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FLIGHT

INTERNATIONAL
FIGHTING FIT
HOW INDIA PLANS
TO MODERNISE ITS
AGEING AIR FORCE
FEATURE P24
COCKPIT CONCERN
New medical study on
pilots death could force
industry to recognise risk
of recycled cabin air 11
GES 3D PRINTING
LPT blades lined up for
additive manufacturing
as engine maker pushes
limits of technology 23
PROGRAMME UPDATE
GULFSTREAM
GOES FURTHER
Designing the longest-legged business jet yet
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3 2
3.40
5-11 AUGUST 2014
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5-11 August 2014
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Flight International
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3 fightglobal.com
FLIGHT
INTERNATIONAL
5-11 AUGUST 2014
MH17 loss prompts ICAO analysis into troubling concerns
about operating civil aircraft in conict regions P13. Brazil
adds to its C295 eet as it enhances SAR capability P19
FLIGHT
INTERNATIONAL
FIGHTINGFIT
HOWINDIAPLANS
TOMODERNISE ITS
AGEINGAIRFORCE
FEATURE P24
COCKPIT CONCERN
New medical study on
pilots death could force
industry to recognise risk
of recycled cabin air 11
GES3DPRINTING
LPT blades lined up for
additive manufacturing
as engine maker pushes
limits of technology 23
PROGRAMME UPDATE
GULFSTREAM
GOES FURTHER
Designing the longest-legged business jet yet
9 7 7 0 0 1 5 3 7 1 2 6 6
3 2
3.40
5-11 AUGUST 2014
INSIDE
CUTAWAY
POSTER
G650ER
19 Brazil adds to C295 feet as it enhances
SAR capability.
Maritime Hermes breaks cover.
Upgraded Il-38N boosts Russian ASW
capability
OSHKOSH SHOW REPORT
20 New Mooney puts money on China.
Carter reveals plans for turbine-powered
PAV-II.
Mahindra seeks US Airvan plant
21 Cessna pitching diesel 172 for avgas-
starved aviators.
Cirrus Aircraft puts Vision to the test.
FAA study could open skies to wider
LSA use
22 MVP Aero unveils amphibian worth
splashing out on.
Icon reveals A5 production prototype.
Kestrel keeps to schedule after new
investment
REGULARS
7 Comment
33 Straight & Level
34 Letters
36 Classied
39 Jobs
43 Working Week
NEWS
THIS WEEK
8 OSCE plans to put UAVs over Ukraine
9 787-10s to be built in South Carolina.
Airbus Helicopters looks on light side
10 FAA to mandate S-92 gearbox fx.
Airbus pursuing Dassault share disposal
proposal.
Final ATV blasts off to supply ISS
11 Cabin air killed BA pilot, say experts
AIR TRANSPORT
12 GE222 crash crew changed runway
approach decision.
Airbus bullish on A350s Asia-Pacifc
prospects
13 Industry to weigh up war zone risks
14 Airbus relaxes on A320 conversions
15 United speeds up removal plan for smaller
regionals.
Rivals battle for Ryanair order
DEFENCE
16 Australian auditors blast NH90 service
entry delay.
Black Hawk sale to Tunisia given DSCA
approval
17 RAAF readies for F-35 deliveries.
Harpoon hooks into Poseidon.
USMC lauds performance of K-Max
COVER STORY
30 Lone ranger Gulfstreams G650ER will
boast the longest legs of any business
jet when it enters service next year.
Plus: cutaway poster
FEATURES
24 INDIAN AIR FORCE Out with the old
The Indian air forces modernisation plan
is massive and costly, but should more
than prepare the service for the future
28 LABACE PREVIEW Come to Sorocaba
Brazil is preparing to host LABACE with
its business jet feet growing fast along
with its new business aviation hub
VOLUME 186 NUMBER 5451
PIC OF THE WEEK
The shot by DeKevin Thornton captures
North American airshow favourite Gene
Soucy ying his Grumman G-Y64A Showcat
at the EEA Airventure in Oshkosh on Tuesday
29 July. Soucy has modied his Ag Cat a
biplane traditionally used for crop spraying
to make it suited for a wingwalking act
and reight night performance.
D
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ightglobal.com/imageoftheday
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COVER IMAGE
Gulfstream supplied this
image of the demonstrator
Gulfstream G650ER, our
featured cutaway this
week, which carried out
proving ights from Los
Angeles to Melbourne,
Australia, and Hong Kong
to New York P30
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NEXT WEEK RUSSIA SPECIAL
What effect will the Western response to
Russias actions in Ukraine have on the
countrys efforts to rebuild its aerospace
industry? We talk to the main players.
THE WEEK ON THE WEB
ightglobal.com
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Flight International
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5-11 August 2014
BEHIND THE
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CONTENTS
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Total votes: 2,026
This week, we ask: Where will a 757 replacement, if Boeing
launches one, be built?
Renton Everett Charleston Elsewhere
Find all these items at ightglobal.com/wotw
Last week, we asked: MH17 shoot down? You said:
Airlines should have been avoiding
conict zone
Could not have been
foreseen
38
%
62
%
HIGH FLIERS
The top ve stories for the week just gone:
1 Airbus terminates Skymark order for six A380s
2 FARNBOROUGH: The end of show orders report
3 A320neo conversions necessary to handle backlog: Enders
4 Air New Zealand issues 787-9 frst user riposte
5 Airbus kicks off A350 route-proving trials
In his eponymous blog, David Learmount argues that the
Air Algerie/Swiftair Boeing MD-83 crash was not in any way
related to the two Malaysian misfortunes, but instead the
result of bad weather, and
rather ordinary. Ariel View
continues to debate whether
airliners should carry missile
warning systems following a
call by US legislators. Israel is
already integrating the Elbit
Systems Sky Shield counter-
measure system on its airliners. The technology is
therefore available, the blog observes, but it remains to be
seen if the requirement will still be there when the hype
around the crashes subsides. Meanwhile, The Dew Line
assesses the Danish fghter requirement, following the
deadline for bids that saw one main competitor withdraw.
US bureau chief Stephen Trimble
(top), pictured in front of a
Douglas C-3, joined hundreds of
thousands of owner-fyers and
enthusiasts at the EAA
AirVenture show in Oshkosh.
His Asia bureau counterpart
Greg Waldron few on an Airbus
A350 certication ight from
Singapore to Hong Kong.
IN THIS ISSUE
Companies listed
Aeroprofessional ..........................................42
AgustaWestland ...........................................27
Airbus ................................................8, 12, 14
Airbus Defence & Space ..............................19
Airbus Helicopters .......................................... 9
Aiut Alpin ....................................................... 9
Alenia Aermacchi .........................................26
All Nippon Airways .......................................13
Alpine Air Support ........................................37
American Airlines .........................................15
Avio .............................................................17
Boeing ...................................9, 12, 15, 16, 17
Bombarider .............................................9, 15
Brecqhou Development................................39
Bristow Helicopters ......................................37
British Airways ..............................................11
British International Helicopters ...................40
Carter Aviation Technologies .........................20
Cessna ........................................................21
CFM International ........................................23
Cirrus Aircraft .........................................21, 22
Cobham.......................................................40
DLR .............................................................33
EasyJet ........................................................41
Elbit Systems ...............................................19
Embraer .......................................................15
FTE Jerez ......................................................37
GE Aviation ..................................................23
General Atomics Aeronautical Systems ........21
General Electric ............................................. 8
Gippsland Aeronautics .................................20
Global Training Aviation ................................37
Gulfstream Brazil .........................................29
Hindustan Aeronautics .................................24
Honeywell ..............................................20, 25
Icon Aircraft .................................................22
Ilyushin ........................................................19
Ivchenko-Progress ........................................19
Japan Airlines ..............................................12
Kaman .........................................................17
Kamov .........................................................27
Kestrel Aircraft .............................................22
Lockheed Martin ..............................16, 17, 19
Lycoming .....................................................20
Mahindra .....................................................20
Malaysia Airlines ......................................8, 13
Martin Jetpack Company ..............................43
MBDA ..........................................................25
Mooney Aviation ..........................................20
MVP Aero .....................................................22
NH Industries ...............................................16
Northrop Grumman ......................................17
PPG Aerospace .............................................. 5
Pratt & Whitney ........................................9, 17
Qantas .........................................................15
Qatar Airways ...............................................12
RAC MiG ......................................................24
Rapiscan ....................................................... 8
Resource Group ...........................................39
Rockwell Collins .......................................2, 44
Rolls-Royce ............................................19, 23
Ryanair ........................................................15
Safran Group ................................................. 8
Schiebel ........................................................ 8
Sigma Aviation Services ...............................42
Sikorsky .......................................................16
Skymark Airlines ..........................................14
Skyworld Aviation .........................................36
Sukhoi .........................................................24
Textron Systems .....................................20, 25
Thales ..........................................................25
Tim Leacock Aircraft Sales ...........................36
TransAsia Airways .........................................13
Uni Air ..........................................................13
United Airlines .............................................15
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ightglobal.com/ComEngDirectory
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now updated for 2014 with enhanced data and in-depth market analysis
ightgIobaI.com/commengines
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COMMENT
5-11 August 2014
|
Flight International
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7 fightglobal.com
Read our archive of Flight
International comments on
editor Murdo Morrisons blog at
ightglobal.com/comment See This Week P11
B
ritish Airways may be centre stage for this weeks
report on a case of pilot and cabin crew illness, but
it is an industry-wide problem not related to a specic
airline or aircraft type.
As more and more pilots and cabin crew come for-
ward with manifestations of organophosphate-induced
neurotoxicity (OPIN), it is getting more difcult for air-
lines, manufacturers and government departments to
take the ofcial line that it is nothing to do with their
work. Plus, as medical knowledge on the subject is ac-
cumulated and more tissue damage samples gathered,
it will become even more difcult.
The Richard Westgate case is likely to become an in-
dustry watershed. Westgate was a 43-year-old BA pilot
who died in December 2012, and the difference in his
case is that he had extensive medical tests done both
before his death and by autopsy after it.
Most crew OPIN victims suffer traumatic symptoms
and just lose their jobs. However, since Westgates case
a BA steward has died and although his case was not
recognised before death, an autopsy revealed almost
identical OPIN symptoms to Westgates. As lawyer
Frank Cannon remarks: They can try explaining one
[case] away, but not another and then another.
The industry can pursue several potential solutions
to prevent engine oil-based organophosphates getting
into cabin air but it had better accelerate its efforts.
Clearing the air
See Air Transport P13
R
e
x

F
e
a
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u
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e
s
Singing from the same hymn sheet requires the right tune
The commercial airline industry does not have a centralised source of advice on the dangers
of fying over confict zones but would such a system be any more credible than what exists?
Conicting risks
I
n the wake of ight MH17s loss over eastern Ukraine,
it is right that ICAO has called a high-level meeting to
examine what, if anything, could be done to mitigate
risks to commercial air transport in conict zones.
It not clear, however, that any workable mitigations
are available apart from the obvious tactic of avoiding
airspace over all conict zones, however minor the
conict may be. That remedy is open to airlines any-
way risk management is their responsibility.
The idea of being compelled to avoid all airspace
subject to any form of dispute is anathema to ICAO. All
the treaties of which it is custodian and curator are
about ensuring freedom of the skies for travel and trade
just as its maritime equivalent the IMO guards the
freedom of the oceans for shipping. So, not only does
ICAO see the closure of airspace as undesirable, but as
a United Nations agency it cannot order airlines not to
use specic airspace it can only provide advice. Only
states have the right close their own airspace.
At present, airlines have a system for airspace risk
assessment. Information about conicts is available not
only via the media, but through NOTAMs, home gov-
ernments, the military, embassies and regional ofces
of IATA.
But would a centralised system be any more relia-
ble? Is there any intrinsic benet from every airline
having access to the same intelligence-based advice? It
may be a tidy idea, but singing from the same hymn
Being compelled to avoid all
airspace subject to any form
of dispute is anathema to ICAO
sheet is not good if it is the wrong hymn. Also, who
would run a central agency for airspace safety advice?
ICAO would be the obvious answer in terms of reliabil-
ity, independence and aviation expertise, but such a
task is diametrically opposed to its raison detre and
it is not an expert in international or internal conicts.
Finally, ICAO would have to depend completely
upon reliable, consistent intelligence feeds from all
over the world which many nations might not be
happy to supply and also upon having the expertise
to make a judgement airlines would trust.
Setting up a scale of four airspace risk categories
from zero to high risk might make passengers feel bet-
ter informed, but it is not the passengers decision, it is
the airlines.
Also under consideration is a treaty to control the
production, use and ownership of missiles, just as
there are treaties banning biological weapons.
There is certainly no guaranteed outcome for that
proposal and if there were it would take years.
THIS WEEK
fightglobal.com 8
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Flight International
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5-11 August 2014
A
contract for leased un-
manned air vehicle (UAV)
services in support of the security
mission in Ukraine is expected to
be awarded imminently, an in-
dustry source has revealed.
The Organization for Security
and Co-operation in Europe
(OSCE) recently issued a solicita-
tion for bids which closed on Fri-
day, 25 July. It stipulates the re-
quirement for a turnkey UAV
solution for deployment in the
conicted east of the country.
The OSCE is seeking a vertical
take-off and landing platform,
preferably for round-the-clock
monitoring operations, to be op-
erational within weeks.
Vienna-based Schiebel re-
sponded to the tender with its
Camcopter S-100, but it is un-
clear whether any other systems
have been offered. Saabs Skeldar
UAV would full the require-
ment, although the company de-
clines to comment on any bid.
[The solicitation] came out of
nowhere, says Chris Day, head
of capability engineering at
Schiebel. Our understanding is
that they want something pretty
much now they dont want
something in a months time.
The OSCE was unavailable to
comment on the solicitation, and
the date of its release remains un-
known. However, sources claim
it was issued suddenly, leading
to speculation that the downing
of Malaysia Airlines ight MH17
in the Donetsk region of Ukraine
prompted the tender.
Day says Schiebel has offered
two full systems each compris-
ing two aircraft plus ground
control station to provide 24h
coverage. The requirement for a
rotary-wing aircraft is due to the
lack of available airelds and
runways in the area.
Schiebel says the tender re-
quires electro-optical and syn-
thetic aperture radar payloads,
which the Camcopter can carry
simultaneously for around 6h.
The scope of the surveillance
operation remains unknown,
although it is thought the UAV
will monitor the movement of
cargo in the region.
The ability monitor access
routes and the movement of mili-
tary materiel would be valuable
to OSCE, hence the interest in ac-
quiring or leasing UAV capability
for this area, says Doug Barrie,
senior fellow for military aero-
space at the International Insti-
tute for Strategic Studies.
The system will initially be
deployed for one month on a trial
basis, although this is expected to
be extended if the system proves
a success.
No evidence has so far
emerged of UAV use by either
side in the Ukrainian conict,
and the size of the nations un-
manned inventory is unclear.
For more coverage of the burgeoning
unmanned air system sector log on to
ightglobal.com/UAV
UNMANNED BETH STEVENSON LONDON
OSCE plans to put
UAVs over Ukraine
European security partnership issues urgent solicitation
for bids to monitor confict zone in east of country
S
c
h
ie
b
e
l
Schiebel has responded by offering its Camcopter S-100 system
FRANCE TAKES DELIVERY OF ITS THIRD A400M
MILITARY TRANSPORTS France has received the third Airbus
A400M Atlas tactical transport from its 50-unit order the fourth
delivery for the programme overall. Handed over on 25 July, MSN10
will be operated by the French air force from its Orlans air base,
which will receive two further aircraft in the coming weeks, says
the manufacturer. The service says the new arrival shows an
increase in performance over the two examples it received last
year, with the A400M now able to reach its contractual ceiling of
39,400ft (12,000m) and boasting additional capacity thanks to its
ability to carry two pallets on the cargo ramp.
MH370 DEEP WATER SEARCH TO START NEXT MONTH
HUNT Investigators hunting for the Malaysia Airlines Boeing
777-200ER missing since March expect to begin deep-water
search operations in September. The revised schedule follows an
update on progress with the bathymetric mapping being undertak-
en to aid the search effort. Chinese naval vessel Zhu Kezhen has
been conducting survey operations since 24 May and had mapped
some 25,000km
2
of sea foor by 30 July. A second surveyor, the
Fugro Equator, has covered over 43,000km
2
, and a Malaysian
vessel, the KD Mutiara, is to join the other ships this month. The
Joint Agency Co-ordination Centre overseeing the hunt for MH370
says the bathymetric survey work will fnish by September, with
deep-water searches to begin in the same month following
selection of a contractor.
ENGINE BUSINESSES POWER UP SAFRAN INCOME
FINANCIALS Safran Groups aerospace propulsion division turned
in an 18% rise in operating income to 745 million ($970 million)
over the frst half, buoyed by the civil aftermarket. Increased volume
and better mix, says the company, resulted in modestly higher
civil original equipment sales. But it says that strong growth in the
CFM International CFM56 and General Electric GE90 aftermarket
increased the divisions services revenue by over 7%. Services
r epresented almost 50% of revenues for the frst half, adds Safran,
which were up by 2.5% to 3.76 billion.
