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STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 28 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6C2, 3; 6D1, 2

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Choose and apply appropriate operational Solve word problems requiring computations
procedures and problem-solving strategies to with whole numbers
real-world situations Use mathematical skills to estimate,
Apply a variety of estimation strategies approximate, and predict outcomes and to
Perform arithmetic operations judge reasonableness of results

Unit Focus/Foci

Problem Solving

Instructional Focus/Foci

Applying problem-solving steps

Materials

Six-Group Activity: Subtraction (Word problems)


Math journals
Overhead projector and pens
Transparencies with word problems and problem-solving steps
Student worksheets with word problems and problems-solving steps

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Warm-up Activity:

Write these problems on the chalkboard. Have students copy and solve in their journals.

Solve:

1. 314 2. 809 3. 6000 4. 6 + (2 x 7) 5. (2 x 6) + 7


262 - 368 - 2758
+ 433

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6. Write 6,512 in expanded form.

7. Estimate and solve: 284


+ 543

Lesson:

Introduce the term strategy, a plan of action that will probably be useful in solving a problem.
Tell students that there are different strategies for solving word problems, and those strategies
will be discussed throughout this unit.

Tell students that a word problem has two parts, the information and the question(s). The
information is given first and is followed by the question(s) to be answered.

Make a transparency and worksheets (for students) of the following problems and steps for
problem solving.

Distribute worksheets and display transparency with problems.

1. Jack has 13 Spiderman comic books and 25 Superman comic books. How many comic
books does he have in all?

Step 1: What is the total number of comic books? or How many comic books does Jack
have?
Step 2: 13 Spiderman comic books 25 Superman comic books
Step 3: Add 13 and 25 Estimate: 10 + 30 = 40
Step 4: 13
+ 25
38
Step 5: Jack has 38 comic books

2. Ebony had 279 beads in a jar. She put 154 beads in her hair. How many beads did she
have left?

Step 1: How many beads did Ebony have left?


Step 2: 279 beads 154 beads
Step 3: Subtract 279-154 Estimate: 300-200 = 100

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Step 4: 279
- 154
125
Step 5: Ebony had 125 beads left.

3. A plant had 8 flowers on it. Each flower had 6 petals. What was the total number of
petals?

Step 1: How many petals were there altogether?


Step 2: 8 flowers 6 petals each
Step 3: Multiply 8 x 6 or Add 8 + 8 + 8 + 8 + 8 + 8
Step 4: 8 8+8+8+8+8+8
x 6
48
Step 5: The flowers had a total of 48 petals.

4. Bill’s bookcase has 24 books. They are arranged on 3 shelves. How many books are there
on each shelf?

Step 1: What is the number of books on each shelf?


Step 2: 24 books 3 shelves
Step 3: Divide 24 ÷ 3 or Subtract 3 from 24 as many times as possible.
8
Step 4: 3 24 24 - 3 = 21, 21 - 3 = 18, 18 - 3 = 15, 15 - 3 = 12, 12 - 3 = 9, 9 - 3 = 6,
6 - 3 = 3, 3 - 3 = 0
Three was subtracted from 24 eight times.
Step 5: Bill’s bookcase has 8 books on each shelf.

Basic Steps for Solving Word Problems

Say: Step 1: Read and understand the problem. Make sure you read the problem from
beginning to end. If you do not understand the problem, read it again until you do. What is
being asked? What do you need to know?

Have students read the first problem. Ask students to identify the question. Underline the
question on the transparency and have students underline the question on their papers. Have
another student reword the question. Have students write the reworded question on the blank
line next to Step 1.

Say: Step 2: Find the facts. What do you know? Is there enough information to solve the
problem? Is there too much information?

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Have students identify and label the facts in problem 1. Circle the facts and label them on the
transparency as they are identified. Have students do the same on their worksheets.

Say: Step 3: Plan how to solve the problem. What can you do to solve the problem? What
strategy or strategies can you use. Which operation(s) can be used? Estimate your answer.

