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LIVINGHERE

2014-2015
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Universities
pump up sports,
culture
Eight great
activities boast
local flavor
Let your foodie
flag fly all over
town
Cascades leads pack
of parks, trails
FROM THE REGIONS ONLY TRAUMA CENTER, TO AN URGENT CARE FACILITY FOR MINOR INJURIES AND ILLNESSES,
AND A NEW FREESTANDING EMERGENCY CENTER DESIGNED TO TREAT EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN, NO WHERE ELSE IN
THE REGION WILL YOU FIND A MORE COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY SYSTEM TO MEET YOUR NEEDS.
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*InQuicker available at all emergency locations.
THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE
EMERGENCY SERVICES
IN THE REGION.
PERIOD.
Bixler Trauma and
Emergency Center
Emergency Center
Northeast
Urgent Care
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OPEN 10 AM - 10 PM, 7 DAYS A WEEK
1541 Medical Drive
OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY, 7 DAYS A WEEK
1300 Miccosukee Road
OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY, 7 DAYS A WEEK
1260 Metropolitan Boulevard
- Most advanced care avallable for
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- Hlghest chest paln accredltatlon
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OPENING
AUGUST 21
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Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 3
4 Living Here | 2014-2015
CRAWFORDVILLE
Robert Frable, D.O.
Aida Torres, A.R.N.P-C
2382 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite C
Crawfordville, FL 32327
850.926.6363
Internal Medicine
Rick Damron, M.D.
Terence Murphy, M.D.
Andrea Randell, M.D.
Richard Thacker, D.O.
Leonard Waldenberger, M.D.
Podiatry
Kevin Derickson, DPM
Family Practice
Erin Ayers, A.R.N.P-C
Pam Garcia, A.R.N.P.-C
Kathleen Wilson, A.R.N.P-C
MAIN CAMPUS
2770 Capital Medical Blvd., Suite 200
Tallahassee, FL 32308
850.878.8235
Rodolfo J. Oviedo, M.D.
Anthony Wright, M.D.
2626 Care Drive, Suite 206
Tallahassee, FL 32308
850.219.2306
Michelle Bachtel, M.D.
Joseph Baker, M.D.
Carey Dellock, M.D.
Sai Konduru, M.D.
Ajay Mhatre, M.D.
Niraj Pandit, M.D.
Emesto Umana, M.D.
Michael L. Douso, M.D., F.A.C.O.G.
Stephanie Cruz Lee, M.D., F.A.C.O.G.
Jolita Burns, M.D., F.A.C.O.G.
2770 Capital Medical Blvd, Suite 110
Tallahassee, FL 32308
850.877.5589
Womens Health
SOUTHWOOD
1910 Hillbrook Trl., Suite 2
Tallahassee, FL 32311
850.878.2637
We all have an idea of what the perfect healthcare experience
should be. Responsive yet friendly. Technologically advanced
yet compassionate. At Capital Regional, our physicians strive
to be the very best every day. And we think it shows.
Accepting appointments at all locations.
Eric Nicholson, M.D.
2626 Care Drive, Suite 105
Tallahassee, FL 32308
850.402.0202
CHATTAHOOCHEE
409 High Street
Chattahoochee, FL 32324
850.663.4343
P H Y S I C I A N N E T W O R K O F C A R E
CAPITAL REGIONAL MEDICAL GROUP
2631 Centennial Blvd., Ste 200
Tallahassee, FL 32308
850-656-7265
CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.com
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TD-0000252703
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 5
FAST
And FAST is just our speed.
is what you want from an ER in an emergency.
For average ER wait times, visit us on the web at CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.com or text ER to 23000.
Message and data rates may apply. For more information visit: TextERhelp.com
Not all emergency rooms are created equal.
When it comes to an emergency the last thing you want is a long wait. Thats why Capital Regional Medical Center
has the fastest ERs in both Leon and Gadsden counties. We can handle everything from heart attacks and strokes to
orthopedic and pediatric illnesses and injuries. When it matters most, choose the Capital Regional Medical Center ERs.
The fastest ERs in the area
Immediate, full-service care
Accredited Chest Pain Center
Joint Commission Top Performer on
Key Quality Measures
Ask EMS to take you to the ER at Capital Regional
TD-0000252764
6 Living Here | 2014-2015
LEON COUNTY
(850) 606-5300 www.LeonCountyFL.gov
Citizens Connect Mobile App available for download on the
iPhone or iPad from the Apple App Store or Google Play
for Android devices by searching for Leon County Mobile.
Leon County At Your Fingertips
P E O P L E F O C U S E D . P E R F O R M A N C E D R I V E N .
As home to Floridas capitol, Leon County is a welcoming, diverse, healthy, and vibrant
community, recognized as a great place to live, work and raise a family. Residents and
visitors alike enjoy the stunning beauty of the unspoiled natural environment and a rich
array of educational, recreational, cultural and social offerings for people of all ages. Leon
County government is a responsible steward of the communitys precious resources, the
catalyst for engaging citizens, community, business and regional partners, and a provider
of efcient services, which balance economic, environmental, and quality of life goals.
Follow us on Facebook and Twitter
TD-0000252588

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The Basics................................ 12
The Region: Our old town........... 13
The weather............................... 14-15
Real estate....................................... 16
Apartments ..................................... 17
Shopping......................................... 25
Utilities............................................. 28
Recycling ......................................... 29
Transportation ................................ 27
Drivers licenses
& vehicle registration.................. 26
Media & libraries ............................ 33
Picking a pet ................................... 30
Animal services ............................... 32
Staying safe..................................... 34
Government............................ 35
Overview: A chance encounter .... 37
Local lawmakers............................. 38
The Clerk of Courts........................ 38
Voter registration............................ 37
Health care.............................. 41
Overview......................................... 42
Major medical facilities .................. 43
Nursing homes
& assisted living........................... 42
Health groups
& support organizations............. 44
Education................................. 47
Overview......................................... 49
Early childhood education
& care ........................................... 50
Educational &
parenting resources .................... 50
Enrolling in public schools............. 52
K-12 schools.................................... 53
Private schools ................................ 55
Higher education............................ 56
Faith & Values ........................ 59
Overview.......................................... 61
Places of worship ........................... 62
Welcome................................... 10
Introduction................................ 10-11
Advertiser index............................. 111
Community.............................. 66
Overview......................................... 67
Helping organizations
& services ..................................... 68
Social & special
interest clubs................................ 68
Senior resources.............................. 71
Special needs resources................. 70
Business & Services............. 72
Overview......................................... 73
Major employers ............................ 73
Employment agencies.................... 76
Banks & credit unions .................... 76
Other business resources............... 77
Sports & Recreation............ 79
Overview, Sports & Rec ................. 80
The Seminoles................................. 84
The Rattlers ..................................... 85
Community centers
& sports programs....................... 81
Local parks & trails ......................... 86
Other sports facilities
& businesses ................................ 82
Hunting & fishing licenses............. 83
Sports clubs..................................... 83
Plant & garden clubs...................... 87
The running scene.......................... 90
The coast ......................................... 88
Environmental groups.................... 88
Waterside parks & beaches........... 89
Arts & Entertainment ......... 91
Overview......................................... 93
Festivals .......................................... 95
Things not to miss.......................... 96
Attractions ...................................... 96
Art galleries & museums .............. 101
Arts groups .................................... 101
Dance .............................................. 99
Music ............................................... 98
Theater .......................................... 100
Movie theaters.............................. 100
Nightlife......................................... 103
Eat & Drink............................. 105
Overview........................................ 106
Restaurants ................................... 107
Food trucks.................................... 110
Contents
LIVINGHERE
2014-2015
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 9
Web Producer Kate Schofield and Policy and Politics Editor Paul Flemming, right, help
Lew Wilson load his SUV with food donated by readers. REBECCAH LUTZ/DEMOCRAT
Members of the Sept. 28, 2013, Tallahassee Democrat kickball team. Back row: Travis Pillow, Cooper Smith, Paul Flemming. Middle
row: Susan Ledford, Jennifer Portman, Avery Portman, Leslie Smith, Bob Gabordi, Sean Rossman, Ryan Dailey. Bottom Row: TaMaryn
Waters, Martha Gruender, Rebeccah Lutz, Donna Gabordi Front: Staphanie Ponte, Jessica Gabordi. NATALIE PIERRE/DEMOCRAT
We live here, too
Paul Flemming and Jennifer Port-
mans son plays baseball at Winthrop
Park.
Byron Dobson attends
Bethel AME Church.
Randi Atwood directs
productions at Theatre
Tallahassee.
Nicole Tschetter volun-
teers as a coach with Girls
on the Run of the Big
Bend.
Bob Gabordi leads
walks on Saturdays with
our fitness site, Move.Tal-
lahassee.com.
I volunteer as a board member for
Alzheimers Project Inc.
Those are just some of the ways in
which our employees interact with the
Tallahassee community, not as journal-
ists, but as people.
Rebeccah
Lutz
Tallahassee
Democrat
Multimedia
News Editor
10 Living Here | 2014-2015
Welcome A part of the community
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 11
We live here, too.
For nearly 110 years, the
Tallahassee Democrat has
chronicled daily life in Flori-
das capital city. We have
documented our communitys
highs and lows, successes and
failures. Weve done so with
the skeptical eyes of journal-
ists, but never as unfeeling,
outside observers. How could
we? We live here, too.
The pages that follow are a
comprehensive guide to the
place we call home.
Living Here magazine and
TLHLivingHere.com are
produced with newcomers in
mind, but theres something
here for everyone. New resi-
dents or visitors will find
entry points for learning the
region, while longtime resi-
dents will enjoy these pages
as a celebration of what
makes us unique.
There is a lot to celebrate.
Tallahassee is a vibrant
town steeped in education,
government, history, arts,
sports, outdoor recreation
and community service. We
are the hub of a region that is
like no other in Florida. It is
the difference between palm
trees and live oaks, condos
and cottages, Key lime pie
and pecan pie, flat terrain and
red clay hills.
If youre new or visiting,
welcome. We hope Living
Here magazine helps you
discover Tallahassee.
If youre a longtime resi-
dent, let these pages reawak-
en your sense of home and
remind you why youve cho-
sen to stay all these years.
Celebrate, with us, Living
Here.
Multimedia News Editor Rebeccah Lutz
joined the staff of the Tallahassee
Democrat in 2005. Her favorite thing
about living here: her husband Matt,
whom she met in Tallahassee.
Marketing and Communications Manager Leslie Smith during a Move.Tallahassee.com paddling
trip down the Wacissa River in Jefferson County. MICHAEL SCHWARZ/SPECIAL TO THE DEMOCRAT
Rebeccah Lutz during the live auction at Purple Craze 2014, an Alzheimers Project Inc. benefit.
CHUCK MCCLENTON/DEMOCRAT
Welcome A part of the community
12 Living Here | 2014-2015
The Lichgate Oak
at 1401 High Road.
MARK WALLHEISER
DEMOCRAT FILES
IN THIS SECTION
The region, Local history,
Weather, Important dates,
Real estate, Shopping, Utilities,
Recycling, Drivers licenses,
Transportation, Libraries,
Media, Animal Services,
Staying safe
The Basics
ONLINE
See videos about the
region, real estate and
the weather at
TLHlivinghere.com
TALLAHASSEE
TIMELINE
1823 John Lee Williams/William
Simmons recommend Tallahas-
see as site of Florida territorial
capital.
1843 Fire destroys almost every
building from the Capitol to
Park Avenue.
1861 Florida votes to secede
from Union.
1902 Third Capitol building
constructed; becomes museum
after 1978 construction of new
Capitol.
1905 First issue of Tallahassee
Democrat published.
1910 Leon High, for all grades,
opens on W. Park Ave.; moves to
current location 1937
1924 Tallahassee celebrates its
Centennial with weeklong festi-
val.
1929 Dale Mabry Field opens as
citys first airport.
1947 Florida State College for
Women becomes co-ed Florida
State University
1949 Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital opens.
1956 Tallahassee bus boycott is
first local civil rights salvo.
1968 Springtime Tallahassee
festival begins; Winter Festival
begins in 1987.
1971 James Ford first black
person elected to Tallahassee
City Commission
1976 Bobby Bowden hired at
FSU, wins two national champi-
onships (1993, 1999). The third
comes under Coach Jimbo Fisher
in 2013.
1981 Donald L. Tucker Civic
Center opens.
1985 Hurricane Kate knocks out
power for two weeks.
2000 Tallahassee is center of
contested U.S. presidential
election for 36 days.
This is why there is a Tal-
lahassee:
In 1823, two years after
Florida became a U.S. territo-
ry, members of the legislative
council wearied of the hard-
ships of traveling to St. Au-
gustine or Pen-
sacola for their
annual sessions.
So they dele-
gated two com-
missioners to
find a meeting
place in be-
tween.
John Lee
Williams came
by boat from
Pensacola and Dr. William
Simmons came by horseback
from St. Augustine. Legend
holds their paths finally
crossed in Tallahassee and
they were so theydeclared us
the capital of Florida.
In truth, Tallahassee was
their intended rendezvous.
Apalachee Indians had lived
here for centuries. The land
was fertile and attractive and
close to the coast. So Wil-
liams and Simmons negotiat-
ed the departure of two
small tribes of Seminole Indi-
ans, a log cabin was built and
the first Legislature met here
in 1824.
And the town was named
Tallahassee, an Indian word
for old town or old fields,
acknowledging the longtime
time presence of Native
Americans.
This is why Tallahassee
prospered:
Tallahassee was home of
the first Florida land boom. In
the 1820s, planters from the
Upper South abandoned
tapped out lands for Tallahas-
see, which became the heart
of Floridas antebellum cotton
empire.
After the Civil War, the
Legislature created todays
Florida State University and
Florida A&M University.
During World War II, Talla-
hassee was home to one of
the 172 bases established in
Florida for military training.
After the war, many of the
soldiers who trained here
returned to marry women
theyd met and to attend the
newly co-educational FSU.
Leon Countys population
grew from 35,000 at the end
of World War II to nearly
285,000 today.
This is why people love
Tallahassee:
Forty years ago, author
Glorida Jahoda dubbed North
Florida The Other Florida.
The name celebrates how our
beguiling woods, waters and
rural origins have not been
obliterated by concrete devel-
opments and theme parks.
We remain attractive and
fertile in ways old and new.
Gerald Ensley is a columnist and senior
writer. His favorite things about
Tallahassee are Sally (his wife), Amanda
(his daughter) and Dooney (his dog).
This old town still fertile ground
The striped awnings at the Florida Historic Capitol Museum were
replaced in spring 2013. GERALD ENSLEY/DEMOCRAT
Gerald
Ensley
Democrat
senior writer
ONLINE
See a video about the Tallahassee region
at TLHLivingHere.com.
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 13
The Basics Our area
Tallahassee is known for hot and
sticky summers that never seem to end
and abbreviated, relatively mild winters.
Floridas capital city,
unlike much of the rest of
the state, actually has four
distinct seasons, though
some years its hard to tell.
I would say we have
four seasons, said Tim
Barry, meteorologist with
the National Weather Ser-
vice in Tallahassee. But
our summers are long, and
our winters are short. So
the transition between the two, our fall
and spring, sometimes may seem unno-
ticeable.
Springtime can be glorious in Tallahas-
see the azaleas begin to bloom and the
city can see some of its driest weather of
the year. (April, on average, is Tallahas-
sees least-rainy month).
Tallahassee is a particularly rainy
place, due in no small part to its proximity
to the Gulf of Mexico. The city gets about
60 inches of rain a year, less than Miami
and Pensacola but enough to land it on at
least one Top 10 list of the countrys
rainiest places.
The city gets on average about 40
percent of its rainfall during the summer
months of June, July and August, when
sea-breeze thunderstorms can bring
afternoon showers on a nearly daily basis.
In 2012, Tropical Storm Debby
brought heavy rain to Tallahassee and a
30-inch deluge to parts of Wakulla Coun-
ty just south of town. Hurricane Kate was
only a tropical storm by the time it hit
Tallahassee in 1985, but it was strong
enough to knock out power for weeks.
Hurricane season runs June 1 through
Nov. 30.
I would say heed the advice of the
emergency managers, Barry said.
Tallahassee has two severe-weather
seasons, with the main one falling be-
tween mid-February and late March and
another in November. Snow isnt out of
the question, but it is rare.
Jeff Burlew is a senior writer and weather nerd. His
favorite thing about living here is the smart people.
Tallahassee sees more than its share of storms,
like this one that postponed the NCAA baseball
tournament. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT
Tallahassee can see
splendid springs, long,
sticky summers
Gene and Fran Route, visiting from St.
Paul, Minnesota, enjoy the eye-popping
cavalcade of spring colors at Maclay
Gardens. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
Jeff
Burlew
Democrat
senior writer
The Basics Weather
14 Living Here | 2014-2015
BE PREPARED
Prepare a disaster-supplies kit, which should include the following:
Water, at least 1 gallon a day per person for three to seven days.
Food, at least enough for three to seven days. You should have
nonperishable packaged or canned food and juices, food for in-
fants, snacks, a nonelectric can opener, cooking tools and fuel,
paper plates and plastic utensils.
Blankets, pillows, etc.
Clothing: Seasonal, rain gear, sturdy shoes
First-aid kits including medicines and
prescription drugs
Special items for babies and older people
Toiletries, hygiene items and damp wipes
Flashlight and batteries
Radio, battery-operated and NOAA weather
radio
Telephones: Fully charged cell phone with extra
battery and a traditional (not cordless) telephone
Cash (with small bills) and credit cards.: Banks and ATMs may not
be available for extended periods of time
Keys
Toys, books and games
Important documents in a waterproof container.: Insurance, med-
ical records, bank account numbers, Social Security card, etc.
