in E a"ain. &t works 0
li'e in this video demonstration!
8ow reactivate 4uto(Position ,ode $# pla#in" G?B, and tr# pla#in" the two licks a"ain, this time not
$otherin" to chan"e position manuall# at all. -on1t move >>?@, and don1t pla# an# position ke#switches.
%ere1s &hat it should loo' and sound li'e.
8otice, this time, that $oth licks work as intended, despite the a$sence of an# manual position control. &t
worked this time $ecause 4uto(Position ,ode was active+ Since the lick works when it starts on strin"
four, we set the startin" strin" to strin" four, and 4uto(Position ,ode automaticall# sets the instrument to
position two when a new phrase was started a whole step hi"her.
%ere1s a video of &hat &ould happen if &e continue to play the same phrase at further transposed
pitch levels &ith )uto=Position *ode turned on
2. &f the secondar# strin" "roup is active 5sustain pedal or >>?;@ is at a value of B2D7, the position will $e set to
the one where the first note pla#ed is availa$le on the secondar# startin" strin", makin" it possi$le to
transpose licks to hi"her or lower pitch(levels without manual position chan"es. 9ere1s an e%ample*
With 4uto(Position ,ode turned .AA, and with the instrument set to open position with the sustain pedal
held, pla# a E(,a)or arpe""io, as follows* A?@, -?@, EG. ,ove the pitch(wheel all the wa# up. &t will look
and sound like this video demonstration!
!epeat this "esture one octave hi"her. &t will look and sound like this video demonstration!
The two phrases are alike in pla#in" techni/ue, $ut the# do not sound alike at all. &n fact, the second
e%ample consists of )ust one note that slides throu"h the three pitches pla#ed. This is $ecause when the
instrument is in open position, all three of these pitches lie on strin" one1s ke#$oard ran"e. To pla# the lick
an octave hi"her, we need to put the instrument in twelfth position.
Tr# manuall# settin" the position to position twelve, and tr# the same lick a"ain. &t works 0 here1s a
video demonstration!
8ow reactivate 4uto(Position ,ode $# pla#in" G?B, and tr# pla#in" the two licks a"ain, this time not
$otherin" to chan"e position manuall# at all. -on1t move >>?@, and don1t pla# an# position ke#switches.
%ere1s a video of &hat it should loo' and sound li'e!
8otice, a"ain, that $oth licks work as intended this time around, despite the a$sence of an# manual
position control. &t worked this time $ecause 4uto(Position ,ode was active+ Since the lick works when it
starts on strin" one, we set the secondar# startin" strin" to strin" one, and 4uto(Position ,ode
automaticall# sets the instrument to open position when the first phrase was $e"un of A?@ with the pedal
down, and then set it to twelfth position when a new phrase was started a whole step hi"her.
%ere1s a video of &hat &ould happen if &e continue to play the same phrase at further transposed
pitch levels &ith )uto=Position *ode turned on!
4s #ou can see, auto(position mode can $e ver# useful for makin" eas# position chan"es, especiall# in conte%ts where a
certain phrase is $ein" pla#ed at different pitch levels. 9ere are a couple of thin"s to keep in mind when usin" auto(
position mode*
B. Pla#in" $lock chords can put #ou at risk of landin" in the wron" position 0 this can happen if the note intended to
$e the first note of the phrase is not pla#ed first. &nstead of pla#in" chords with no intention of startin" on a
particular strin", aim to pla# the note which #ou need to fall on that startin" strin" )ust a split second $efore the
others. This will "uarantee that auto(position mode functions as #ou need it to.
2. Startin" a phrase on a note which is outside the pla#a$le ran"e of the startin" strin" will put the instrument in
either position one or position twent#(four+ if the startin" strin" is strin" four and #ou start a phrase on a EG, the
instrument will set itself to open position, and the note will sound on strin" five, since EG is $elow the pla#a$le
ran"e of strin" four 5-?@ ( G;7. Similarl#, if the startin" strin" is strin" ten and #ou start a phrase on E, the
instrument will set itself to position twent#(four, and the note will sound on strin" ei"ht, since E is outside the
pla#a$le ran"e of strin" ten 54?2 ( -7.
G. 9ittin" a position ke#switch or movin" >>?@ while auto(position mode is active will deactivate auto(position mode
and put the instrument in the position specified. To""lin" the auto(position ke#switch off a"ain will leave the
instrument in the last position it was automaticall# switched into.
9!,# Important :;pressive Controls:
.ther than usin" >>?@ for position control, #ou need to use several other controllers to "et e%pressive performances out
of the Wavelore Pedal Steel Guitar. These other controllers are #our mod(wheel, e%pression pedal, the pitch(wheel, and
>>? 5portamento time7.
(.5.1) #e 2od!3eel
This all important controller does three different thin"s*
I# The mod(wheel controls vi$rato depth and speed. ,ost pedal steel pla#in" uses a "entle roll of the slide to impart a
su$tle, sinusoidal variation on the pitch of a "iven note or chord. Pla# a note or chord, and slowl# move #our mod wheel
while holdin" it. Iou will hear the pitch waver sli"htl#. 4dditionall#, the vi$rato increases in speed as #ou increase the mod(
wheel1s value. &t is possi$le to assi"n separate controls for speed and depth if #ou wish* please see section .@ on pa"e
BD for instructions if #ou1d like to separate these functions.