Ask students for strategies to solve problem 1. Write the strategies on the blank lines under
problem 1 on the transparency and have students write them on their papers. Students should
understand that there can be more than one way to solve a problem.

Say: Step 4: Solve the problem using your plan. Show all of your steps.

Using the strategies discussed in Step 3, have students solve problem 1 in the space provided.
Ask a volunteer to go to the chalkboard and write the solution.

Say: Step 5: Check your answer. Did you answer the question that was asked? Is your answer
reasonable? Retell your answer in a complete sentence.

After students have agreed the answer is correct and that the question has been answered, have
them write the answer in a complete sentence.

Repeat this process with the other problems.

Write the problems below on the chalkboard or transparency. Have students solve these
problems independently using the steps and strategies discussed in the lesson.

1. Ted ran 12 miles on Saturday and 7 miles on Monday. How much farther did he run
on Saturday?
2. Sam’s cat weighs 13 pounds. Dan’s cat weighs 27 pounds. What is the total weight
of the cats?

Review the solutions orally with students. Have students identify the questions, facts and
estimates, label strategies used, and answer in complete sentences.

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Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no, if they did not. If the answer is no, say: The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

1) In Step 5 of problem solving, you retell your answer in a complete sentence. (yes)
2) A strategy is a plan of action that will probably be useful in solving a problem. (yes)
3) The two parts to a word problem are the information and the question. (yes)
4) There are 60 seconds in a minute. (no)
5) When planning how to solve a word problem you should estimate your answer. (yes)
6) Read and reread the problem, until you understand the problem. (yes)
7) There can be more than one way to solve a problem. (yes)
8) A gallon has four quarts. (no)
9) A square has four equal sides. (no)
10) During the first step, you should identify the question to be answered. (yes)

Free-Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free Choice Activity sheet (one box per day).

Six-Group Activity

Have a group of six students, two from each ability level, complete the teacher-directed activity
sheet: Subtraction (word problems).

Math Workshop

Have the students work in the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

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Connection(s)

Enrichment:

Fine Arts:

Home:

Remediation: See attached Six Group Activity sheet: (Subtraction: word problems).

Technology:

Assessment

Informally assess students’ responses during lesson, and the Ten Statement review.

Homework

Have students solve and explain in their math journals the steps used to solve the following
problem: Betty baked 36 cupcakes and Vanessa baked 48 cupcakes. How many cupcakes did
they bake in all?

Teacher Notes

188
Six-Group Activity

Subtraction (Word problems)

Materials:
6 index cards (5” x 7”)
1 black marker
1 pencil
1 envelope (9 ½” x 6 ½ ”)

Prepare the following index cards using black marker to write the problems on the front of the
cards. Use the pencil to write the answers on the back of the cards.

1. A pair of boots on sale were marked down from $30.00 to $21.95. How much is saved by
buying the boots on sale?

2. Carlo’s schoolbooks came to a total cost of $18.45. How much change should he get from
$20?

3. Mrs. Garrett’s groceries came to a total cost of $42.56. How much change should she get if
she gives the cashier $50?

4. Ms. Stroud makes $140 a week. If $29.58 in deductions are taken from her check, how much
does she go home with each week?

5. The Mississippi River is 1,171 miles long. The Ohio River is 981 miles long. How much
longer is the Mississippi River?

6. A ten-speed bicycle originally marked $140 was on sale for $89.79. How much do you save
by buying the bicycle on sale?

Answers:

1) $8.05 2) $1.55 3) $7.44 4) $110.42 5) 190 miles 6) $50.21

Copy this study board to use with the reteaching of this lesson.

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Subtraction of word problems

Say: These are key words that tell you when to subtract: difference, balance, how much more?
how much larger?, and how much change?

Be careful of how you line up numbers when working with money in a problem. For example, to
find out how much change you would get from $10 for a $5.79 purchase, set the numbers up in
this way making sure the decimal points are lined up:

$10.00
- 5.79
4.21

Use this word problem and ask these questions:

Mr. Moore makes $180 a week. If $36.74 in deductions are taken from his check, how much
does he take home each week?