Tools Keep a set with you during the storm
Vehicle fuel tanks filled
Pet care items: Proper identification, immunization records, medi-
cations; ample food and water; a carrier or cage; muzzle and leash
ONLINE: Go to www.Tallahassee.comor www.nhc.noaa.gov for storm in-
formation. ON THE AIR: The National Weather Service radio frequency for Calhoun,
Franklin, Gadsden, Jackson, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, Madison, Taylor and Wakulla
counties is 162.400 MHz.
HURRICANE SEASON TIPS
1. Develop a written family plan for dealing with a disaster based
on your vulnerability to hurricane hazards.
2. Discuss hazards that could affect your family, including storm
surge, flooding and wind.
3. Locate a safe room or the safest areas
in your home for each hurricane
hazard. In certain circum-
stances the safest areas
may not be your home
but within your
community.
4. Determine escape
routes from your home
and places to meet
measured in tens of miles rather than hun-
dreds.
5. Have an out-of-state friend as a single point
of family contact.
6. Make an evacuation plan now that includes
your pets.
7. Post emergency telephone numbers by
your phones and make sure your children
know how and when to call 911.
8. Check your insurance coverage.
Source: National Hurricane Center in Miami
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 15
The Basics Weather
ONLINE
Watch a video on hurricane tips at
TLHlivinghere.com
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NEIGHBORHOODS
Betton Hills (Central Tallahassee) One of Tallahassees oldest and finest in-town neighbor-
hoods, close shopping, schools and parks.
Bull Run (Northeast) Spanning 428 acres, this family-oriented community features new con-
struction by award-winning area builders.
Huntington Estates (Northwest) A neighborhood of single-family homes on large lots, close
to shopping, schools and entertainment.
Indian Head Acres (Central) Close to downtown, this community has homes dating from the
1950s, plus a mix of more contemporary architectural styles.
Killearn Estates (Northeast) Tallahassees first planned community with underground util-
ities. It has about 3,800 homes in distinctive neighborhoods.
Killearn Lakes Plantation (Northeast) Homes in all styles and prices, tucked into the forests
of northern Leon County.
Lake Talquin (Southwest) Waterfront living for the boater or fishing enthusiast with every-
thing from cottages to estate homes.
Piney Z (East) A former plantation that spans 450 acres, this residential community is flanked
by three parks and has access to popular local trails.
SouthWood (Southeast) A planned community with parks, trails, schools and golf club within
walking distance of a state office center.
Summerbrooke (Northeast) A scenic residential area of custom homes in the rolling hills of
northeastern Tallahassee, plus a top-rated golf course.
ONLINE: For a comprehensive list of neighborhoods, visit www.econa.org.
COUNCIL OF NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATIONS
CONA, the Council of Neighborhood Associations, works in cooperation with homeowners
associations and neighborhood groups. For details, visit www.econa.org.
PARADE OF HOMES
Scheduled for successive weekends each May, the annual Parade of Homes is an event planned
and promoted by the Tallahassee Builders Association. The Parade gives builders a chance to
showcase their best work. There are homes entered in every style, size and price range. For
more, visit www.tallyba.com.
Real estate in Tallahassee is on the
move, with a healthy number of home
sales each month and a variety of build-
ers busy with new residential communi-
ties.
The offerings range from rural re-
treats to in-town residences and every-
thing in between. For many builders,
the demand for new construction in-
creased this year and they hope it will
maintain into 2015.
Robert Parrish, president of Parrish
Group, is the developer behind King-
smill, a new community on Thomasville
Road in Bradfordville. It totals 10.5
acres and has 39 home sites. There is a
common area set aside, and the home-
owners association takes care of land-
scape maintenance.
On the east side of Tallahassee is
The Preserve at Buck Lake, where
Foundation Homes and TriCon Build-
ers Inc. have 31 lots in the develop-
ments first phase. Some Preserve
home sites have views of Buck Lake,
and the development includes conser-
vation spaces.
Premier Fine Homes and Tallahas-
see Homes Inc. are building at a 41-lot
section of Bull Run that opened at
Dahlgren Drive and Kerry Forest Park-
way.
Realtor Jeff Doxsee of Premier is
president of the Tallahassee Board of
Realtors. His companys market niche is
the home of 1,800 to 2,200 square feet.
His advice to consumers new to the
housing market here is to take some
time to learn something about the areas
and neighborhoods of Tallahassee.
Look for the geographical area you
want to be in. Look for school zones
you want to be in, then research the
builder or the seller to see how long
they have been around and how much
they contribute to the community,
Doxsee says.
Dave Hodges is the business editor for the Tallahas-
see Democrat. His favorite thing about living here:
things to do, from concerts to great restaurants.
Buyers find plenty of home options
Tallahassee Homes features models in Bull Run. DAVE HODGES/DEMOCRAT FILES
By Dave Hodges
Democrat Business Editor
16 Living Here | 2014-2015
The Basics Housing
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 17
The Basics Where to live
1111 on High, 1111 High Road, 224-0011,
1111onhigh.com
1303 Ocala, 1303 Ocala Road, 576-2183,
live1303.com
601 Copeland, 601 S. Copeland St.,
629-4055, 601copeland.com
A University View, 445 Conradi St.,
567-9759
Adams St. Lofts, 420 N. Adams St.,
681-1071, adamsstreetlofts.com
Alexan SouthWood, 2000 Merchants
Row Blvd., 688-7095, alexansouthwood-
.com
Arbor Landing, 4910 N. Monroe St.,
354-5357, arborproperties.com
Arbor Station, 619 Arbor Station Lane,
386-1900, arborproperties.com
Arbor View, 2750 Old St. Augustine
Road, 942-3602, arborproperties.com
Arlington Apartments, 415 E. Brevard
St., 521-0306, firstpropertyservices.com
Arrow Pointe, 3380 Fred George Road,
514-3888, arrowpointeapts.com
Arrowhead, 325 Hayden Road, 309-
7368, remaccproperties.com
Ashburn Hills, 1610 Belle Vue Way,
576-9226, ashburnhills.com
Ashford Club at Betton Hills, 2055
Thomasville Road, 386-8186, ashfordatbet-
ton.com
Astoria Arms Apartments, 2350
Wanda Court, 386-1565
Augustine Club, 2001 Old St. Augustine
Road, 877-5726, augustineclub.com
Azalea Place, 600 Victory Garden Drive,
877-5535, arborproperties.com
Banyan Bay Club, 1800 Miccosukee
Commons Drive, 671-1117, mybanyan-
bayapts.com
Barrington Park Apartments, 2801
Chancellorsville Drive, 942-1128, barring-
tonparkcondo.com
Bellevue Square, 1854 Belle Vue Way,
222-4688, holisticproperties.net
Benchmark Property Management,
522 E. Jefferson St., 244-6275, bpmrental-
s.com
Benchmark West, 2202 W. Pensacola
St., 575-1483, ipadmgt.com
Berkshire Manor, 2060 Continental
Ave., 576-6925, berkshiremanor.net
Bethel Towers, 324 N. Martin Luther
King Jr. Blvd., 224-2486, betheltally.org
Blairstone at Governors Square, 501
Blairstone Road, 656-2299, blairstoneat-
govenorssquare.com
Boardwalk at Appleyard, 2566 W.
Tennessee St., 574-0003, boardwalkfsu.net
Bradford Oaks, 316 Ausley Road,
521-0306, bradfordoaksapts.com
Broward Park, 110 Broward St., 521-
0306, firstpropertyservices.com
Burt Reynolds Hall, 2065-2 Delta Way,
893-2500, regionalpropertyservices.com
Camaron at Woodcrest, 275 John Knox
Road, 385-8080, camaronatwoodcrest.com
Campus Circle, 800 Basin St., 421-2233,
campuscircletallahassee.com
Campus View, 1819 West Pensacola St.,
222-4688, holisticproperties.net
Campus Walk, 810 Wadsworth Drive,
681-3809, campuswalk.com
Canopy Oaks, 1619 Lake Ave., 575-1834
Capital Court Apartments, 700 N.
Calhoun St., 222-1066
Capital Oaks Villas, 2600 Miccosukee
Road, 942-7700, capitaloaksvillas.com
Capital Place at Southwood, 2300
Bluff Oak Way, (888) 603-4265, capital-
placeatsouthwood.com
Capital Ridge Apartments, 3255
Capital Circle NE, 385-0965, capital-
ridgebyelon.com
Capital Walk Apartments, 850 Capital
Walk Drive, 678-7604, richpropertiesfl.com
Carolina Square, 700 W. Virginia St.,
222-4879, carolinasquareapts.com
Carriage House Apartments, 420 E.
Park Ave., 385-1001, yourhpm.com
Castle Apartments, 2902 Battle Moun-
tain Way, 942-5929, southgroupapart-
ments.com
Catalyst, 631 W. Madison St., 577-1149,
catalystfsu.com
Cedars West, 2765 W. Tharpe St.,
386-7844
Chapel Terrace, 1828 W. Pensacola St.,
576-5558, chapelterraceapts.com
Chartre Oaks, 2011 Belle Vue Way,
575-4433, chartreoaksridge.com
Chartre West, 214 Columbia Drive,
877-417-9111
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TALLAHASSEE BUILDERS
18 Living Here | 2014-2015
The Basics Apartments
Club at Lake Jackson, 5001 Lake Front
Drive, 562-5201, clubatlakejackson.com
College Club Townhomes, 2833 S.
Adams St., 325-1700, collegeclubtownho-
mes.com
College Plaza, 405 W. College Ave.,
224-5611, phoenix-south.com
College Square, 2166 W. Pensacola St.,
385-7368, 385rent.com
College Town at Madison Street, 815
W. Madison St.., 765-5968, fsucollege-
town.net
Collegewood Apartments, 502 W.
Jefferson St., 224-5611, phoenixsouth.com
Colony Club, 446 Conradi St., 224-7319,
colonyclubvillage.com
Columbia House Apartments, 1815
Miccosukuee Commons Drive, 576-5417
Conklin Commons, 1220 Conklin St,
386-1567, cabatproperties.com
Continental Park, 2393 Continental
Ave., 508-4404, mattoxrealty.com
Cottages at Magnolia, 408 E. Magnolia
Drive, 580-7444, cottagesatmagnolia.com
Cypress Gardens, 2711 Allen Road,
386-1212, capitalpropertiesFL.com
Cypress Pointe, 1555 Delaney Drive
#1223, 893-9548, capreit.com
Delaney Park, 3550 Esplanade Way,
369-8234, delaneyparkatsouthwood.com
Eagle Pines, 445 Appleyard Drive,
575-8145, phoenix-south.com
Eagles Landing, 1655 Eagles Landing
Blvd., 385-8290, arborproperties.com
Eagles Point, 770 Appleyard Drive,
574-3234, eaglespointtally.com
Embassy House Apartments, 415 N.
Gadsden St., 222-5935,
Escambia Court Townhomes, 215-E
Dixie Drive, 224-6275, bpmrentals.com
Evergreens at Mahan, 900 Riggins
Road, 656-7391, evergreensatmahan.com
Florida Towers, 472 W. Jefferson St.,
224-5611, phoenix-south.com
Forest Hills, 1817 W. Call St., 222-2286
Forum Tallahassee, 2525 W. Tennessee
St., 765-1103, forumtallahasseeapts.com
Franklin Pointe, 631 E. Call St., 222-
2864, franklinpointe.com
Fulton Hill, 603 Fulton Road, 385-0621,
sdmcinc.com
Gateway at Seminole Suites, 2421
Jackson Bluff Road, 877-6770, gatewayat-
seminolesuites.com
GeorgeTown, 524 W. Tharpe St., 385-
5821, southgroupapartments.com
Glen Hollow Apartments, 1554 Lake
Ave., 576-5006
Glen Oaks, 2074 Midyette Road, 671-
1790, glenoaksapt.com
GrandMarc, 1000 W. Brevard St., 222-
6272, grandmarctallahassee.com
Green Briar Garden Homes, 2110
Jackson Bluff Road, 894-7368, greenbriar-
gardenhomes.com
Greenside Apartments, 1660 Kay Ave.,
309-7368, remaccproperties.com
Greystone Place, 2416 Jackson Bluff
Road, 523-0100, cabatproperties.com
Griffin Heights, 1010 Basin St., 224-
1314, griffinheights.com
Hancock Place, 2912 Ivanhoe Road,
510-8891, twdevelopment.com
Harbin Terrace, 1701 W Pensacola St.,
576-9980, harbinterraceapartments.com
Hayden Arms, 319 Hayden Road,
893-2500, regionalpropertyservices.com
Heritage Grove, 1947 Heritage Grove
Circle, 645-3333, heritage-grove.org
Heritage Park, 1128 Ocala Road, 576-
8754, southgroupapartments.com
Hickory Hill Apartments, 2315 Jackson
Bluff Road, 350-0828
Hidden Green, 1579 Kelly Run, 893-
2500, regionalpropertyservices.com
Hidden Villas Apartments, 2131 N.
Meridian Road, 385-2191
Hillside Apartments, 600 Eugenia St.,
513-1515, firstpropertyservices.com
Indian Oaks West, 1816 Jackson Bluff
Road, 545-8164, debgerber.com
Indian Ridge Apartments, 2924
Miccosukee Road, 878-2139,
Inverness, 1370 Ocala Road, 385-1001,
yourhpm.com
Jackson Square at the Hermitage,
1767 Hermitage Blvd., 365-9345, jackson-
squareapartments.com
Jakes Place, 511 N. Woodward Ave.,
577-3333, myjakesplace.com
Jamaica Palms, 302 E. Georgia St.,
222-0157, cpservices.net
Jamestown Garden Apartments, 310
W. Jefferson St., 224-2141, jeffersonman-
agement.com
Jamestown Woods, 3150 Windsong
Drive, 386-3006, jamestownwoods.com
Jasmine Court, 600 Mary Beth Ave.,
309-7368, remacc.com
Jefferson Arms, 412 W. Jefferson St.,
224-5611, phoenix-south.com
Jefferson Towers, 516 W. Jefferson St.,
222-5611, phoenix-south.com
Jeffwood Apartments, 924 W. Pensaco-
la St., 224-5679, tallyapts.com
Jennings Place, 1516 Adams Street,
580-7444, jenningsplace.com
Kingston Square, 410 W. Van Buren St.,
224-0980, firstpropertyservices.com
Lakes at San Marcos, 4660 Woodville
Highway, 942-1002, lakesatsanmarcos.com
Landmark Apartments, 2125 Jackson
Bluff Road, 576-5421, landmarktallahas-
see.com
Legacy Suites, 415 Chapel Drive, 222-
2525, legacysuitesapartments.com
Legacy Town Homes, 1240 Conklin St.,
523-0100, cabatproperties.com
Leon Arms, 2502 Holton St., 576-7308
Leparulo Properties, 808 St. Augustine
St., 224-7368, tallahasseecollegerental-
s.com
Lexington Apartments, 106 W. 7th
Ave., 521-0306, firstpropertyservices.com
LondonTown, 2039 N. Meridian Road,
385-9757, southgroupapartments.com
Magnolia Terrace, 509 E. Magnolia
Drive, 877-6420, magnoliaterraceapts.net
Meridian Place, 2000 N. Meridian Road,
385-3423, meridianplaceapartment.net
Miccosukee Hills, 3201 Miccosukee
Road, 878-5844, miccosukeehillsapts.com
Mission Overlook, 187 Del Caramel
Way, 386-1212, capitalpropertiesfl.com
Mission West, 2651 Vista Rise #D,
575-1495, crerentals.com
Monterey Apartment Homes, 2301
Old Bainbridge Road, 385-0536
North Point Apartments, 2651 North
Point Court, 422-3700, firstpropertyservi-
ces.com
Oak Creek Place, 2350 Wanda Way,
523-0100, cabatproperties.com
Oak Pointe, 1747 Capital Circle NE,
385-5359, oak-pointe-apts.com
Oakcrest, 110 Dixie Drive, 792-1457
Ochlockonee Pointe, 33870 Blue Star
Highway, 32343, 580-4075, ochlockonee-
pointeapartments.com
Osceola Lofts, 501 Chapel Drive, 224-
5638, osceolalofts.com
Osceola Ridge, 1001 Ocala Road,
575-5001, osceolaridge.com
Palms West, 2325 W. Pensacola St.,
576-6814,
Park Avenue Villas, 2102 E. Park Ave.,
656-1156, remaccproperties.com
Parkway Square, 2855 Apalachee
Parkway, 877-9762, parkwaysquareapt-
s.com
Parkwood Apartments, 401 W. Park
Ave., 681-9953, regionalpropertyservi-
ces.com
Pebble Hill Apartments, 2353 Mission
Road #J, 574-1240, pebblehillapts.com
Pinecrest West, 1380 Ocala Road,
576-8527
Plantations at Pine Lake, 1833 Hal-
stead Blvd., 893-6003, plantationsat-
pinelake.com
Planters Crossing, 1447 Stone Road,
385-1600, plantersapartments.com
Players Club, 222 N. Ocala Road, 575-
3615, playersclubfsu.com
Pointe East, 703 Pointe Court, 521-0306,
firstpropertyservices.com
Polo Club, 1000 High Road, 580-8078,
poloclubtallahassee.com
Polos on Park, 2626 E. Park Ave.,
309-7667, polosonpark.com
Portland Terrace Apartments, 641
McDonnell Dr, 224-1424
Portofino Villas, 770 Appleyard Drive,
574-3234
Providence Pointe, 111 W. 9th St.,
322-7380, cabatproperties.com
Richmond Square, 911 Richmond St.,
386-8500
Ridgewood, 2100 Apalachee Parkway,
878-7298, http://www.ridgewood-apart-
ments.com/
Rockbrook Gardens Apartments, 1021
Idlewild Drive, 878-4226, rockbrook-
gardens.com
Rolling Hills, 280 John Knox Road,
385-2560,
Savannah Sound Apartments, 1950 N.