TRIAL LAUNCHED TO DETECT BATTERIES IN AIR CARGO
TECHNOLOGY Security screening specialist Rapiscan is to explore
the feasibility of detecting batteries in air cargo, under a research
contract from the UK Civil Aviation Authority. The CAA has selected
Rapiscan for a research and development effort to see whether un-
declared lithium batteries in air freight can be identifed. CAA state
safety programme manager Ian Shaw says the company has the
technical experience to gather signifcant test data. Under the
nine-month contract Rapiscan will look at various cargo confgura-
tions and develop image-processing tools and detection algorithms.
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BRIEFING
THIS WEEK
5-11 August 2014
|
Flight International
|
9 fightglobal.com
FAA to mandate
S-92 gearbox fx
THIS WEEK P10
F
inal assembly of the 787-10
will be conducted by Boeing
at its facility in North Charleston,
South Carolina beginning in 2017.
We looked at all our options
and found the most efcient and
effective solution is to build the
787-10 at Boeing South Caroli-
na, says Larry Loftis, vice presi-
dent and general manager of the
787 programme.
This will allow us to balance
787 production across the North
Charleston and Everett sites as
we increase production rates.
Were happy with our growth
and success in South Carolina,
and the continued success at both
sites gives us condence in our
plan going forward.
Design of the 787 familys
largest variant is taking place at
Boeings facilities in Everett,
where the 787-8 and 787-9 are
assembled.
Boeing says the 787-10 mid-
body fuselage is too long to be
transported from North Charles-
ton to Everett for nal assembly.
Introducing the 787-10 in North
Charleston [also] allows the Ev-
erett facility to focus on the 787-8
and 787-9, says the airframer.
The 787-10 is 5.5m (18ft) long-
er than the 787-9, and 3.05m of
that additional length is in the
midbody section.
Boeing has three production
lines for the 787 two in Everett
and one in South Carolina pro-
ducing 10 aircraft a month. This
will increase to 12 in 2016 and 14
by the end of the decade.
Everett will continue to assem-
ble seven aircraft a month, while
the South Carolina nal assembly
line will grow to ve aircraft each
month in 2015 from three current-
ly, and then up to seven each
month by the end of the decade.
MANUFACTURING GHIM-LAY YEO WASHINGTON DC
787-10s to be built in South Carolina
Boeing announces plans for fnal assembly of the largest variant of twinjet family at its North Charleston facility
B
ombardier may seek more in-
formation before accepting
Pratt & Whitneys proposed solu-
tion to the engine malfunction
that has kept the CSeries ight
test eet grounded for two
months, executives say.
The aircraft manufacturer is
still evaluating P&Ws proposed
x for the oil system failure that
damaged the PW1500G engine
and fuselage of FTV-1 during a 29
May ground test, says Bombardier
chief executive Pierre Beaudoin.
Bombardier received P&Ws
submission two weeks ago, he
says. We should make a deci-
sion shortly, so we continue to
say [a return to ight is possible]
within weeks. Weve made
substantial progress because Pratt
has proposed a solution to return
to ight.
Despite the two-month ground-
ing, Bombardier also maintains
the six-month window for entry
into service of the rst CSeries
aircraft in the second half of 2015,
he says.
A
irbus Helicopters has quietly
launched a new reduced
weight variant of its EC145 light-
twin, aimed at the re-ghting
and aerial work segments.
Called the EC145e, the manu-
facturer has stripped out all
unnecessary weight from the air-
frame, including the second pi-
lots seat. It estimates around
200kg has been cut from the air-
crafts empty weight.
Production will be around 10
aircraft per year, says Airbus
Helicopters Germany chief execu-
tive Dr Wolfgang Schoder. Final
assembly will take place on the
same line as the new EC145 T2 at
Production of the smaller 787-8 and -9 will stay at Everett
B
o
e
in
g
Airbus Helicopters looks on light side
ROTORCRAFT DOMINIC PERRY DONAUWRTH
The EC145 T2 is assembled on the same line as the new variant
A
ir
b
u
s

H
e
lic
o
p
t
e
r
s
the airframers Donauwrth plant,
although this could be moved to
its US facility in Columbus,
Mississippi where the similar
UH-72A Lakota is produced.
At present two separate lines
are running at Donauwrth, pro-
ducing both legacy EC145 C2s and
the newer T2. However, work on
the older model will stop in a few
months says Schoder.
Work on the enhanced T3/P3
versions of the lighter EC135 is
also taking place at Donauwrth.
Certication of the upgraded
types is envisioned in September
with rst delivery to Italys Aiut
Alpin taking place a month later.
Improvements include longer
rotor blades, modied engine in-
takes and engine control software
to boost the helicopters hot and
high performance.
Airbus Helicopters took in net
orders for 148 rotorcraft in the rst
half of 2014 a fall of 11% on the
same period last year amid signs
of a weaker than expected market
for civil helicopters.
Speaking on a 30 July results
call, Tom Enders, chief executive
of Airbus Group, said the com-
mercial market was still pretty
soft. Nonetheless, the airframer
hopes to make inroads into the
market with new products like the
7.5t EC175, which will enter ser-
vice in the fourth quarter.
Airbus Group chief nancial

ofcer Harald Wilhelm says re-
search and development spend-
ing at the unit was also a bit
above plan in the rst half, as
Airbus Helicopters stepped up
its entry-into-service preparations
for the EC175 and the EC145 T2.
The crisis involving the
EC225 that plagued the com-
pany in 2012 and 2013 is now
behind us, Enders adds.
POWERPLANTS
Bombardier to
evaluate P&W
x for CSeries
THIS WEEK
fightglobal.com 10
|
Flight International
|
5-11 August 2014
For more in-depth coverage of the
global rotorcraft sector, go online to
ightglobal.com/helicopters
A
n Automated Transfer Vehicle
payload has been successfully
launched by the European Space
Agency to carry out surveillance
and provide supplies to the Inter-
national Space Station the fth
and nal mission of its type.
ATV-5 dubbed George Lema-
tre was launched using the
Airbus Defence & Space Ariane 5
rocket on 29 July, from Kourou,
French New Guinea.
ATV-5 was expected to have
completed its initial operations
some 10h after launch, and will
take two weeks to test equipment
and perform experiments.
The mission will include the
vehicle ying around the ISS to
test its laser infrared imaging sen-
sor (LIRIS). A virtual 3D model of
the station will be generated
using LIRIS, after which the data
stored on board will be down-
loaded and analysed.
ATV-5 will then dock with the
ISS on 12 August for six months
and deliver 6,600kg (14,600lb) of
freight, after which it will leave
with waste material.
ATV-5 for which Airbus was
also the prime contractor weighs
20t, making it the heaviest pay-
load to be launched by Ariane.
The mission marks the 60th
launch using the Ariane 5 rocket.
The rst ATV mission was
launched in 2008, also in support
of the ISS crew.
S
ik
o
r
s
k
y
The airframer has already advised operators to make the changes
R
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Rafale: conflict of interests?
A
ir
b
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D
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f
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&

S
p
a
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The pod launched on 29 July
T
he US Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration has proposed to
mandate a series of actions al-
ready recommended by Sikorsky
aimed at preventing a main gear-
box oil pump failure on the air-
framers S-92 helicopter.
The proposals include auto-
mating a process to switch a by-
pass valve if oil pressure drops
below 2.4bar (35psi), and install-
ing a sensor that would detect an
oil pressure drop and alert the
pilot, a notice of proposed rule-
making issued on 23 July says.
The FAA would also require
software changes to give the pilot
visual and aural warnings of an
oil pump failure in the S-92s
main gearbox.
Publishing the draft rule in the
Federal Register is the rst step in
the FAAs rulemaking process.
The public now has a chance to
comment on the rule until 22
September.
Sikorsky has already advised
S-92 operators to make the same
hardware and software changes
in a series of service bulletins is-
sued by the company from 2011
to 2013.
The bulletins and rulemaking
process began following the 2009
crash of an S-92 off Newfound-
land, Canada in which 17 people
died due to a loss of oil in the
main gearbox.
The FAA document also dis-
closes another incident of a leak-
ing oil pump.
The S-92s manual requires the
pilot to manually switch the by-
pass valve within 5s of an oil
pump failure alert. In that case it
took the pilot signicantly longer
to make the manual switch, the
FAA says.
SAFETY STEPHEN TRIMBLE WASHINGTON DC
FAA to mandate
S-92 gearbox x
Sikorsky has already advised operators to make necessary
software tweaks to ensure pilots warned if oil pump fails
Fifth and fnal ATV blasts off on ISS supply mission
MILESTONE BETH STEVENSON LONDON
A
irbus Group has under-
scored its determination to
divest its 46.3% stake in rival
French airframer Dassault Avia-
tion, as the reshaped company
shrugs off the last vestiges of
state control.
Airbus has held the stake in
Dassault which makes both
business jets and combat aircraft
since before its inception as
EADS, as a legacy of the national-
isation of Frances aerospace in-
dustry in the early 1980s.
However, with its interest in
the Euroghter consortium, Air-
bus has found itself in an
awkward position where the
Typhoon has been pitched
against the rival Dassault Rafale
in ghter requirement contests.
However, in its half-year re-
sults for the period ended 30
June the company states: As
part of a portfolio review, Airbus
Group continues to pursue dis-
posal options for its investment
in Dassault Aviation. Chief
executive Tom Enders, speaking
on an investor call on 30 July,
STRATEGY DOMINIC PERRY LONDON
Airbus pursuing Dassault
share disposal proposal
declined to be drawn on a
timeline for the disposal of the
stake, but said Airbus Group is
actively working to divest the
share in Dassault.
No reason for the renewed in-
terest in a sale has been given, but
industry insiders say that since
Airbus Group reshaped its share-
holding in early 2013 reducing
the inuence of the French and
German governments any im-
pediments to the deal have grad-
ually been removed.
Airbus Group earned 67
million ($90 million) from its
interest in Dassault in the rst
half of 2014.
Airbus has been
in an awkward
position where the
Typhoon was pitched
against the rival
Dassault Rafale
THIS WEEK
5-11 August 2014
|
Flight International
|
11 fightglobal.com
GE222 crash crew
changed runway
approach decision
AIR TRANSPORT P12
S
ustained exposure to organo-
phosphates (OP) from con-
taminated cabin air contributed
to the death of a 43-year-old
British Airways pilot, a group of
medical experts believe.
Their ndings are likely to in-
crease pressure on the industry to
take more seriously the issue of
sustained exposure to engine
bleed air. Airlines and govern-
ments have dismissed sugges-
tions that it can be a factor behind
ightcrew falling ill.
The pilot, senior rst ofcer
Richard Westgate, started ying
professionally in 1996 and
worked for various airlines be-
fore joining BA in 2007. He died
in December 2012 after years of
increasingly serious symptoms of
sickness that went undiagnosed
in the UK despite reference to 15
different medical consultants.
Symptoms included head-
aches, loss of memory and numb-
ness in his limbs. He was ground-
ed on full pay in September
2011, and consultation with a
neurologist in Amsterdam fol-
lowed. As a result, extensive
MEDICAL INVESTIGATION DAVID LEARMOUNT LONDON
Cabin air killed BA pilot, say experts
Authority on organophosphate poisoning says tissue from Richard Westgate, who died in 2012, worst case he has seen
medical details of his symptoms
before death are on record.
Although no coroners inquest
has been held into his death, med-
ical experts led by Prof Mohamed
Abou-Donia of Duke University
Medical School, North Carolina,
the worlds leading authority on
organophosphate poisoning, have
just published a study into two
autopsies carried out on Westgate,
who until his illness was a slim, t
paragliding champion.
Abou-Donia and his colleagues
are also investigating the death
this year of an unnamed 34-year-
old BA airline steward, whose
tissue samples indicate degrada-
tion that appears identical to
Westgates case and consistent
with organophosphate-induced
neurotoxicity. Both he and
Westgate died in their beds.
POISONING
Abou-Donia says Westgates case
is one of the worst cases of orga-
no-phosphate [OP] poisoning I
have come across. In all my spe-
cialised tests for neuro-specic
auto-antibodies he was the worst
by far. He adds: The air trans-
port industry constantly over-
looks vital components of OP poi-
soning: the combined effects of
multiple compound exposure
repeated low-dosage exposure is
just as dangerous as a single large
dose (often more so) and the ge-
netic predisposition to toxicity of
the individuals genes.
The potential risks of air con-
tamination have been a sensitive
area for some years. The airlines
do not deny that organophos-
phates can be present in the en-
gine bleed air that supplies the
cabin, but they and aircraft man-
ufacturers maintain that this is at
a harmless level. Abou-Donia ar-
gues this was not so in Westgates
case, despite the fact that the
pilot had never logged an actual
fume event during his career.
WATERSHED
Frank Cannon, the lawyer acting
for the families of both deceased,
says the Westgate case is a water-
shed in this controversy: They
can try explaining one [case]
away, but not another and then
another. Cannon says he has
about 50 cases on his books.
BA says: It would be inappro-
priate to comment on the cause
of death of an individual. The
safety and security of our custom-
ers and crew are of paramount im-
portance to British Airways and
will never be compromised.
Our crew are encouraged to
report any possible fume event so
that our engineers can investigate
it. We would not operate an air-
craft if we believed it posed a
health or safety risk to our custom-
ers or crew.
Westgate: series of symptoms
AIR TRANSPORT
fightglobal.com 12
|
Flight International
|
5-11 August 2014
David Learmount offers his succinct views
on the complexities of aviation safety:
ightglobal.com/Learmount
T
aiwans Civil Aeronautics
Administration (CAA) has
denied reports that air trafc con-
trollers at Magong airport rejected
a request from crashed TransAsia
Airways ight GE222 to change
the direction of the turboprops
landing approach.
Taiwanese media had claimed
that the pilot of the crashed ATR
72-500 requested to land at the
airports runway 02, instead of
the instructed approach from the
opposite direction, runway 20.
The CAA conrmed that a re-
quest to change the direction of
the approach was made by the
TransAsia ightcrew. It adds,
however, that while air trafc
controllers were checking with
the air force about the request, the
pilot changed his mind and de-
cided to land on runway 20. He
communicated this decision to
controllers prior to making the
ill-fated landing attempt.
Magong airport, which han-
dles both civil and military activ-
ities, has a single runway, desig-
nated 02/20. It is 3,000m (9,800ft)
long and runs in a north/north-
easterly direction.
While the ATC was still co-
ordinating with the military, the
latest weather data reported a
visibility of 1,600m, and the two
pilots decided to use runway 20
for landing, it says.
The CAA says that besides
TransAsia, an Uni Air aircraft had
also requested to land on runway
02 at about the same time. It is
not clear at which exact point of
the ight did pilots from both air-
lines request a change in the di-
rection of their approaches.
TransAsias 14-year-old turbo-
prop, registered B-22810, was op-
erating the Kaohsiung-Magong
ight when it crashed into build-
ings on approach to land, killing
48 passengers and crew on board.
The circumstances of the
crash are still unclear, but Ma-
gong was battered by typhoon
activity on the day of the acci-
dent. Heavy rain and poor visi-
bility reportedly led the ight
crew to initiate a go-around after
an aborted initial approach.
TransAsia Airways has pledged
to enhance its safety standards on
domestic ights, stating that it
plans to raise visibility require-
ments for take-offs and landings of
its domestic ights to at least 50%
above that required by the airports
and regulator.
A
ll Nippon Airways (ANA)
has nalised an order with
Boeing for 40 widebody aircraft
comprising 20 777-9Xs, 14
787-9s and six 777-300ERs.
The deal, originally an-
nounced as a commitment in
March, is valued at $13 billion,
says the US airframer.
The aircraft we have selected
will enable us to modernise and
expand our eet further as we
seek to become one of the worlds
leading airline groups, says
Shinichiro Ito, chief executive,
ANA Holdings.
Boeing adds that the 777X has
300 orders and commitments
from six customers globally.
This order from ANA
demonstrates the strength of our
50-year partnership and we are
proud to make history with ANA
once again, says Boeing
Commercial Airplanes chief ex-
ecutive Ray Conner.
The turboprop crashed into buildings, killing 48 people on board
R
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ACCIDENT MAVIS TOH SINGAPORE
GE222 crash crew
changed runway
approach decision
TransAsia fight requested landing from opposite direction
but then reverted to original course before fatal accident
FLEET
ANA seals $13bn Boeing order
The deal includes 20 777-9Xs
B
o
e
in
g
MARKETING GREG WALDRON SINGAPORE
Airbus bullish on A350s
Asia-Pacifc prospects
A
irbus remains condent
about the prospects for the
A350-1000 in the Asia-Pacic,
despite recent high prole wins
for the Boeing 777X in the region.
Sophie Pendaries, Airbuss
head of product marketing and
customer affairs, stresses that the
developmental A350-1000 will
be lighter than the 777X, which
will give it superior cost per seat
economics.