Ask: What are the key words that tell you to subtract in this word problem? (taken from) What
number is the minuend? (180) What number is the subtrahend? ($36.74) What is the
difference? ($143.26)

Tell students that they are going to do an activity involving subtraction. Say: I want you to write
the key words and solve the problem. Lay a card on the table and give the students time to write
the answer. As you reveal the answer, say: The answer is…. Store the activity in the 9 ½” x 6
½” envelope.

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STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 29 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6D1, 2

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Choose and apply appropriate operational Solve word problems requiring computations
procedures and problem-solving strategies to with whole numbers
real-world situations Use mathematical skills to estimate,
Perform arithmetic operations approximate and predict outcomes and to
Apply a variety of estimation strategies judge reasonableness of results

Unit Focus/Foci

Problem Solving

Instructional Focus/Foci

Writing story problems

Materials

Six-Group Activity: Multiplication (Step one: regrouping to the tens place)


Math journals

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Warm up Activity:

Write the problem below on the chalkboard or a transparency. Have students copy the problem
in their math journals. Have students solve the problem using the five steps from the last lesson.

1. The children in Room 107 collected 78 cans of food for the food drive. The children in
Room 109 collected 54 cans of food. How many more cans did Room 107 collect than
Room 109? (24)

Step 1: Room 107 collected how many more cans than the Room 109?
Step 2: 78 cans 54 cans

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Step 3: Subtract 78 - 54 Estimate 80 - 50 = 30
Step 4: 78
- 54
24
Step 5: The children in Room 107 collected 24 more cans of food than the children in
Room 109.

Lesson:

Write the following on the chalkboard or transparency:


1. Kevin had 24 cars. Bill had 17 cars.

Ask students to think of questions that can be written from this information. Students’ responses
should include both addition and subtraction questions. Example: Addition - How many cars
did they have altogether? Subtraction - How many more cars did Kevin have than Bill?

It would be recommended at this time to review words and phrases that would help students
decide which operation to use when solving a problem. These would include altogether, total,
have left, how many more, twice as many, between them, less than.

Write the following on the chalkboard or transparency: 2. Denise baked 20 sugar cookies and
18 chocolate chip cookies. 3. Tina read 14 books. Karen read 10 books.

Have students write one addition and one subtraction question for each problem. Discuss
students’ responses.

Possible answers can include the following:

1. Addition - What is the total number of cookies that Denise baked?


Subtraction - How many more sugar cookies than chocolate chip cookies were there?
2. Addition - Between them, how many books did they read?
Subtraction - How many more books did Tina read than Karen?

Write the following on the chalkboard or a transparency:


3. Sara has 20 stickers.

Encourage students to complete the number story (orally). Have them think of an addition
question to go along with the problem.

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Example: She bought 10 more.
Addition - What is the total number of stickers she has now? (30)

Next have student change the information so a subtraction problem can be written.

Example: She gave 2 to her best friend.


Subtraction - How many did she have then? (18)

Give students the following statements and have them complete the number stories. Have them
write one addition problem and one subtraction problem for each statement. Also instruct them
to solve one of the problems using the problem solving steps learned.

5. Debbie had 30 pieces of candy.


Possible answers: Addition - She bought 10 more pieces.
How many pieces does she have now?
Subtraction - She ate 7 pieces.
How many pieces did she have left?

Have a student go to the chalkboard and write a completed addition problem on the chalkboard
(with solution).

Have a student go to the chalkboard and write a completed subtraction problem on the
chalkboard (with solution).

Have those 2 students explain their solutions.

6. Jim put 26 fish in his tank.


7.
Possible answers: Addition - He put 7 more fish in the tank.
How many are in his tank now?
Subtraction - He removed 16 fish from his tank.
How many fish remained in his tank?