II# The placement of the mod(wheel at the moment a note is released determines which of the two availa$le release(
sample t#pes are used 5this function is also re(assi"na$le to an# other controller if desired7*
.ver the lower half of the mod(wheel's ran"e 5K(;K7, the instrument will use 2palm damp3 release samples. These
releases use the su$tle effect of the strin" $ein" muted with the palm of the hand.
.ver the upper half of the mod(wheel's ran"e 5DK(NK7, the instrument will use 2pick damp3 release samples. These
releases use a less su$tle effect of the pick stoppin" the strin", resultin" in a more noticea$le 2click3 sound.
While the mod(wheel is in the middle of it1s ran"e 5;B(;67, no release sample is pla#ed.
III# The placement of the mod(wheel at the moment a note is released determines the volume of whichever release
sample is pla#ed 5this function is also re(assi"na$le to an# other controller if desired7*
.ver the lower half of the mod(wheel's ran"e, the palm damp releases will $e attenuated 5turned down7 as the wheel
approaches the center position, at which point the# will $e full# attenuated 5inaudi$le7. With the mod(wheel at Cero,
the palm damps will $e as loud as possi$le, $ut still su$tle.
.ver the upper half of the mod(wheel's ran"e, the pick damps will $e attenuated as the wheel approaches the center
position, at which point the# will $e full# attenuated. With the mod(wheel at B2D, the pick damps will $e as loud as
possi$le.
(.5.2) #e Expression ,edal
The e%pression pedal should, if assi"na$le, $e assi"ned to control >>?BB, in which case it will function )ust like the
volume pedal, whose use is e%tremel# common in pedal steel pla#in". Pullin" it all the wa# to the 2rear3 position 5open7,
will turn the instrument down to inaudi$le. &f #ou pla# a note in this state and move the pedal forward, the note will fade in.
This controller can $e used to create swellin" and fadin" effects, and can $e used alon" with velocit# to influence the
instrument's place in a mi%.
&mportant* 4 8ote on the 2Ripper Effect3
The Cipper effect is a common term for the tendenc# of ,&-& control messa"es to sound less smooth than sources of
analo" control. &n the case of the Wavelore Pedal Steel Guitar, it can $e particularl# evident when usin" the e%pression
pedal. What happens is this* <nlike an analo" volume pedal, the ,&-& e%pression pedal onl# transmits B2N increments of
data. Aurther, if the ph#sical controller is moved /uickl# over a lar"e ran"e of values, the hardware will 2steal3 a si"nificant
amount of these increments. &ma"ine startin" with the pedal at Cero, hittin" a note, and movin" the pedal as /uickl# as
#ou can to full value. The result could $e that the volume does not pro"ress smoothl# from Cero to B2D, $ut rather )umps
from Cero to sa#, 2@, then to ;, to DK, to BKK, and finall# to B2D. &ncludin" the e%tremes, our smooth swell has $een
reduced from a nice soundin" curve to a 2stair case3, with )ust si% steps.
&n order to avoid this pro$lem, we recommend usin" the e%pression pedal in the same su$tle manner as a real pedal steel
pla#er would use his or her volume pedal. ,ost of the time, the# do not swell from off to full, let alone do the# do so
/uickl#. When usin" the pedal to affect the attack of a note, it's usuall# rocked $ack to a$out KS of it's volume, and the
forward motion is much slower than our a$ove e%ample. E%periment to "ain a feel for )ust the ri"ht pedal techni/ue.
(.5.4) ,itc!3eel
The default settin"s for pitch(wheel $ehavior allow a num$er of stock pedal steel st#le chordal $ends, since each strin" of
the instrument has its own pitch($endin" ran"e. Aor e%ample, one of the easiest tricks to perform usin" the pitch(wheel is
the I IV pro"ression. &n the open position, this is an E(ma)or 4(ma)or pro"ression, performed $# one of two means1*
Pla# an# E(ma)or chord, and move the wheel up all the wa#. The E note remains static while the G? moves to an
4, and the E moves to a >?, spellin" an 4(ma)or chord.
Pla# an# 4(ma)or chord with the wheel moved all the wa# down. Iour 4 note will sound as a 2pre($ent3 G?, and
#our >? will sound as E. Then move the wheel to the center position to return the pitches to those #ou pla#ed,
soundin" an 4 chord.
Similarl#, while the secondar# strin" "roup is active, most inversions of the E(ma)or chord can $end upward to a >?(minor
chord, creatin" a V vi pro"ression*
Pla# a E(ma)or chord 5EG, -?@, A?@7 with the pedal down, and move the wheel up. The E will $end to a >?, the
-? to an E, and the A? to a GG, spellin" a >?(minor chord.
!everse the pro"ression $# startin" with the wheel moved up full#, then return the wheel to its center position.
This pro"ression does not work on all inversions of the E(ma)or chord+ if #ou pla#, for e%ample, E2, -?G, and A?G, then
move the wheel up, the -? does not $ent at all, leavin" the >?(minor chord incomplete. To finish the chan"e, use
portamento to slide the -? to E while performin" the pitch(wheel movement.
Iou can also perform the followin" trick to slide into an A?(minor chord*
With the pedal up, pla# EG, A?@, and G?@ to"ether 5this could $e viewed as an E(ma)or with the root pre($ent to
the ninth, A?.
,ove the wheel all the wa# up, $endin" the E to a >?, and the G? to an 4, spellin" and A?(minor chord.