We estimate a cost advantage
of 15% per trip against the 777X,
and a 5% lower cost per seat,
she says. Pendaries was speaking
with Flight International aboard
MSN5, the fth test A350-900,
during a test ight on the Singa-
pore-Hong Kong route one of
the busiest city pairs in the Asia-
Pacic, and an important market
for future A350 operators Singa-
pore Airlines and Cathay Pacic.
Despite strong success with
the A350-900, the larger -1000
has struggled to secure sales since
winning a landmark order for the
type with Japan Airlines (JAL).
The JAL deal marked a major
inroad for the European airframer
in Japan traditionally a strong-
hold of Boeing.
Pendaries adds that the
A350-1000s operating weight
when empty will be 33t lighter
than the 777-8X, owing to the
types composite fuselage the
777X will feature an aluminium
fuselage and will be 40t lighter
than the 777-9X.
This will reduce navigation
charges, lower landing fees and
cut fuel burn. In addition to the
lower seat cost, these factors will
also reduce the cost per trip by
15%. Every time you y with
the A350-1000, you cut your risk
by 15%, she says.
The ight was one of a series of
ight tests between the two Asian
super-cities designed to study
how the A350-900 will perform in
typical airline service, with an
emphasis on short turnarounds,
operating in hot, tropical condi-
tions and the impact of the envi-
ronment on aircraft systems.
AIR TRANSPORT
fightglobal.com
Neo conversions
inevitable Enders
AIR TRANSPORT P14
5-11 August 2014
|
Flight International
|
13
T
he International Civil Avia-
tion Organisation (ICAO) is
establishing a task force that aims
to examine ways to reinforce the
collection of accurate informa-
tion about conict zones, and im-
prove their risk assessment dur-
ing route planning.
The senior-level task force
which government and industry
representatives will be invited to
join is being set up in the wake
of the loss of Malaysia Airlines
ight MH17, apparently after a
missile strike, over Ukraine.
ICAO secretary general
Raymond Benjamin, speaking
during a brieng in Montreal last
week, said the destruction of
MH17 was unacceptable and
had raised troubling concerns
about operating over regions
caught up in armed conict.
He acknowledges that the mat-
ter is highly complex and po-
litically sensitive, but says that
ICAO has an important role to
play in ensuring that the right
information reaches the right
people at the right time.
While the pursuit of accurate
information on which to base op-
erational decisions on ight safe-
ty is a near-term objective, ICAO
has also highlighted a need for
better international control over
the design and deployment of
anti-aircraft weapons.
International Air Transport
Association director general
Tony Tyler, also present at the
brieng, said the loss of the
Boeing 777-200ER on 17 July
had exposed a gap in the sys-
tem. Tyler says that crucial deci-
sion-making information must be
authoritative, accessible and un-
equivocal. Even information
which might be considered sensi-
tive can be sanitised, he says,
in a manner which will ensure
airlines can act effectively.
WEAPONRY
Tyler adds that MH17 has
demonstrated that powerful
anti-aircraft weaponry is in the
hands of non-state entities, and
that there is little in terms of
international conventions to
address the associated risks. But
he concedes that this is a longer-
term issue.
MH17 had been operating in a
section of open and approved air-
space situated above a zone of
closed airspace.
Keeping airspace open for the
passage of commercial trafc
maintains a revenue stream of air
navigation fees, but Tyler rejects
the notion that this creates a con-
ict of interest for governments.
Im sure that no country, no
civilised person, would put a few
dollars ahead of the value of
human lives, he says.
ICAO expects that the task
force will be able to submit an
initial report within six to eight
weeks. Its ndings will be
presented to the ICAO Council.
The organisation will also host a
high-level safety conference in
February 2015.
Tyler insists that there is no sys-
temic failing and stresses a need
to keep a sense of perspective.
Weve identied a gap. Lets
close that gap but not completely
rewrite the rules on how things
are done.
Meanwhile, Ukrainian author-
ities were last week trying to
establish a 20km safe zone
around the crash site of Malaysia
Airlines ight MH17 to enable
investigators to examine the
Boeing 777s wreckage.
The zone is smaller than the
40km combat-free radius that
Ukrainian president Petro
Poroshenko originally ordered on
21 July. That declaration has
since been updated to refer to a
zone 40km in diameter.
Ukrainian deputy prime min-
ister Vladimir Groisman, chairing
the commission investigating the
loss of MH17, says the country
will not lead any military action
within the 20km radius.
It came after Ukrainian-
authorities disclosed that the
Boeing 777-200ER had suffered
explosive depressurisation.
The National Security and
Defence Council of Ukraine says
that a specialist committee study-
ing the cause of ight MH17s de-
struction on 17 July has informed
that it was subjected to massive
explosive decompression.
SURVEILLANCE
The Council has not specied
any trigger hostile act or other-
wise for the sudden depressuri-
sation. Nor has it stated the
source of its information.
Investigators in the UK have
been analysing information from
the two ight recorders retrieved
from the 777s wreckage.
The UK Air Accidents Investi-
gation Branch says that it has fed
its information to the internation-
al investigation team through the
Dutch Safety Board, which is
heading the MH17 inquiry.
Investigation of the crash is
being carried out under ICAO
rules, says the Dutch Safety
Board, adding that it has shared
information only with the
inquiry team, and not the Ukrain-
ian government. We didnt brief
anybody else except the team
members, it states.
Ukrainian investigators also
believe MH17 had been ying an
established route.
The state commission support-
ing the inquiry says that analysis
of data from automatic depend-
ent surveillance (ADS-B) trans-
missions and ground radar con-
rms that the aircraft was
operating in Ukrainian airspace
within an established air trafc
services route.
While investigators have yet to
conclude that a missile brought
down MH17, this remains the
most prominent theory at govern-
ment levels.
INITIATIVE DAVID KAMINSKI-MORROW LONDON
Industry to weigh up war zone risks
ICAO-led task force will aim to advise airlines of potential dangers of fying over areas of confict in wake of MH17
IATA chairman Tyler says the crash exposed gap in the system
R
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Authorities have tried to establish a safe zone around the site
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AIR TRANSPORT
fightglobal.com 14
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|
5-11 August 2014
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ightglobal.com/dashboard
MANUFACTURING DAVID KAMINSKI-MORROW LONDON
Airbus relaxes on A320 conversions
Airframer says further transfers from original variant will be necessary to keep transition to all-Neo production on track
A
irbus expects to entertain fur-
ther conversions of its A320
family to the re-engined A320neo
in order to cope with overbook-
ing in the backlog.
Although the airframer origi-
nally insisted it would not permit
switching of existing A320 orders
to the A320neo, it has recently re-
laxed this policy for a limited
number of customers.
Airbus Group chief executive
Tom Enders explains that the
manufacturer has effectively
been forced to allow conversions
in order to keep the transition to
all-A320neo production on track.
He says that given the over-
booking of A320 slots and the
shortening interval before
A320neo transition, Airbus can
no longer manage the backlog by
pushing out aircraft some
years down the road.
Enders says Airbus does not
want to move A320 orders to
2018 and beyond because the air-
framer is aiming to achieve full
A320neo production cutover by
this point.
HIGHER MARGINS
He adds that, as a result, conver-
sion of A320s is inevitable,
adding: We knew it was com-
ing. However, he points out that
conversions to the A320neo re-
sult in higher margins for the
slots, and he expects further simi-
lar switches to emerge in the sec-
ond half of 2014 and over the
course of next year.
Airbus says the A320neo re-
mains on track for rst ight in
September, and entry into service
in the fourth quarter of 2015.
Meanwhile, the company also
says the A350 is on schedule for
certication in the third quarter
and service entry in the fourth,
even as costs for the programme
weighed on the airframers
rst-half earnings.
The commercial aircraft divi-
sions earnings before one-off
costs for the six months to 30
June rose by rose by 4.5% to
1.29 billion ($1.8 billion).
Airbus Group says A350 de-
velopment remains on track,
but acknowledges that its rst-
half nancials have shouldered
support costs and the effects of
front-loaded research expenses
compared with last year.
Revenues for the Airbus divi-
sion rose by 7% to 19.4 billion
as it delivered 303 aircraft over
the six months.
Airbus Group points out that
this involved a more favourable
mix of aircraft, including 13
A380s ve more than it man-
aged by last years interim.
The airframer expects full-year
deliveries to be around the same
level as in 2013 including the
rst A350-900 handover to Qatar
Airways with this gure ex-
ceeded by net orders.
The group forecasts moder-
ate return-on-sales growth for
2014, and says its 2015 target,
pre-A330neo development con-
siderations, is unchanged.
A
ir
b
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The airframer originally insisted
it would not permit switching
of orders to the newer twinjet
CONTRACT
Toulouse sure it can remarket Skymarks cancelled A380s
Airbus has cancelled Japanese car-
rier Skymark Airlines order for six
A380s, saying it has taken the
action in accordance with its
contractual rights.
However, the airframer is conf-
dent it will be able to remarket the
assembled Skymark Airlines A380s
within six months.
Skymark had previously disclosed
it was discussing a possible cancel-
lation of the 2011 order with Airbus,
saying that increased competition
and weaker local currency had af-
fected the business climate since it
placed the order.
A
ir
b
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Airbus confident it will find new homes for A380s in six months
However, the carrier also ex-
pressed concern that it would incur
a penalty if the order was cancelled.
The frst two of the Rolls-Royce
Trent 900-powered aircraft have al-
ready been built, with one undergo-
ing test fights, but the airframer has
not ftted the interior to either a
crucial decision which will aid the
remarketing effort.
Remarketing chances of a green
aircraft that doesnt have the cabin
furnishing is higher than for a [cus-
tomised] white-tail, said Airbus
Group chief Tom Enders during a
frst-half results briefng.
We dont have a record of giving
up easily on any of our customers,
adds Enders, pointing out that
Skymark would have been the frst
A380 operator in the key Japanese
market. We had to act proactively
to limit their, and our, liability.
Airbus Group chief fnancial of-
fcer Harald Wilhelm says the
Skymark situation will not impact
the 2015 objective for A380 produc-
tion break-even.
Enders insists that the A380 is
not running out of orders, and
there is no need to decide on a ma-
jor overhaul, including an option for
a new engine.
Enders insists that a re-engining
programme would require a con-
vincing business case, which would
certainly take more than one or two
customers.
Meanwhile, Korean Air took deliv-
ery of its tenth A380 on 29 July its
fnal superjumbo on order.
The aircraft will undergo tests
required by authorities in South
Korea before being deployed on the
Seoul Incheon-Atlanta route on 3
August, the airline says.
AIR TRANSPORT
fightglobal.com
Australian auditors
blast NH90 service
entry delay
DEFENCE P16
R
yanair sees Boeings 200-seat
variant of the 737 Max 8 and
Airbuss planned 189-seat
A320neo as contenders for its
next aircraft order.
Chief executive Michael
OLeary has welcomed Boeings
intention to offer a capacity-
boosted version of its re-engined
narrowbody. However, he stress-
es there is no intention to amend
the carriers existing 180-aircraft
order for 189-seat 737-800s due
for delivery between September
this year and 2018.
We will take those aircraft as
is, but for the next round of air-
craft, [for the period] 2019-2025,
we are looking at the 189-seat Air-
bus, or what I hope will be a 197
to 198-seat 737, OLeary said at a
brieng in London.
Boeing disclosed its plan for a
200-seat Max 8 during last
months Farnborough air show.
Airbus, meanwhile, intends to
raise the number of passengers
the A320 is certicated to carry
from 180 to 189, with an internal
conguration change based on a
larger door and installation of a
wider slide.
On the possibility that the Irish
budget carrier could turn to Air-
bus for aircraft in the future,
OLeary says: We have a long-
standing relationship with Boe-
ing, and in the future I suspect we
will operate largely with Boeing
aircraft, but I think we would be
keen to operate some Airbus air-
craft somewhere in the business.
Meanwhile, OLeary has
sought to quash speculation that
he is planning to depart his
position as chief executive of
Ryanair, saying he is committed
to two more years with the low-
cost airline.
5-11 August 2014
|
Flight International
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15
Airline will cut fleet to 231 50-seaters, including ERJ-145s
U
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A
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s
Q
antas is to embark on a 12-
month cabin upgrade of its
Boeing 737-800s which will see
an additional row added at the
rear of the economy class cabin
and an enhancement to the carri-
ers in-ight entertainment.
The programme will com-
mence in the middle of 2015 and
see 67 aircraft upgraded, the Aus-
tralian carrier says.
The airline has yet to decide
where the work will take place.
After the upgrade, Qantass 737s
will feature 174 economy seats
up from 168 currently and 12
business class seats.
The addition of six economy
seats will be made possible by
changes to the rear galley and
lavatory. However, despite the
addition of additional seats, the
carrier says there will be no
changes to the amount of seating
space for each passenger.
The new arrangement will in-
crease the capacity of Qantass 737
eet by 3%, the carrier adds.
CABINS GREG WALDRON SINGAPORE
Qantas to hike 737-800 seating
FLEETS
American Dreamliner delivery on track
American Airlines is on track to
receive its frst Boeing 787-8 late in
the fourth quarter, as it focuses on
modernising its largely ageing feet,
says chief executive Doug Parker.
The airline anticipates the delivery
of two 787s this year, with 11 more
due in 2015 from its frm order for 42
of the type which includes both the
-8 and larger -9 models. Speaking
with Flight International at the Global
Business Travel Association annual
convention in Los Angeles, which was
held on 25-29 July, Parker declined to
provide any further detail on the
delivery schedule.
American will initially fy its
Dreamliners on domestic routes
before placing them on international
services. This approach is similar to
United Airlines plan, when it re-
ceived the its frst 787s in 2012.
U
nited Airlines is accelerating
plans to remove 50-seat re-
gional jets from its eet, with a
new target to park about 130
aircraft by the end of 2015.
In outlining the plan, Jeff
Smisek, chairman, president and
chief executive of the Chicago-
based Star Alliance carrier, in-
creases the number of aircraft
United plans to remove by 30
from comments he made in June.
United now anticipates having
roughly 231 50-seat regional jets
including the Bombardier CRJ200
and Embraer ERJ-145 in its re-
gional eet at the end of 2015,
based on these numbers and its
most recent eet plan. The carrier
plans to remove 47 of the aircraft
this year. The airline will replace
some of the small regional jets
with the 76-seat Embraer 175s it
rst introduced in May. It plans
to have 70 of the type in its re-
gional eet by the end of 2015.
Smisek will not say whether
the additional 30 aircraft would
be replaced by other eet chang-
es, or allow United to cut addi-
tional capacity from its network.
Uniteds overall eet could
shrink to about 1,200 aircraft at
the end of 2015 from 1,265 at the
beginning of this year with the
updated 50-seat guidance.
The E175 is cheaper to operate
and provides United with more
revenue generating opportunities
than 50-seat aircraft. It is about
10% more fuel efcient and of-
fers new up-sell opportunities to
both rst class and economy plus
seating, airline executives say.
FLEETS EDWARD RUSSELL WASHINGTON DC
United speeds up
removal plan for
smaller regionals
Star Alliance carrier updates target to mothball 130 aircraft
by end-2015, but keeps mum on future capacity strategy
We are looking at
the 189-seat Airbus,
or what I hope will be
a 197 to 198-seat 737
MICHAEL OLEARY
Chief executive, Ryanair
OLeary: Two more years
R
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OUTLOOK OLIVER CLARK LONDON
High-capacity rivals will
battle for Ryanair order
DEFENCE
fightglobal.com 16
|
Flight International
|
5-11 August 2014
For an in-depth look at the global military
inventory, download our World Air Forces
directory: ightglobal.com/WAF2014
T
he US Defense Security
Co-operation Agency (DSCA)
has approved a potential $700
million foreign military sale of 12
Sikorsky UH-60M Black Hawk
helicopters to Tunisia.
Congress, which will now de-
cide whether to authorise the
deal, was notied of the DSCAs
approval on 23 July.
Included within the price are
spare parts, training and logisti-
cal support. Weapon systems
notably Hydra rockets and
Lockheed Martin AGM-114
Hellre missiles are also fea-
tured, as are electro-optical infra-
red laser designators, night vision
goggles, communications sys-
tems and laser, missile and radar
warning systems.
The proposed sale will im-
prove Tunisias capability to
deter regional threats and
strengthen its homeland defence,
as well as support counter-terror-
ism operations, the DSCA says,
describing Tunisia as a friendly
country in North Africa.
The rotorcraft will be used for
border patrol, quick reaction and
medical evacuation for Tunisias
air and ground forces, and in
counter-terrorism and border
security operations.
In addition, on 14 July US
secretary of defense Chuck Hagel
signed documentation alongside
Hamad bin Ali al-Attiyah his
equivalent in Qatar for the
latters potential purchase of up
to 24 Boeing AH-64 Apache
attack helicopters.
The deal is valued at $11
billion, including the purchase of
Patriot missiles and Javelin anti-
tank guided weapon systems.