8. Marilyn cooked 10 hot dogs.


Possible answers: Addition - She cooked 5 more hot dogs.
How many hot dogs did she cook in all?
Subtraction - Her brothers and sisters ate 8 of them.
How many were left for her?

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Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no, say: The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

1) 800 x 10 = 8000. (no)


2) From the statement Debbie had 30 pieces of candy you can write an addition and a
subtraction problem. (yes)
3) The phrases have left and how many more are used in subtraction problems. (yes)
4) In the last problem-solving step, you should write your answer in a complete sentence. (yes)
5) Tina read 14 books and Karen read 10 books. A good addition question would be How many
books did they read altogether? (yes)
6) There are two cups in a pint. (no)
7) One of the problem-solving steps is to choose which operation to use to solve the problem.
(yes)
8) The expanded form of 98 is 90 + 8. (no)
9) In problem solving, you should estimate your answer before solving because it will help you
determine the reasonableness of your answer. (yes)
10) The words total and altogether are used in addition questions. (yes)

Free-Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free Choice Activity sheet (one box per day).

Six-Group Activity

Have a group of six students, two from each ability level, the complete teacher-directed activity
sheet: Multiplication (step one; regrouping to the tens place).

Math Workshop

Have the students work in the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding exp licit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context

194
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

Connection(s)

Enrichment: Have students create their own word problems solutions. These can be put on a
bulletin board.

Fine Arts:

Home:

Remediation: See attached Six-Group Activity Sheet: Multiplication (Step one; regrouping to
the tens place).

Technology:

Assessment

Informally assess students’ responses during lesson, and Ten Statement review.

Homework

Have students copy these beginning story problems from the chalkboard. Instruct students to
complete the story problems. Have them write an addition and a subtraction question for each.

1. Katie planted 23 flowers. Chris planted 27 flowers..

2. Mike has 10 posters on his wall. Dan has 15 posters on his wall.

Teacher Notes

195
Six Group Activity

Multi-digit addition: Step One Regrouping to the tens place

Materials:
3” x 5” index cards
9 ½” x 6 ½” envelope
black marker
pencil

Prepare the index cards using these problems:

35 92 75 63 39 84 16 45 127 99
+26 +29 +25 +29 +12 +28 + 6 +26 + 66 + 26

Say: When adding numbers with more than one digit in some cases you are going to rename
because only numbers that add up to a one digit number fit in the ones place. When a set of
numbers add up to more than 10, you must rename to the next place.

Answers:

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
35 92 75 63 39 84 16 45 127 99
+ 26 + 29 + 25 + 29 + 12 + 28 + 6 + 26 + 66 + 26
1 1 0 2 1 2 2 1 3 5

Copy this study board and use it when reteaching the activity.

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Example: + 295

Step 1: Start at the right of the problem.


Add the ones, 7 + 5 = 12
12 = 1 ten and 2 ones
Ask the group if 7 + 5 equals more than 9.

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5167
Example: + 97
4

Start at the right in the ones place.


Add 7 + 7 = 14. 14 equals 1 ten and 4 ones.
Ask the group if 7 + 7 equals more than 9. If the answer is yes, rename to the tens
place.

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STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 030 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6C2; 6D1, 2

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Choose and apply appropriate operational Solve word problems requiring computations
procedures and problem-solving strategies to with whole numbers
real-world situations
Perform arithmetic operations

Unit Focus/Foci

Problem Solving

Instructional Focus/Foci

Drawing pictures to solve story problems


Determining too little information and too much information

Materials

Six-Group Activity: Multiplication (Basic facts)


Math journals
Overhead

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Warm up Activity:

Have students, create an addition and subtraction story problem with solutions using the numbers
7 and 8.

Lesson:

Display the following on the chalkboard or a transparency: Ned caught 5 bugs. Each bug had 6
legs. How many legs were there altogether?

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Draw 5 bugs with 6 legs each to show the facts in the problem. Tell students that sometimes
they can draw figures or pictures to help them solve a problem.

Ask: Does picture helps to solve the problem. What is the answer? (30) Display the next
problem for students and ask them to draw in their journals pictures to help them solve it.