Point Blvd., 385-9001, savannahsoun-
dapts.com/
Seminole Grand, 1505 W. Tharpe St.,
383-7300, seminolegrand.com
Seminole Ridge, 1375 Pullen Road,
422-3424, seminoleridefsu.com
Shadow Ridge, 2424 W. Tharpe St.,
385-0286, shadowridgebyelon.com/
Shamrock Village of Killearn, 3711
Shamrock St. W., 893-1197
Silverleaf East, 2712 W. Tharpe St.,
576-5421, landmarktallahassee.com
Skyview, 615 West St. Augustine St.,
222-4688, holisticproperties.net/sky-
view.htm
Southgate, 675 W. Jefferson St., 425-
4200, southgateattallahassee.com
Spanish Oaks, 1327 High Road, 222-
8496, southgroupapartments.com
Spirit Wind, 1716 Bellevue Way, 222-
9176, studentsrenthere.com
Springwood, 2660 Old Bainbridge Road,
562-2900, springwood-apts.com
St. Augustine Hills, 2415 Old St. Augus-
tine Road, 656-6340, staugustinehillsapt-
s.com
Stadium Place, 224 Hayden Road,
222-9176, studentsrenthere.com
Star Suites, 1360 High Road, 576-5100,
star-suites.com
Stratford Landing, 2616 Mission Road,
575-3703,stratfordlandingapts.com/
unit_floorplan.html
Sweet Bay Club, 2309 Old Bainbridge
Road, 383-7400,
Talla Villa, 925 E. Magnolia Drive,
877-5241
Tally Square Apartments, 1112 S.
Magnolia Drive, 878-1855, tallysquare.com
Tanglewood Apartments, 1600 Pullen
Road, 386-1030, tanglewoodapartment-
s.net
Tenn St. Station, 600 Dixie Drive,
574-7663, campusparktennstreet.com/
The Boardwalk Village, 101 Chapel Dr,
727-5990, boardwalktally.com/
The Commons, 1325 W. Tharpe St.,
523-1000, commonsfsu.com
The Cottages at Country Club, Gads-
den St., 521-0306, firstpropertyservices.com
The Cottages at Cumberland Forest,
1144 Greentree Ct., 309-7368, remacc-
properties.com
The Cove, 2210-1 Mission Road, 224-
6275, bpmrentals.com
The Evergreens at Mahan, 901 Riggins
Road, 656-7391, pegasusresidential.com
The Lakes at University Center, 1335
Airport Drive, 576-9984, thelakeshoa.org
The Landing at Appleyard, 475
Appleyard Drive, 576-7500, landinga-
tappleyard.com
The Luxe on West Call, 1600 W. Call St.,
765-2201, luxeonwestcall.com
The Osceola Apartments, 500 Chapel
Drive, 222-5010, theosceolaapartment-
s.com
The Paddock Club Tallahassee, 1900
Centre Pointe Blvd., 878-6600, tpctallahas-
see.com
The Park at Forest Ridge, 2677 Old
Bainbridge Road, 514-4000, theparkatfor-
estridge.com
The Park at Midtown, 1600 Old Bain-
bridge Road, 222-3696, theparkatmid-
town.com
The Pines of Tallahassee, 3801 Mission
Trace Blvd., 562-7441, thepinestallahassee-
.com
The Plantations at Killearn, 2305
Killearn Center Blvd., 668-8900, capreit-
.com
The Plaza, 982 W. Brevard St., 222-9843,
theplazaaptstallahassee.com
The Pointe, 3000 S. Adams St., 298-
4200, atthepointe.com
The Preserve at San Luis, 1560 San Luis
Road, 513-1300, thepreserveapt.com
The Reserve at Heritage Oaks, 3909
Reserve Drive, 878-8520, reserveatherit-
ageoaks.com
The Savannahs, 720 W. Carolina St.,
599-9200, savannahsatfsu.com
The Village, 2241 W. Pensacola St,
309-7368, remaccproperties.com
Timber Ridge, 1417 Pullen Road, 580-
0000, timberridgetownhomes.net
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 19
The Basics Apartments
Timberwood, 2300 Timber Oaks Lane,
402-9000, cpservices.net
Twin Oaks Southwood, 2500 Mer-
chants Row Blvd., 386-4800, twinoaksat-
southwood.com
U Club on Woodward, 700 N. Wood-
ward Ave., 765-5506, uclubonwoodward-
.com
University Center Apartments, 1341
Jackson Bluff Road, 894-7368, univer-
sitycenterapartments.com
University Club Townhomes, 228 Dixie
Drive, 309-0100, universityclubtownho-
mes.com
University Courtyard, 3025 S. Adams
St., 878-1973, universitycourtyardapart-
ments.com
University Gardens, 400 Putnam Drive,
402-3800, universitygardensstudenthou-
sing.com
University Gardens II, 401 Putnam
Drive, 580-7444, universitygardensstuden-
thousing.com
University Green, 320 W. Tennessee St.,
661-7113, universitygreenfsu.com
University Heights, 2915 Sharer Road,
298-4431, lyndliving.com
University House Retreat, 2636
Mission Road, 597-9783, retreattallahas-
see.com
University Lofts, 680 W. Virginia St.,
577-3333, universitylofts.net
University Village, 1825 W. Call St.,
425-3100, walktoclass.com
Venetian Villas, 235 S. Ocala Road,
580-0060, venetianvillasapts.com
Verandas at Southwood, 3700 Capital
Circle SE, 878-5545, verandasapts.com
Victoria Grand Apartments, 2350
Phillips Road, 329-6200, victoriagrand.com
Villa San Carlo, 205 White Drive, 575-
1773, villasancarlo.com
Villa Cortez, 1834 Jackson Bluff Road,
576-9949, villacortezapts.com
Villa Cristina, 2030 Belle Vue Way,
575-2030, villacristina.com
Villa Del Lago, 2700 W. Pensacola St.,
575-8187, villadellagoapts.com
Villa Dylano, 400 Hayden Road, 575-
1600, villadylano.com
Villa Lucia, 1845 Belle Vue Way, 580-
0030, villalucia.us
Villa Reanna, 1924 W. Pensacola St.,
580-4444, villareanna.com
Villa San Marco, 2400 W. Tharpe St.,
580-6000, villasanmarco.net
Villa San Michele, 1685 Baldwin Park
Drive, 580-0020, villasanmichele.us
West 10 Apartments, 2614 W. Ten-
nessee St., 574-5900, west10apts.com
White Drive Courtyard Apartments,
457 White Drive, 445-7808
White Drive Villas, 2347 Horne Ave.,
224-6275, bpmrentals.com
Whitehall Apartments, 1704 W. Call St.,
222-6819, whitehallstudentapartments.com
Windrush Village, 410 Victory Garden
Drive, 878-1802
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20 Living Here | 2014-2015
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Tallahassee
To view a list of homes for sale in your area,
visit Tallahassee.com/homes
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1901 Capital Circle NE
Tallahassee, FL 32308
Cell: (850) 545-3363
josephineang@msn.com
www.josephineang.com
Professionals Realty
Josephine Ang,
CRS, SFR
Broker-Associate
Each Ofce Independently Owned and Operated
850-728-3525
www.marencox@gmail.com
tallahasseerealestateandrelocation.com
Relocation Specialist
My experience will open doors for you
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Moving Up Down or Around
Maren Cox
850-545-9224
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Fletcher & Company
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BROKER-OWNER
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850.212.0440, 850.727.0066
316 Williams Street
Tallahassee, FL 32303
A Lifetime In Tallahassee,
Experienced in Happy
Real Estate Stories
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Leah Chapin, GRI,SRES,CLG, Green
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Real Estate Broker/ Owner
Mobile: 850.544.0162
Of ce: 850.893.9800
Fax: 850.893.9890
1550-1 Village Square Blvd.
Tallahassee, FL 32309
www.MatticeRealEstate.com
lori@matticerealestate.com
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 21
Real Estate Professionals
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Mattice
gaystefen@gmail.com
(850) 519-2701
R e a l E s t a t e , L L C
Gay Stefen
Investment Properties and Land Specialist
www.MyGadsdenCountyRealtor.com
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Justin Peel, CRS
Broker / REALTOR

(850) 519-8621
justinpeel@maclayrealty.com
www.maclayrealty.com
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Nancy Stedman Broker, CRS, GRI
realtornancy@comcast.net
www.retrieverproperty.com
Your best friend in the real estate market!
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Cindy Teem
850.766.3682
Broker Associate, Armor Realty
CRS, e-PRO, SFR, AHWD
www.CindyTeem.com
Relocation Specialist
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(850) 5086777
www.jenniferpatty.com
jenniferpatty@comcast.net
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Serving you is My business
Betty Perez, Realtor, e-Pro, SRES
Capital City Real Estate Group, LLC
850-508-8208
www.BettyPerez.com
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22 Living Here | 2014-2015
Coldwell Banker HARTUNG AND
NOBLIN, INC.
REALTORS

Yvonne J. Howell
933-2219
yvonnejhowell@gmail.com
Barbara Davidson
567-0891
bdtally@comcast.net
Jo Eldridge
566-6763
joeldridge@comcast.net
Kathy Rivenbark
363-3800
TLHKathy@gmail.com
Ana Sootin
545-1914
anasootin@gmail.com
Tom & JoAnn Jacobs
556-2220
www.TallyOpenHouses.com
Deborah Thompson
933-1349
www.deborahthompson.com
Sandy Higdon
510-5500
www.sandyhigdon.com
Meg G. Hilaman
556-2366
meg.hilaman@gmail.com
Jonathan Rigsby
980-5734
jcr279@comcast.net
bdtally@comcast.net ally@comcast.net joeldridge@comcast.net jo TLHKathy@gmail.com hy anasootin@gmail.com tin@gmail.com
Virginia Glass
599-2645
vaglass@aol.com
Christie Orros
321-2393
www.tallyrealestate.com
Maren Cox
728-3525
marencox@gmail.com
Molly Jenkins
Specializing in East Leon &
Jefferson Counties!
528-1707
molly.jenkins@coldwellbanker.com
Helping You Find the
Kelly Chavers
212-1727
chaversk@gmail.com
Fincher W. Smith
545-9070
ncher@nchtally.com
Lea Manifold
443-2649
Leamanifold@aol.com
Priscilla Tharpe LLC
933-9412
TharpePL@gmail.com
Jim Butler
933-9005
jmb9005@gmail.com
Kathy Reardon
510-2511
kathy@tallahasseehomeseller.com
Lisa Carey
212-3083
Lesa Hart
443-7919
CareyHartRealtors.com
ColdwellBankerTallahassee.com
Tallahassee Office: 850-386-6160 Wakulla Office: 850-926-2994
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 23
Property of your Dreams
Donald deG. Pickett
591-4725
donpick@aol.com
Shep Sheppard
556-6862
shep@cbhnmail.com
Rubye Carol Lamb
545-8387
rcarollamb@aol.com
Cassandra G. Harbin
545-6661
CGHarbin1@aol.com
Nadia Scheffers
264-9005
www.ScheffersRealEstate.com
Theresa Sawyer
264-2845
theresa_sawyer@comcast.net
Bill Enright
933-1066
Bill.Enright@coldwellBanker.com
Sandy Dallett
528-3285
sandy@iselltallahasee.net
Marilyn Yeager
694-3689
marilyngyeager@gmail.com
Sherry Metz
566-3179
sherrymetz@yahoo.com
Bonnie Scott-Walls
294-9275
BonnieScottWalls@Comcast.net
Debra Bell
321-5560
Debracoldwellbanker@comcast.net
Janet Dinkelman
509-4980
Janet.Dinkelman@gmail.com
Hartung and Noblin, Inc.
Mariela Santurri
Hablo Espaol!
545- 3920
mariela@marielasellshomes.com
Scott Williamson
228-5512
scottwilliamsonhomes.com
Chris Cicatello
519-2624
ccicatello@embarqmail.com
Jason Boone
545-0186
jasonbutlerboone@yahoo.com
Tammy DeHart
363-2903
dehartrealtor@gmail.com
Laura Kenney
694-1939
Sales@laurakenney.net
Georgia Turner 510-4286
Cindy Cooper 545-8076
www.TLHRealEstate.com
A BRAND YOU KNOW, A NAME YOU CAN TRUST
Residential | Commercial | Corporate Relocation
Amber Whetstone
570-8242
amberelinor@gmail.com
24 Living Here | 2014-2015
Terance Keenan/
Susan Byler
Keller Williams Realty
850-445-2476 / 850-510-8583
www.BuySellTallahassee.com
Donna Godwin
Hill Spooner & Elliott
850-545-0421
donnagodwinrealtor@gmail.com
Nan Greynolds
Gary Bartlett Real Estate
850-509-9210
nan.greynolds@gmail.com
Bill Lord
Armor Realty
850-933-6066
www.billlord.com
Marsha Morrison
Marsha Morrison Realty
850-508-8810
marsha@marshamorrison.com
Joy Blomeley
Coldwell Banker Hartung and Noblin
850-491-5093
joyblomeley@comcast.net
Skip Poppell
The Poppell Appraisal Firm
850-545-6393
skip@thepoppellrm.com
Christie Orros
Coldwell Banker Hartung and Noblin
850-321-2393
TallyRealEstate.com
Susan P. Gwynn
Armor Realty
850-545-3906
spgwynn@comcast.net
Sarah G Henning
Keller Williams Realty
850-668-5333
sarah@bestmovehomesales.com
Kristina Petrandis
Premier Fine homes
850-694-0020
Petrandis@gmail.com
Georgia Turner
Coldwell Banker Hartung and Noblin
850-510-4286
Georgia@TLHRealEstate.com
Stacie Spears
The Naumann Group
850-445-5510
www.staciespears.com
Lisa Montgomery-
Calvert
Montgomery Realty
850-556-1226
LisaMCalvert@comcast.net
Sherrie Cartee
The Naumann Group
850-545-6970
cartee11@msn.com
Trina Searcy
Keller Williams Realty
850-508-0154
TrinaS@kw.com
Tallahassee Top Realtor Council
A wealth of experience for all Your real estate needs
Lisa Carey
Coldwell Banker Hartung and Noblin
850-212-3083
Lisa@CareyHartRealtors.com
Lesa Hart
Coldwell Banker Hartung and Noblin
850-443-7919
Lesa@CareyHartRealtors.com
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 25
The Basics Shopping
pass Outfitter, Walter Green,
Fabrik and Francecas to look
at a wide variety of clothes
and find an outfit for a night
out on the town.
Midtown is poppin with
hip boutiques and shops
most of which are locally
owned. Divas and Devils and
Cole Couture are perfect for a
fun hippy, vintage look. Spar-
kle by Madison is one of my
favorite shops to find a dress
whether a cocktail dress or
sundress, all of them are af-
fordable.
Nestled between the two
universities is Gaines Street,
which is the center of a bohe-
mian, artsy culture. Avant
Garb is one of the handful of
stores that brings to life this
atmosphere through vintage
clothing. Theres also Olde
It doesnt matter what type
of person you are preppy,
edgy, bohemian or sporty
Tallahassees shopping scene
has stores for every fashion
personality.
The local boutiques, shops
and stores continue to evolve
along with the fashion indus-
try. Fashionistas welcomed
2014 with the addition of
Urban Outfitters in College
Town, and Miracle Plaza
joined the scene a few months
earlier.
Miracle Plaza intermingles
a love of food with fashion.
Whole Foods, Zos Kitchen
and BurgerFi are a few food
stops in the center. You can
stroll through Southern Com-
Ready, set, shop
By Nicole Tschetter
Democrat staff writer
College Town, the Seminole Boosters' mixed-use development at
Madison Street and Woodward Avenue, has commercial space
with dining and entertainment tenants. GLENN BEIL/DEMOCRAT FILES
Kathy Fezler
Smith
Broker
545-8310
Mike
Ferrie
Realtor
566-8373
Dixie
Russell
Realtor
566-9285
850-329-7000
Ranked
as One of
Tallahassees
Top Real
Estate
Companies
Suzanne
Mozley
Realtor
545-5574
Dee Ann
Maxfeld
Realtor
508-7989
Sarah
Kosturko
Realtor
445-8760
Kenny
Ayers
Realtor
508-5500
Sedita
Cayson
Realtor
933-6973
Bettie
Bedell
Realtor
570-0181
Gregg
Conner
Realtor
509-4399
Wanda
Sawyer
Realtor
933-3146
Ada
Feliciano
Realtor
545-3870
Debbie Gerber-
Mahan
Realtor
545-8164
Patrick
Hardy
Realtor
294-1232
Marvin
Goldstein
Realtor
294-0029
Becky
Sauers
Realtor
508-3870
W W W . P R I M E S O U T H R E A L T Y . C O M
TD-0000252376
26 Living Here | 2014-2015
The Basics Shopping / Getting around
Leon County Tax Collector
Offices issues state vehicle
registrations and disabled
parking permits, driver licenses
and renewals, hunting and
fishing licenses, I.D. cards and
renewals, property tax col-
lections, title work, tourist
development tax, vehicle,
vessels and mobile home regis-
trations and renewals.