The proposed sale
will improve Tunisias
capability to deter
regional threats
DCSA
I
n a scathing report, Australian
auditors have blamed a series
of procurement errors and
development deciencies for
the delayed service entry of the
nations eet of NH Industries
NH90 multi-role helicopters.
Final operational capability
(FOC) for the rotorcraft is now
not anticipated before April 2019
almost ve years late. In the
meantime, the Australian Army
Aviation Corps has had to
continue operating its eet of age-
ing Sikorsky S-70A Black Hawks
beyond their planned retirement
date. And the Royal Australian
Navy has been left with a
capability gap following the
withdrawal from service of its
Westland Sea King 50As in 2011.
Acquired under three separate
phases of the Australian Defence
Forces (ADF) Project Air 9000 re-
quirement worth a projected
A$4 billion ($3.8 billion) an ini-
tial contract for 12 helicopters was
signed in 2005, with a contract
modication covering an addi-
tional 34 completed in 2006.
However, the Australian Na-
tional Audit Ofce (ANAO)
says in its report that defence
chiefs initially recommended
the purchase of 12 new-build
Sikorksy S-70M Black Hawks,
along with 36 new or remanu-
factured S-70Ms for the second
phase.
This decision was overruled
by the then Liberal-National
coalition government led by
John Howard, the ANAO says,
despite receiving the support of
most of the armed forces senior
commanders.
Although the NH90 TTH
v ariant selected known as the
MRH90 in Australian service
theoretically also matched
Canberras needs, some nine
years since the contract signing
the 11t rotorcraft is still
underperforming.
Further, operational tests and
evaluations had not validated the
ability of the MRH90 to satisfy
any of the 11 operational capabil-
ity milestones set by the army
and navy, the ANAO says,
blaming the relative immaturity
of the programme when deliver-
ies began in 2007.
CONSEQUENCES
Redesigns have been required for
some elements, including bol-
stered cabin oors and wind-
screens, rappelling hooks and
door gunner positions, the
ANAO adds. In addition, the pro-
vision of common spares has
been found to be lacking, and
sustainment has proven more
costly than originally forecast.
Overall, [the defence minis-
try] has had to cope with ongoing
commercial and technological
management issues which are yet
to be fully resolved, with sus-
tained improvements in MRH90
capability and value for money
yet to be demonstrated, it adds.
The ANAO report highlights
development deciencies and
acquisition decisions as the pri-
mary causes of the difculties ex-
perienced by the programme.
Crucial stages of development
were not appropriately per-
formed, leading to serious and
potentially long-term consequenc-
es for capability delivery and ex-
penditure, the ANAO says.
With the acquisition of the
MRH90, the eet of S-70A Black
Hawks operated by the army since
the 1980s was to have been with-
drawn by December 2013. How-
ever, the retirement did not com-
mence until January 2014, and is
now not scheduled to be complete
until June 2018.
FOC for the MRH90 was
originally to be declared in July
2014, but this is now not expect-
ed to be realised until April 2019.
The ANAO does highlight
some benets from the pro-
gramme, however, through the
localisation of MRH90 assembly
at the Brisbane facility of Airbus
Helicopters subsidiary Australi-
an Aerospace. All but three of the
28 helicopters delivered to date
have been built at the site.
This capability has also
spawned a dedicated composite
component manufacturing capa-
bility, feeding into NHIs global
supply chain. However, the re-
port does not quantify the value
of this work.
The type is not now expected to
enter service until June 2018
CAPABILITY
BETH STEVENSON LONDON
Black Hawk sale
to Tunisia given
DSCA approval
C
o
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m
o
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a
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o
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A
u
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a
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REQUIREMENT ANDREW MCLAUGHLIN SYDNEY
Australian auditors blast
NH90 service entry delay
Development defciencies blamed for hold-up to introduction of multi-role helicopter
DEFENCE
5-11 August 2014
|
Flight International
|
17 fightglobal.com
Brazil adds to C295
feet as it enhances
SAR capability
DEFENCE P19
A
ustralias rst pair of F-35
Lightning II combat aircraft
have been rolled out, during a
ceremony at Lockheed Martins
Fort Worth nal assembly site in
Texas. They are the lead exam-
ples of at least 72 aircraft to be
produced for the nation, under an
acquisition worth a projected
A$12.4 billion ($11.6 billion).
Following the 24 July event,
training aircraft AU-1 and AU-2
are to undergo functional fuel
system checks before being trans-
ferred to the ight line for ground
and ight tests that are due to
occur in the coming months,
says Lockheed.
The two aircraft will be formal-
ly delivered to the Royal Austral-
ian Air Force later this year be-
fore being transferred to the US
Air Forces Luke AFB in Arizona,
the main international training
base for the stealthy F-35.
Initial RAAF pilot training
will begin in the United States in
2015, and from 2018 the Austral-
N
egotiations have commenced
between Boeing and the US
Department of Defense to secure
integration of the AGM-84
Harpoon Block 1G anti-ship mis-
sile with the P-8A Poseidon mari-
time patrol aircraft, on behalf of
the types Australian customer.
Canberra announced in Febru-
ary it had approved the acquisi-
tion of eight P-8As for the Royal
Australian Air Force, plus four
options. Australia has main-
tained a co-operative programme
with the US Navy on the devel-
opment of the P-8A since 2007.
The Boeing 737-derived type
and an as-yet undetermined num-
ber of Northrop Grumman MQ-4C
Triton unmanned aircraft will re-
place the RAAFs 18 Lockheed
Martin AP-3C Orions from 2017.
In a 24 July notication, the
DoD suggests the work required
on the Harpoon Block 1G is large-
ly related to integrating the weap-
on with the P-8As combat system
software. The work includes de-
veloping, lab and aircraft testing,
evaluating and implementing the
updates to the aircraft hardware
and software conguration.
INTEGRATION
Harpoon hooks
into Poseidon
T
he US Marine Corps (USMC)
Lockheed Martin/Kaman
K-Max unmanned helicopter has
returned from its Afghan deploy-
ment, following almost three
years in theatre.
USMC lauds performance of K-Max in Afghanistan
ASSESSMENT BETH STEVENSON LONDON
Canberras JSF fleet will replace its F/A-18A/B Hornets
L
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M
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t
in
ACQUISITION CRAIG HOYLE LONDON
RAAF readies for F-35 after
roll out of rst two ghters
Aircraft unveiled at Forth Worth assembly plant are lead examples of 72-strong order
The cargo-carrying unmanned
air vehicle returned in May, and
is now undergoing technical as-
sessment at Lockheeds Owego
facility in New York.
A United States Marine Corps
assessment of assets in theatre
concluded that the UAV was no
longer required in Afghanistan
to support the mission, so the
unmanned rotorcraft was
subsequently returned, Capt Pat-
rick Smith, programme execu-
tive ofcer for multi- mission
UAS, says.
The system outperformed ex-
pectations while deployed, as it
was originally only due to oper-
ate for six months from December
2011. This excelled anything we
thought possible, says Smith.
The USMC is in discussions
about potentially making K-Max
a programme of record, although
Smith cannot offer any detail on
when this could happen, or
which budget year it could fall
under. I cant say when this will
happen; this is still right now in a
primary stage, he says.
K-Max carried some 20,400
tonnes of cargo throughout its de-
ployment with the two aircraft
that were in theatre.
Meanwhile, Lockheed is
planning to conduct a series of
demonstrations with K-Max,
including an effort to demonstrate
the aircrafts ability to move a
company-developed unmanned
ground vehicle (UGV) during test-
ing in US Army-led trials at Fort
Benning, Georgia in August.
The K-Max is capable of
carrying loads of up to 2,720kg
(6,000lb), while the squad
mission support system UGV can
weigh up to 2,270kg.
ian Defence Force will com-
mence ferry ights of JSF aircraft
to Australia, the service says.
Lead operational unit 3 Sqn
will become operational in 2021,
according to the RAAF, with this
being the rst of what is currently
planned to be three frontline
units equipped with the conven-
tional take-off and landing F-35A
at the Tindal and Williamtown
bases. A training squadron will
also operate the type from the lat-
ter location, with a total of 72 air-
craft scheduled to be fully opera-
tional by 2023.
Being acquired via Project Air
6000, Australias F-35As will re-
place its legacy eet of Boeing
F/A-18A/B Hornets.
A fourth operational squadron
will be considered for RAAF Base
Amberley, for a total of about 100
F-35As, the air force says.
Canberra says 30 Australian
companies have so far secured
workshare worth $412 million on
the F-35 programme.
L
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The rotorcraft carried a total of 20,400 tonnes of cargo
SAFETY IN
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DEFENCE
5-11 August 2014
|
Flight International
|
19 fightglobal.com
Acclaim as reborn
Mooney takes off
SHOW REPORT P20
I
lyushin has delivered the rst
upgraded Il-38N anti-subma-
rine warfare (ASW) aircraft to the
Russian navy, following a
modernisation effort that began
in 2012.
Handed over on 15 July, the
turboprop-powered type is the
rst of ve examples to receive
the enhancements under a Rb3.5
billion ($100 million) contract.
The upgrades focus on the ad-
dition of a Novella P-38 target
track and search system devel-
oped by St Petersburg-based Le-
ninets, giving the 1960s-era air-
craft what the manufacturer calls
a second life. The P-38 broad-
ens the area a single Il-38N can
cover, while allowing it to track
32 targets simultaneously.
Speaking at a ceremony to
mark the delivery, Maj Gen Alex-
ey Serdyuk said the modernised
Il-38N would increase the ser-
vices ASW capabilities. We
have been waiting for this aircraft
for a long time, he adds.
Flightglobals MiliCAS data-
base lists the Russian navy as hav-
ing an active inventory of 16
Ivchenko-Progress AI-20M-pow-
ered Il-38s, with a further 12 in
storage. Ilyushin has indicated the
entire 28-strong eet is likely to
receive the upgrade by 2020.
E
lbit Systems is offering its
Hermes 900 unmanned air
system (UAS) in a maritime
patrol conguration.
The Israeli company says the
variant has been designed to an-
swer the full spectrum of oper-
ational needs for a maritime pa-
trol UAS. The types payload
weighs 350kg (770lb) and in-
cludes a maritime radar and elec-
tronic surveillance systems. In
addition, the type can use its sat-
ellite communication links to act
as a radio relay and enable an op-
erator to talk to distant vessels.
Elbi claims the aerodynamic
efciency of the Hermes 900 ena-
bles frequent changes in ight
proles, allowing visual identi-
cation of targets, in addition to
radar detection.
The UASs satellite communi-
cation capability enables it to per-
form missions at ranges up to
1,000nm (1,850km) from shore.
DEVELOPMENT ARIE EGOZI TEL AVIV
Maritime Hermes breaks cover
E
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it

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Payload includes a maritime radar and other surveillance systems
ACQUISITION DOMINIC PERRY LONDON
Brazil adds to C295 eet as
it enhances SAR capability
Nation also takes delivery of last of nine upgraded P-3 Orion anti-submarine warfare aircraft
B
razil has ordered three search
and rescue-congured Air-
bus Defence & Space C295s for
the nations air force.
Deliveries of the twin-turbo-
props will take place from the end
of this year, the airframer says.
The new SAR aircraft will join
an existing eet of 12 transport-
congured C295s known as the
C-105 Amazonas in Brazilian ser-
vice taking the air forces total
inventory of the type to 15.
We are very proud of this re-
peat order, which demonstrates
Brazils high level of condence
in our light- and medium-aircraft
family, as well as conrming the
C295s demonstrated excellence
in the SAR role, says Antonio
Rodrguez Barbern, head of
commercial for military aircraft at
Airbus Defence & Space.
More than 140 C295s have
been ordered by 19 countries, the
airframer adds.
Separately, Airbus Defence &
Space has delivered the last of
nine Lockheed P-3 Orion anti-
submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft
it has upgraded for the Brazilian
air force.
The nal enhanced example
was ferried from Airbus Defence
& Spaces facility in Seville,
Spain to the services base in Sal-
vador de Baha, Brazil.
Acquired from the US Navy in
2006, the nine aircraft have been
equipped with a suite of mission
sensors, communications sys-
tems and cockpit avionics, along-
side the Airbus Defence & Space
Fully Integrated Tactical System.
In addition, work was carried
out on the nine-strong eets air-
frames and Rolls-Royce T56
powerplants, to prolong the P-3s
operational life for many years
to come.
Brazil will use the modernised
aircraft to perform ASW, mari-
time patrol, search and rescue
and economic exclusion zone en-
forcement missions.
Airbus Defence & Space has
modernised a total of 12 P-3
Orions nine for the Brazilian air
force and three for its Spanish
equivalent.
F
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a

A

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B
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s
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ir
a
ENHANCEMENT
DOMINIC PERRY LONDON
Upgraded Il-38N
boosts Russian
ASW capability
Follow more defence topics
on our The DEW Line blog:
ightglobal.com/dewline
The Brazilian air force already operates 12 of the twin-turboprop transports
SHOW
REPORT
fightglobal.com 20
|
Flight International
|
5-11 August 2014
OSHKOSH 2014
Keep up with the latest news and read
in-depth analysis from the business
aviation sector: ightglobal.com/bizav
The Experimental Aircraft Associations annual
AirVenture show in Oshkosh, Wisconsin is the biggest
gathering of recreational pilots and aviation enthusiasts
in the world. It is also a crucial showcase for innovation
in light aviation often an incubator for technologies
that fnd their way into the commercial sector. From
start-ups to iconic brands, the week-long event is always
well supported by manufacturers. Stephen Trimble was
on hand to see what new ideas are gaining traction
P
ic
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R
eturning to Oshkosh after a
ve-year hiatus in grand style,
Mooney Aviation revealed a back-
log of 14 orders, the delivery of the
rst aircraft off a restarted produc-
tion line and disclosing plans to
offer a diesel engine variant.
A US-based company with
Chinese investors led by Jerry
Chen a former aerodynamics
professor at the University of
Southern California acquired
Mooney last October, resurrect-
ing the Texas-based company
after it was forced into its latest
round of bankruptcy in late 2008.
Chens investors inherited an
assembly line in Kerrville, Texas,
with ve aircraft in various stages
of assembly. The company has
sold the rst aircraft an M20TN
Acclaim Type S off the restarted
line. Mooney expects to deliver
about six aircraft through the end
of 2014, Chen says. Mooney was
delivering eight aircraft per
month shortly before declaring
bankruptcy in 2008, and the new
ownership may seek to match
that level of production.
Three of the 14 sales logged so
far have come from Mooneys
Florida-based distributor, but
Chen believes the real market is
in China. Chinese buyers have
purchased 10 Mooneys so far,
Chen says, with the last sale
coming from the auction of the
rst aircraft.
For now, Mooney is building
two models the Acclaim and
the Ovation but signicant
modications may be coming.
However, Mooney types are
powered by avgas, which is
increasingly difcult to obtain in
several parts of the world,
including Asia.
M
ahindra Aerospace showed
up at Oshkosh with a new
brand for the GA8 and GA10
Airvan utility aircraft and new
interest in nding a US-based
assembly site.
The GA8 and GA10 were inher-
ited by Mahindra after its acquisi-
tion of Australias Gippsland Aer-
onautics. The rm has since
dropped the GA designation, re-
branding the pair as the Airvan 8
and Airvan 10.
Mahindra has delivered nearly
300 Airvan 8s from a factory in
Australia. As the Airvan 10 nears
certication later this year, the
rm is considering a new manu-
facturing plan for the Airvan 8.
About 90% of Airvan 8s are
made in the USA pre-assembled
at a Mahindra facility in Seattle
and then shipped to Australia for
nal assembly so it would be
possible to reduce costs by mov-
ing production to the USA.
A
n engine ignition glitch
spoiled the planned arrival of
the Carter Aviation Technologies
PAV-II prototype, but the slowed-
rotor compound aircraft still ap-
pears to be gaining momentum.
The PAV-II launched from a
nearby airport, intending to land
at Wittman Regional airport in
Oshkosh on 29 July, but an engine
ignition warning early in the ight
caused the developmental types
pilot to return to base.
Founder and designer Jay Cart-
er also revealed plans for a tur-
bine-powered version of the xed-
wing auto-gyro, and disclosed
ongoing discussions with a possi-
ble foreign partner to license the
technology for production.
The PAV-II is powered by a
350hp (261kW) turbocharged pis-
ton Lycomings IO-540. The next
step is to build a prototype pow-
ered by the Honeywell TPE331-14
a 1,750shp turboprop.
MANUFACTURING
New Mooney puts
money on China
Reborn frm returns to Oshkosh for frst time in fve years
after restarting production and looking to export market
An engine ignition glitch spoiled the types arrival at Oshkosh
The airframer has sold an M20TN from its rebooted assembly plant
AUTO-GYROS
Carter reveals plans for
turbine-powered PAV-II
MANUFACTURING
Mahindra seeks US Airvan plant
5-11 August 2014
|
Flight International
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21 fightglobal.com
OSHKOSH 2014
SHOW REPORT
Icon reveals
A5 production
prototype
SHOW REPORT P22
W
ith 100 low-lead avgas be-
coming increasingly scarce
in Europe and Asia, Cessna has
added a new variant of its ubiqui-
tous 172 with a diesel engine.