Jim had 2 cakes. Each cake had 10 candles on top. What was the total number of candles on the
cakes? (20) Have a student go to the chalkboard and show his/her solution.

Display the problem below and have a student read it aloud.


Ken, Bob, and Ted went bug hunting in the park. Ken found 8 butterflies, Bob found 4 beetles,
and Ted found 6 beetles. How many beetles did Bob and Ted find?

Ask students to identify the facts needed to solve the problem. (Bob found 8 beetles and Ted
found 6 beetles.) Ask what information was given that they did not think was needed. (Ken
found 8 butterflies.) Ask how they know the information about Ken is not needed. The question
did not include Ken.

Ask students why they think extra information is included in some math problems. Two of the
reasons are: 1) to see if students are thinking, 2) to see if students can identify the important
facts and numbers in the problem.

Display the next problem on the chalkboard. Have students identify the important facts and the
unnecessary facts in the problem. Dennis wrote 10 stories. Sam wrote 8 stories, and Jessie
wrote 5 plays. Who wrote the most stories? (Dennis)

Display the following problem. Cynthia has 20 pencils and Bertha has 13 pencils. How many
pencils do they have altogether?

Have students read the problem and tell what information they could add to the problem. For
example: Cynthia’s pencils were red and Berhta’s pencils were blue.

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Display the following: Rich had 3 shirts with buttons on them. How many buttons did he have
altogether? Ask students how they would solve the problem. Students should realize that there
is not enough information to solve the problem. They need to know how many buttons were on
each shirt.

Display the following problem and have students tell what information is missing in order to
solve the problem. Sue had 25 pieces of candy. She gave each of her friends an equal number of
pieces. How many pieces did each friend get? Students need to know how many friends Sue
had in order to solve the problem.

Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no, say, The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

1) Drawing pictures can help to understand and solve a problem. (yes)


2) A problem can have too much information. (yes)
3) You cannot solve a problem with too little information. (yes)
4) 10 x 85 = 850 (no)
5) In the problem 2+3 = 5, two and three are the addends. (no)
6) In the problem where Rich has 3 shirts with buttons on them, we needed to know how many
buttons were on them in order to solve the problem. (yes)
7) Sometimes too much information is given to see if students can identify the important facts
and numbers in the problem. (yes)
8) If a problem has too much information you should ignore the extra information. (yes)
9) One reason too much information is given is to see if students are thinking. (yes)
10) One half of 40 is 20. (no)

Free-Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free Choice Activity sheet (one box per day).

Six-Group Activity

Have a group of six students, two from each ability level, complete the teacher-directed activity
sheet: Multiplication (basic facts).

200
Math Workshop

Have the students work in the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

Connection(s)

Enrichment:

Fine Arts:

Home:

Remediation: See attached Six-Group Activity sheet: Multiplication (Basic facts).

Technology:

Assessment

Informally assess students’ responses during lesson, Ten Statements and on the homework
assignment.

Homework

Have students complete the following:


1. Write a story problem. Draw a picture to show solution.
2. Write a story problem with too much information. Underline the unneeded information.
3. Write a story problem with too little information and indicate what could be added to
complete the problem.

Teacher Notes

201
Six-Group Activity

Multiplication (basic facts)

Materials:
15 index cards (3” x 5”)
1 black marker
1 pencil
1 (9 ½” x 6 ½”) envelope

Prepare the following index cards using the black marker to write the problems on the front of
the cards and the pencil to write the answers on the back of the cards.

3 groups of 5 4 groups of 3 4 groups of 4 5 groups of 2 6 groups of 5


7 groups of 3 8 groups of 7 10 groups of 5 4 groups of 9 7 groups of 6
8 groups of 3 7 groups of 7 5 groups of 4 7 groups of 2 8 groups of 8

Answers:
15 12 16 10 30
21 56 50 36 42
24 49 20 14 64

Tell the students that they are going to do a multiplication activity. Remind the students that
when they want to know how much groups of numbers are, they should use multiplication
because it is more efficient.