Tr# the same trick, $ut startin" from a pure E(ma)or chord, 5e"* E2, EG, G?G7, and move the wheel up while usin"
portamento to slide the E to an A?. This is a true I > ii pro"ression.
The same possi$ilities e%ist when usin" the 2Enhanced3 preset for pitch(wheel $ehavior 5see section TT for details7, with
two important additions*
With the pedal up, and E(ma)or chord, rather than $endin" downward to an 4(ma)or chord, will $end to a ED, where the
interval $etween G? and E will resolve inward 5the notes move in opposite directions7 to sound 4 and -?. The reverse is
true when $endin" $ack up from this position.
With the pedal down, the E(ma)or will also $end down to a E chord, $ut this time with no seventh, and with more 2correct3
voice leadin" than when usin" the ori"inal preset+ E sta#s static, while E $ends to -? and G? $ends to A?. 4"ain, the
reverse occurs when startin" with the wheel alread# down. This is different from the ori"inal preset in that the ori"inal
preset has E $endin" down to 4, soundin" a seventh 547, $ut omittin" the root 5E7. With the enhanced preset, #ou have
access to $oth the V and the V-7 chord in an# position.
<sin" either pitch(wheel preset, there are a "reat man# possi$ilities for soundin" chord pro"ressions via $ends com$ined
with ke#$oard portamento. &n fact there are too man# for us to codif#. Please e%periment li$erall#, and note #our findin"s!
&f there is somethin" #ou want to do, $ut can1t, #ou ma# $e a$le to accomplish it usin" a custom pitch(wheel setup* Please
see Section .2 for instructions for setup of custom pitch(wheel confi"urations.
(.5.() ,ortamento #ime $%%&5)
9avin" a controller assi"ned to >>? is important $ecause it allows access to the e%tremes of slide speed. The default
speed allows a considera$le ran"e to $e accessed via velocit# of tar"et notes, $ut usin" >>? allows #ou to pla# slides
that are e%tremel# fast or slow. E# default, portamento speed is controlled $# a com$ination of velocit# and >>?, which
allows $ends of different speeds to $e pla#ed without havin" to chan"e an# controllers. &n this confi"uration, >>? allows
access to faster and slower ran"es of speeds. That is, with >>? at Cero, velocit# will chan"e $end speed from ver# fast
to medium fast, whereas with >>? at B2D will allow velocit# to modulate speed $etween medium slow and ver# slow.
There are man# user(defina$le parameters. Editin" them to taste is covered in Section .B.
,# :ditin the Instrument1s Setup
There is alwa#s a possi$ilit# that a "iven instrument confi"uration will not $ehave in the wa# #ou ma# prefer. Given the
enormous num$er of possi$le opinions on how an# instrument should $e confi"ured, we've done ever#thin" possi$le to
offer the $est out(of(the($o% pro"rammin" we can in this li$rar#, $ut #ou ma# still have certain reservations or differences
of opinion. These differences could $e a$out a wide variet# of choices, includin"*
>hoice of assi"ned controllers* ,an# ma# want, for e%ample, to have the instrument use different controllers for
vi$rato and release control, where our confi"uration uses the mod(wheel for $oth.
Fi$rato st#le* .ur choice was one of a medium(slow, su$tle vi$rato. Iou ma# find a need for a more a""ressive
vi$rato.
Slide speed ran"es* Iou ma# onl# want #our $ends and slides to var# from half a second in len"th to a full second,
whereas our ori"inal setup offers a ran"e from ver# fast to ver# slow. Iou can confi"ure $end speed ran"es and
control sources in almost an# variet# #ou wish.
&n addition to these varia$les, there are countless other wa#s in which the instrument could $e different, and some of
those wa#s could $e $etter, at least for certain people or pro)ects. This section contains instructions on some of the man#
wa#s that #ou can customiCe the sounds in the li$rar# to suit different needs or tastes.
,!0# )bout the PitchA<olume Pae ?Default <ie&#
Concept:
&n the screen(shot a$ove, the various kno$s and $uttons allow #ou to confi"ure the e%pression control 5volume7, $end
speed control sources and ran"e, neck position control 5includin" on=off, routin", and volume controls for the voice "uide7,
sustain pedal usa"e, and the ,&-& control for alternatin" the primar# strin"s with the secondar# ones.
Controls:
3) %age 4enu/ This control is alwa#s visi$le, and allows #ou to view the settin"s displa#ed $# default, the settin"s for
pitch(wheel $ehavior, ke#switches, release sample $ehavior, the virtual amplifier models, or the a$out $o%.
2) 5olume +ontrol/ >hoose #our ,&-& continuous controller for volume pedal emulation. 4lternativel#, set it to B2N to
activate 2learn mode3. While in learn mode, #ou can simpl# move the controller on #our ,&-& ke#$oard that #ou
wish to assi"n as the e%pression control. >lick 2.K3, or pla# a note on #our ke#$oard, and #our assi"nment is
saved.
6) 4#7# 0end &peed +ontroller/ >hoose #our ,&-& continuous controller for $end=slide speed control. 4lternativel#,
set it to B2N to activate 2learn mode3. While in learn mode, #ou can simpl# move the controller on #our ,&-&
ke#$oard that #ou wish to assi"n as the speed control. >lick 2.K3, or pla# a note on #our ke#$oard, and #our
assi"nment is saved. .nce set, movin" the assi"ned controller will chan"e the speed of $ends to the
correspondin" point $etween the minimum and ma%imum speeds 5displa#ed in item ? 7.