The Turbo Skyhawk JT-A joins
the Cessna 182-derived Turbo
Skylane JT-A as the companys
answer to the avgas issue.
The Skylane JT-A powered
by the four-cylinder Safran SMA
SR305-230E diesel has been
delayed by more than a year in
certication testing, but is really
close, says Joe Hepburn, Cess-
nas senior vice-president of cus-
tomer service.
For the smaller Skyhawk JT-A,
Cessna selected the Continental
CD-155 diesel engine, with a
$65,000 option charge over the
$370,000 price tag for an avgas-
fueled Cessna 172, Hepburn adds.
The diesel engine produces
more thrust at cruise altitude than
a piston, raising the Skyhawk
JT-As speed to 131kt (242km/h)
5kt more than a standard
Skyhawk, Hepburn says.
The diesel also functions more
efciently than a piston engine.
REGULATIONS
FAA study could
open skies to
wider LSA use
T
he US Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration has requested a
survey of light sport aircraft
(LSA) employed for commercial
services in foreign countries.
The request is a possible step
towards expanding the sectors
applications in the USA a decade
after the regulated category was
created, according to a LSA
advocacy group.
The survey will inform FAA
deliberations into allowing LSA
to serve a variety of commercial
services, including sightseeing
tours, pipeline surveillance and
crop spraying, says Dan Johnson,
president and chairman of the
board of the Light Aircraft Manu-
facturers Association. [Such an
approval] could happen in a year
or two, Johnson adds.
The LSA category is currently
restricted to just two commercial
applications aircraft rentals and
ight instruction. Expanding that
denition would require a rule-
making process, Johnson says.
However, the average time it
takes to complete a rulemaking is
seven to 10 years. The FAA could
fast-track such a rule for LSA due
to concerns in another aviation
sector unmanned air vehicles.
One motivating factor is drones,
Johnson says. It all depends on
how motivated [FAA ofcials] are,
and drones are giving them near-
term motivation.
The FAA currently prohibits
the commercial use of UAVs, al-
though a few exceptions exist.
The agency is required to launch
a rulemaking process that would
allow small UAVs some access to
national airspace for commercial
purposes, but its internal sched-
ule continues to slip.
C
irrus Aircraft is continuing to
test the ight characteristics
of the rst production-conform-
ing model of the single-engined
SF-50 Vision jet.
The rst aircraft, known as C-0,
achieved rst ight last March
and entered Part 23 certication
testing shortly thereafter. The
example will be followed by the
end of the year with rst ights of
C-1 dedicated to icing testing
and C-2, Cirrus president and
chief operating ofcer Pat Wad-
dick says. The latter will y func-
tional and reliability tests.
Cirrus plans to deliver the rst
SF-50 to a customer around the
end of 2015, Waddick says.
The type will enter the market
as the only certicated, single-
engined jet with a greater than
300kt (555km/h) cruise speed
and a 28,000ft service ceiling.
Cirrus Aircraft puts Vision to the test
DEVELOPMENT
The Continental CD-155 will power the Turbo Skyhawk JT-A
ENGINES
Cessna pitching diesel 172
for avgas-starved aviators
New variant aims to tackle increased scarcity of 100 low-lead fuel in Europe and Asia
Flying from point to point, the
range of the diesel-powered ver-
sion increases as much as 58%,
Hepburn says.
Diesel-powered aircraft are not
new to general aviation, but their
signicance is growing due to
widespread concerns about the
toxicity levels of 100 low-lead
avgas, and its increasing scarcity
outside the USA.
Piper Aircraft, for example, in-
tended to bring the diesel-pow-
ered Archer DX to Oshkosh this
year, but customer demand in Eu-
rope forced the company to keep
the prototype aircraft on its cur-
rent sales tour overseas, according
to president and chief executive
Simon Caldecott. The Archer DX,
powered by the Centurion 2.0S, is
priced at $399,500 a roughly
$60,000 premium over the Archer
LX, he adds.
Lycoming is not widely credit-
ed as a diesel engine manufactur-
er, but ofcials have touted the
companys quiet inroads into the
market over the past year. The
manufacturer now has two diesel
engines powering aircraft, says
Michael Kraft, senior vice-presi-
dent and general manager.
The Lycoming DEL-120 powers
the US Armys General Atomics
Aeronautical Systems MQ-1C
Gray Eagle, while its EL-005
drives the Textron Systems
Aerosonde Mk4.7G, he says.
Although both models are un-
manned air vehicles, Lycoming
designed the engines for use in the
general aviation eet, pending
customer interest, Kraft says.
The Turbo Skyhawk
JT-A joins the Cessna
182-derived Turbo
Skylane JT-A as the
companys answer
to the avgas issue
The FAA prohibits the
commercial use of
UAVs, although a few
exceptions exist
fightglobal.com 22
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5-11 August 2014
OSHKOSH 2014
SHOW REPORT
A
start-up with links to the
original Cirrus management
team has launched a sporty new
amphibian development project-
ed dubbed the MVP.
Anticipating scrutiny associat-
ed with a start-up aircraft manu-
facturer, MVP Aero ofcials
emphasise they are taking a fresh
approach to the conventional
model of developing, building
and marketing a new aircraft.
Mike Van Staagen, MVP Aeros
executive vice-president, is blunt-
ly honest about the challenge of
nding a market for the $189,000
light sport aircraft (LSA).
This is an expensive
airplane, says Van Staagen,
designer of the Cirrus Vision jet.
I cant afford it myself.
The key to making the pricing
model work is offering buyers
more value, he says. In general
aviation, value is often dened as
a function of utilisation and the
costs of operation. So a $150,000
aircraft own 100h per year has a
value of $1,500 per ight hour,
Van Staagen says.
MVPs objective is to design
the aircraft to increase utilisation
by a factor of two or three,
perhaps driving the hourly value
of the product to $500, Van
Staagen says.
The design of the MVP is
certainly different, even for an
amphibian. The canopy opens
and raises aft behind the fuselage,
revealing a at foredeck ahead of
the instrument panel. Both seats
in the cockpit can be removed
and installed on a lightweight
pedestal on the foredeck, creating
a platform not unlike a bass
shing boat.
Catwalks extend around the
fuselage from the nose to the tail.
The hull is designed to manage
up to 200kg (440lb) in body
weight without listing, allowing
the pilot and a passenger to be on
the same side of the vessel.
The length of the tail boom
was partly based on a require-
ment to accommodate a ham-
mock connect from the vertical
stabiliser to the pusher engine.
MVP Aero also is seeking to
dene a new business model.
The company has partnered with
existing manufacturers, such as
Glasair, to produce the aircraft,
allowing up to six to eight MVPs
to be delivered monthly.
Other features are more
subtle. Van Staagen says he
chose fabric to cover the wing to
save weight, then shaped the
surface with a constant chord
because it will need more ribs
than a metallic and composite
structure. The constant section
greatly simplies the tooling
required, he says.
I
con Aircraft marked the sixth
anniversary of the unveiling of
the A5 amphibian light sport
aircraft by displaying the rst
production-conforming prototype
at EAA Airventure.
The arrival of the ESN-1 air-
craft marks a key milestone as
Icon prepares for a delayed entry
into service next May and a rapid
production ramp-up in 2016.
This milestone such an im-
portant one for us, says Steen
Strand, chief operating ofcer
and co-founder of Icon Aircraft.
It represents the synthesis of
production design and produc-
tion engineering and production
thinking, all into one airplane.
Icon plans to complete two
more production-conforming pro-
totypes in the next few months,
with the second focused on static
testing and the third marked for
rst delivery to a customer.
Under the abbreviated certi-
cation trial period for LSA air-
craft, Icon plans to begin the cer-
tication process in the second
quarter and complete it by May.
Icon intends delivering the rst
20-25 A5 amphibians in 2015,
with production to ramp to
hundreds of aircraft annually by
2016, Strand says. Icon has
invested tens of millions of dollars
in automated tooling for nal as-
sembly, he adds.
Icon launched the two-seat A5
in 2008 with plans to deliver the
rst production aircraft in 2010.
The company, however, struggled
with design challenges, such as
rening the spin-resistant wing.
The delays do not appear to
have slowed demand. Steen said
that Icon has taken well over
1,000 order deposits.
K
estrel Aircraft is on pace to
deliver the rst of its epony-
mous, single-engined turboprop
aircraft in 32-36 months, a com-
pany ofcial says.
Kestrels timing is driven solely
by the availability of nancing,
says chief technical ofcer RJ
Siegel. The company, founded by
Cirrus co-founder Alan Klapmei-
er, is now bringing on board a
foreign investor, whose contribu-
tion supports the 32-36 month
timetable, Siegel says.
Kestrel was launched to
produce the rst single-engined
turboprop design for the
commercial market in 25 years.
It would take advantage of new
advanced in carbonbre
airframes, which Klapmeier
pioneered with the Cirrus SR-20
and SR-22.
The new investor is not
American or in the aviation in-
dustry, Siegel says. He just
wants to move into the aviation
industry because he sees that its
a particular growth industry for
his country, he adds.
CONCEPT
An amphibian worth splashing out on
Start-up admits MVP light sport aircraft is expensive, at $189,000, but insists value comes with low cost of operation
TURBOPROPS
Kestrel keeps to
schedule after
new investment
Icon reveals A5 production prototype
MILESTONE
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Deliveries of the aircraft were first scheduled to begin in 2010, but the design presented challenges
Keep up with the latest news and read
in-depth analysis from the business
aviation sector: ightglobal.com/bizav
5-11 August 2014
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Flight International
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23 fightglobal.com
Although some engine makers think the technology is still immature, GE Aviation is taking additive manufacturing seriously
Part of the way to the future
now going through a process of
validation of our blades, says
Riccardo Procacci, chief execu-
tive of Avio Aero.
Avio is working with a 3D
printing process known as
electron beam welding to
grow the LPT blade additively
meaning that none of the metal
needs to be machined away in
the initial build.
ATI Metals, meanwhile, also
displayed a picture of a new
blade at Farnborough air show.
The company currently supplies
titanium aluminide billet to Avio
and GE for the manufacturing of
LPT blades on production
engines, such as the GEnx.
Titanium aluminide is a use-
ful material for engines because
it is strong, light and can with-
stand intense heat. One draw-
back, however, is that it is hard
to machine into a nished part
using conventional processes,
which involve pouring the
liquid metal into a mould, cast-
ing it and then machining off the
excess material.
Titanium aluminide is noto-
riously a very difcult material
to work with, both in the casting
as well as the post-machining
process, Morris says. [Electron
NEWS FOCUS
Out with the old
FEATURE P24
3D PRINTING STEPHEN TRIMBLE FARNBOROUGH
GE believes 3D printing can be used beyond non-critical components
L
ow-pressure turbine (LPT)
blades for aircraft engines
could be the next application
conquered by additive manufac-
turing techniques.
GE Aviation has already
pushed selective laser sintering
a form of 3D printing further
than anyone else, announcing on
15 July that a factory in Alabama
will be the rst to mass-produce
jet engine parts using an additive
manufacturing process.
That factory will build fuel
nozzles for the CFM Leap-1,
which combines a core made by
GE and a low-pressure section
from Snecma.
GE is now evaluating a differ-
ent 3D printing process to build
LPT blades for the GE9X the en-
gine selected to power the Boeing
777X, and the engine makers
most complex propulsion system
yet. I think that the rst applica-
tion for LPT blades would proba-
bly make its way on the GE9X,
says Greg Morris, additive manu-
facturing leader at GE.
Morris is credited for GEs keen
interest in additive manufactur-
ing, even as rivals have expressed
scepticism about the near-term
potential of 3D printed parts in jet
engines. He founded an epony-
mous start-up in the early 1990s,
which happened to be located
near GE Aviations headquarters
in Cincinnati. A relationship
formed between the start-up and
the industrial conglomerate,
which spread from small proto-
types to the CFM fuel nozzle.
SUITABILITY
Another recent GE acquisition is
also involved in the decision on
3D printing for LPT blades,
however. GE closed a deal to
acquire Italys Avio a year ago,
and the LPT manufacturing spe-
cialist has since opened a
1,900m
2
(20,000ft
2
) facility dedi-
cated to additive manufacturing
of engine parts.
Avio is evaluating the suitabil-
ity of 3D printing to build LPT
blades for the GE9X. We are
beam welding] is a very efcient
way to create these LPT blades.
Avio is also experimenting on
a process to build multiple
blades simultaneously, with the
nal result on each piece
requiring up to 20% less
machining to complete.
APPLICATIONS
Pratt & Whitney and Rolls-Royce
currently use 3D printing to
build prototypes and non-criti-
cal parts, such as brackets.
However, both engine makers
have predicted it will be decades
before additive manufacturing
techniques become a practical
way of building parts for produc-
tion aircraft engines.
GE, however, believes the
technology is mature enough to
reliably build thousands of fuel
nozzles, and perhaps LPT blades,
each year.
Were taking it from where it
was as a prototyping industry to
truly an additive manufacturing
industry, says GE Aviation chief
executive David Joyce.
The particular design of the
Leap-1 fuel nozzle can only be
built using a 3D printer, due to
intricate channels within the
part, Joyce adds. If GE decides to
build the LPT blade of the GE9X
using a 3D printer, it will be be-
cause the titanium aluminide
material is so hard to machine
into its nal shape.
More applications for additive
manufacturing are not far behind
as the technology matures but
so far only at GE Aviation.
We could go crazy, Morris
says. I could talk about 50 parts
and applications were looking at
and get everybody really excited
about it, but were trying to be
very controlled about where we
feel we have our arms wrapped
around it.
We have years [or] decades
before people accept it like they
accept a casting today. The company plans to print thousands of fuel nozzles per year
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INDIAN AIR FORCE
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5-11 August 2014
ATUL CHANDRA BENGALURU
The Indian air forces long-term modernisation plan
is massive in scale and costly, but should more than
prepare the service for all aspects of any future conict
OUT WITH THE OLD
New Delhis incoming PMFs will be a country-
specic development of Sukhois T-50/PAK-FA
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A
t the beginning of this decade New
Delhi embarked on a modernisation
of the Indian air force on an unprec-
edented scale. The process is under
way as part of the long-term integrated per-
spective plan, which spans a period of 15
years from 2012.
This plan splits into ve-year periods, from
the 12th plan, which runs until 2017, to the
14th plan, which covers 2023 to 2027.
The intervening 13th plan period will see
the entry into use of the Dassault Rafale and
Russian perspective multi-role ghter (PMF),
which is essentially an India-specic devel-
opment of the Sukhoi T-50/PAK-FA. These
future types will be backed up by about 260
Sukhoi and Hindustan Aeronautics-built
Su-30MKIs, operating alongside 49 Dassault
Mirage 2000 multirole ghters, 60 RAC
MiG-29 interceptors and approximately 120
Sepecat/HAL Jaguar strike aircraft all of
which will have completed upgrades.
The air forces last of 80 MiG-27 ML attack
aircraft will be retired by 2020, along with 150
MiG-21s, which will be phased out by 2022.
In all, some 230 combat aircraft will be re-
tired from service during the 13th plan, with
the home-grown Tejas Mk I and Mk II ghters
replacing the MiG-21 and MiG-27.
Dassaults omnirole Rafale offering
emerged as the winner for the air forces 126-
unit medium multi-role combat aircraft re-
quirement early in 2012. The French compa-
ny was required to deliver 18 aircraft directly
in y-away condition, with the rest to be
produced under license by HAL.
While a contract has yet to be signed, Indias
defence ministry announced in June that Das-
saults offer for the required transfer of technol-
ogy was compliant with the requirements
specied in its earlier request for proposal.
WORKSHARE
Speaking in March, Dassault chief executive
Eric Trappier announced the nalisation of a
workshare agreement with HAL. It wasnt
easy, he said, but the French and Indian
partners have decided who does what and
how they should work together as an organi-
sation. For its part, HAL will need to absorb
technology from over 70 partners associated
with the Rafale programme, and chairman RK
The nations An-32REs are to be replaced
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25

Tyagi acknowledges that license production
would present plenty of challenges.
At an estimated cost of $30 billion, the ef-
fort to develop the fth-generation PMF
modied to meet Indias requirements is the
nations most expensive defence programme
ever. Delays have beset New Delhis part of
the project, and the air forces expected order
requirement has been slashed from 214 air-
craft 166 single-seat and 48 twin-seat exam-
ples to just 144 single-seat ghters.
A $295 million project denition phase
was completed in June 2013, but contract sig-
nature for full-scale design and development
work is still yet to take place, with programme
options also including the possible integra-
tion of a higher thrust engine at a later stage.
Flight testing of prototypes manufactured
by HAL at its Nasik facility is scheduled to
begin from 2018, but the overall effort has
been delayed by at least three years, and the
type is now expected to enter squadron
service from 2022.