Example: XXXX 2 groups of 4

XXXX

Ask these questions:

1) What is another way to write this problem? (2 times 4, 2 × 4, 2 ⋅ 4, 2(4))


2) What is the answer? (8)

Explain that a card will be displayed on the table and the students should write the answer. Give
six seconds to write the answer before the card is turned over to reveal the answer. While
revealing the answer say: The answer is… Repeat this until completion of the deck.

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STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 31 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6C2; 6D1, 2

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Perform arithmetic operations Solve word problems requiring computations
Choose and apply appropriate operational with whole numbers
procedures and problem-solving strategies to Use mathematical skills to estimate,
real-world situations approximate, and predict outcomes and to
Apply a variety of estimation strategies judge reasonableness of results

Unit Focus/Foci

Problem Solving

Instructional Focus/Foci

Reviewing problem-solving steps and strategies, writing story problems, too much information,
too little information

Materials

Six-Group Activity: Multiplication (Dice game, 1-digit by 2-digit)


Math journals
Prepared transparency of questions to be used with plus and minus cards
Review worksheet
One 3” x 5” index card with a plus sign for each student
One 3” x 5” index card with a minus sign for each student

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Warm up Activity:

Write the numbers 2, 5, 3, and 4 on the chalkboard. Have students copy the incomplete problem
below. Have students compose a problem that will yield the largest sum possible by writing one
digit in each space. Students can use each digit only once. Have students compose a second
problem that will yield the smallest difference.

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____ ____ 53 52 ____ ____ 52
+ ____ ____ +42 or 43 + ____ ____ - 43
95 95 9

Lesson:

There will be a mixed practice review to prepare for the formal assessment in the next class
session. Distribute the (+) and (-) index cards. Review the word problems with too much
information and too little information. Tell students you are going to read some word problems.
Tell students to hold up the card with the plus sign if the word problem has too much
information. If there is not enough information, have students hold up the card with the minus
sign on it.

Display the first problem on the transparency so students can read along silently as you read
aloud. Have students hold up the appropriate index card, and call on a student to tell what
information was not needed or what could be added to help solve the problem.

Problems for the transparency:

1. Sally had a box of marbles. She gave 14 of them to Mike. How many did she have left?
(minus card - need to know how many marbles were in the box originally.)
2. Tim ate 2 bananas, 1 peach, and a cupcake. How many pieces of fruit did he eat? (plus card
- cupcake)
3. Bill made 15 paper airplanes. Luther made more airplanes than Bill. How many more
airplanes did Luther make? (minus card - need to know how many airplanes Luther made)
4. Doug bought t-shirts for 8 of his friends. How much did he spend for the t-shirts? (minus
card - need to know how much each T-shirt cost.)
5. Pete and Tony collected pop cans for 3 days. Pete collected 50 cans and Tony collected 75
cans. Who collected the most cans? (plus card - 3 days)
6. There were 50 cars, 15 trucks, and 20 vans in the parking lot. How many trucks and vans
were in the lot? (plus card - 50 cars)
7. Sylvia bought a new jacket. She gave the salesperson $50. How much change did she get
back? (minus card - need to know the price of the dress)
8. Walt saves coins - He has 15 silver dollars, 30 quarters, and 24 pennies. How many silver
coins does he have? (plus card - 24 pennies)
9. Jenny practices on the piano for one hour on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Friday. How many
hours has she practiced? (minus card - need to know how many weeks she practiced)
10. You ordered a hamburger for $2.55, a sundae for $3.45, and a slice of pie for $2.40. How
much did you spend on dessert? (plus card - a hamburger for $2.55)

204
Distribute worksheets to students. Solve the following story problem. Be sure to show all five
steps, and be ready to explain your process and solution.

1. Craig counted 25 pieces of candy in his bag. Taylor counted 22 pieces in her bag. How
many more pieces did Craig have than Taylor?

Step 1: Craig had how many more pieces than Taylor?