-) &peed +ontrol &ource/ 4llows four possi$le choices of how slide=$end speed is determined*
I# >ontroller* The controller assi"ned $# item ? G will determine the duration of all pitch $ends.
II# Felocit#* The velocit# of the 2tar"et note3 5the note that the ori"inal pitch will $end up or down to7 sets the speed
of the $end.
III# Felocit# P Scale* The velocit# of the 2tar"et note3 5the note that the ori"inal pitch will $end up or down to7 sets
the speed of the $end, $ut the speed will $e scaled $# the percenta"e of the full speed ran"e displa#ed in item ?;.
I<# >>PFelocit#* The ,&-& controller set in item ?G will determine the >>($ased speed of the $end, $ut the
velocit# of the 2tar"et note3 5the note that the ori"inal pitch will $end up or down to7 will offset the speed in either
direction, dependin" on whether the tar"et note1s velocit# is less than ;@ 5slows the $end7 or "reater than ;@
5speeds the $end up7.
8) 0end &peed 9ange:min and ma()/ Set the fastest 5min7 and slowest 5ma%7 $end times, whose values then will $e
interpolated $# #our choice of control sources and=or velocit# scalin" when pla#in" $ends and slides.
Felocit# Speed Scalin" Aactor* The e%tent to which tar"et note velocit# offsets the >>($ased speed of the $end
is determined $# this control. Settin" it to Cero will prevent velocit# from affectin" $end speed, whereas settin" it to
BKK will allow the full specified ran"e of speeds to $e accessed.
;) 5elocity &caling 2actor* -etermines the e%tent to which tar"et note velocit# affects $end speeds. :ower values
limit the effect of velocit#, whereas hi"her values allow a "reater portion of the overall speed ran"e to accessed
without movin" the assi"ned >>.
1) .eck %osition +ontrol* >hoose the ,&-& continuous controller that will $e used to select the active neck position.
4lternativel#, set it to B2N to activate 2learn mode3. While in learn mode, #ou can simpl# move the controller on
#our ,&-& ke#$oard that #ou wish to assi"n as the neck position control. >lick 2.K3, or pla# a note on #our
ke#$oard, and #our assi"nment is saved.
<) 5oice 'uide =n>=ff/ 4ctivates or deactivates the voice "uide. &f active, a voice will call the num$er of the active
position when the neck position control is moved.
?) 5oice 'uide 5olume/ Set the volume of the voice "uide to taste.
3@) Ase 5olume +ontrol/ 4dds the volume control as set in item ?2 as an additional volume control for the voice
"uide+ &f set to 3.n3, #our assi"ned volume >> will further attenuate voice "uide samples tri""ered $# position
chan"es. &f it is set to 2.ff3, the voice "uide volume will onl# $e affected $# item ?6.
33) &tring &witch/ >hoose #our ,&-& continuous controller for real(time switchin" $etween primar# and secondar#
strin"s. 4lternativel#, set it to B2N to activate 2learn mode3. While in learn mode, #ou can simpl# move the
controller on #our ,&-& ke#$oard that #ou wish to assi"n as the switch control. >lick 2.K3, or pla# a note on #our
ke#$oard, and #our assi"nment is saved. .nce set, movin" the assi"ned controller to a Cero value will activate
onl# the primar# strin"s, whereas movin" it to a value of B2D will activate a com$ination of the primar# and
secondar# strin"s.
32) 5oice 'uide 9outing/ This $utton lets #ou route the samples tri""ered $# position control or ke#switch to alternate
outputs of #our sound card. Set to B = 2 if #ou wish to hear the voice "uide throu"h the same monitorin" s#stem as
the instrument, or set to G = @ if #ou wish to monitor the voice "uide separatel#. The second settin" can $e useful
for monitorin" the voice "uide in live performance where it is undesira$le to $roadcast the voice over the main
s#stem.
36) Ase &ustain/ This $utton can $e used to set whether the sustain pedal will function in a traditional manner or not.
Since the pedal allows a convenient hands(free controller for primar#=secondar# strin" switchin", it ma# not
alwa#s $e desira$le to allow it to also hold notes. &t can, however, make certain chordal $endin" techni/ues
easier, since sustainin" a chord allows the fin"ers to release $efore strikin" an# tar"et notes to which the
soundin" chord tones will $end. <sin" this control and optionall# re(assi"nin" the strin" switch 5?BB, a$ove7, the
user can decide )ust how to confi"ure the com$ination of switchin" and sustainin".
,!3# )bout the Pitch=Wheel Pae
Concept:
&n version 2., #ou can now specif# the ran"e 5in semitones7 for the pitch(wheel, with discrete control over $oth the
upward and downward ran"e of each individual strin". The ori"inal settin"s are included as a preset, as well as a new
2enhanced3 settin" which allows the wheel to resolve tritones in contrar# motion 0 see $elow for an e%planation of the
importance of this a$ilit#. 4lso included are several 2lock3 functions, which allow simultaneous settin" of all strin"s, which
saves editin" time.