ADDITIONAL ORDERS
Indias PMF aircraft will be manufactured in
Nasik, once HAL has completed production
of the air forces Su-30MKIs. The cost of ac-
quiring 272 examples has been pegged at $9
billion, including those aircraft delivered di-
rectly by Sukhoi. An estimated 200
Su-30MKIs are already in squadron service,
with HAL having handed over more than 150
aircraft from the licensed production of 222.
The remaining aircraft on order will be de-
livered by 2018-2019. However, to bridge the
gap between Su-30MKI assembly and PMF
manufacture, an additional MKI order is
likely to be placed. This is despite engine
trouble that has dogged the eet and issues
with aircraft serviceability, which has also
proved problematic.
Today, the air force is in the midst of deep
upgrades for a substantial portion of its ghter
eet. The $1.8 billion upgrade of 49 Mirage
2000s will see them remain operational until
2040. According to Nicolas Korotchansky,
vice-president, deputy combat aircraft do-
main at Thales, Dassault and Thales will
help HAL in the integration work starting
from the fth aircraft, with integration work
on the rst four being performed under the re-
sponsibility of the French companies.
Indias rst upgraded Mirage 2000 was
own at Istres air base in October 2013. All 49
aircraft were to receive the upgrades by 2021,
but the project is not now expected to be-
completed until 2024.
In 2012, MBDA bagged a $1.3 billion con-
tract for 493 Mica air-to-air missiles, which
are to be delivered between 2015 and 2019 as
part of the Mirage 2000 upgrade. To replace
life-expired Matra Super 530D and Magic II
missiles, the new weapon has a key advantage
over the earlier systems due to its 112kg
(246lb) weight. This means the upgraded
Mirage can be congured to carry four radar-
and two infrared-guided missiles.
MBDA has been working closely with
Thales, which has been responsible for the
integration work on the rst Mirage upgrades
carried out at the French air force base in
Istres, and [is] training HAL engineers in
readiness for carrying out the integration
work on the remaining Mirage aircraft in
India, the European guided weapons
manufacturer says.
Also moving ahead is the modernisation of
the MiG-29 eet, part of a $964 million con-
tract signed in 2008. The deal was for the up-
grade of 63 MiG-29 interceptors to the UPG
multi-role standard; equivalent to the
MiG-29SMT. However, the loss of three in-
service examples since the contract was
signed has reduced the programme scope to
60 airframes. So far, work on four single-seat
and two twin-seat MiG-29s has been complet-
ed, and the aircraft have been redelivered to
India. The remaining 54 examples will be
modied in India. Local companies were in-
vited to undertake structural retrot and life
extension work on 33 of the eet earlier this
year, with the task to be completed within
three years.
A $520 million Jaguar upgrade to the Darin
III (display, attack, range and inertial naviga-
tion) standard has been delayed and will now
be completed by 2020. Efforts to re-engine the
entire eet of more than 120 strike aircraft
with Honeywell F125-INs have also been de-
layed. The US contractor responded to a sin-
gle-source request for proposal issued in 2012
for 270 engines, and a technical evaluation is
now under way.
PAYLOAD
Darin III-standard Jaguars will also receive
MBDAs ASRAAM air-to-air missile as part of
a $428 million order nalised during July.
The ASRAAM has been designated as the
new generation close combat missile by the
Indian air force.
The upgraded Jaguar will also carry
Textron Defence Systems CBU-105 Sensor
Fused Weapon, and maritime strike variants
of the Jaguar are now equipped with Boeing
AGM-84 Harpoon Block II anti-ship missiles.
The Indian air force took delivery of its
sixth Boeing C-17 strategic transport in June,
and the remaining aircraft on contract will be
delivered by December, completing an order
for 10. There has so far been no announce-
ment on orders for a further six of the type,
and Boeing anticipates completion of C-17
production by mid-2015.
Lockheed Martin will commence deliver-
ies of an additional six C-130J-30 tactical
transports from 2017. The new aircraft will be
The Indian air force is in
the midst of deep upgrades
for a substantial portion
of its combat ghter eet
The air force will eventually boast 49 upgraded Dassault Mirage 2000s
More than 150 Dhruvs are in service in India
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5-11 August 2014
based at Panagarh air base in Indias east-
ern state of West Bengal. The rst batch of the
special mission-congured transports are
based at Hindon air base in Delhi. The govern-
ment has chosen not to order an additional
Hercules to replace aircraft KC-3803, which
crashed in March 2014, and as a result the ser-
vice will operate a total of 11 C-130Js once de-
liveries for the second batch are concluded.
HALs effort to co-develop and produce a
multirole transport aircraft (MTA) with Rus-
sias United Aircraft Corporation has run into
delays, and a programme denition phase
that was to have been completed by Septem-
ber 2013 has still not been declared as com-
plete. This has delayed contract signature for
the detailed design phase, which once
launched should be followed by rst ight
within approximately four years. As a result,
the debut ight of the MTA is now expected
to take place around 2019-2020.
The MTA will be a largely conventional air-
craft, with minimal use of composites for
structures such as the empennage. The choice
of engine for the Indian version has yet to be
decided, with two candidates under consid-
eration. There will be a 60:40 workshare split
between Russia and India, and the total devel-
opment cost of $600 million is to be shared
equally between the partners.
Indias MTAs will eventually replace its air
forces upgraded Antonov An-32REs in ser-
vice. A total of 104 of the updated medium
transports are being completed, under a $400
million deal placed in 2009, with an addition-
al $110 million spent on upgraded Motor Sich
AI-20 engines. Delivery of the last batch of
ve aircraft to India later this year will com-
plete the upgrade of 40 of the type in Ukraine.
The remaining 64 aircraft are to receive their
modications at Kanpur in by 2017-2018.
HAL has been kept out of the HS 748 re-
placement contract for 56 transports to re-
place the obsolete Avro, which was produced
under license at Kanpur. The selected foreign
original equipment manufacturer will deliver
16 aircraft, and an Indian production agency
from the private sector will supply the re-
maining 40 under license. Indias bid submis-
sion deadline has been extended until 28 Au-
gust, with Airbus Defence & Space and Alenia
Aermacchi respectively offering their rival
C295 and C-27J tactical transports.
IMPROVEMENTS
A contract signature for six Airbus A330 mul-
ti-role tanker transports (MRTT) is expected
to happen soon. Airbuss defence unit had ex-
tended the validity of its bids until June at the
request of the Indian government. Once the
contract is signed, the air force can expect the
delivery of its rst aircraft in three years.
All deliveries of the A330 MRTT from the
end of 2017 will benet from structural and
aerodynamic improvements as well as updat-
ed computers and displays being introduced
Efforts to re-engine the nations entire eet
of more than 120 Jaguar strike aircraft with
Honeywell F125-INs have been delayed
The Tejas family will replace older types

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already been extended numerous times, and
Airbus Helicopters will no longer be in a posi-
tion to maintain the current bid without a
clear visibility regarding the conclusion of
this programme. The company, which is of-
fering its AS550C3 Fennec against the Kamov
Ka-226T, has said that if its product is selected
deliveries will commence within 12 months
of a contract signing, with a nal assembly
line to be set up in India.
Russian Mil Mi-17V5 and Mi-171Vs will
handle the medium lift role, as older Mi-8 and
Mi-17s are retired.
Half of the order from a 2012 contract for 59
V5s has already been delivered, and all 80 of
the type from an earlier order are operational.
With the service having grounded its eet
of three AgustaWestland AW101 helicopters
following a procurement scandal, the VVIP
transport role will now be handled using
Mi-17V5s.
More than 150 Dhruv helicopters have
been delivered to the Indian military and par-
amilitary forces. HAL is now manufacturing
Mk III utility and Mk IV Rudra weaponised
variants, along with examples in the light
combat helicopter (LCH) and light utility heli-
copter (LUH) guises.
LCH is in the advanced stage of certica-
tion, the detailed project report for production
is ready and certication activities have been
accelerated, says Tyagi. Basic ight tests
have been carried out to evaluate its perfor-
mance parameters, and sea level trials have
been successfully completed. The detailed
design activities have been completed for
LUH and we are expecting the rst LUH to y
out from 2017, he adds.
on the basic A330. Additionally, we are in-
troducing enhancements to the mission sys-
tem and mission planning system, and the
conguration of the Indian aircraft will con-
tain all these enhancements, says Federico
Lacalle, regional sales director for Airbus De-
fence & Space, Asia Pacic.
We and some of our customers have al-
ways been aware of the potential capabilities
of the A330 MRTT as the basis for SIGNIT/
ELINT [signals/electronic intelligence] appli-
cations, as the weight and power require-
ments of modern mission systems have
grown and require larger platforms, Lacalle
says. It would also be possible to combine
the roles of AAR [air-to-air refuelling] and
SIGINT. He says that while some interesting
conversations have been held with certain
operators, there is no immediate plan to pro-
ceed with such a design.
New Delhi has also invested a substantial
sum towards developing indigenous airborne
early warning and control (AEW&C) and air-
borne warning and control system (AWACS)
platforms. A global tender was issued in
March for six aircraft for use in an AWACS
India program. We have held productive
meetings with the Centre for Airborne Sys-
tems [CABS] and Defence Research & Devel-
opment Organisation to evaluate the use of
Airbus platforms as the basis of an indigenous
AWACS. Those conversations have gone well,
and we will certainly be responding to the
tender, Lacalle says.
Development of the AWACS platform is
scheduled to be completed in seven years, but
realistically will take at least a decade.
A $300 million effort to design and develop
an indigenous AEW&C system is running be-
hind schedule, with the rst of three aircraft to
be delivered to the air force next year. Embraer
has already delivered two EMB-145s to CABS
for this project, and ight-testing is under way.
Airbus Defence & Space is also jointly re-
viewing the home-grown AEW&C system,
along with CABS. The Indian air force already
operates three A-50I Phalcon platforms, based
in Agra under Central Air Command control,
along with Ilyushin Il-76 airlifters and Il-78
tankers. The service plans to have ve
AWACS and two indigenously-developed
AEW&C platforms operational by 2017-2018.
REQUIREMENT
The air forces helicopter eet is also to com-
plete its modernisation during the 13th plan
period. We are in contract negotiations with
the MoD for the requirement of 22 [AH-64E]
Apache attack helicopters for the Indian air
force, says Dennis Swanson, vice-president,
Boeing Defence, Space & Security India. The
manufacturer is bullish on nalising the con-
tracts by the end of 2014 for the Apache and
an expected contract for 15 CH-47F Chinooks.
Also to be introduced between 2018 and
2022 are 64 of the air forces eventual 197 re-
connaissance and surveillance helicopters,
which will be purchased once a long-running
tender concludes: the current request for pro-
posals was issued some ve and a half years
ago. The extended delay has become a seri-
ous concern for Airbus Helicopters, the Eu-
ropean manufacturer says. Bid dates have
We are in negotiations with
the MoD for the requirement
of 22 Apache helicopters
DENNIS SWANSON
VP, Boeing Defence, Space & Security India
A contract signature for six Airbus A330 multirole tanker transports is expected soon
I
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fightglobal.com 28
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Flight International
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5-11 August 2014
STEPHEN TRIMBLE SOROCABA
Brazil is preparing to host LABACE with its business jet eet growing
fast as is the countrys new business aviation hub at a small city airport
COME TO
SOROCABA
The countrys rapidly expanding
eet includes 41 Phenom 300s
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ongonhas-So Paulo airport has
always been an awkward site to host
the Latin American Business
Aviation Conference and Exhibition
(LABACE) the largest gathering of its type in
the region.
It some ways, the growing Brazilian econo-
my is to blame. Demand from domestic air-
lines has transformed Congonhas into a slot-
restricted airport.
As a result, its metropolitan runway rarely
welcomes the scores of business aircraft that
will be showcased at LABACE from 12-14
August. Infraero, the Brazilian airports au-
thority, prefers to keep Congonhas focused as
a domestic hub for airlines, to the exclusion of
business jets.
The show site itself occupying an asphalt
deck in front of an abandoned maintenance
facility is tucked into a remote corner of the
cramped city airport, squeezed between a
taxiway and Avenida Washington Luis a
major trafc artery in the south-central area of
sprawling So Paulo.
However, LABACEs crafty organisers
make the most of this limited footprint.
For three working days and festive nights,
the site plays host to more than 16,000 attend-
ees, 160 exhibitors and about 70 aircraft in a
jigsaw-like display.
RELENTLESS
The numbers in each category grow steadily
every passing year, as both Latin American
and Brazilian business aircraft eets continue
a steep and seemingly relentless expansion.
Indeed, one major theme at LABACE this year
will be conrming whether Brazil has
eclipsed Mexico as the worlds second-largest
base for business jets after the USA.
Embraer statistics released earlier this year
showed a tight race between the two Latin
American national giants. At the end of the
rst quarter, Brazils eet came in at 825 pri-
vate jets to 830 in Mexico. Mexico remains
largely a secondary market for business air-
craft, but the chance to claim the title of Latin
Americas largest business jet operator is
prized in Brazil. As the domestic eet grows,
Brazilian infrastructure for business jet opera-
tions is starting to mature away from the busy
taxiways of Congonhas.
Sprinkled around So Paulo state is a
growing industry dedicated to supporting the
jet-powered movement of executives and
high net-worth individuals.
Indeed, the location that has captured the
attention of the domestic business aircraft
community this year is not the LABACE site
at Congonhas, or even Embraers Phenom jet
factory in Gavio Peixoto. The highlight of
business aviation in Brazil this year is instead
found in Sorocaba, a medium-sized city about
110km (68 miles) west of Congonhas.
It is here that Brazils prominence as a pre-
mier business jet market is most apparent. In
less than a year, Sorocabas Bertram Luiz Leup-
olz airport has blossomed as the regional and
continental hub for maintenance, repair and
overhaul (MRO) for business aircraft.
LABACE PREVIEW
fightglobal.com 5-11 August 2014
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Flight International
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29
The ascension of Sorocaba as part of the re-
gions growth seems sudden, but in reality the
area has been rising steadily for decades.
To outsiders, the heart of Brazilian aero-
space lies east of So Paulo in So Jos dos
Campos home of Embraers commercial and
product development. North of So Paulo, Em-
braer has opened business and military aircraft
factories in the remote town of Gaviao Peixoto.
All along, however, the single-runway air-
port in Sorocaba has played a large role in sup-
porting Brazils vast general aviation eet. Bra-
zilian civil aviation authority ANAC lists
Sorocaba as the 14th-largest airport in Brazil in
terms of aircraft movements, with 77,420 in
2012. The same statistics also reveal a lack of
passengers, with only 77,776 the same year.
Since 1962, Bertram Luiz Leupolz has
served as the home of Conal, a full-service
maintenance provider for private aircraft all
over the region. A network of service providers
has subsequently evolved around Conals
7,700m
2
(82,900ft
2
) hangar over several dec-
ades. ANAC has listed 19 aircraft maintenance
companies registered in Sorocaba alone.
APPETITE
More recently, business jet manufacturers
themselves have moved into Sorocaba, but in
a globally meaningful way. For decades, Bra-
zil had been largely a secondary market in the
business aviation landscape, where sales of
used jets signicantly outpaced deliveries of
new models. As the countrys wealth has
soared in the last decade, however, so has the
appetite for business aviation. From 2009 to
2012, for example, Gulfstream reported its in-
stalled eet in Brazil grew from 14 jets to 34.
Dassault reported similar growth.
Not surprisingly, the largest beneciary of
Brazils rise in the business jet sector has been
Embraer. The local manufacturer only entered
the market in 2001 with the Legacy 600, a
conversion of the ERJ-145 airliner.
The airframer introduced a new family of
light jets with the Phenom 100 in 2008, and the
300 in 2009. The jets have sold well in North
America, but their biggest market remains in
Brazil. As of the end of the rst quarter, Em-
braers installed base in Brazil now counts 89
Phenom 100s, 41 Phenom 300s, 18 Legacy
600s, 10 Legacy 650s and three Lineage 1000s.
As eets have climbed into the dozens for
each manufacturer, so has interest in the after-
market. For many years, manufacturers were
content to hand off product support to local
partners in Brazil but no more. The Brazil-
ian market has evolved a competitive model
that demands establishing a large local pres-
ence. Dassault arrived in 2009, opening a
2,140m
2
maintenance facility in Sorocaba.
The facility supports the 50 Falcon business
jets now based in Brazil. The unit is a full-ser-
vice facility, offering airframe inspections,
line maintenance and engine maintenance.
Gulfstream has also been active in Soro-
caba. In 2012 it rebranded and upgraded the
Jet Aviation Sorocaba facility as Gulfstream
Brazil, putting the centre on an equal footing
with Gulfstream Luton and Gulfstream Bei-
jing. Earlier this year, Gulfstream moved into
an even larger hangar at Sorocaba airport.
MATURING MARKET
Brazils local aircraft manufacturer has not
stood still, however. In November, Embraer
opened a 20,000m
2
facility on the other side
of the Sorocaba runway from Gulfstream and
Dassault. Here, Embraer will take its next step
as an business jet manufacturer.