Step 2: 25 pieces 22 pieces
Step 3: Subtract 25 - 22
Step 4: 25
- 22
3
Step 5: Craig had 3 more pieces of candy than Taylor.

2. Given the following information, write one addition question and one subtraction question.
Beth ate 12 cookies. Cindy ate 15 cookies
Addition: possible answer - How many cookies did they eat altogether? (175)
Subtraction: possible answer - How many more cookies did Cindy eat than Beth? (3)

3. Finish the following story problem. Remember to include a question.


Troy had 40 pennies in his bank. Troy added 15 pennies. How many pennies does he have
now? (55)

4. Use illustrations to solve this problem.


Shawna had 16 pictures in her photo album. She had 8 pictures on a page. How many pages
did she have? (2 pages)

Read each of the following problems. If there is unnecessary information in the problem write
too much information in the blank, and cross out the unneeded information. If there is too little
information to solve the problem, write too little information in the blank, and write what is
needed to solve it.

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5. Kelly arranged her dolls in 4 rows. She put 3 dolls in each row. She put dresses on 6 of
them. How many dolls does Kelly have? Too much information (cross out She put dresses
on 6 of them)

6. Steve and Fred played six games of cards. Who won the most games? Too little information
(need to know how many games each of them won)

Allow students time to complete the worksheets.


Review students’ responses orally. Have students go to the board and write their solutions.
Make sure the following points from the previous problem solving lessons are reviewed:

1. The basic problem-solving steps and strategies are:


n read and understand the problem
n identify the question
n identify the facts and labels
n identify words or phrases that indicate which operations can be used to solve the
problem
n plan how to solve the problem
n estimate the answer
n use the plan to solve the problem
n check the reasonableness of the answer by comparing the answer to the estimate
n write the answer in a complete sentence
n remember that there can be more than one way to solve a problem

2. Drawing pictures to help solve a problem


3. Writing questions based on given information
4. Writing and completing story problems
5. Identifying problems with too much information
6. Identifying problems that cannot be solved because there is too little information

Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no, say: The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

1) You cannot solve a problem if there is too little information. (yes)


2) When solving a story problem, you must identify the important facts. (yes)
3) After planning how to solve your problem, you should estimate your answer. (yes)

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4) The answer in subtraction is called the difference. (no)
5) If you do not understand a story problem, you should reread the problem until you do. (yes)
6) To find the area of a figure, multiply the length times the width. (no)
7) Bessie has 4 balls. Each ball has 2 stripes. What is the total number of stripes? To illustrate
this problem you would draw 4 circles and put 2 stripes on each. (yes)
8) You should check the reasonableness of your answer. (yes)
9) There can be more than one way to solve a problem. (yes)
10) The distance around a circle is called the circumference. (no)

Free Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free Choice Activity sheet (one box per day).

Six Group Activity

Have a group of six students, two from each ability level, complete the teacher-directed activity
sheet: Multiplication (Dice game, 1-digit by 2-digit)

Math Workshop

Have the students work in the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

Connection(s)

Enrichment: Have students create problems with too much or too little information. Remind
students to include solutions.

Fine Arts:

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Home: Encourage family members to create problems for students to solve.

Remediation: See attached Six-Group Activity sheet: Multiplication (Dice game, 1-digit by 2-
digit)

Technology:

Assessment

Informally assess students’ responses during lessons, Ten Statement reviews.

Homework

Have students review for test using notes from journals and written assignments.

Teacher Notes
Geography/ Political Science
Interactions of people with environment
Political interdependence of people and nation

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STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 032 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6C2; 6D1, 2

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Perform arithmetic operations Solve word problems requiring computations
Choose and apply appropriate operational with whole numbers
procedures and problem-solving strategies to Use mathematical skills to estimate,
real-world situations approximate, and predict outcomes and to
Apply a variety of estimation strategies judge reasonableness of results

Unit Focus/Foci

Problem Solving

Instructional Focus/Foci

Assessing problem-solving steps and strategies, writing story problems, too much information,
too little information

Materials

Teacher-prepared test

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Lesson:

Assessment (test)

Students must show their work. They may use their own strategies. They do not have to follow
all the steps verbatim as long as their answers are correct and they show how they arrived at
them.