The Tax Collector offices are
a one stop resource for all of
the above. Hours are 8:30
a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday and
online at leontaxcollector.net.
Go to the website to trans-
act business online, obtain
required forms or to find the
nearest walk-in office location.
Customers can also search the
tax roll and pay property or
Tourist Development Taxes or
process Tag Registrations on-
line through the website. In
addition, taxes or registration
can be paid by mail.
OFFICES
Metro 8 Service Center: 1276
Metropolitan Blvd., Suite 102, Tallahas-
see, FL 32312
Cross Creek Service Center: 1210
Capital Circle SE, Tallahassee, FL 32301
Southside Service Center: 3477 S.
Monroe St. Suites 1-3, Tallahassee, FL
32301
Westside Service Center: 870-1
Blountstown Highway, Tallahassee, FL
32304
Lake Jackson Town Center: 3840 N.
Monroe St. Suite 102, Tallahassee, FL
32303
Interpreter/Medical Driving Test
by appointment only: Available
appointment times 9 a.m. or 2 p.m. No
appointments are scheduled on Fridays.
Road Test Examinations, Monday-
Friday: First come first served. Testing
stops at 4:30 p.m. daily.
Tax collector Doris Maloy:
P.O. Box 1835, Tallahassee, FL 32302,
488-4735, www.leontaxcollector.net
Drivers licenses &
vehicle registrations
Fields Clothing Co., which has
original FSU swag and designs
on T-shirts and hoodies that
are perfect for game day.
The boutiques that glim-
mer throughout Market Street
offer a variety of choices. A
few to check out are Heels
and Handbags, Spriggs and
Gidgets which has a lot of
FSU gear.
You cant forget Tallahas-
sees malls Governors
Square and Tallahassee Mall.
Governors Square tends to be
the more prominent shopping
spot, but it depends on what
youre looking for. Burlington
Coat Factory, Barnes & Noble
and Bath & Body Works are
some of the popular stops at
Tallahassee Mall.
Governors Square boasts
hit places like Victorias Se-
cret, Forever 21, Dillards and
Macys. The popular clothing
store H&M has just made its
way into the list of shops.
Shopping
centers
Betton Place: 1950 Thomasville Road
Carriage Gate Center: 3425 Thom-
asville Road
The Cottages at Lake Ella: 1621 N.
Monroe St.
Governors Marketplace: 1514 Gove-
nors Square Blvd.
Manor@Midtown: 1122 Thomasville
Road
Market Square: 1514 Timberlane Road
Miracle Plaza: 1815 Thomasville Road
The Pavilion at Market Street: 1410
Market St.
Railroad Square Art Park: 567 Industri-
al Drive
Village Commons: 1400 Village Square
Blvd.
Governors Square Mall: 1500 Gover-
nors Square Blvd.
Tallahassee Mall: 2415 N. Monroe St.
Over 35 years of
Furniture Innovation,
Comfort & Style
www.hhfurnitureanddesign.com | 850-539-6886
Store Hours: Wed-Sat. 10am - 6pm, Sun Noon-5pm
Havana
302 N. Main St.
Havana, Florida
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 27
The Basics Getting around
TALLAHASSEE
REGIONAL AIRPORT
The airport is served by four major airlines
(including their subsidiary carriers).
Carriers include: American Airlines, Delta
Air Lines, Silver Airways and US Airways.
Additionally, non-stop and connecting
service to virtually every major destination
in the world. The airport is located at
3300 Capital Circle SW.
Call 891-7802 or go to
www.FlyTallahassee.com. More in-
formation is available at
www.facebook.com/FlyTallahassee and on
Twitter @iFlyTallahassee.
AIRLINES SERVING
THE AIRPORT
American Airlines: www.aa.com or
(800) 433-7300. Daily flights to Miami
and Dallas/Fort Worth.
Silver Airways: www.Gosilver. or (800)
881-4999. Daily flights to Fort Lauderdale,
Orlando and Tampa.
Delta Air Lines: www.delta.com or
(800) 221-1212. Daily flights to Atlanta.
US Airways Express:
www.usairways.com or (800) 428-4322.
Daily flights to Charlotte and Washington,
D.C.
OTHER AIRLINE
FACILITIES
Tallahassee Regional Airport operates a
dedicated air-cargo facility.
Delta Cargo: www.delta.com or (800)
352-2746.
FedEx: www.fedex.com or (800) 238-
5355.
AIRPORT CAR RENTAL
AGENCIES
Alamo/National: (800) 462-5266.
Avis/Budget: (800) 331-1212 or (850)
576-4166.
Dollar/Thrifty: (800) 800-4000 or
575-4255.
Enterprise Rent-A-Car: 575-0603.
Hertz: (800) 654-3131 or 576-0155.
CAR RENTAL OFF SITE
Avis Rent A Car: 222-3744, 1414 S.
Monroe St., www.avis.com
Budget Car Rental: 915-0600, 628 N.
Monroe St., www.drivebudget.com
Enterprise Rent-A-Car: 575-0603,
www.enterprise.com
552-0660, 2810 Sharer Road, Ste. 11
574-4321, 1485 Blountstown St.
878-1500, 3404 Mahan Drive
Hertz: (800) 654-3131, www.hertz.com
576-3266, 3204 W. Tennessee St.
574-5671, 3254 Capital Circle SW
TAXI SERVICE
City Taxi Inc.: 562-4222 or 575-7575,
811 Mabry St.
Yellow Cab/Capital Transportation:
999-9999, 3941 W. Pensacola St.,
www.TallahasseeYellowCab.com
AAA Checkers Cab: 386-6666, 1320
Idlewild Drive
Discount Taxi: 421-8294, 2105 Lake
Bradford Road
Skyline Transit Inc: 574-0770, 916 S.
Lipona Road
Capital City Pedicabs: 296-7227, 113
S. Monroe St., www.capitalcityped-
icabs.com.
HOTEL SHUTTLES
Doubletree Hotel: 224-5000
Quality Inn: 877-4437
STARMETRO
StarMetro Mass Transportation & Dial-A-
Ride: 891-5200
StarMetro, the transit system for the city of
Tallahassee, operates 12 cross-town
routes, as well as university routes serving
FSU, Florida A&M University and TCC.
Students attending FSU and FAMU may
ride StarMetros routes for free anytime,
anywhere. Faculty and staff employed by
FSU also may ride free.
StarMetros paratransit service, Dial-A-
Ride, provides transit service for senior
and disabled customers living in the city of
Tallahassee or within three-quarters of a
mile of a StarMetro fixed route in an
unincorporated area.
To learn about StarMetros bus routes and
time tables, visit Talgov.com/starmetro or
call 891-5200. Ride guides are available
on StarMetro buses, as well as at C.K.
Steele Plaza, 111 W. Tennessee St., and
StarMetros administrative offices, 555
Appleyard Drive.
StarMetros Fare Options
Monthly Pass: $38
Seven Day Unlimited Pass: $10
Seven Day Reduced Fare: $7.50
One Day Unlimited Fare: $3
Regular One-Trip Fare: $1.25
One-Trip Fare: 60 cents
Dial-A-Ride (paratransit service):
$2.50
Children under 42: Free
Transfers: Free
Purchase passes with cash at C.K. Steele
Plaza and StarMetros administrative
offices.
Reduced fare is for seniors, children 17
and younger, people with disabilities and
those with a Medicare card. ID cards may
be obtained at StarMetro offices or social
service agencies.
For information, contact 891-5200 or visit
Talgov.com/starmetro. Also visit Face-
book.com/starmetrotransit and follow its
Twitter page @RideStarMetro.
Transportation
The Place to Recreate Your Living Space
www.hhfurnitureanddesign.com 850-539-6886
Store Hours: Tue-Sat. 10am - 6pm, Sun Noon-5pm
Tallahassee
6267 Old Water Oak Rd.
Tallahassee, Florida
(&%''''"!"$$#
28 Living Here | 2014-2015
The Basics Plugged in
UTILITIES
City of Tallahassee
The city of Tallahassee Utilities provides
electric, water and sewer, natural gas,
garbage, single-stream recycling and
storm-water management to residents
within the city limits, as well as electric,
water, sewer and natural gas services in
various areas outside the city limits.
GETTING
CONNECTED
In person: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday-
Friday, Customer Account Services, first
floor, Frenchtown Renaissance Building,
435 N. Macomb St.
By phone: Transfer services available by
phone at 891.4YOU (4968). New services
for utilities cannot be started/connected
over the phone.
Online: View account information,
request utility programs, ask a question,
turn on, transfer or turn off utilities, pay
your bill and more at Talgov.com/YOU.
By mail: Send written requests for new
service or transfer to:
Utility Customer Services
300 S. Adams St., Box A2
Tallahassee, FL 32301
By fax: Request utility account transfers
with completed forms via fax at 891.0901.
Find forms online at Talgov.com/YOU.
PAYING YOUR CITY
UTILITY BILL
Electronic/Online:
e+ Online: Customers can register/log in
to their e+ online account to make no-fee
payments; visit Talgov.com/YOU for details.
Smartbill : The electronic SmartBill
(e-bill) is another no-fee electronic payment
option that allows you to schedule and pay
your utility bill directly from the SmartBill.
Western Union: A service fee applies
to these transactions.
By mail: Make checks payable to the
City of Tallahassee. Use the envelope
included in the statement and send to:
City of Tallahassee
435 N. Macomb St. Relay Box
Tallahassee, FL 32301
Remote payment locations: Utility
customers wanting to make in-person
payments by cash or check can do so at 18
authorized payment centers. For a list of
locations, please visit online at Talgov.com/
you/you-account-pay-in- person.aspx.
Automatic check withdrawal:
Certain banks and credit unions allow
utility customers to pay their bills through
automatic check withdrawal. Call 891.6494
or visit Talgov.com/YOU to complete a
form.
By phone: Via Western Union. A service
fee applies to these transactions. Call toll
free: 877.765.8189.
In person: Utility bills may be paid on
the first floor of the Frenchtown Renais-
sance Center, 435 N. Macomb St., 8
a.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.
DISCONNECTED?
If your power has been dis-
connected because of non-
payment: Call 891.4YOU (4968) 7
a.m.-11 p.m. seven days a week or go to
Utility Customer Account Services at the
Frenchtown Renaissance Center at 435 N.
Macomb St., 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday-
Friday, to pay the bill and any reconnection
fees. Service will be restored the same day.
For after-hours reconnections :
Available 5:30 p.m.-11 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Customers can reconnect via Western
Union before 10 p.m. by calling 891.4YOU
(4968). After-hours fees are billed to the
next statement and an after-hours order to
reconnect is dispatched, once payment is
verified.
At the Police Department: Cus-
tomers may also pay with check or money
order at the Tallahassee Police Department,
234 E. Seventh Ave., until 9:30 p.m.
CITY RECYCLING
Recycle Container: If you are within
the city limits, you should have a recycling
container in addition to your garbage
container. (If you live in an apartment
complex, it may be different.) If your home
does not have one, you may request one by
calling 891.4YOU (4968).
What to recycle: Glass bottles and
jars, aluminum cans, steel cans, tin cans, all
plastic containers. Paper: newspapers,
magazines, catalogs, junk mail, office paper,
cardboard, and paperboard boxes.
What NOT to recycle: No wax
coated, plastic-coated or food-contaminat-
ed boxes (pizza, milk cartons). No hardback
books or plastic bags.
Pickup schedule: Pickup is once per
week curbside, on the same day as your
garbage collection. Garbage and recycling
containers should be rolled out to the curb
anytime on the day prior to your collection
day or by 6:30 a.m. on your scheduled
collection day (except those customers
taking part in the Citys Helping Hands or
Premium Service programs).
SOLID WASTE
SERVICES
GARBAGE
What goes in your garbage
container: Non-recyclable, nonhazard-
ous household waste.
Pickup schedule: Pickup is once per
week curbside, on the same day as your
recycling collection.
Helping hands: For customers who live
in a single-family home or townhouse and
are physically unable to roll a recycling or
garbage cart to the curb, Helping Hands
Service provides weekly garbage and
recycling pickup at the back door at no
extra charge.
A Helping Hands application is available at
Talgov.com/YOU; or call 891.4YOU (4968)
with questions.
Premium service: A fee-based service
for customers who wish to have their
garbage and recycling containers pulled,
emptied and returned to the house.
YARD WASTE
What can be picked up: Grass
clippings, pine straw, leaves, shrub trim-
mings and small limbs.
To prepare for pickup: Place yard
waste in heavy-duty bags or boxes. For
shrubs and limbs, make piles 6 feet by 4
feet and 4 feet high. The maximum size for
limbs is 6 feet long, 4 inches diameter.
For pickup: Yard waste is collected
every other week. Place at the curb for
collection in accordance with your Red or
Blue week schedule (available at
Talgov.com/YOU), and separate from other
solid waste.
BULKY ITEMS
What can be picked up: Large items
that dont fit in your garbage container.
For pickup: Bulky items from residential
establishments are collected every other
week, and shall be placed at the curb for
collection in accordance with Red or Blue
week schedule (available online at
Talgov.com/YOU) and separate from other
solid waste.
ELECTRONICS
What can be picked up: Computers,
electronic toys, televisions, etc. For pickup:
Place at the curb on Thursdays by 6:30
a.m.
Services for city residents
The cult hit TV show,
Lost (2004-2010)
liked to make fun of
Tallahassee. In a 2005
episode, a U.S. Marshal
pursuing Kate (Evange-
line Lilly) tracks her
down at a bus station
buying a ticket for
Tallahassee. The mar-
shal says, I spent a
week in Tallahassee
one night. Its all strip
malls and Waffle
Houses. In a 2006
episode, two men
share stories of their
sexually transmitted
diseases: You may
have been to (Thai-
land). But Ive been to
Tallahassee. Lets just
say something was
burning and it wasnt
the sunshine.
Helping you nd
your in-town
or beach home
Serving Tallahassee,
the Emerald Coast
& Surrounding Areas
Mary
Doyle
REALTOR

(850) 933-9470
MaryDoyleRealtor
@gmail.com
Donna
Godwin
REALTOR

(850) 545-0421
DonnaGodwinRealtor
@gmail.com
Call us today for all your
Real Estate needs.
TD-0000252747
GaryBartlettRealEstate.com
Thinking about
buying or selling
real estate?
Turn to a face
you know,
a name you trust.
TD-0000253061
Call me today
and lets begin building a long-
lasting relationship together.
me Warranty Provides extra peace of mind for buyer and seller
me Staging
and out
tion
850-443-5887
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 29
The Basics Plugged in
UTILITIES OUTSIDE
THE CITY
WASTE PICKUP
Residents in unincorporated Leon County
can subscribe with Waste Pro Inc. (606-
1899) for curbside garbage and recycling
pickup or visit LeonCountyFL.gov/curbside
. Unincorporated residents may also use
the Rural Waste Service Center in their
area. Leon County Solid Waste Manage-
ment has four full-service centers in the
county at the Fort Braden, Miccosukee,
Woodville and Apalachee Parkway sites.
Visit LeonCountyFL.gov/SolidWaste for
locations and hours. Call 606-1800 for
more information. To report problems
with county pickup, call 606-1899.
DROP-OFF SITES
The Leon County Solid Waste Manage-
ment Facility, 7550 Apalachee Parkway, is
open for clean yard debris disposal (no
bagged yard debris) 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Monday through Friday.
The garbage drop-off area for unin-
corporated residents is open from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. on Saturday. Permits to use the
drop-off area are available in Building F, 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.
The landfill at the Solid Waste Manage-
ment Facility no longer accepts construc-
tion and demolition debris. Marpan
Recycling, 6020 Woodville Highway,
accepts these materials. 216-1006 or
www.MarpanRecycling.com.
Household hazardous waste:
Paint, cleaners, yard and pool chemicals,
rechargeable batteries, compact fluo-
rescent bulbs and other toxic materials
cannot be thrown in a regular trash
container. Bring these to the Hazardous
Waste Center, 7550 Apalachee Parkway,
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Saturday.
606-1816 or
www.LeonCountyFL.gov/HHW or attend
the community collection event from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. on the first Saturday of
every month during the school year at
Leon County Public Works, 2280 Miccosu-
kee Road.
Electronics Recycling: Residents
should bring these items to the Hazard-
ous Waste Center Monday-Saturday (or
the community collection event) from 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information call
606-1816.
Swap Shop: Leon Countys Household
Hazardous Waste Swap Shop is open 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday.
Residents may pick up or drop off items
that could be used by other residents. For
more information call 606-1803.
COUNTY RECYCLING
Recycling: Leon County residents
subscribing to Waste Pro Inc. services for
curbside garbage collection automatically
receive curbside recycling. Four Rural
Waste Service Centers are available for
plastic bottles, aluminum and steel cans,
glass bottles and jars and paper and
cardboard recycling. Residents may also
bring up to four tires per day and one
electronic item per day. Call 606-1827 to
learn more or visit
www.LeonCountyFL.gov/recycling.
TALQUIN ELECTRIC
Talquin Electric Cooperative provides
electric, water and wastewater needs in
portions of Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla and
Liberty counties.
CONNECTS &
DISCONNECTS
Consumers must request service in person
at any member services office. Requests
to disconnect services are accepted by
phone or via member feedback by
providing the account number. Offices are
open 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday
with the exception of the Hosford Office,
which is open 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2
p.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Online
payments, outage reporting available at
www.talquinelectric.com.