Controls:
3) %reset 4enu/ Presents the followin" options*
I# .ri"inal 0 Sets the pitch(wheel1s effect on the individual strin"s as follows. Strin"s are color coded usin" the
same scheme as the ke#$oard dia"rams in the 2!eall# Ouick Start3 and 2Ouick Start3 "uides earlier in this document *
String # Upward Range (Semitones) Downward Range
1 +2 -2
2 +1 -1
3 +1 -1
4 0 0
5 +2 -2
6 +1 -1
7 +2 -2
8 0 0
9 +1 -1
10 +2 -2
II# Enhanced 0 Sets the pitch(wheel1s effect on the individual strin"s as follows. !an"es that differ from the
2ori"inal3 preset are hi"hli"hted accordin" to the same color code as the ke#$oard dia"rams in the 2!eall# Ouick
Start3 and 2Ouick Start3 "uides earlier in this document*
String # Upward Range (Semitones) Downward Range
1 +2 -2
2 +1 -1
3 +1 +1
4 0 -1
5 +2 0
6 +1 +1
7 +2 -2
8 0 -1
9 +2 -1
10 +2 0
8ote that all of the hi"hli"hted strin"s have different ran"es for their upward and downward wheel movements. The
e%ceptions are strin"s si% and three, $oth of which will alwa#s $end upward $# one semitone whether the wheel is moved
up or down. The $enefit to this s#stem is derived from one ver# t#pical "esture often emplo#ed $# pedal steel pla#ers*
When in open position, com$inations of strin"s G, @, ;, N, and BK 5the primar# strin"s7 to"ether with pedalin" can $e used
to pla# all three of the & 5E(ma)or7, &F 54(ma)or7, and FD 5ED7 chords. Pla#in", sa#, strin"s , @, and G with no pedals will
produce and E(ma)or chord 5EG, E@, and G?@7. Steppin" on the first two pedals will $end the E and the G? to >? and 4
respectivel#, resultin" in an 4(ma)or chord 5>?@, E@, and 4@7. !eleasin" the first pedal will $end the >? $ack to a E while
the 4 remains unchan"ed. Simultaneousl# movin" the ri"ht knee lever will drop the E down to a -?, resultin" in a ED
chord 5EG, -?G, and 4@7, which can resolve $ack to E(ma)or 5EG, E@, G?@7. &n notation, the process looks like this*
8otice the contrar# movement of the 4 G? and the -? E in measure three. While previousl# onl# possi$le usin"
simultaneous ke#$oard portamenti in opposite directions, it1s now possi$le to perform this chordal $endin" techni/ue
usin" )ust the pitchwheel+ with the 2enhanced3 preset ena$led, follow these "uidelines*
B7 Pla# the E chord in measure one.
27 ,ove the pitch(wheel all the wa# up to transition to an 4 chord.
G7 !eturn the pitch(wheel to the center position, and pla# the 4 chord in measure two.
@7 While holdin" the 4 chord, pla# EG and -?@, either to"ether or one at a time.
7 With the pitch(wheel pulled all the wa# down, pla# the E chord in measure three. What will sound is the ED in the
same measure.
;7 !eturn the wheel to the center position 0 the ED chord will $end to the E chord, with the -? ascendin" to E and
the 4 descendin" to G?, )ust like the voice leadin" a pedal steel pla#er would use, $ut without the necessit# of
pla#in" awkward contrar# le"ato techni/ue on the ke#$oard.
To summariCe the purpose of this new wheel confi"uration* This setup allows the & chord in the ke# whose tunin"
corresponds to the current position 5.pen L E, B
st
L A, 2
nd
L A?, etc7 to $end upward to the &F chord, and downward to the
FD. Aurther, the & $ends convenientl# downward to a F 5no D
th
7 when the strin" switch is on 5default* sustain pedal7, and
the F vi 5E >?m7 movement attaina$le with the switch en"a"ed is still preserved.
I# :ock 4ll* This preset will allow #ou to chan"e an# one of the values shown for the per(strin" wheel ran"es and
/uickl# match all others to it. &t is useful if #ou1d like to set the entire instrument to use the wheel traditionall#. Aor
e%ample, if #ou wished to have the entire instrument $end upward $# two semitones and downward $# two
semitones, #ou would choose this preset, and could then set the all strin"s $# ad)ustin" an# one strin"1s upward
or downward ran"e.
II# :ock 4ll <pward* Similar to 2:ock 4ll3, $ut onl# locks the upward values of the strin"s1 wheel ran"es to each
other. <se this settin" if #ou want to set all strin"s1 upward pitch(wheel ran"es to the same value at once, $ut still
want to maintain separate editin" capa$ilit# for the downward ran"es.
III# :ock 4ll -ownward* Similar to 2:ock 4ll3, $ut onl# locks the downward values of the strin"s1 wheel ran"es to
each other. <se this settin" if #ou want to set all strin"s1 downward pitch(wheel ran"es to the same value at once,
$ut still want to maintain separate editin" capa$ilit# for the upward ran"es.
I<# :ock <pwardP-ownward* :ocks each strin"1s downward and upward values. ,ovin" an# strin"1s downward or
upward value with this preset en"a"ed will set the opposite wheel direction to the ne"ative of the value set. Aor
e%ample, with this preset selected, chan"in" strin" one1s upward wheel ran"e to 2P3 will set that strin"1s
downward wheel ran"e to 2(3. <se this preset if #ou want to chan"e each strin"1s values individuall#, $ut want
their up=down values to $e the same, as in traditional pitch(wheel $ehavior.