The Phenom 100 and 300 entered service
ve years ago, which means the ve-year
inspection interval is now beginning. As
Brazils business aviation industry has ma-
tured, so has Embraers capabilities. Embraer
ofcials claim the MRO hangar will be the
largest of its kind in Brazil. The facility
includes shops for component repair, as well
as the broad capability to complete mainte-
nance inspections.
In March, Embraer also opened a xed-
based operation within the MRO facility at
Sorocaba. The timing matched the build-up to
the World Cup in Brazil, but only barely. In
mid-May, construction workers were still
paving a large parking ramp adjacent to the
Embraer hangar originally intended to sup-
port World Cup demand.
Next door to Embraers hangar, another facil-
ity is under construction. In size and design it
appears to resemble the Embraer structure, but
it does not belong to the company.
The new tenant of the facility has not been
announced, but there are hints of its identity.
Among large-cabin business jet manufac-
turers, only Bombardier lacks a presence in
Sorocaba. The company has an established
network across Brazil, but no dedicated facil-
ity on the scale of its rivals in Sorocaba. How-
ever, that omission may be changing. As Em-
braer opened its xed base in March, press
reports quoted ofcials speculating that Bom-
bardier will be the tenant of the new hangar.
The highlight of business
aviation in Brazil is found in
Sorocaba, a medium-sized
city west of Congonhas
Rebranded: Gulfstream Brazil opened in 2012
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Dassaults facility in Sorocaba supports 50 Falcon business jets
fightglobal.com
COVER STORY
30
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Flight International
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5-11 August 2014
KATE SARSFIELD LONDON
CUTAWAY TIM HALL
Gulfstreams G650ER a revamp of its agship G650
will stand apart from its rivals by boasting the longest
legs of any business jet when it enters service next year
LONE
RANGER
COMMITMENTS BY COUNTRY
COUNTRY LOI ORDERS
Unknown country 62
USA 6
Hong Kong 4
India 2
UK 1
South Korea 1
Greece 1
Azerbaijan 1
Taiwan 1
China 1
Finland 1
Australia 1
Malta 1
Ireland 1
UAE 5
TOTAL 5 84
Source: Flightglobal Ascend Online Fleets
G
ulfstream has strengthened its domi-
nance of the ultra-long-range busi-
ness jet sector with the launch in
May of its G650ER.
The 7,500nm (13,900km), 16 passenger air-
craft will sit at the top of the Savannah-based
airframers family of twin-engined business
jets, and will possess the longest legs of any
in-service business jet to date.
Gulfstream now boasts a family of six busi-
ness jets positioned in the top half of the busi-
ness aircraft spectrum.
The line-up consists of Gulfstreams entry-
level offering, the $15.7 million, 3,000nm
range midsize G150 as well as the $24.5 mil-
lion, 3,600nm super-midsize G280. In the
large cabin sector the company has the $42.2
million, 4,350nm G450 and the $60 million,
6,750nm G550; while in the ultra-long-range
sector it now has the $64.5 million 7,000nm
G650 and the $66.5 million G650ER.
This niche business aircraft category has
been left largely unscathed by the nancial
downturn due to the continued demand for
these high-end aircraft from the worlds
wealthy elite and global corporations.
We had a great response to the aircraft follow-
ing its launch, says Gulfstreams senior vice
president of sales and marketing, Scott Neal.
Customers had been asking for more range and
capability. While the baseline G650 covers a
huge numbers of city pairs with its 7,000nm
range, there are always people who need to y
further. The 650ER will be the only business air-
craft in the world capable of travelling 7,500nm.
FLEXIBILITY
This additional range opens city-pairs such as
Dallas and Dubai and San Francisco and New
Delhi, according to Gulfstream. The G650ER
demonstrator recently completed long-dis-
tance ights from Los Angeles to Melbourne
and from Hong Kong to New York, to estab-
lish the aircrafts performance credentials.
To accommodate this extra range, the
G650ER incorporates about 1,810kg (4,000lb)
of extra fuel compared with the G650. No
structural changes were needed, and the air-
crafts empty weight is the same as the G650.
Gulfstream says this is because the original
G650 wing was designed to have additional
volume capacity for future growth.
However, Gulfstream had to tweak the sys-
tem that monitors fuel ow and the G650ERs
ight management software.
Take-off distance for the agship model is
extended slightly by just over 440ft (134m) to
6,300ft, in order to preserve the 10,000h time
between overhaul rating of the Rolls-Royce
BR725 A1-12 engines, which also power the
G650, Gulfstream says.
Maximum ramp weight and fuel weight are
also increased by 1,810kg to 47,000kg and
21,900kg respectively. Despite the extra
weight the G650ER will share the same ceil-
ing and operating speeds of the G650, includ-
ing its Mach 0.85 normal cruise and Mach
0.925 maximum cruise speeds.
The G650ER provides the mission exibil-
ity to y longer routes at higher cruise speeds
or carry heavier payloads on shorter missions,
says Gulfstream. Cruising at near Mach 0.90
the G650ER will carry eight people 6,400nm.
With the exception of the minor adjust-
ments, the G650ER is identical to its stable-
mate. It features the same choice of 12 interiors
and oorplans, 16 large panoramic windows
and Gulfstreams bespoke cabin management
system, along with its Honeywell Primus Epic-
based PlaneView II cockpit with enhanced
vision systems and head up display.
The ER will build on the success of the
G650, which already ies farther than any
other in-service traditional business jet to
date, says Neal.
The G650 was launched in 2010 and be-
came Gulfstreams most successful product
introduction ever, Neal says.
CONVERSIONS
The aircraft was originally unveiled with a
6,000nm range, but Gulfstream added
1,000nm to the specication sheet as the type
achieved certication in 2012.
The G650 has been in service for around 20
months and by the middle of July, 70 exam-
ples of the type were in service, according to
Flightglobals Ascend eet database.
Half of the G650 customers are based in
North America, followed by Europe with
19% and Asia-Pacic with 9% of the global
inventory. Gulfstream will not disclose the
size of the orderbook for the G650ER, but As-
cend reveals the airframer has secured 61
sales for the G650 family, and a letter of intent
for another ten aircraft. Many of our G650
customers have converted to the ER model
and we have also secured new ER orders
The twinjet has completed ights
from Los Angeles to Melbourne
and from Hong Kong to New York
fightglobal.com
G650ER
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31
Africa 1%
Unknown area 7%
Asia Pacifc 9%
North America
50%
Europe
19%
Middle East 6%
Latin
America
6%
SOURCE: Flightglobal Ascend Online Fleets
G650 FLEET DISTRIBUTION
Total number of aircraft = 70
ULTRA LONG-RANGE MARKET PLACE
AIRCRAFT MTOW
*
CABIN VOL
**
MAX PAX RANGE (nm) SERVICE ENTRY PRICE $
FALCON 8X 33,140 1,695 16 6,450 2016 57 million
G650 45,220 2,140 16 7,000 2012 64.5 million
G650ER 2,138 16 7,500 2015 66.5 million
GLOBAL 6000 45,170 2,140 16 6,055 2005 62 million
GLOBAL 7000 48,240 2,640 19 7,300 2016 72.4 million
GLOBAL 8000 47,580 2,240 19 7,900 2017 68.7 million
NOTE:
*
kg
**
cuft SOURCE: Airframers
since its launch, Neal says.
Private individuals, government and cor-
porations are the bedrock of the G650 global
customer base, Neal says. Global brands such
as ExxonMobil, Nike, Pzer, Starbucks and
Walt Disney are already members of this
exclusive owners club, according to Ascend.
For Gulfstream, the corporate sector is less
stable than other markets. There is always
more pressure on corporations to assess their
spending requirements when the economy
isnt doing well, and this will have an impact
on aircraft sales, says Neal.
In contrast the exclusive high net worth in-
dividual segment has provided a constant and
steady stream of new customers. Private
customers have predictable purchasing cycles
which are less affected by a nancial
downturn, says Neal. Despite this, we are
seeing good activity and encouraging signs
across both of these sectors now.
The popularity of the G650 series is
manifested in the three-year waiting list. This
is not a problem for Gulfstream, however.
This is a short waiting time compared to
the eight-year backlogs that were typical at the
height of the market in 2007, Neal says.
Owners that dont want to wait for an aircraft
are given the choice of a G550 or G450 to use
until their aircraft is ready for delivery. This is
a popular option.
Less patient buyers have turned to the used
aircraft market. However, the strong demand
and lengthy lead times have impacted the
price and availability of the G650. According
to Tim Barber, director of international aircraft
broker Jet Brokers Europe, G650 sellers can
ask for prices in excess of $70 million.
We seem to be back to the heady days of
2007 as far the G650 is concerned, he says.
It is simply a case of supply and demand.
The demand is there but the supply is not.
There isnt a single G650 for sale right now.
This is welcome news for Gulfstream and its
customers, many of whom, Neal says, have
converted their G650 orders into the ER ver-
sions that will begin rolling off the production
line in the second half of 2015. A number of
G650 owners have signed up for the $2 million
ER retrot, which will be offered throughout
Gulfstreams service centre network from early
next year and will take roughly a week. Peo-
ple are taking the ER because of its resale
value, says Gulfstreams vice president of
communications Steve Cass.
Aerospace analyst Richard Aboulaa
praises Gulfstreams strategy in blazing a trail
in the lucrative ultra-long-range sector.
Gulfstream is also doing a great job leverag-
ing its brand, which is about the best in the
business, he says.
It is very smart to attack this segment for
the following reasons. One, its clear that part
of the market will pay any price for the very
biggest and most capable product it can get, so
why not seize the high ground? Two, Bombar-
dier, its direct competitor, clearly has its
hands full with the CSeries and Lear 85. That
gives Gulfstream complete dominance of this
new segment for ve years, at least.
DOMINANCE
Gulfstreams product has a lengthy head start
on its nearest rivals Bombadiers 7,300nm
range Global 7000 and 7,900nm range Global
8000 which are scheduled to enter service
in 2016 and 2017 respectively.
Dassaults 6,450nm range Falcon 8X,
which sits at the lower end of the ultra long-
range sector, is also slated for service entry in
2016. We expect to have delivered more than
200 G650/ERs by then, Cass says, rmly es-
tablishing our dominance of this sector.
While Gulfstreams status in the ultra-long-
range sector is not in doubt, Aboulaa warns
that the market appeal of the G650ER will in-
evitably impact sales of the G650. The 650
and 650ER are basically pursuing the same
market segment, he says. Either the 650ER
will cannibalise the 650s market presence, or
it will make the 650 altogether obsolete.
Cass dismisses these concerns, however.
There is plenty of demand for both models,
and we continue to produce them side-by-
side, he says.
Cutaway P32
This will be the only business
aircraft in the world capable
of travelling 7,500nm
SCOTT NEAL
Senior vice president, sales and marketing, Gulfstream
fightglobal.com 32
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Flight International
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5-11 August 2014
G650ER CUTAWAY
This issue should hold a cutaway poster of the
Gulfstream G650ER. If yours is missing or
damaged please contact:
Dawn Hartwell
Quadrant House, The Quadrant,
Sutton, Surrey SM2 5AS, UK
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8652 3315
Fax: +44 (0) 20 8652 3840
dawn.hartwell@ightglobal.com
FLIGHT
INTERNATIONAL
STRAIGHT&LEVEL
5-11 August 2014
|
Flight International
|
33 fightglobal.com
From yuckspeak to tales of yore, send your offcuts to murdo.morrison@ightglobal.com
100-YEAR ARCHIVE
Every issue of Flight
from 1909 onwards
can be viewed online at
ightglobal.com/archive
would have passengers perched
side by side on bicycle-style
saddles.
The seating device, says the
application, comprises a
backrest which describes a
circular translational movement
towards the front and upwards
of the device when the seating
device is brought to the retracted
conguration. A seating
structure is provided
The ying men
Owing to the grave state of
affairs on the Continent, it is
possible that the
British Empire
may be involved in
a European War.
In such an event, the
assistance of every able-
bodied man might be
required, and it is felt that no
class of the community could
be of more use to the naval
and military authorities than
the fying men.
Swap shop
For sale: aeroplane, brand
new, single, undoped, worth
over 100, less
engine. Willing to
exchange for a
good car. Contact
Membland Aviation, Newton
Ferrers, Plymouth.
Up to scratch
BOAC is subjected to ferce
competition on its routes. It
therefore must
have competitive
equipment with
which to meet this
competition. The British
aircraft industry must not be
surprised if we evaluate all
available aircraft and demand
that the British industry
should produce an aircraft at
least as good as we can
obtain from other sources.
Tardy Hermes
When the Hermes spaceplane
was conceived by France in
the 1980s, it was
to fy in 1995-96.
Now a committed
European Space
Agency project, the frst
manned fight has slipped to
2001 at the earliest, despite
offcial pronouncements of
1999 as the fight year.
F
lig
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t
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lo
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Our Supermarine Swift cutaway: minus brown paper
Hot news: keeping the sun off
Getting noticed at 50,000ft
Send for the
swat team
Our recent story about German
research agency DLRs work on
assessing the effect of insect
contamination on wing leading
edges reminded Richard
Chandless of a tale told to him
by Arthur Luscombe about
famous Supermarine test pilot
Jeffrey Quill.
During the initial ight testing
of the Spitre manufacturers
Swift jet, it was discovered by
Luscombe, the ight engineer,
that an erratic second take-off
had been the result of the
leading edge on the maiden
ight acquiring a lm of
squashed insects.
In those make-do-and-mend
days, the pair came up with an
instant solution.
Thereafter, says Richard,
All the Swifts ights were
started with brown paper taped
over the leading edge, and with
a length of string running from
inboard to outboard with one
end in the cockpit. Once safely
through the layer of insects
Quill would pull the string,
which would bear the brown
paper, which would duly vanish
into the slipstream.
He concludes: Just shows
DLR are getting there a bit late.
Flight Daily
Snooze
Delighted to see our daily being
repurposed usefully on a sultry
day at Farnborough.
New high for PR
Every day, Budgie journalists
inboxes bulge with irrelevant
uff and tedious twaddle from
the public relations industry, so
full marks to Houston PR for
announcing its rebrand with a
charmingly pointless missive
entitled: Not urgent: worlds
highest press release.
Theres a link to a short YouTube
video of a press release pinned
to a camera-equipped hot air
balloon which rises to the edge
of space.
Insert your own joke about hot
air, it helpfully adds. View it at
http://tinyurl.com/p2cx88j
Are you sitting
uncomfortably?
Is this Airbuss strategy to win
Ryanair from Boeing?
Toulouses bofns have
submitted a patent application
for maximising capacity on
low-cost airline routes of less
than 2h. A cabin conguration
Race to the bottom?
comprising a bearing piece on
which are xed, side by side, a
plurarity of seating devices with
reduced bulk.
Seems a long way from the
airframers campaign for
standard 18in seats on all
airliners.
And now that Ryanair has
gone all cuddly, not even one
that Michael OLeary might
stand for, we suspect.
LETTERS
fightglobal.com 34
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Flight International
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5-11 August 2014
fight.international@fightglobal.com
We welcome your letters on
any aspect of the aerospace
industry.
Please write to: The Editor,
Flight International, Quadrant
House, The Quadrant, Sutton,
Surrey SM2 5AS, UK.
Or email ight.international@
ightglobal.com
The opinions on this page do not
necessarily represent those of the editor.
Flight International cannot publish letters
without name and address. Letters must
be no more than 250 words in length.
FLIGHT
INTERNATIONAL
We welcome your letters on
any aspect of the aerospace
industry.
Please write to: The Editor,
Flight International, Quadrant
House, The Quadrant, Sutton,
Surrey SM2 5AS, UK.
Or email ight.international@
ightglobal.com
The opinions on this page do not
necessarily represent those of the editor.
Letters without a full postal address sup-
plied may not be published. Letters may
also be published on fightglobal.com and
must be no longer than 250 words.
FLIGHT
INTERNATIONAL
MH17: wait until
facts are known
SAFETY
Approaching a clear denition
In your leader (Flight International, 29 July-4 August) you claim that
Back in 2010 the airlines came up with a defnition of a stable ap-
proach and told their pilots that if they were not stable by 1,000ft
on fnal approach they were to go around again.
Not so. The Flight Safety Foundation published this defnition
back in the August-November 2000 issue of the Flight Safety Digest
a special issue on approach and landing accident reduction
(ALAR). This came out of the work of the ALAR task force.
The defnition of a stable approach is found in a couple of places
in this publication.
The sad thing is that many airlines have been slow in adopting
this defnition, although most probably do today, and that usable
tools for teaching pilots to obtain the correct touchdown point and
timely stopping of the aircraft are still, in my opinion, missing.
Capt (ret) Erik Reed Mohn
Former co-chair operations and training working group, ALAR task
force, Flight Safety Foundation
As a Dutch national Ive been
bombarded with all sorts of pub-
lic emotions and statements after
the disaster of ight MH17.