Service interruptions should be
reported to: 866-899-4832 or
888-802-1832.
OUT-OF-TOWN OFFICES
Headquarters: 1640 W. Jefferson St.,
Quincy, 627-7651 or 878-4414
Quincy Area Office: 1607 W.
Jefferson St., 627-9666
Wakulla Area Office: 681 Wakulla
Arran Road, 926-7422
Hosford Area Office: 20557 NE
Cooperative Way, 379-8679
TALLAHASSEE OFFICES
Crossway Road Area Office
(South Leon County): 326 Cross-
way Road, 877-2111
Lake Jackson Area Office (West
Leon County): 4808 Portal Drive,
562-0125
Bradfordville Area Office
(North and East Leon County):
6724 Thomasville Road, 893-6853
CABLE & SATELLITE SERVICES
Comcast of Tallahassee: The cable
company offers a variety of packages,
including digital cable with video on
demand, high definition, digital video
recorders, high speed Internet access,
home telephone service. Hours: Mon.- Fri.,
8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Sat., 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. 24/7 customer service. Located at
3760 Hartsfield Road. Contact: 574-4000,
800-comcast or www.comcast.com.
Direct TV: This satellite provider is
available through several local outlets. For
information on area dealerships, equip-
ment costs and installation, call 800-347-
3288, 800-531-5000 or visit www.di-
rectv.com/city/tallahassee-fl.
TELEPHONE SERVICE
Several wireless companies Verizon,
AT&T and Sprint, among others offer
cellphone service in this area. See local
stores or company websites for more
information. For land lines, there is
CenturyLink, which provides local and
long-distance phone services, high-speed
Internet and TV, as well as advanced data
and voice services. Visit www.centurylink-
.com or call 907-2070 or 599-1005.
Retail locations are at 2020 W. Pensacola
St. and 1544 Governors Square Blvd.
(850) 562-4692 (850) 539-SOOT
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30 Living Here | 2014-2015
The Basics Animals
Whether its a trail running
partner, a fishing pal or just a
warm friend to snuggle with
during those
summer rain
storms, adding
a furry friend to
the family can
be an adven-
ture.
But while
the allure of a
four-legged
friend to share
those moments
with may seem like a good
idea, welcoming a pet into
your family is a commitment.
There are a few things to
consider before adopting.
Perri Dale, assistant direc-
tor of the Tallahassee-Leon
Animal Service Center said
first things first, find an ani-
mal that you, and your family,
connect with.
You need to fall in love
with an animal; you need to
see if there is a connection
between you, Dale said. She
added another important
factor is making sure your
schedule fits into providing
the interaction and stimulation
that animals require.
Pets are also a financial
investment in food, regular
veterinary visits, housing and
the occasional fun-filled out-
ing. Cats and dogs need more
than fish or reptiles.
If your one-bedroom apart-
ment seems cramped with just
you in it, imagine how a dog
who is itching to chase a ten-
nis ball for hours will feel. If
thats the case, maybe youre a
cat or a fish person.
Spending time with your
pets is part of being an owner.
Staff writer Karl Etters has lived in the
Tallahassee area since he was a kid. His
favorite thing about living here is the
Southern charm and the beaches in
Franklin and Wakulla counties.
Find a pet that
suits your family
Move.Tallahassee.com walkers trekked from Los Robles Animal
Hospital to show off adoptable dogs. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
Karl
Etters
Democrat
staff writer
ONLINE
The Tallahassee-Leon Animal
Service Center, at 1125 East-
erwood Drive, is open for pet
adoptions Tuesday through
Friday 10:30 a.m.6:30 p.m.;
Saturday 10 a.m.5 p.m. and
Sunday 1 p.m.5 p.m.
Adoption fees
$50 for dogs and cats
$15- $100 for reptiles and birds
$10 for rabbits
$5 for rodents, fish or fowl
You can see which animals are
available at the animal shelter
by visiting talgov.com/animals .
A cat seeks a home during during a Take Me Home pet
adoption event at the fairgrounds last year. DEMOCRAT FILES
TD-0000252401
634 E. Park Avenue
Tallahassee, FL 32301
850 561-1122
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ANIMAL CONTROL
Tallahassee Animal Control: The City
of Tallahassee Animal Control Division
investigates reports of animal cruelty,
enforces animal control regulations,
responds to complaints about dangerous
or nuisance animals, rescues animals in
distress and educates the public. For more
information, visit talgov.com/animals or
call 891-2958. Business hours are 8 a.m.-5
p.m. Mon.-Fri. A 24-hour on-call officer is
paged for after-hours and weekend
emergencies (sick, injured or aggressive
animals in city limits) by contacting the
Tallahassee Police Department at 891-
4200 or the Leon County Sheriffs Office
922-3300. 1125 Easterwood Drive,
www.talgov.com/animals.
ANIMAL SHELTERS
The Tallahassee-Leon Community
Animal Service Center: Investigates
reports of animal cruelty, enforces animal
control regulations, responds to complaints
about dangerous or nuisance animals,
rescues animals in distress, provides
humane care for 9,000 animals impound-
ed annually, provides microchip ID, helps
people find lost pets, seeks homes for
shelter animals, humanely euthanizes
animals that cannot be adopted, coor-
dinates foster homes and educates the
public. Online kennel features adoptable
pets at the ASC. Lobby hours: 10:30
a.m.-6:30 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5
p.m. Saturday and 1-5 p.m. Sunday. Kennel
closes 30 minutes prior to lobby closing.
1125 Easterwood Drive; 891-2950;
www.talgov.com/animals.
Wakulla Animal Shelter: Relies on
contributions and volunteers to provide a
haven for lost, sick, injured, abused or
unwanted pets. 1 Oak St., Crawfordville;
926-0890. www.chatofwakulla.org.
BIRD ENTHUSIASTS
Big Bend Bird Club Inc.: Exotic bird club
for owners of parrots, finches, and canar-
ies. paco@bigbendbirdclub.org, www.big-
bendbirdclub.org.
BIRDLAND Parrots for Life: A
nonprofit organization formed to improve
the quality of life of parrots and their
people by providing education, outreach
and other services. The groups primary
mission is to work with people to keep
their birds in their homes. birdland-
tallahassee@gmail.com, 933-8656.
Tri State Avian Society: Supports
research and bird-related causes. Club
members share their birds with the public,
and help foster or adopt unwanted and
surrendered birds. 524-3020; tristateavian-
society.org; wgllc@comcast.net.
DOG ENTHUSIASTS
Apalachee Coursing Club (ACC):
Sanctioned by the American Sighthound
Field Association to hold field trials for all
sighthound breeds. Field trials open to the
public, no fee. John Bruntlett, 877-3565;
www.lurecoursing.org.
Ochlockonee River Kennel Club
Welcomes those interested in purebred
dogs whether they are breeders or
exhibitors, animal-care professionals, or
interested pet owners. Holds monthly
meetings. 222-2218; www.orck.com.
Tallahassee Dog Obedience Club:
Offers competitive and pet owner dog-
training classes. Holds AKC-sanctioned
obedience and agility trials and seminars.
562-4421; www.tdoclub.org.
EMERGENCY CARE
Allied Veterinarian Emergency
Hospital: After-hours care for sick and
injured animals. 24 Hours, weekdays,
holidays and weekends. 2324 Centerville
Road; 222-0123.
Big Bend DART: The volunteers of the
Big Bend Disaster Animal Response Team
work as disaster responders when called
upon by the state, local officials, the Red
Cross or the Humane Society. Volunteers
available to talk to groups, schools or
organizations about disaster preparedness
for animals. bigbenddart@gmail.com;
fldart.org or www.bigbenddart.org
Northwood Animal Hospital: Provides
emergency care for injured and sick
animals 24 hours a day, seven days a
week. Also accepts sick, injured and
orphaned wildlife for St. Francis Wildlife
Association. 1881-B N. Martin Luther King
Jr. Blvd.; 385-8181 (Emergency requests);
385-7387 evenings, weekends, holidays.
www.northwoodanimalhospital.com.
HUMANE SOCIETIES
& AID GROUPS
Animal Aid & Spay and Neuter
Center: Committed to reducing the
overpopulation of pets by spaying and
neutering, eventually eliminating the
euthanasia of adoptable pets, while
providing low-cost, necessary services to
domestic animals. 2270 Boone Blvd.
386-4148. www.animalaid.us.
Animal Shelter Foundation: An
all-volunteer, nonprofit organization
established to help homeless pets. ASF
supports the Tallahassee Animal Service
Center by providing specialized surgeries
and heartworm treatments to help ready
shelter pets for adoption, community
micro-chipping, and free spay/neuter
vouchers for the pets of needy residents.
P.O. Box 13858, Tallahassee, FL 32317.
894-6738. animalshelterfoundation.org;
info@TallyASF.org
Be the Solution Inc.: A nonprofit
devoted to ending pet overpopulation,
providing financial assistance to those who
cannot afford the cost of a spay or neuter
surgery and educating residents. 1400
Village Square Blvd., Suite 3-306 and
Tallahassee Mall. 545-2043.
Citizens for Humane Animal Treat-
ment (CHAT of Wakulla): Formerly
Wakulla Humane Society. A nonprofit
organization in Wakulla County committed
to improving the health, safety and
well-being of domesticated animals.
Adoptable pets, animal health services,
chip and dip, volunteer opportunities. 1
Oak St. Crawfordville; 926-0890 or
926-0891; www.chatofwakulla.org.
Gadsden County Humane Society:
Formed to to rescue and shelter abused,
neglected and homeless animals, work
toward the solution of overpopulation of
animals, support the improvement of all
anti-cruelty and animal-control laws,
promote foster adoption programs,
promote proper care and placement of
animals, and educate the public. 539-
0505; gchspets@gmail.com; Face-
book.com/gadsdenhumane.
Its Meow or Never for Ferals: A
nonprofit organization that utilizes the
trap-neuter-return solution to stray cat
overpopulation in and around Tallahassee.
2103 Pink Flamingo Lane, 559-9796,
its-meow-or-never@comcast.net, www.it-
smeowornever.com.
Jefferson County Humane Society:
Wolf Creek Pet Adoption Center, built by
JCHS in 2014, is a selective intake, non-
profit adoption center. Education, spay/
neuter and adoption programs. 2123 E.
Washington St., Monticello; 342-0244;
www.jeffersonhumane.org.
Leon County Humane Society: The
oldest animal welfare organization in the
Tallahassee area, this nonprofit organiza-
tion promotes animal welfare through
foster/adoption services, discounted
spay/neuter vouchers and humane educa-
tion. 413 Timberlane Road; 224-9193;
www.lchs.info; info@LCHS.info
Thomasville-Thomas County Humane
Society: Primary goal is to improve the
lives of lost, homeless and abandoned
animals. 180 Big Star Drive, Thomasville,
Ga.; 229-228-0613. www.thomas-
villehumane.org.
TREATS Inc.: Treats is a nonprofit group
that helps domestic animals in need. It
provides a free spay/neuter program and a
pet medical-assistance program for people
facing pet medical expenses they cannot
afford. TREATS, Inc., P.O. Box 14806,
Tallahassee, 32317-4806. www.treat-
sinc.org; info@treatsinc.org.
PET RESCUE
Tallahassee Big Dog Rescue: Volun-
teers dedicated to helping pets find loving
homes. Healthy dogs, cats, all breeds, ages,
sizes, available for adoption at PetSmart.
562-3200, www.bigdogrescue.com.
Tallahassee Collie Rescue Inc.: Match-
ing collie lovers with collies in need. Often
offers collies for adoption by appointment.
309-1593. www.tallahasseecollierescue-
.org.
WILDLIFE ASSISTANCE
Florida Wild Mammal Association
(FWMA): A local nonprofit dedicated to
the rescue, rehabilitation and release of
injured, sick and orphaned wildlife. 198
Edgar Poole Road, Crawfordville, 363-
2351, choppaotta@aol.com,
www.FWMA.org.
Goose Creek Wildlife Sanctuary Inc.:
Provides rehabilitation to sick, injured,
orphaned and displaced native wildlife.
Animal hotline: 545-3491. www.goo-
secreekwildlifesanctuary.org; info@goo-
secreekwildlifesanctuary.org.
St. Francis Wildlife Association: A
nonprofit organization dedicated to the
conservation of wildlife in North Florida
and South Georgia through the rescue and
rehabilitation of sick, injured and orphaned
wildlife and public education. 627-2291,
www.stfranciswildlife.org.
OTHER GROUPS
Pets Ad Litem: An alliance of advocates
and professionals providing a legal voice
for animals. 119 S. Monroe St., Suite 300,
425-3409.
Sundance Oaks Miniature Horse
Farm: Breeds and raises miniature horses,
and welcomes visitors. 5026 Sundance
Lane, 893-5057. www.sundancemini-
horses.com; cleatus2691@aol.com.
TMH Animal Therapy: A volunteer
animal-visitation group sponsored by
Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare. 1300
Miccosukee Road, 431-5331. Contact
stephanie.perkins@tmh.org.
Animal services & groups
Erika Leckington, Director of
Tallahassee Animal Services,
strokes a cat. GLENN
BEIL/DEMOCRAT FILES
32 Living Here | 2014-2015
The Basics Animals
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 33
The Basics Read & listen
PUBLICATIONS
American Classifieds: Weekly ads.
2441 Monticello Drive. 385-0505; talla-
hassee@americanclassifieds.com;
www.tallahasseeamericanclassifieds.com
Capital City Villager: Alternative,
independent arts, culture and news paper.
320-7806
Cultura Latina Magazine: Bilingual
magazine geared toward the Hispanic
community. P.O. Box 20961. 879-2698 or
879-2125; info@culturalatinamag.com;
www.culturalatinamag.com.
FAMUAN: Campus newspaper of Florida
A&M University. 510 Orr Drive, Suite
3081. 599-3159 or 599-3379; thefa-
muan@hotmail.com; www.thefamuanon-
line.com.
FSView & Florida Flambeau: In-
dependent newspaper covering Florida
State University. 561-6653; classifieds,
644-1598; www.fsunews.com.
The Tallahassee Advertiser: Weekly
classified ads. 3471 N. Monroe St. Unit A.
574-0520; www.tallyads.com.
The Tallahassee Democrat: The capital
citys daily newspaper. 277 N. Magnolia
Drive. 599-2100; www.tallahassee.com.
Tallahassee Magazine: Lifestyle
magazine. Rowland Publishing Inc., 1932
Miccosukee Road. 878-0554; www.talla-
hasseemagazine.com; www.rowlandpub-
lishing.com.
Tallahassee Woman Magazine: A free
lifestyle and information publication.
893-9624; info@TalWoman.com;
www.TalWoman.com.
The Wakulla News: Weekly newspaper
covering Wakulla County. P.O. Box 307,
Crawfordville, FL 32326. 926-7102;
denise@thewakullanews.net; www.the-
wakullanews.com.
Your Health: A monthly healthy lifestyle
publication. Martha Gruender, 599-2171,
mgruender@tallahassee.com.
TV
(CABLE CHANNELS ARE COMCAST)
FAMU-TV20: Local FAMU and Tallahas-
see news. 412-5426 (cable) or 599-3102
(news).
Leon County Government Chan-
nel-16: Local county and Tallahassee
news. 606-5330.
TCC22: Local TCC and Tallahassee news.
tcc22@tcc.fl.edu. 201-6197.
WCOT TV 13: City of Tallahassee govern-
ment access channel. 891-8533.
WCTV: Channel 6 (cable 9). CBS. 893-
6666.
WFSU/WFSG: Channel 11 (cable 5).
Florida State Universitys educational
access TV channel. 487-3086 or 487-
3170. wfsu.org.
WLCS-23: Leon County School Board
channel. 922-0199.
WTBC: Digital 2405 (cable 240). North
Florida Baptist Church station. 386-6500.
WTLF: Channel 24 (cable 6) CW. 576-
4990.
WTLH: Channel 49 (cable 10). Fox.
576-4990.
WTWC: Channel 40 (cable 12). NBC.
893-4140.
WTXL: Channel 27 (cable 7) ABC.
893-3127.
FM RADIO
88.1 and 99.5: WAYT, Way FM. Contem-
porary Christian. 888-422-9293; wayt-
.wayfm.com.
88.9 and 93.7: WFSU, FSUs public radio.
National and local programming. 487-
3086; www.wfsu.org.
89.7: WVFS, FSUs college alternative
station. 644-9692; www.wvfs.fsu.edu.
90.1, 105.7 and 1070 AM: WFRU
rebroadcasts the signal of WFRF. Faith
Radio Network Inc. 201-1070; www.faith-
radio.us.
90.5: WANM, the Flava, FAMUs urban,
jazz, gospel, old school R&B and hip-hop
station. 599-3083; 599-8448 (Requests);
www.wanm.org.
91.1 and 104.5: WUJC and W283AW.
CSN International, Christian radio. 800-
357-4226; www.csnradio.com.
91.5 and 92.7: WFSQ, FSUs public radio,
classical. 487-3086; www.wfsu.org.
91.9: WKVH, K-Love Contemporary
Christian. (800) 525-5683; www.klove-
.com.
93.3: WVFT, talk. 523-7890.
94.1: WAKU, Wave 94, Christian music.
926-8000; www.wave94.com.
94.9: WTNT, country. 385-9868;
www.wtntfm.com.
96.1: WHBX FM, Jamz, urban adult
contemporary. 201-3000 or (Requests)
201-5269; www.961jamz.com.