Distribute copies of the test.

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Test

Teacher may reproduce this copy of the test for students.

Draw pictures to help you solve the following problems. (5 points each)

1. Jackie has 4 shirts. Each shirt has 5 stripes. How many stripes does Jackie’s shirt have in
all?

2. Kent has 25 books. He put the same amount of books on each of the 5 shelves of his
bookcase. How many books did he place on each shelf?

Read each problem and decide if the problem has too much information or not enough
information. Write too much information or too little information on the blank after the problem.
(5 points each)

3. Lamar’s fifth grade class is buying tickets to a ballgame. Each ticket costs $4. How much
money will Lamar’s class need? ______________________________________________
4. Bernie’s photo album holds 24 pictures. Dawn’s photo album holds 25 pictures. Wendy’s
photo album holds 30 pictures. Dawn’s photo album holds how many more pictures than
Bernie’s photo album? ____________________________________________________
5. At the basketball game, Tom spent $6.30 for 3 sandwiches. Kenny spent $1.50 for 3 sodas.
What was the cost of each sandwich? ___________________________________________
6. Sheryl bought 7 peaches. How much did she spend? _______________________________

Write one addition question and one subtraction question for each problem below. (5 points for
each question)

7. Bill mailed 6 invitations and his brother Mark mailed 8 invitations.


Addition: _______________________________________________________________
Subtraction: _____________________________________________________________
8. Cathy ate 10 pieces of candy. Bonnie ate 8 pieces of candy.
Addition: _______________________________________________________________
Subtraction: _____________________________________________________________

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Finish the following story problem. Be sure to include a question. (5 points for writing
necessary statement(s), 5 points for the question, and 5 points for the solution)

9. Jim read 5 books.

Solve the following story problems. Be sure to show your work, and write your answers in
complete sentences. (5 points each)

10. Jane had 6 quarters, 8 dimes, and 4 pennies in her bank. How many coins did she have in
all?

11. Karl had 4 pears. Each pear had 2 leaves on its stem. How many leaves were there in all?

12. Chuck had 40 homework problems. If he finished 25 of them, how many problems did he
have left to do?

13. Clay collected 35 pop cans. Sam collected 14 pop cans. Kevin collected 20 pop cans. What
was the total number of cans collected?

14. LaVonna had 5 bags. She put 6 sheets in each of her folders. How many folders did she
have in all?

15. Taylor had 42 sheets of paper. She put 6 sheets in each of her folders. How many folders
did she have in all?

16. Mable had a box of 60 paper clips. She now has 42 paper clips. How many more paper clips
does she need to fill her box?

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Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no, say: The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

No Ten Statements today.

Free Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free Choice Activity sheet (one box per day).

Six-Group Activity

No Six-Group Activity today.

Math Workshop

Have the students work in the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

Connection(s)

Enrichment:

Fine Arts:

Home:

Remediation: See attached Six-Group Activity sheet.

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Technology:

Assessment

Formal Assessment: Test (See attached.)

Homework

Teacher Notes

Key for test:

1. 20 stripes 2. 5 books
3. too little information 4. too much information
5. too little information 6. not enough information
7. possible answer: Addition: How many invitations did they mail altogether?, Subtraction:
How many more invitations did Mark mail than Bill?
8. possible answer: Addition: What is the total number of pieces of candy that Cathy and
Bonnie ate?, Subtraction: How many fewer pieces of candy did Bennie eat?
9. possible answer: 10 books 10. Jane has 18 coins in all.
11. There were 8 stems in all. 12. Chuck had 15 problems left to do.
13. The total number of cans collected was 69. 14. LaVonne had 30 buttons.
15. Taylor had 7 folders. 16. Mable needs 18 paper clips to fill her box.

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