2) #ndividual %itchB$heel 9ange 5alues/ Each value edit field is the value 5in semitones7 that that strin" can $end
upward or downward. Iou can click the arrows, click and dra", or dou$le(click and t#pe a value. 4ll ran"es are
from (B2 to PB2, and either upward or downward ran"es can use either positive or ne"ative num$ers+ thus, it is
possi$le to 2invert3 the pitch(wheel $ehavior for an# strin" of the instrument if desired. To implement inverted
wheel $ehavior, simpl# set the desired strin"1s upward ran"e to a ne"ative value and set its downward ran"e to a
positive.
There are man# possi$ilities for interestin" harmonic tricks and sound effects to $e discovered when #ou start
e%perimentin" with the pitch(wheel settin"s. To return the instrument to its factor# state, simpl# select 2ori"inal3
from the presets menu.
,!"# )bout the +eys&itches Pae
Concept:
&n the screen(shot a$ove, the various controls allow #ou to confi"ure a series of ke#switches and the ran"e of positions
that the# will make availa$le. Arom this pa"e, #ou can also switch the voice counter for ke#switched position chan"es on
or off, as well as set parameters for 2auto position mode3, which can $e used to let the instrument set #our position $ased
on a preselected startin" strin" for each phrase pla#ed.
Controls:
B7 4inimum position Ceyswitch/ The lowest ke#switch, which will correspond to the minimum position via ke#switch
5set in ?G7. Set to B2N to activate learn mode. .nce in learn mode, pla# the desired minimum ke#switch, and click
2.K3 to accept #our assi"nment.
27 4a(imum Ceyswitch 7isplay. This la$el displa#s the note name of the hi"hest ke#switch, which is automaticall#
set $ased on the minimum ke#switch and the position ran"e, set in items ?1G and ?@.
6) 4inimum %osition 5ia Ceyswitch/ this control sets the lowest neck position that will $e availa$le via ke#switch. Aor
e%ample, if set to K, hittin" the minimum position ke#switch set in ?B will activate the open position. &f set to BK,
hittin" the minimum position ke#switch will activate position ten.
-) 4a(imum %osition 5ia Ceyswitch/ this control sets the hi"hest neck position that will $e availa$le via ke#switch.
Aor e%ample, if set to BK, hittin" the ma%imum position ke#switch set in ?2 will activate the tenth position. &f set to
B2, hittin" the ma%imum position ke#switch will activate position ten.
Please note* Since the num$er of ke#switches and the num$er of ke#switcha$le positions must $e e/ual,
editin" an# of controls B, G, or @ will have effects on the others. Aor e%ample, if positions K(B2 are
availa$le and the minimum position ke#switch is re(assi"ned to GB, the ma%imum position ke#switch will
chan"e to G2 to reflect this chan"e. 4dditionall#, if the ma%imum position via ke#switch is then $oosted to
BG, the ma%imum position ke#switch will increase $# one ,&-& note value to G?2, in order to keep the
num$er of ke#switches the same as the num$er of positions used.
8) 5oice 'uide on C&/ -e=4ctivates the tri""erin" of voice "uide samples for position chan"es via ke#switches.
Since the voice "uide was ori"inall# included to aid with >>? tri""ered position switchin", it ma# $e necessar# to
use it for that purpose, $ut not for ke#switches, since the# are easier to chan"e accuratel# on the fl#.
;) AutoB%osition 4ode/ Switches $etween auto position off and auto position $# ke#swtich.
1) AutoB%osition Ceyswitch 7isplay/ Shows the ke#switch used to to""le auto(position mode on or off. The note will
alwa#s $e one semitone $elow the minimum position ke#swtich, and is set as such automaticall# when the
minimum position ke#switch is chan"ed. 4lso displa#s the current auto(position mode status 5on or off7.
<) AutoB%osition %rimary &tart &tring/ Set the startin" strin" for phrases $e"un with the strin" "roup switch set to
Cero 5default* sustain pedal 0 see section @.B ( 4$out the Pitch=Folume Pa"e, control ? BB7. When the first note of
a phrase is pla#ed on the primar# strin"s, the position will $e set to the one correspondin" to the location of that
note on the selected strin".
?) AutoB%osition &econdary &tart &tring/ Set the startin" strin" for phrases $e"un with the strin" "roup switch set to
B2D 5default* sustain pedal 0 see section @.B ( 4$out the Pitch=Folume Pa"e, control ? BB7. When the first note of a
phrase is pla#ed on the secondar# strin"s, the position will $e set to the one correspondin" to the location of that
note on the selected strin".
,!9# )bout the <ibratoADampin Pae
Concept:
&n the screen(shot a$ove, the various kno$s and $uttons allow #ou to confi"ure the vi$rato depth and speed, and assi"n
,&-& controllers for real(time control of those parameters. Arom this pa"e, #ou can also assi"n controllers for real(time
selection and attenuation of release samples. There is also a master volume kno$ for release samples.
Controls:
B7 5ibrato 7epth +ontroller/ >hoose #our ,&-& continuous controller for vi$rato depth. 4lternativel#, set it to B2N to
activate 2learn mode3. While in learn mode, #ou can simpl# move the controller on #our ,&-& ke#$oard that #ou
wish to assi"n as the vi$rato depth control. >lick 2.K3, or pla# a note on #our ke#$oard, and #our assi"nment is
saved.
2) 4a(imum 5ibrato 7epth/ Set the ma%imum vi$rato depth to taste. This will $e the width of the pitch fluctuation
while the controller assi"ned in item ?B is at a value of B2D.