97.9: WTSM, ESPN Radio - Tallahassees
Sports Monster. (Studio Phone) 523-
3776 or (Office) 561-8400;
www.979espnradio.com.
98.9: WBZE FM, Star 98.9, 80s, 90s and
today. 201-3000 or (Requests) 385-0989,
www.mystar98.com.
99.9: WANK, Hank FM, adult hits.
386-8004; www.999hank.fm.
100.7: WFLA, 100.7, talk radio. 422-3107
or (Talk line) 205-9352; www.wflafm-
.com.
101.5: WXSR, X101.5, new rock. 422-
3107 or (Requests) 386-3101;
www.x1015.com.
102.3: WWLD FM, Blazin 102.3, hip-hop,
R&B. 201-3000 or (Requests) 201-1023,
www.blazin1023.com.
103.1: WWOF, country, 103.1 The Wolf.
386-8004; www.1031thewolf.com.
104.1: WGLF FM, Gulf 104, classic rock.
201-3000 or (Requests) 681-0436;
www.gulf104.com.
104.9: WHTF, Hot 104.9, top 40. 386-
8004. www.hot1049.com.
106.1: WQTL - The Path, oldies and
rock and roll. 386-8004; www.1061the-
path.com.
107.1: WGMY, Hit Music Now, adult
contemporary. 422-3107;
www.my1071.com.
AM RADIO
730: WSTT, Gospel. 219-882-3388 or
219-882-3399; www.wstt730.com.
1270: WNLS, the Team, Fox-sports
affiliate. 422-3107 or (Talk line) 205-
9352; www.1270theteam.com.
1330: WCVC, Catholic Radio. 386-1330;
www.divinewordradio.com.
1410: Gospel. (Office) 201-3000 or
(Requests) 205-1410; heaven1410.com.
1450: WTAL, Religion talk. 877-0105;
671-1450 (Requests),
www.wtal1450.com.
ONLINE RADIO
107.9 (online link): WFSD-LP, religious.
www.tallahassee22.adventistchurch-
connect.org/article/12/christian-radio.
Worship and Glory Radio.com: Online
radio featuring modern praise and
worship music. www.worshipandgloryra-
dio.com.
Divine Word Radio: Catholic online
radio station for Pensacola-Tallahassee.
www.divinewordradio.com.
Christian World Media: Live church
services online. www.christianworld-
media.com/wordstream.
LIBRARIES
Leon County Public Library System
The main Leon County Public Library is
downtown at 200 W. Park Ave., but the
system has several branches. For in-
formation about the library or its
branches, go to www.leoncountylibra-
ry.org. To reach the main library, call
606-2665.
The main library is open 10 a.m.-9 p.m.
Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday,
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and 1-6 p.m.
Sunday. Branch libraries are closed
Sundays and Mondays. They are open 11
a.m.-8 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday, 10
a.m.-6 p.m. Wednesday and Friday, 10
a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday.
Eastside Branch, 1583 Pedrick Road,
606-2750.
Dr. B. L. Perry Jr. Branch, 2817 S.
Adams St., 606-2950.
Fort Braden Branch, 16327 Blount-
stown Highway, 606-2900.
Lake Jackson Branch, 3840 N. Monroe
St., 606-2850.
Northeast Branch/Bruce J. Host
Center, 5513 Thomasville Road, 606-
2800.
Woodville Branch, 8000 Old Woodville
Road, 606-2925.
OTHER LOCAL LIBRARIES
Florida Geological Survey Library:
Gunter Building MS No. 720, 903 W.
Tennessee St., 617-0300,
www.dep.state.fl.us/geology/publications/
library.htm. Hours: 8:30 a.m.-11:45 a.m.
and 12:45 p.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.
In August, the library will be moving
locations to 3000 Commonwealth Blvd.
Florida State University Libraries:
Providing research materials and librari-
ans to illuminate the world. 116 Honors
Way, 644-5211, lib.fsu.edu.
Jefferson County R.J. Bailar Public
Library: Monticellos friendly public
library serving Jefferson County and
surrounding areas since 1903. 342-0205,
jcpl.wildnernesscoast.org.
State Library and Archive: R.A. Gray
Building, 500 S. Bronough St., 245-6600,
dlis.dos.state.fl.us. Library hours are 9
a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Legislative Library: Room 701, The
Capitol, 245-6612, dlis.dos.state.fl.us.
Library hours are 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Monday-Friday.
Supreme Court Law Library: 500 S.
Duval St., 488-8919, library.flcourts.org.
Library hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-
Friday.
Media & Libraries
Olivia Lunsford and Riley Rudd look at books at the Lake Jackson
Branch Library. MELINA VASTOLA/DEMOCRAT FILES
EMERGENCIES IN ALL JURISDICTIONS: 911
LAW ENFORCEMENT
Tallahassee Police: 891-4200
Leon County Sheriffs Office: 606-
5800
Gadsden County Sheriffs Office:
627-9233
Jefferson County Sheriffs Office:
997-2523
Wakulla County Sheriffs Office:
745-7100
Quincy Police: 627-7111
Monticello Police: 342-0150
Gretna Police: 856-9460
Havana Police: 539-2801
FIRE DEPARTMENTS
Tallahassee: 606-5800 (dispatch) and
606-6600 (administration)
Havana: 539-2800
Quincy: 875-7315
Gadsden County: 627-3644
Jefferson County: 342-0182
Wakulla County: 421-3101
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
State Emergency Management
Emergency Operations Center:
413-9900
UTILITIES
Tallahassee power outages control
center: 891-4968 (streetlight outages,
water, utilities and gas emergency
repairs)
Leon County Department of Public
Works: 606-1400 (24 hour)
Emergency traffic signal repair:
891-2080 (6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.); 891-
4200 (after hours, TPD)
ANIMALS
City of Tallahassee Animal Control:
891-2958
Leon County Animal Control Divi-
sion: 606-5400
ASSISTANCE/SUPPORT
Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross: 878-6080
Salvation Army: 222-0304
National Weather Service Radio:
162.400 MHz for this area.
National Weather Service
in Tallahassee: 942-8833
SHERIFF
LARRY CAMPBELL
Leon County Sheriff Larry Campbell
has a long career in Florida law en-
forcement. Since he was sworn in as
sheriff in 1996, he has
focused a great deal of
his attention and
energy on crime pre-
vention and communi-
ty oriented programs
to benefit Tallahassee
and Leon County.
Campbell has encour-
aged his deputies to involve them-
selves in the community in order to
keep it safe. This is highlighted by
deputies involvement with youth
programs, community projects and
events like the United Way, Special
Olympics and the American Heart
Association. Campbell attended Flori-
da State University and has degrees in
criminology and psychology.
POLICE CHIEF
MICHAEL DELEO
Tallahassee Police Chief Michael DeLeo
is a 20-year law enforcement veteran,
having spent his entire career with the
Plantation Police De-
partment before tak-
ing the helm at TPD in
2013. During his career,
hes served in the
patrol, SWAT, street
crimes and K-9 units,
among others. DeLeo
has a Bachelor of Arts
degree from the University of Florida,
a Master of Science from St. Thomas
University and a Juris Doctor degree
from Nova Southeastern University. He
was an adjunct faculty member for
Broward College, Institute of Public
Safety. He also developed the Safe 7
Grant Program, served as the chair-
person for the Juvenile Assessment
Center and is a member of the Joint
Advisory Committee for the Institute
of Public Safety.
The Tallahassee area is served by two main law enforcement
agencies and others including Florida Highway Patrol.
TALLAHASSEE POLICE
DEPARTMENT
234 E. Seventh Ave., 891-4200 or 606-5800
Chief Michael DeLeo, 891-4341
www.talgov.com/tpd
Neighborhood Watch: The Neighborhood Watch program, which
is run by the Tallahassee Police Departments Community Relations
Unit, and Neighborhood Crime Watch, which is run by the Leon
County Sheriffs Office, involves the direct participation of citizens in
their neighborhoods, in cooperation with law enforcement, to
detect and prevent crime.
Crime Stoppers: To report information about a crime or a
suspect, call 574-TIPS (8477), text BBCS plus your tip to 274637
(CRIMES), download the TipSubmit Mobile App, or visit www.le-
oncountyso.org/crime-stoppers. Call 891-4200 (24 hours a day).
Citizens Police Academy: Citizens can receive nine weeks of
classroom and field instruction regarding the responsibilities facing
police officers. Go to talgov.com or contact Officer Sean Wyman,
CPA Coordinator at 891-4362 or at sean.wyman@talgov.com.
LEON COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE
2825 Municipal Way, 606-5800
Sheriff Larry Campbell, 922-3346
www.leoncountyso.com
Crime Prevention: Offers training programs to community
groups, businesses and organizations. Call 606-3250 to make an
appointment.
Leon County Jail: Houses pre-trial, pre-sentenced county and
state sentenced males and females, as well as juvenile offenders
charged as adults. 535 Appleyard Drive. Call 606-3500.
Sheriffs Posse: The group provides several avenues for citizens to
volunteer to help the Sheriffs Office.
School Resource Deputies: Assigned to Leon County middle
and high schools and some elementary schools, these officers teach
youth-oriented prevention programs.
CAMPUS POLICE
FSU Police Department: 830 W. Jefferson St., 644-1234
FAMU Police Department: 2400 Wahnish Way, 599-3256
TCC Police: 444 Appleyard Drive, 201-6100
Safety on Campus: Blue Light Trails are used at Florida State and
Florida A&M Universities. The phones connect callers directly to
university police.
FDLE Capitol Police: Ensures a safe environment at state facil-
ities. Located at the Capitol building: 400 S. Monroe St., Suite 213,
488-1790, www.fdle.state.us.
FLORIDA HIGHWAY PATROL
Troop H. Headquarters: 2100 Mahan Drive, 410-3046,
www.fhp.state.fl.us
Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehi-
cles: Neil Kirkman Building, 2900 Apalachee Parkway, 617-2000
Local safety
agencies
34 Living Here | 2014-2015
The Basics Safety
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 35
IN THIS SECTION
Introduction
Lawmakers
Voter registration
Join the conversation
The Florida Senate at the
opening of the 2014 session on
March 4. GLENN BEIL/DEMOCRAT
Government
ONLINE
See a video on government
at TLHlivinghere.com
36 Living Here | 2014-2015
Welcomes You to
(850) 606-5300 www.LeonCountyFL.gov
P E O P L E F O C U S E D . P E R F O R M A N C E D R I V E N .
As home to Floridas capitol, Leon County is a welcoming, diverse, healthy, and vibrant community,
recognized as a great place to live, work and raise a family. Residents and visitors alike enjoy the stunning
beauty of the unspoiled natural environment and a rich array of educational, recreational, cultural and
social offerings for people of all ages. Leon County government is a responsible steward of the communitys
precious resources, the catalyst for engaging citizens, community, business and regional partners,
and a provider of efcient services, which balance economic, environmental, and quality of life goals.
Floridas Capital County
COMMISSIONER
Kristin Dozier
Chairman
District 5
COMMISSIONER
Mary Ann Lindley
Vice Chairman
At-Large
COMMISSIONER
Bill Proctor
District 1
COMMISSIONER
Jane G. Sauls
District 2
COMMISSIONER
John E. Dailey
District 3
COMMISSIONER
Bryan Desloge
District 4
COMMISSIONER
Nick Maddox
At-Large
LEON COUNTY
GOVERNMENT
TD-0000252774
Who will we be bumping into at the Publix
come January 2015? (And I dont mean Jameis
Winston.)
In November, Florida will elect its next
governor, with voters deciding wholl be tooling
around town in that black SUV
and, by extension, who youll be
seeing the next table over at the
sushi place or in line at the big
box retail outlet or checking out
a book at the library.
As I gaze into the political
crystal ball that comes standard
with my position, Im going to
make a bold prediction: The
Sunshine States next chief exec-
utive will be a guy whos held the
job before.
See, incumbent Rick Scott here in high
summer as this is written, the certain Repub-
lican nominee and Charlie Crist the all-
but-certain Democratic choice would both
fit the description. Both have been residents at
700 N. Adams St., and both of them have
picked up the Tallahassee Democrat from the
driveway as Republicans. If Crist returns, hell
do so with a different voter-registration card in
his wallet from the last time he lived there.
Partisan identity aside, theres going to be an
atmospheric change in Tallahassee next year.
Either there will be a Democrat in the Gover-
nors Mansion for the first time in 16 years or
there will be a consecutive second-term gover-
nor for the first time in eight years.
These are different men, but there is a com-
mon theme: You never know where you might
have a chance meeting with the governor of
the nations fourth largest state. Its one of the
perks of living in Tallahassee.
From experience, here are a few tips. First,
go about your business. You could make edu-
cated guesses about where the most powerful
man in Florida politics might go. But wheres
the fun in that? Serendipitous encounters are
the way to go.
Where might you run into Scott or Crist?
The Woodville Branch of the LeRoy Col-
lins Leon County Public Library system. Scott
and his wife Ann popped by, apparently fresh
from the St. Marks Trail, on a 2014 Saturday.
Big Daddys. Crist famously shut down the
college bar adjacent to his alma mater on West
Tennessee during his first term while courting
his now-wife.
Grace Mission Episcopal Church. Scott
attended the church catercorner from the Gov-
You never know where you
might have a chance encounter
REGISTER TO VOTE
Leon County residents can
visit www.leonvotes.org
for information about regis-
tering to vote. An regis-
tration form for all Florida
residents, with instructions
and addresses for individual
counties, is available at
http://elections.myflorida.
com/pdf/webapp form.pdf
ELECTION DATES
Primary election: Aug. 26
Early voting: Aug. 14-23
(check specific local dates)
General election: Nov. 4
Early voting: Oct. 20-Nov. 2
(check specific local dates)
LEGISLATIVE DATES
Regular session:
March 4-May 2
2014 VOTER
REGISTRATION
Primary registration
deadline: July 28
General election
registration deadline:
Oct. 6 See POLITICS 40
Paul
Flemming
Florida Capital
Bureau
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 37
Government Your representatives
Few TV
shows men-
tioned Tallahas-
see more often
than Aaron
Sorkins West
Wing (1999-
2006). Twice,
Navy ships were called The Tallahassee. Political
operatives talked about visiting Tallahassee. A pilot
who committed suicide was from Tallahassee. A
failed Republican presidential candidate agreed to
be a lecturer at FSU. And the references started in
the very first episode: Two young women ap-
proached White House adviser Josh Lyman (Bradley
Whitford) in a coffee shop: Were juniors at Florida
State. Political science majors. Can we have your
autograph?
West Wing actors Richard Schiff, Allison Janney, Melissa Fitzgerald and
Bradley Whitford. GANNETT
38 Living Here | 2014-2015
Government Your representatives
THE STATE CAPITAL
In a fortunate compromise, the early
settlers of St. Augustine and Pensacola
ports decided to split the distance and
chose Tallahassee as their seat of govern-
ment. The 22-story Capitol dominating our
skyline stands for the economic engine of
the Big Bend, with state government as our
biggest employer and purchaser of local
services and materials.
THE GOVERNOR
Gov. Rick Scott was a wealthy busi-
nessman but a political unknown when he
ran for governor in 2010. Riding a conser-
vative political wave and using his own
money to finance his campaign, he defeat-
ed Attorney General Bill McCollum in the
Republican primary and, in the general
election, Democratic nominee and state
Chief Financial Officer Alex Sink. It was
the closest gubernatorial race in Florida
since Gov. Lawton Chiles was re-elected
in 1994.
Scott, 61, was sworn in as Floridas
45th governor on Jan. 4, 2011. Born in
Bloomington, Ill., and raised in Kansas City,
Mo., he earned a business degree from the
University of Missouri-Kansas City and a
law degree from Southern Methodist
University. He started Columbia Hospital
Corporation in the late 1980s, and by the
time he left about a decade later, it had
grown to become the biggest health care
company in the world.
As governor, his priorities have in-
cluded private job creation and shrinking
the cost of government, including the state
workforce. Scott resides in Naples when he
isnt in Tallahassee.
This year, Scott is running for re-
election against former Gov. Charlie Crist,
who is seeking to reclaim the Governors
Mansion, this time as a Democrat.
Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera
was appointed to the post on Jan. 14,
2014, about 10 months after former Lt.
Gov. Jennifer Carroll resigned in the wake
of a statewide crackdown on Internet cafes,
including one outfit that had employed her
as a consultant.
Lopez-Cantera, the first Hispanic to
become Floridas lieutenant governor, is a
former Florida House member, serving as
majority whip and later majority leader. He
was elected property appraiser of Miami-
Dade County in 2012 before Scott tapped
him as lieutenant governor.
The Governors Office has a citizens-
services hot line (488-4441) and a general
switchboard (488-7146). For people with
hearing loss or speech disability, call
850-922-7795 (TTY) or 711 (Florida
Telecommunications Relay).
NATIONAL, STATE
REPRESENTATION
U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland, R-Panama
City, (561-3979) was first sworn into office
Jan. 5, 2011. Both he and U.S. Sen. Bill
Nelson, D-Orlando, (942-8415) have
offices here. Southerlands Tallahassee
office is located at 3116 Capital Circle NE,
Suite 9, and Nelsons Tallahassee office is
located at the U.S. Court House Annex, 111
N. Adams St.
Most major federal agencies have a
Tallahassee branch. The federal complex is
at 111 N. Adams St. The Big Bends repre-
sentatives in the Florida Legislature are
state Rep. Halsey Beshears, R-Monticello,
(717-5007); state Sen. Bill Montford,
D-Tallahassee, (487-5004); Rep. Michelle
Rehwinkel Vasilinda, D-Tallahassee
(488-0965); and Rep. Alan Williams,
D-Tallahassee (488-1798).