Close to 200 Dutch citizens
died on that ight. I didnt know
a single one of them conse-
quently my emotions dont come
close to the agony, despair and
shock the loved ones of the de-
ceased must feel.
A popular Dutch newspaper
stated that all Dutch citizens
mourn. Probably all except one.
I can only try to imagine how
the relatives of the victims must
feel amid this public restorm of
random speculations, accusa-
tions and assessments from an-
yone that feels the need to pub-
licly express. It must be total
confusion and distraction from
the grief that they have to live
through somehow.
I know that society nowadays
demands answers yesterday
but if theyre not there, what do
you do?
It would really contribute to
the credibility of politicians and
the popular press to hold back
and leave fact-nding up to the
experts to wait until they come
up with veried facts, proof and
conclusive evidence from which
conclusions can be drawn.
If not for anything else, at least
for the peace of mind of the rela-
tives of the deceased.
Probably a lesson or two could
be learned from the Malaysians
who swiftly managed to obtain
the recorders through silent di-
plomacy and the NTSB, which
developed a media policy that
would strike a compromise be-
tween feeding media sharks
and keeping the integrity of re-
leased infor mation intact.
Bart Mak
By email
Diskrotor debate
As a retired aeronautical engi-
neer, I still absolutely disagree
with the general idea that com-
pound and tiltrotor concepts are
the most promising.
I want to share my concept for
a diskrotor in the hope that it
might encourage discussion. You
can nd a description and imag-
es of the type at diskrotor.com
My concept (pictured above)
for a modied Sukhoi T50/PAK-
FA with diskrotor could be re-
garded as replacement for the
unhappy F-35.
George Vranek
Stans, Switzerland
System failure
I have been the pilot of a modern
airliner for the last seven years
yet, along with many colleagues, I
still dont understand the ight
management systems on my
aircraft. I am regularly tested on
hard systems failures, yet rarely
am I exposed to soft system fail-
ures during licence prociency
and operator prociency checks.
Ironically I spend a week each
and every year learning how to
put on a lifejacket (again) and
carefully lift a box (again).
If this time was devoted to
FMC, autothrottle and whats it
doing now training then Id feel
substantially more capable and
more professional.
Name and address withheld
Training truths
I was disturbed to read the com-
ments (Flight International, 29
July-4 August), ascribing blame
to the major training organisa-
tions for pilot shortages.
Having been involved with ab-
initio training for 17 years, I be-
lieve that far from being villains,
the schools can be proud of their
record. Its not possible to detail
this fully, but perhaps an exam-
ple or two will serve.
Since 9/11, the schools have
worked with little support to
maintain a ow of new pilots.
They have worked to protect stu-
dent interests by introducing pre-
assessments, and also by refund-
ing training costs if any student
failed the course. I know of no
other scheme which comes even
close to offering such an ethical
guarantee. But there is more the
schools created loan schemes, set
up degree programmes and put in
place graduate placement servic-
es all without industry support.
Simultaneously, prices have
been held down while the value
of courses has been progressively
enhanced by adding career de-
velopment training.
That new pilots must now pay
for their training is as unwel-
come to the schools as it is to pi-
lots. Equally, schools cannot in-
uence terms of employment
they can only work within the
boundaries set by the airlines.
It must be for the airlines and
their pilots to market commercial
ying as a career the schools
themselves cannot do this alone.
Mike Langley
Chippenham, UK
Training courses to take you there
www.ightglobal.comJtraining
Try Flightglobal Training's new site for the fastest
route to building your aerospace and aviation career
Build your career
READER SERVICES
5-11 August 2014
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36| Flight International | 5-11 August 2014 ightglobal.com
CLASSIFIED
TEL +44 (0) 20 8652 4897 FAX+44 (0) 20 8652 3779 EMAIL classified.services@rbi.co.uk
Calls may be monitored for training purposes
New and used aircraft
Independent Authorised Sales Representative for the United Kingdom
+44 (0) 1258 818181 tim@timleacockaircraft.com jonathan@timleacockaircraft.com timleacockaircraft.com
www.skyworld.co.uk
Skyworld Aviation is marketing
a portfolio of ATR aircraft for sale
and/or lease, with availability
throughout 2014, starting
immediately:
ATR 42-500 (pax)
ATR 72-201/2 (pax)
ATR 72-212 (pax)
ATR 72-500 (pax)
ATR 72-202 (Freight, Class E)
The Regional Aircraft Marketing Specialist
Tel. + 44 1753 832088 info@skyworld.co.uk
ATR 42/72s for sale or lease
For more information visit our
website www.skyworld.co.uk
or contact Patrick Leopold at
patrick@skyworld.co.uk
Tel. + 44 1753 832088
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ightglobal.com 5-11 August 2014 | Flight International | 37
Dauphin AS.365
Parts Specialists
www. al pi ne. aer o
Tel: +41 52 345 3605
Courses and tuition Aircraft spares
38| Flight International | 5-11 August 2014 ightglobal.com
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flightglobal.com/jobs
EMAIL recruitment.services@rbi.co.uk CALL +44 (20) 8652 4900 FAX +44 (20) 8652 4877
Getting careers off the ground
flightglobal.com 5-11 August 2014 | Flight International | 39
Job Vacancy Notification for S92 EASA TRE Pilots
BRUNEI SHELL PETROLEUM COMPANY SENDIRIAN BERHAD (BSP)
Brunei Shell Petroleum Company Sendirian Berhad (BSP) is a dynamic, world-class company and one of the biggest energy companies in Asia. BSPs activity is focussed on
the exploration and production of crude oil and natural gas from onshore and offshore fields. BSP has a long history in Brunei of more than 80 years and is at the leading
edge of energy technology. BSP puts safety and environment at the heart of everything it does and invests in the people and community of Brunei Darussalam.
Brunei Shell Petroleum Aviation Department (SAV) operates its own Sikorsky S92 aircraft and AW 139 helicopters to provide support to the offshore exploration and production
activities in Brunei. SAV has achieved an outstanding helicopter safety record while successfully delivering a high level of involvement by Brunei citizens in all phases of its
operations. SAV has a unique place within Royal Dutch Shell, as BSP is the only Shell company that owns, operates and maintains helicopters as an internal activity.
SAV is now seeking motivated S92 TRE pilots to join this world-renowned aviation organization.
Essential Qualifications and Experience
Valid EASA ATPL (H) IR or equivalent license acceptable to the Brunei Department of Civil Aviation
Valid EASA S92 TRE qualification.
A minimum of 5000 hours total flying hours.
A minimum of 1500 hours in command of multi-engine helicopters, of which at least 500 hours must be in command in the offshore oil and gas role
Benefits
Competitive salary (with no personal income tax). An initial appointment of 2 years with potential subsequent contract renewal. Company housing, healthcare and
recreational activities provided. A safe living environment with excellent travel links to other countries in Asia.
It is a requirement that you attach the following mandatory items when you register via BSP Recruitment website:
1) Recent Curriculum Vitae (CV), indicating full personal details and working experiences
2) Scanned copy of valid passport, aircrew medical and EASA license.
3) Scanned copy of the highest academic qualification certificate
Please visit BSP Recruitment website for the position description, closing date and Frequently Asked Questions at: www.bsp.com.bn/main/jobs/jobs.asp
For queries, contact the Recruitment team at: +673 337 3689 or +673 337 6679 (Monday to Friday: 8 a.m. 4 p.m. Local Time) or e-mail at RecruitmentBN@shell.com
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40| Flight International | 5-11 August 2014 flightglobal.com
Cobham Aviation Services Helicopter Services is a part
of the Cobham group that specialises in the provision,
operation and support of helicopters and associated
services for military and government applications world-
wide.
Licensed B2 Engineer
CYPRUS
Based in Cyprus and reporting to the Chief Engineer, you
will be responsible for the maintenance of Bell 412s in
support of the UK MoD who provide SAR, Aero-Medical,
Surveillance, Fire-Fighting and Troop support roles.
You will be the holder of an unrestricted EASA Part 66 B2
licence, preferably with the Bell 412, however, for the
right candidate full training will be given. You will also
be familiar with aircraft maintenance control and
management systems.
This is an accompanied position, which includes housing
and international Health Care Cover.
To apply, email your CV with a brief summary of your
career to date to graham.barnes@cobham.com or send
your application to Sue Denny, HR Advisor, Cobham
Aviation Services, Helicopter Services, Jameson House,
Lutyens Close, Chineham Court, Basingstoke, RG24 8AG.
Closing Date: 23 August 2014
British International Helicopters (BIH) is one of the UKs largest
domestically owned helicopter operators.
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Chief Helicopter Pilot MoD/SAR - Newquay
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domestically owned helicopter operators.
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As365N2 Helicopter Captain - Newquay
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is th( (li(nts i(quii(m(nt that appli(ants must hav( pi(vious
mPlPtHiy nyPnN (xp(iP(n(( oM (mIHiR(d op(iHtPons Hnd Hll
HppoPntm(nts Hi( suI|((t to (lP(nt s(iutPny Hnd HppiovHl.
Pl(as(s(ndCVand(ov(iingl(tt(itoanne.burton@rigbygroupplc.com
Air Trafc Control
Ofcers
The Public Services Department of the States of Guernsey is seeking
qualied Air Trafc Control Ofcers to provide ADI and APS services at
Guernsey Airport.
Candidates will hold a valid ATCO Licence issued in accordance with
Commission Regulation (EU) No. 805/2011 together with valid ADI
and APS Rating and Unit Licence Endorsements, and a current EASA Class
3 Medical Certicate. An OJTI or Examiner Endorsement would be
an advantage.
ATC at Guernsey Airport provides ADI and APS services in Class D airspace
to a varied mix of trafc ranging from microlights to short haul airliners.
An APS service is provided to Alderney Airport. A major airport
rehabilitation project has recently been completed, and a new Thales
PSR/Mode S MSSR radar will shortly become operational. RNAV
approaches are in frequent use at both islands.
The successful candidate will attract a salary range of 49,312 and
81,626 plus shift allowance, according to experience. An advantageous
relocation package is offered.
Contact: Mr Frank McMeiken, Manager Air Trafc Control, Guernsey
Airport on 01481 234950 or email: frank.mcmeiken@gov.gg
Closing date: 12 August 2014
Please apply online at www.gov.gg/jobs.
The eRecruitment team can be contacted at
eRecruitment@gov.gg or tel: 01481 747394.
flightglobal.com 5-11 August 2014 | Flight International | 41
DONT WANT TO
KEEP THEIR FEET
ON THE GROUND.
For those who
easyJet is one of the biggest airlines in Europe, and were growing at real pace. There are no
signs of us slowing down - in fact, were about to open up three new bases across Europe:
in Amsterdam, Porto and Naples.
For talented, experienced and ambitious Captains and Co-pilots, that means we have some
amazing opportunities to join us in one of these bases and be part of it from the very start.
Operating an A320 family aircraft, youll travel to some of Europes most challenging
destinations, where youll join an ever-expanding pan-European airline thats revolutionising the
way people travel.
With integrity, energy and a genuine passion for ying, youll have a real desire to be part of a
highly professional and successful pilot team and meet these minimum requirements:
Currently operating on A320 family aircraft
UK EASA licence (or converted by start date)
Class 1 unrestricted medical
Low-visibility Cat IIIB-qualied
Right to live and work in Europe with unrestricted access across the easyJet network
Minimum ICAO Level 5 English with requirement to achieve Level 6 within six months
of employment
Full eligibility criteria for each role can be found on our website, together with application details.
Working for easyJet isnt just about ying planes its being part of one of the biggest success
stories in modern aviation.
This is generation easyJet. There really is no career like it.
Find out why at careers.easyjet.com
Captains and Co-Pilots
Amsterdam, Porto, Naples
Attractive
42 | Flight International | 5-11 August 2014 ightglobal.com
Email: recruitment@sigmaaviationservices.com
www.sigmaaviationservices.com
Tel: +353 1 669 8224
Fax: +353 1 669 8201
Email: recruitment@sigmaaviationservices.com
www.sigmaaviationservices.com
The preferred company for Stress (Fatigue & DT), GFEM,
Composites), Aeronautical Research. Business units:
Contract staff, Workpackages, Innovation and New
Concepts, Aeronautical Research. www.bishop-gmbh.com
Contact bishop.peter@bishop-gmbh.com
Tel 0049-(0)40-866-258-10 Fax 0049-(0)40-866-258-20
To advertise in this
Employment Services Index
call +44 (0) 20 8652 4900
fax +44 (0) 20 8261 8434
email recruitment.services@rbi.co.uk
Please note that calls may
be monitored for training purposes
Flight International
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Call: +44 (0)1524 381 544
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To advertise in this
Employment Services Index
call +44 (0) 20 8652 4900
fax +44 (0) 20 8261 8434
email recruitment.services@rbi.co.uk
Please note that calls may
be monitored for training purposes
Flight International
To advertise in this
Employment Services Index
call +44 (0) 20 8652 4900
fax +44 (0) 20 8261 8434
email recruitment.services@rbi.co.uk
Please note that calls may
be monitored for training purposes
Flight International
To advertise in this
Employment Services Index
call +44 (0) 20 8652 4900
fax +44 (0) 20 8261 8434
email recruitment.services@rbi.co.uk
Please note that calls may
be monitored for training purposes
Flight International
WORKING WEEK
fightglobal.com
Making the personal jetpack real
Bergler: Developing a unique combination of skills and experience
Ulrich Bergler is director of engineering for Martin Jetpack Company, based in Christchurch, New Zealand, which
is aiming to produce an ultralight ducted lift aircraft for frst responders, military clients and the domestic market
WORK EXPERIENCE ULRICH BERGLER
How did you get into aviation?
I may not be the typical director
of engineering in the aerospace
industry, as Ive so far had very
little to do with aircraft nor am
I the typical manager of an
engineering team. After graduat-
ing with a degree in Precision
Engineering from the University
of Applied Science in Munich
Germany, I worked for three
years in a research facility for
leading-edge electric drive sys-
tems. I then joined a large corpo-
ration developing powertools for
the construction industry. After
emigrating to New Zealand, a US
medical devices corporate of-
fered me a role in their Christch-
urch electronics division. I went
back to university and complet-
ed an MSc in Applied Psycholo-
gy at the University of Canter-
bury in Christchurch. It is this
combination of skills and experi-
ences that attracted the eyes of
the team here at Martin Aircraft
looking for the right person to
support their next step in the de-
velopment of both the product
and the company.
That was in November?
And so far no two days have
been the same. There are new
and exciting developments
under way. Additional staff were
required for some technical chal-
lenges that need attention, and
its been a lot for me personally
to take in. An important aspect
of my role is also to grow our
team culture to support innova-
tion while applying robust
processes in preparation for pro-
ducing the aircraft.
How has the design evolved?
The journey towards the jetpack
is marked by many incremental
changes, rather than a few big
steps. Most important are the de-
velopment of a y-by-wire sys-
tem with electronic stability con-
trol. It frees the pilot from
controlling the aircraft to attend
to the mission tasks. This system
also enabled an entire range of
safety features to be implement-
ed. The other noticeable step is
in the conguration changes one
can see when comparing our pro-
totype P12 to its predecessor
P11. It is more powerful, has
more lift and is more agile.
How do you keep stability at
altitude?
Our stability control system is
using a third-party INS to sense
orientation and motion in the air.
The system will take action by
correcting the position of the nor-
mal control vanes and modify
thrust, if required, to counteract
wind gusts. This means the pilot
can operate the aircraft without
the need to also stabilise it.
What engineering challenges
remain?
First, let me say that there are no
insurmountable challenges left.
The aspects requiring engineer-
ing attention are primarily to re-
ne the design for improved reli-
ability and safety, and make it
ready for production. The aspect
most in focus is a continued
drive to create a jetpack that is as
safe as it can be given its concept.
One key is a new generation con-
trol system that will give even
greater capability to making the
craft easy and safe to y.
How is the military design
different?
There is quite a lot of interest
from military and emergency
response clients. Each one has
specic requirements, but pri-
marily the recreational aircraft
needs to satisfy the requirements
of FAR part 103, be easy to
maintain without involvement of
specialist aircraft maintenance
and, above all, be safe. The
military or emergency response
client needs mission objectives to
be supported thus requirements
on performance and specic
equipment are more in the
forefront. The more extensive
training programmes available to
the military will mitigate the
more extreme operating modes of
the aircraft, and service and
maintenance is supported by
dedicated facilities with skilled
technicians.
When can a private citizen take
one home?
Our focus is on the rst respond-
er jetpack and heavy lift UAV ap-
plication of the aircraft. Much of
these development activities will
benet a personal jetpack. Hobby
pilots will have to wait until the
end of 2015 to get closer to taking
one of our machines home.
For more employee work
experiences, pay a visit to
ightglobal.com/workingweek
If you would like to feature in
Working Week, or you know
someone who does, email your
pitch to kate.sarseld@
ightglobal.com
5-11 August 2014
|
Flight International
|
43
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