6) 5ibrato &peed +ontroller/ >hoose #our ,&-& continuous controller for vi$rato speed. 4lternativel#, set it to B2N to
activate 2learn mode3. While in learn mode, #ou can simpl# move the controller on #our ,&-& ke#$oard that #ou
wish to assi"n as the vi$rato speed control. >lick 2.K3, or pla# a note on #our ke#$oard, and #our assi"nment is
saved.
-) 4a(imum 5ibrato &peed/ Set the ma%imum vi$rato speed to taste. This will $e the speed of the pitch fluctuation
while the controller assi"ned in item ?G is at a value of B2D.
8) 9elease &ample &elector +ontroller/ >hoose #our ,&-& continuous controller for release sample selection.
4lternativel#, set it to B2N to activate 2learn mode3. While in learn mode, #ou can simpl# move the controller on
#our ,&-& ke#$oard that #ou wish to assi"n as the release selector. >lick 2.K3, or pla# a note on #our ke#$oard,
and #our assi"nment is saved. .nce set, this controller will determine which t#pe of release sample is pla#ed
when a note is released. See section @..B for more details.
;) 9elease &ample Attenuation +ontroller* >hoose #our ,&-& continuous controller for real(time release sample
volume control. 4lternativel#, set it to B2N to activate 2learn mode3. While in learn mode, #ou can simpl# move the
controller on #our ,&-& ke#$oard that #ou wish to assi"n as the release volume control. >lick 2.K3, or pla# a note
on #our ke#$oard, and #our assi"nment is saved. .nce set, this controller will determine which how loudl# release
samples are pla#ed when a note is released. See section @..B for more details.
1) 9elease &ample 4aster 5olume* Set the master volume of release sample pla#$ack to taste. This settin" will
chan"e the volume of the release samples in addition to the release sample attenuation controller.
,!,# )bout the )mplifier Pae
Concept:
&n the screen(shot a$ove, the various kno$s and $uttons allow #ou to confi"ure the tone of the instrument. EO, rever$
level, amp model and mic confi"uration can all $e ad)usted from this pa"e.
Controls:
B7 Amp &imulation =n>=ff/ 4cts as a $#pass control for the amp simulation. Iou ma# want to set this to 2.ff3 if #ou
wish to use a G
rd
part# amp simulator with the instrument.
2) 9everb Devel/ Set the desired amount of rever$ to taste. This control is onl# availa$le for the first two amp models
5see item ?G, $elow7, since the classic tu$e amp has no $uilt(in rever$.
6) Amp Type/ >hoose $etween three possi$le amp models* Steel Guitar 4mp, ,odern Tu$e 4mp, or >lassic Tu$e
4mp.
-) 0right>2ull &elector/ Set to 2Eri"ht3 to add e%tra tre$le to the active amp model.
8) &tereo>4ono 4ic &election/ >han"es the availa$le option in item ?; 5see $elow7 $etween pairs of stereo mics and
sin"le mono mics.
;7 4icrophone &elector/ >hoose the active microphone5s7. Stereo options include a close pair of d#namic mics, an
am$ient pair of condenser mics, and two mi%ed confi"urations* .ne with a room mic on the left channel and a
close mic on the ri"ht, the other $ein" the opposite 5!oom mic ri"ht, close mic left7.
1) ThreeB0and E)ualiFer* Set the $ass, middle and tre$le output of the instrument to taste. Please note that e%treme
chan"es to these settin"s can result in si"nificant volume chan"es that ma# result in clippin". 4d)ust the master
volume 5shown a$ove the tre$le kno$7 to compensate.
N7 Tremolo* This $utton performs two functions* Airst, it indicates the status of the Tremolo effect $# hi"hli"htin"
when tremolo is active. 4dditionall#, clickin" this $utton will $in" up the tremolo controls*
B7 Speed* Set the rate at which the volume will oscillate.
27 -epth* Set the depth to which the volume will oscillate.
G7 Switch ,ode* >hoose whether the tremolo is alwa#s off, alwa#s on, de=activated $# ke#switch 52KS37, or
de=activated $# ,&-& controller 2>>37
@7 Switch* When Switch ,ode is set to 2Switch w=KS3, this control will allow #ou to set which ke# to""les tremolo on
or off. When set to 2Switch w=>>3, it will allow #ou to assi"n the controller used for the same purpose. Whether
usin" a >> or a ke#switch, the control can $e set to B2N to activate learn mode+ ,ove #our desired controller, or
pla# the desired ke#switch, and click 2.K3 to accept the assi"nment.
!eturn to the amplifier pa"e 5or view another pa"e7 $# selectin" it from the 2pa"e3 menu at the top left!
,!B# )bout the Temperament Pae
Concept and Controls:
The screen(shot a$ove shows ten slidin" controls, each of which will 2tune3 one of the instrument1s ten strin"s $# up to P=(
K cents, or a half a semitone. Temperament is used $# advanced pedal steel pla#ers to allow their instruments to sit
$etter harmonicall# in mi%es featurin" other instruments, such as strin"s or vocals, which ma# not $e pla#ed in e%actl#
e/ual temperament.
4dvanced users ma# consider usin" this feature for the same sort of purpose, $ut with no chan"es made to this settin",
the Wavelore Pedal Steel Guitar will pla# in 2e/ual temperament3, which is the norm in most recordin" and performin"
situations.