THE LEON COUNTY
COMMISSION
The Leon County Commission is a
seven-person board, with each member
serving a four-year term. The commission is
the legislative body of the county and has
the authority to set tax rates and pass local
ordinances. To contact commissioners, call
606-5300 or visit www.leoncountyfl.gov.
John Dailey was elected in November
2006, serving the citizens of District 3.
Dailey began his professional career at the
Florida League of Cities, where he worked
on issues involving local governance. His
priorities are sustainable growth, environ-
mental protection and economic devel-
opment.
Bryan Desloge was elected to
represent District 4 in 2006. His priorities
are economic development and preserving
the quality of life in the county. Desloge
serves as president of the Florida Associa-
tion of Counties.
Kristin Dozier was elected District 5
commissioner in 2010, after Commissioner
Bob Rackleff bowed out of the race
against her. She serves as chair of the
Innovation Park board. Her priorities
include economic development and
extension of the Blueprint 2000 sales tax,
which pays for road and environmental
projects.
Mary Ann Lindley was elected as
one of two at-large, or countywide, com-
missioners in 2012. A former journalist, she
worked more than three decades as a
columnist and editorial-page editor at the
Tallahassee Democrat. In 2013, she suc-
cessfully pushed for a domestic-partner
registry granting rights to both gay and
straight couples.
Nick Maddox, a former professional
football player, was elected to an at-large
seat in 2010. Hes serving as chairman of
the County Commission and the Communi-
ty Redevelopment Agency. His priorities
include economic development, fiscal
sustainability and community development.
Jane Sauls has served the citizens of
District 2 since 1996. Sauls priorities have
included funding for branch libraries and
road improvements. In 2012, she was the
only commissioner to oppose proposed
gas-tax and stormwater-fee increases along
with mandatory curbside trash collection.
Bill Proctor was elected to the
County Commission in 1996 and represents
the citizens in District 1. He served as
chairman of the board in 2006. His priori-
ties as the District 1 commissioner are
affordable housing, quality health care and
extending sewer lines to the southern part
of the county.
THE TALLAHASSEE
CITY COMMISSION
The City Commission is the decision-
making body for the city, comprising four
commissioners and a mayor, who each
serve four-year terms. Commissioners pass
ordinances and set tax rates inside city
limits. The mayor is considered a leader-
ship mayor whose role includes presiding
over commission meetings and serving as
the ceremonial head of government. For
more information, call 891-8181 or visit
www.talgov.com.
At the age of 23, Commissioner
Andrew Gillum became the youngest
person ever elected to the City Commission
in 2003. He since has won re-election three
times, most recently in 2013. Gillum has
focused on a number of issues, from city
THE CLERK OF COURTS
Go to the Leon County Clerk of Courts office to pay traffic and
criminal fines, initiate or contest a civil case, pursue probate
issues and make child support payments. The office helps
residents file domestic violence injunctions and seek help for
loved ones with mental health or substance abuse issues. The
clerks office also accepts passport applications and issues
marriage licenses and even performs wedding ceremonies. 301
S. Monroe St., No. 100, 577-4005, www.clerk.leon.fl.us. Bob
Inzer has served as clerk of courts since 2001.
THE FLORIDA CHANNEL
The FLORIDA Channel is a public affairs programming service
funded by the Florida Legislature and produced and operated
by WFSU-TV. The service features programming covering all
three branches of state government. It is Floridas only source
for live unedited coverage of the Governor and Cabinet, the
Legislature and the Supreme Court. The FLORIDA Channels
programming can be seen on the digital multi-cast of Public
Television stations in Florida on cable systems and on public,
educational and government channels in the state. You may
also watch TheFLORIDAChannel.org, which provides live
streaming as well as archives of events and hearings. When the
state Legislature is in session, the service offers live gavel to
gavel coverage from the chambers of the Florida Senate and
the Florida House of Representatives, along with committee
meetings, press conferences and caucuses. Throughout the
year, The FLORIDA Channel airs coverage of the oral
arguments of Florida Supreme Court, meetings of the
Governor and Cabinet, the Florida Public Service Commission,
along with a wide variety of news conferences and public
hearings. For more information, call 488-1281.
Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera sits between Gov. Rick Scott
and Attorney General Pam Bondi as the Florida Senate
opens the 2014 session in March. GLENN BEIL/ DEMOCRAT FILES
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 39
Government Your representatives
utilities and quality of life to activities for
young people. Gillum is running for mayor
of Tallahassee in 2014; several candidates
are vying for the City Commission seat he
is vacating.
Scott Maddox, an attorney, served
on the City Commission for a decade
starting in 1993 and was the citys first
leadership mayor, serving from 1997 to
2003. After leaving the City Commission,
he ran for statewide office, including
attorney general and agriculture commis-
sioner. He returned to City Hall after
winning the Seat 1 race in 2012.
John Marks, Tallahassees mayor, was
first elected in 2003 and was re-elected in
2006 and 2010. He opted not to seek
re-election in 2014. He worked a decade in
the law firm of Katz, Kutter, et al., P.A. and
worked for six years with Knowles, Marks &
Randolph. He and his son, John Marks IV,
have their own firm, Marks & Marks, which
focuses on utility regulation, telecommuni-
cations and Internet law.
Nancy Miller was elected to her first
term during in 2010. Miller, a biologist,
business owner and urban planner, was an
original member of the Economic and
Environmental Consensus Committee, the
group that created the Blueprint 2000
initiative. She has focused on issues ranging
from sense-of-place initiatives to the
local economy.
Gil Ziffer was appointed to the City
Commission in 2009 to fill a vacancy
created by the resignation of Allan Katz.
Ziffer won election to the City Commission
in 2010 and has filed to run for re-election
in 2014. He is president of ZifferStansberry,
an advertising and public-relations firm. He
has focused on issues ranging from Capital
Cascades park to arts and culture.
Tallahassee City Commissioner
Andrew Gillum holds his son
Jackson while he files his
paperwork to get on the
ballot. GLENN BEIL/DEMOCRAT FILES
Tallahassee is
mentioned in doz-
ens of books not
even counting
every Carl Hiaasen
novel satirizing
Florida politics. But
the 1999-2000
literary season
brought a hat trick
of best-seller men-
tions: Dick Francis
Shattered (with a
racehorse named
Tallahassee); John
Grishams The
Brethren (featuring
a former reporter
for a newspaper in
Tallahassee, who in
one scene makes a
phone call from a
Texaco station on
Thomasville Road);
and Rick Reillys
Slo-Mo, a sports
satire in which the
title character discovers his long lost mother and father in
Tallahassee and retires here after one season in the NBA.
Supervisor of Elections
315 S. Calhoun St., Suite 110
Tallahassee, FL 32301
(850) 606-8683 (VOTE)
vote@leoncountyf.gov
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August 26, 2014
Primary Election
November 4, 2014
General Election
TD-0000252459
Of course
you have an
opinion and
wed love to hear
it. Heres how you can be
heard in the Democrats
Opinion section, both in print
and online.
Join the conversation
Zing!: Condense your thoughts into a snappy (and anonymous) one-liner. Send it to zing@tallahas-
see.com. Even if you dont make it into print, your Zing! will be in the daily Zing! blog (www.tallahas-
see.com/blog/zing).
Zing! You Back: Interested in Zing!ing the Zing!ers in an online video? Contact Leslie Smith at leslies-
mith@tallahassee.com.
Letter to the editor: Offer an opinion in 200 words or less. Include your name and send it to let-
ters@tallahassee.com.
My View: This is a full-length column written from a position of authority. (A teacher writing about
education? Nice. A teacher writing about Iraq? Perhaps not.) Aim for about 700 words, and send it to
Mark Hohmeister (mhohmeister@tallahassee.com). Include a photo and a short bio.
The members of the Democrats Editorial Board are Julie Moreno, publisher; Bob Gabordi, executive
editor; Byron Dobson, associate editor; Mark Hohmeister, associate editor; and Leslie Smith, marketing &
communications manager.
Got a question? Email Mark. And keep the conversation going.
40 Living Here | 2014-2015
Government Speak up!
ernors Mansion four
months into his term, a part
of a tour of area churches
he and his wife made in
that first year.
Walmart. Back in the
day when Twitter was new,
I had a smash hit when I
ran into Crist at the West
Tennessee Walmart and
broadcast it to the world, or
at least the then-couple
hundred followers of
@PaulFlemming. I was
buying wasp killer. He had
a cartful of household
items and exercise equip-
ment. I did not have an
FDLE detail accompanying
me.
Enjoy Tallahassee and
its politico-chance encoun-
ters. When in doubt, take
the stairs. Thats where you
could always run into Jeb
Bush.
Paul Flemming is the politics and
policy editor for the Tallahassee
Democrat. His favorite thing about
living here is all the fabulous public
art. Follow @PaulFlemming on
Twitter.
Continued 37
Charlie Crist showed up at Big Daddys while courting his wife
during his first term as governor.
Gov. Rick Scott and his wife, Ann, left, dropped in at the
Woodville Branch Library this spring.
Comedian Tim Allens
current sitcom, Last
Man Standing, has
referenced Tallahassee
twice. Once, Tallahassee
was a characters safe
word during kinky sex.
Another time, Allens
geologist wife Vanessa
(Nancy Travis) was
vying for a promotion
with another woman.
Vanessas Ph.D. was
from Ohio State; the
other womans Ph.D.
was from Yale but the
job went to a man, who
the other woman
sneered, only has a
masters from Florida
State.
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 41
Health Care
IN THIS SECTION
Introduction
Major medical facilities
Nursing homes & assisted living
Health organizations
& support groups
Nicole Pafuri, left, and Kim
Allison gain experience as
interns at dermatologist
Armand Cognettas office.
GLENN BEIL/DEMOCRAT
ONLINE
See video on health
care at
TLHlivinghere.com
42 Living Here | 2014-2015
Health Care Expanding medical options
Nursing
homes &
assisted
living
Allegro Senior Living Community
4501 Shannon Lakes Drive W.
273-4579
www.allegroliving.com
Brookdale Senior Living Sterling
House
1780 Hermitage Blvd.
877-713-1963
www.brookdaleliving.com
Broadview Assisted Living
2110 Fleischmann Road
270-7775
www.broadview-tallahassee.com
Cherry Laurel Retirement
Community
1009 Concord Road
656-8758
www.cherrylaurel.com
Harborchase of Tallahassee
100 John Knox Road
531-0404
www.harborchase.com
Heritage Health Care Center
3101 Ginger Drive
877-2177
Magnolia House Assisted Living
& Memory Care
1125 Strong Road, Quincy
875-1334
Miracle Hill Nursing Home and
Convalescent Center
1329 Abraham St.
224-8486
www.miraclehillhealthcare.com
St. Augustine Plantation
2507 Old St. Augustine Road
309-1982
www.staugustineplantation.com
Seven Hills Health &
Rehabilitation Center
3333 Capital Medical Blvd.
877-4115
Westminster Gardens
301 E. Carolina St.
224-8021
Westminster Oaks Continuing
Care Retirement Community
4449 Meandering Way
878-1136 or (866) 937-6257
www.westminsterretirement.com
Pacifica Senior Living Woodmont
Senior Living
3207 N. Monroe St.
462-5728
www.pacificawoodmont.com
Tallahassee Memory Care
2767 Raymond Diehl Road
329-4634
www.TallahasseeMC.com
As further evidence of
expanding health services
locally, major providers are all
involved in some phase of
facility development or con-
struction.
The newest of the projects
is the Tallahassee Outpatient
Clinic being developed for the
Veterans Administration at a
31.57-acre site on Orange
Avenue just east of Blair Stone
Road.
The $55 million clinic,
which will be completed by
the summer of 2016, will pro-
vide a broad range of general
and specialized medical, den-
tal, surgical, psychiatric, nurs-
ing and ancillary services.
While there will be outpatient
surgery available, those pa-
tients needing more intensive
procedures would be as-
sessed, stabilized and trans-
ferred either to local facilities
or to the Gainesville VA Med-
ical Center, based on the ur-
gency of their needs.
Tallahassee Memorial
HealthCare began design in
2014 of a Surgery and Adult
ICU expansion of about
290,000 square feet. The facil-
ity will be located on the south
side of the TMH campus on
the corner of Miccosukee
Road and Medical Drive
The expected project cost
of $170 million includes the
surgical center that will have
an initial 20 operating rooms
with shell space for 12 to 16
additional rooms. The adult
intensive care units will be
relocated to this expansion
with an initial buildout of 48
ICU rooms, and shell space for
an additional 24 rooms.
Capital Regional Medical
Center is involved in a 4.7-
acre expansion on Capital
Circle Northeast. Phase 1 will
add 107 more parking spots
and new signs. Phase 2 will be
an outpatient health complex.
Capital Regional Cardiolo-
gy Associates has expanded
its cardiology practice to sev-
en cardiologists. There are
additional services now avail-
able in Quincy through Capital
Regional Medical Associa-
tions, including obstetrics,
cardiology, podiatry and sur-
gery.
TMH is now the 25th hos-
pital in the nation and the only
hospital in the Big Bend to
receive full Atrial Fibrillation
Certification status from the
Society of Cardiovascular
Patient Care. TMH says this
certification reflects its spe-
cialized, protocol-driven ap-
proach to treating AFib pa-
tients, improving patient out-
comes and increasing commu-
nity education.
TMH has also opened the
regions first clinic dedicated
to the diagnosis and treatment
of the condition.
The new clinic will provide
easier access to care for those
struggling with the disorder.
AFib is a common irregular
heartbeat that can lead to
blood clots, stroke or heart
failure.
The Tallahassee Outpatient Clinic is being developed for the Veterans Administration at a
31.57-acre site on Orange Avenue just east of Blair Stone Road.
Community health services,
facilities ready to grow again
By Dave Hodges
Democrat business editor
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 43
Health Care In good hands
HOSPITALS
Capital Regional Medical Center
CRMC boasts a state-of-the-art facility, an
Ortho/Neuro Unit and an Express-Care
division of its Emergency Department.
2626 Capital Medical Blvd.
325-5000, www.capitalregional
medicalcenter.com
HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital
An inpatient hospital that provides
outpatient services and offers occupation-
al, physical and speech therapy.
1675 Riggins Road, 656-4800,
www.healthsouthtallahassee.com
John D. Archbold Memorial Hospital
A nonprofit hospital in Thomasville, Ga.,
with a level-2 trauma center that provides
inpatient and outpatient health-care
services for patients.
915 Gordon Ave., Thomasville, Ga.
229-228-2000, www.archbold.org
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital
TMH encompasses a nonprofit hospital,
which is the eighth-largest hospital in
Florida and the largest medical facility in
the area, as well as a number of satellite
facilities and family medical centers in the
five counties surrounding Leon County.
345 S. Magnolia Drive, 402-5301
3515 Maclay Blvd S., 402-5301
1300 Miccosukee, inside TMH, 402-5301
www.tmh.org
Select Specialty Hospital
A hospital that provides extending acute
care for short-term acute to specialized
extended acute.
1554 Surgeons Drive
219-6800, www.selectspecialtyhospitals.
com
CLINICS WALK-IN
AND PRIMARY CARE
Patients First
Offers walk-in medical and minor emer-
gency care, often eliminating the need for
an emergency room visit.
1690 N. Monroe St., 385-2222
3258 N. Monroe St., 562-2010
505 Appleyard Drive, 576-8988
2907 Kerry Forest Parkway, 668-3380
1160 Apalachee Parkway, 878-8843
3401 Capital Circle NE, 386-2266
1705 E. Mahan Drive, 877-7164
Tallahassee Primary Care Associates
Offers preventative care and treatments in
family practice, obstetrics, pediatrics,
sports medicine, diagnostic imaging and
clinical laboratory.
Has several participating offices:
1803 Miccosukee Commons Drive, Suite
202, 402-6210, 402-6200
1205 Marion Ave., 681-3887
132 Lee Ave., 224-8833
2858 Mahan Drive, Suite 5, 942-0180
1636 North Plaza Drive, 656-1000
1885 Professional Park Circle, Suite 30,
877-5143
1511 Surgeons Drive, Suite A, 878-6134
1511 Surgeons Drive, Suite B, 701-0621
1511 Surgeons Drive, Suite C, 701-0695
2850 Capital Medical Blvd., 309-1972
2915 Kerry Forest Parkway, No. 103,
a907-0097
2558 Capital Medical Blvd., 309-1000,
www.tallahasseeprimarycare.com
Capital Regional Health Care &
Medical Group of North Florida
2770 Capital Medical Blvd., Suite 200,
878-8235
1910 Hillbrooke Trail, Suite 2, 878-2637
409 High St., Chattahoochee, 663-4643
2382 Crawfordville Highway, Suite C,
Crawfordville, 926-6363,
www.capitalregionalmedicalgroup.com
Florida Department of Health Clinics
Roberts and Stevens Building, 1515 Old
Bainbridge Road, 606-8010
Richardson-Lewis Building, 872 W.
Orange Ave., 606-8010
Molar Express (dental), 912 Railroad
Avenue, 606-8400
Bond Community Health Center
Serves residents of Leon, Gadsden,
Wakulla, Jefferson, Taylor, Franklin, and
Madison counties providing health care
and support services, ranging from
eligibility assistance and transportation, if
necessary. Open 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday
and Thursday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday,
Wednesday and Friday, and 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
first and third Saturdays.