,!/# Savin Jour Chanes
To save an# chan"es #ou1ve made to the instrument, simpl# open the save dialo" from within Kontakt and save the
instrument under a new filename. Iou1ll $e a$le to load the instrument with #our preferred confi"uration at a later time. &f
#ou are hostin" Kontakt within #our -4W, savin" #our pro)ect will save the chan"es made, $ut the ori"inal instrument will
remain unchan"ed unless #ou use the save dialo".
B# Where to Get *ore %elp
4t Wavelore, we consider it our dut# to ensure that #ou have the $est possi$le e%perience with our products and support.
&f #ou've read this far, #ou pro$a$l# alread# know that there is nothin" simple a$out this instrumentUwell, there is one
simple thin"*
-f you5re aving trouble6 e!mail us and we5ll elp you77 3e5re at/
supportVwavelore.com
There is also a support section on our we$site which will contain updates to the product as the# $ecome availa$le, and
currentl# contains links to a num$er of useful resources.
)ppendi; ): The Pedal Steel Guitar 2ec'
)0# 2ec' Diaram
Aor a hand# reference when learnin" new positions or for decidin" which positions are $est while se/uencin" certain
passa"es, consult the followin" dia"ram of the pedal steel "uitar neck*
Primar# strin"s are shown in $lack, secondar# strin"s in red. 8ote also the 2pitch $end ran"e3 column, which "ives each
strin"1s $endin" ran"e.
)3# Written Pitches Per=Strin ?Soundin one octave lo&er than &ritten#
9ere are the notes of theB
st
twelve frets of each strin", as shown on the octave(tre$le clef*
)"# Position Diarams >=39 ?primary strins# 5Watch )s <ideo7
)"!> C -pen Position
)"!3 C Second Position
)"!" C Third Position
)"!9 C .ourth Position
)"!, C .ifth Position
)"!B C Si;th Position
)"!/ C Seventh Position
)"!4 C :ihth Position
)"!7 C 2inth Position
)"!0> C Tenth Position
)"!00 C :leventh Position
)"!03 C T&elfth Position
)"!0" C Thirteenth Position
)"!09 C .ourtheenth Position
)"!0, C .ifteenth Position
)"!0BC Si;teenth Position
)"!0/ C Seventeenth Position
)"!04 C :ihteenth Position
)"!07 C 2ineteenth Position
)"!3> C T&entieth Position
)"!30 C T&enty=.irst Position
)"!33 C T&enty=Second Position
)"!3" C T&enty=Third Position
)"!39 C T&enty=.ourth Position
)9# Position Diarams >=39 ?secondary strins# 5Watch )s <ideo #
)9!> C -pen Position
)9!0 C .irst Position
)9!3 C Second Position
)9!" C Third Position
)9!9 C .ourth Position
)9!, C .ifth Position
)9!B C Si;th Position
)9!/ C Seventh Position
)9!4 C :ihth Position
)9!7 C 2inth Position
)9!0> C Tenth Position
)9!00 C :leventh Position
)9!03 C T&elfth Position
)9!0" C Thirteenth Position

)9!09 C .ourteenth Position
)9!0, C .ifteenth Position
)9!0B C Si;teenth Position
)9!0/ C Seventeenth Position
)9!04 C :ihteenth Position
)9!07 C 2ineteenth Position

)9!3> C T&entieth Position
)9!30 C T&enty=.irst Position
)9!33 C T&enty=Second Position
)9!3" C T&enty=Third Position
)9!39 C T&enty=.ourth Position
),# Position Diarams >=39 ?Primary and Secondary Comparison#5Watch )s <ideo C .ast Watch as <ideo C Slo&7
),!> C -pen Position
),!0 C .irst Position
),!3 C Second Position
),!" C Third Position
),!9 C .ourth Position
),!, C .ifth Position
),!B C Si;th Position
),!/ C Seventh Position
),!4 C :ihth Position
),!7 C 2inth Position
),!0> C Tenth Position
),!00 C :leventh Position
),!03 C T&elfth Position
),!0" C Thirteenth Position
),!09 C .ourteenth Position
),!0, C .ifteenth Position
),!0B C Si;teenth Position
),!0/ C Seventeenth Position
),!04 C :ihteenth Position
),!07 C 2ineteenth Position
),!3> C T&entieth Position
),!30 C T&enty=.irst Position
),!33 C T&enty=Second Position
),!3" C T&enty=Third Position
),!39 C T&enty=.ourth Position
)ppendi; B: Credits
The followin" people pla#ed important roles in the creation of this software instrument*
,ark Eel$in ( Performance, audio editin", instrument desi"n, documentation.
Steven ,iller ( 4udio en"ineerin", /ualit# assurance.
Jim Fan Euskirk 0 4udio en"ineerin", voice recordin"s
4nna 9ouston 0 Focal samples performance.
-avid 9arve# ( Photo"raph#, desi"n concept, desi"n. dkchVtelus.$lack$err#.net
:uke ,erdso#, ,ertC >reative >ommunications &nc. ( Wavelore lo"os and visual concept. www.mertC.ca
4dam Aoran ( Performance tutorials
>hris :edrew 0 >onsultation. www.chrisledrew.com
-on >uff ( >onsultation, instrument rental.
Dast Apdated/ .ov 38, 2@@?
Copyright 2009 Wavelore Instruments. KONTAKT is a registered trademark o NATI!" IN#T$%&"NT# #ot'are #ynthesis (m)*.

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