1720 S. Gadsden St.
576-4073
www.bondchc.com
Neighborhood Health Services
Volunteer staff and physicians provide
Leon County residents and the neigh-
boring counties with comprehensive
primary health care. Open 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
Monday through Wednesday and Friday,
and 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Thursday.
438 W. Brevard St.
224-2469
info@neighborhoodmedicalcenter.org
www.nhsclinic.org
Integrative Healthcare
Primary care, integrating conventional and
alternative medicine.
2016 Delta Blvd.
878-4434, www.IHCFL.com
OTHER FACILITIES &
ORGANIZATIONS
Apalachee Center Inc.
Responds to individuals who are in an
emotional or psychotic crisis. Provides
detoxification services to individuals
abusing potentially dangerous substances.
2634-J Capital Circle NE
523-3333, www.apalacheecenter.org
Capital Health Plan
A nonprofit health plan founded by local
citizens in 1982. CHP serves Leon, Gads-
den, Jefferson and Wakulla counties.
383-3333, www.capitalhealth.com
Administrative Center: 1545 Raymond
Diehl Road
Health centers (serving CHP members):
2140 Centerville Place, 1491 Governors
Square Blvd.
Centre Pointe Health and
Rehabilitation
Centre Pointe Health and Rehabilitation
provides in- and out-patient therapy as
well as skilled nursing services to patients
who have complex medical needs.
2255 Centerville Road
386-4054, www.CentrePointeRehab.com
Capital Regional Cancer Center
The center provides a range of cancer
treatments, including: Tomo-Therapy,
radiation therapy and brachytherapy.
2003 Centre Pointe Blvd.
878-2273, www.CapitalRegional
CancerCenter.com
Eye-I-Deals (Karen Detwiler O.D.P.A.)
Locally owned and operated optometrist
office performing eye examinations for
glasses and contact lenses, eye health
exams, glaucoma testing and other
services using state of the art technology
with computerized eye care.
410 West Tennessee Street
561-8776, www.EyeIDeals.com
Gulf Coast Dermatology
Gulf Coast Dermatology is a full-service
dermatology practice specializing in
medical and cosmetic skin care for all
ages.
1350 Market St., Suite 200
231-3376, www.dermatology
tallahassee.com
Radiology Associates
Provides the following diagnostic technol-
ogies: X-Rays, contrast radiography,
ultrasound, mammography, bone density
measurements/DEXA scans and CT scans.
1600 Phillips Road
878-4127, www.radassociates.com
Southeastern Urological Center,
P.A./Southeastern Surgery Center
A urology clinic that provides outpatient
surgery for its patients.
2000 Centre Pointe Blvd.
Appointments: 223-2423
Toll-free: (800) 689-6678,
www.seuc.com
Tallahassee Memorial Center for
Pain Management
An ambulatory surgical center.
2824-2 Mahan Drive
558-1270, www.tmhpainrelief.com
Tallahassee Neurological Clinic
1401 Centerville Road, Suite 300
Neurology: 878-8121
Neurosurgery: 877-5115
www.tnc-neuro.com
Tallahassee Neurological Clinic,
Division of Pain Management
A pain management clinic.
2824-1 Mahan Drive
558-1260, www.tnc-neuro.com
Tallahassee Orthopedic & Sports
Physical Therapy
Facility specializing in general and sports
physical therapy, with a special emphasis
in Certified Hand Therapy and with the
Major Medical Facilities
Full Service Hearing Care
For Your Family
Audiology Associates and Tallahassee ENT
Serving families since 1986
Experienced and
professional care from
the only area clinic with
both Doctors of Audiology
and ENT Physicians.
(&%''''"!"$#!
1405 Centerville Rd Ste 5400 2625 Mitcham Dr 850-877-0101 www.TallahasseeHearingHelp.com
Health Care Your medical choices
44 Living Here | 2014-2015
only therapeutic pool for aquatic therapy
in the Big Bend. Locations in Tallahassee,
Crawfordville and Madison.
3334 Capital Medical Blvd., Suite 300
877-8855, www.tospt.com
Tallahassee Outpatient Surgery
Center
A state-of-the-art, multispecialty out-
patient facility with surgical expertise in
many areas, including: orthopedics,
podiatry, ENT, ophthalmology, plastic
surgery, general surgery, oral surgery and
pain management.
3334 Capital Medical Blvd. Suite 500
877-4688, www.tallahasseeoutpatient-
.com
Tallahassee Single Day Surgery
An ambulatory surgical center offering the
following specialties: general surgery,
dentistry/oral surgery, gynecology, otola-
ryngology, ophthalmology, orthopedics,
plastic/constructive surgery, podiatry and
urology.
1661 Phillips Road; 878-5165
Tallahassee Sleep Diagnostic Center
Diagnoses and treats wake and sleep
disorders.
1605 E Plaza Dr. Suite 103
878-7271
H. A. Scott holds a sign for her
sister while walking in the
Making Strides Against Breast
Cancer Walk in 2013. MICHAEL
SCHWARZ/DEMOCRAT FILES
ALZHEIMERS
Alzheimers Project Inc.: A support and
service provider for caregivers of people
with Alzheimers disease and related
dementia. Services are provided free,
including support groups, counseling,
respite and the Project Lifesaver Program, a
wanderer recovery program. 301 E. Tharpe
St., 386-2778, www.alzheimersproject.org.
Wakulla County Alzheimers Support
Group: Offers caregiver and respite
support groups. Pat Ashley, 984-5277.
BLOOD DISORDERS
& SERVICES
Hepatitis Support Group: For patients
with hepatitis or any liver disease, to
provide education, support and resources.
Meets at TMH-Diabetes Center every first
Monday of the month, 1981 Capital Circle
N.E. Pamela Langford, 443-8029,
www.healsofthesouth.org.
OneBlood: Division of Florida Blood
Services. Blood supplier to hospitals in
north Florida and south Georgia. OneBlood
operates seven bloodmobiles that are
scheduled at least a month in advance for
visits to any group that signs up 12 or more
donors. 1731 Riggins Road, 877-7181,
www.oneblood.org.
Sickle Cell Foundation Inc.: Offers free
sickle cell screenings. Counseling by
appointment is provided to people with
sickle cell disease. Peer support group
meetings also offered. If needed, funds are
available for assistance with prescription
medicines, transportation, utilities and
rental assistance, up to $250. 1336 Vickers
Road, 222-2355, www.sicklecellfoundatio-
n.org.
BRAIN INJURY
AND STROKE
Big Bend Brain Injury Support Group:
Offered by the TMH Neuro-Science Center
for survivors of brain injury, family and
professionals. Meets at Conference Room A
(Cafeteria) of Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital. 431-5037.
Stroke Support Group: For stroke
survivors and their families. Meets at
Harbor Chase Assisted Living, 100 John
Knox Road. 431-5037.
BREASTFEEDING
Breast Feeding Support Group: Meets
at Tallahassee Memorials A Womans
Place, 1301 E. Sixth Ave. A lactation
consultant attends. 431-4928.
La Leche League of Northeast Flori-
da: Breastfeeding information and support
group. Call for up-to-date meeting in-
formation. 552-3948; National contact,
(800) LA-LECHE (800-525-3243); www.la-
lecheleague.org.
CANCER
American Cancer Society: A nation-
Health Groups &
Support Organizations
www.se-plasticsurgery.com
Ben J. Kirbo, M.D.
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Award-winning doctors, Ben J. Kirbo, M.D.,
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are dedicated to providing outstanding patient care,
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Results-oriented medical spa treatments
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Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 45
Health Care Your medical choices
wide, community-based, voluntary health
organization focusing on cancer. 257-6941;
cancer information, 24 hours a day:
800-227-2345, www.cancer.org.
Bosom Buddies: Women living with or
survivors of breast cancer. Monthly meet-
ings, lunches. Daleen Gilpin, 668-3515, or
Murt Mayne, 878-1747 or james-
mayne@embarqmail.com.
Cancer Care: Professional counseling for
cancer patients or caregivers, either
individually or through support groups
available online, via telephone or on site.
(800) 813-HOPE (4673), www.cancercare-
.org.
Chicken Soup: A 40+ womens support
group of survivors and newly diagnosed
members. Catherine Moore, 627-7818.
CHiCKS (Choosing Hope in Cancer):
Informal group of younger women survivors
of or newly diagnosed with cancer. Meets
monthly. Caroline Miller, 297-0588, ext.
3702; Paula Clark, 251-9724.
I Can Cope: The American Cancer Society
presents an educational series for adults
with cancer and their loved ones that helps
people learn more about facing cancer. For
more information, call Angela Singh,
599-3369. American Cancer Society, 2619
Centennial Blvd.
The Leukemia and Lymphoma Soci-
ety: An agency offering support, educa-
tion, advocacy and financial assistance for
cancer patients. Lynette Mills, 800-868-
0072.
Look Good, Feel Better: An American
Cancer Society Program to help restore
appearance and self image. Held monthly.
For more information, call 431-4926, or
800-227-2345, ext. 2417.
National Cancer Institute: Coordinates
the National Cancer Program, which
conducts and supports research, training,
health information dissemination and other
programs. (800) 4-CANCER (800-422-
6237), www.cancer.gov.
Ovarian Cancer Survivors: Peer support
for survivors and caregivers. Meetings held
5:30-7 p.m. second Monday of every
month at Tallahassee Memorial Cancer
Center, One Healing Place. 443-8251,
www.ovarian.org/Big-bend.
Sharon Ewing Walker Breast Health
Center Breast Cancer Navigator: The
navigator guides patients through the
health-care system and helps arrange for
needed support and resources. Peggy,
431-3433 or 431-LIFE (5433).
Reach to Recovery: American Cancer
Society program offering support for breast
cancer patients by connecting them with
breast cancer survivors who can guide
them through their experience. To learn
more, call 800-227-2345, ext. 2417.
CAREGIVERS
Caregivers Support Group: Meets
monthly at the Senior Center 3702 N.
Monroe St. 431-5037.
CHILDRENS SERVICES
Capital Area Healthy Start Coalition:
This nonprofit organization works to
provide the immediate services and support
moms need to have healthy babies.
Services include childbirth education,
parenting classes, nutrition counseling,
smoking cessation classes, breastfeeding
education, home visits and more. 1311 N.
Paul Russell Road, Suite 101-A, 488-0288;
www.capitalareahealthystart.org.
Childrens Miracle Network: A nonprof-
it organization dedicated to helping
children by raising funds and awareness for
childrens hospitals across North America.
Childrens Miracle Network local office,
2834 Remington Green Circle, Suite 101-A,
386-6417, www.shandskids.org.
Ronald McDonald House: A home-
away-from-home for families of pediatric
patients. 712 E. Seventh Ave., 222-1706,
www.rmhctallahassee.org.
CROHNS DISEASE
Crohns & Colitis Foundation of
America: Nonprofit, volunteer-driven
organization dedicated to finding the cure
for Crohns disease and ulcerative colitis.
The North Florida Chapter hosts a monthly
support group in Tallahassee. P.O. Box
14959, Jacksonville; (646) 370-9359;
www.ccfa.org/chapters/nfl, infonorthflori-
da@ccfa.org.
DIABETES
Children with Diabetes Family Sup-
port Group: Quarterly evening meetings.
Tallahassee Memorial Diabetes Center,
1981 Capital Circle N.E., 431-5404.
Diabetes Support Group: Quarterly
evening meetings. Tallahassee Memorial
Diabetes Center, 1981 Capital Circle N.E.,
431-5404.
Bariatric Support Group: For candidates
or existing bariatric surgery patients.
Monthly meetings. Tallahassee Memorial
Diabetes Center, 1981 Capital Circle N.E.,
431-4709.
Diabetes Education and Support
Group: Focuses on obtaining supplies for
treatment and eating properly. Meets
monthly. Smith-Williams Service Center,
2295 Pasco St., 891-1860.
DOWN SYNDROME
Down Syndrome Association of
Tallahassee Inc.: Meets monthly. Every-
one who has a child with special needs is
welcome. 2910 Kerry Forest Parkway
D4-212; www.dsatallahassee.org, presi-
dent@dsatallahassee.org.
EPILEPSY
Epilepsy Association of the Big Bend:
Private, nonprofit organization serving men,
women and children with epilepsy/seizure
disorders and their families in 14 Panhandle
counties. The association provides services,
information and a support group. 1215 Lee
Ave., Suite M4, 222-1777; www.epilepsyas-
soc.org.
GRIEF COUNSELING
The Compassionate Friends of Talla-
hassee: A nonprofit organization that
supports families after the death of a child.
2198 N. Meridian Road. 422-8404,
tcfot@yahoo.com.
Lees Place Grief Counseling Center:
Nonprofit loss, trauma and grief counseling
and training center. Quality, licensed
therapy at sliding fee scales. We provide
therapy for all types of loss and trauma:
divorce, death, crime, foster and adoption,
suicide, abuse, loss of functionality and
anticipatory grief. 216 Lake Ella Dr. 841-
7733, beth@leesplace.org, www.leesplace-
.org.
HEART AND LUNGS
American Heart Association: Commit-
ted to reducing disability and death from
heart disease and stroke. 2851 Remington
Green Circle, Suite C, 878-3885, www.a-
mericanheart.org.
American Lung Association: Aims to to
prevent lung disease and promote lung
health. (800) LUNGUSA or 386-2065,
www.lung.org.
Better Breathers: Survivors of and/or
living with lung ailments. Patty Ballantine,
386-2065.
Broken Hearts of Florida Inc.: Support-
ing, educating and connecting families
affected by congenital heart defects and
other pediatric heart diseases. Family and
Friends Dinner Night, first Friday of every
month, 6:30-8 p.m., at St. Stephens
Lutheran Church fellowship hall, 2198 N.
Meridian Road. 668-5864, www.broken-
heartsflorida.org, info@brokenheartsflori-
da.org.
HIV/AIDS
Big Bend Cares: Provides education and
comprehensive support to people infected
with or affected by HIV/AIDS. 2201 S.
Monroe St., 656-2437, www.bigbend-
cares.org.
HOSPICE
Big Bend Hospice: A nonprofit organiza-
tion that serves patients with a life-limiting
illness and their families in eight counties.
Provides physical, emotional, spiritual and
practical care tailored for each family.
Together with the patients own physician,
the Hospice team provides expert pain and
symptom control. A Hospice House provides
care for patients with acute medical needs
that require 24-hour medical supervision.
Big Bend Hospice remains with each family
for up to a year following the death of a
loved one to provide support through the
grieving process. Grief support programs
are available to anyone in the community
regardless of whether they have used
Hospice. 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, 878-
5310 or www.bigbendhospice.org.
Covenant Hospice: Provides caring for
people with life-limiting illnesses, their
families and loved ones. Covenant Hospice
is nonprofit and is an independent, unaffili-
ated organization, working with hospitals,
nursing facilities and adult living facilities
when living at home is not possible. 1921
Capital Cirle NE., Lina Nunez, 575-4998.
MENTAL HEALTH
AND ADDICTION
Al-Anon/Alateen: The Al-Anon Family
Groups are a fellowship of relatives and
friends of alcoholics. Teenagers also
welcome. PO Box 13163, Tallahassee,
32317. 222-2294; www.tallyalanon.org.
Alcoholics Anonymous: A fellowship of
men and women who share experience,
strength and hope so they may recover
from alcoholism. 224-1818, www.in-
tergroup5.org.
Anxiety and Behavioral Health Clinic:
If you experience uneasiness in social
situations or panic, you may be eligible to
receive free treatment. Also free smoking
cessation treatment. 1107 W. Call St.,
645-1766, www.anxietyclinic.fsu.edu.
Apalachee Center Inc.: A private,
not-for-profit behavioral health-care
organization offering a full range of mental
health, alcohol and drug abuse services
both outpatient and residential. 2634
Capital Circle N.E., 523-3333,
www.apalacheecenter.org.
Behavioral Health Solutions: Provides
mental health evaluations for 19 of the
most common mental health disorders such
as ADHD, social and generalized anxiety,
PTSD, autism, bipolar disorder, major
depression, and panic attacks. 2898 Mahan
Dr. #5, 552-0691,
behavioralhealthtallahassee.com.
Better Brain Care L.L.C.: Specializing in
(
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LET US BE YOUR ROCK
Alzheimers Project, Inc. exists to provide comfort, support,
and assistance to persons with memory disorders and their
caregivers in the Big Bend area.
Caregiver Support Groups and Counseling (Leon and surrounding counties)
Day Respite Programs in Leon, Gadsden and Wakulla counties
Powerful Tools for Caregivers and Professional Training
Project LifeSaver (A program for the proactive recovery of wanderers)
Alzheimer's Project, Inc. 301 East Tharpe Street Tallahassee, FL
32303 (850) 386-2778 www.alzheimersproject.org
46 Living Here | 2014-2015
Health Care Your medical choices
EEG neurofeedback therapy, treatment of
ADD, bipolar, anxiety and panic, chronic
pain, migraines, depression, addictions,
brain injury, autism, Aspergers, hyperac-
tivity, post-traumatic stress disorder, stress,
PMS, attachment disorder and childhood
trauma. 1618 Mahan Center Blvd., Suite
101. 656-1129, www.betterbraincare.com.
DISC Village: A private, nonprofit organi-
zation that provides a wide variety of
treatment and rehabilitative services to
individuals and families throughout North
Florida. Focuses on the prevention of
alcohol and other drug abuse, crime,
behavioral problems and mental health
disorders. 3333 W. Pensacola St. 575-4388,
www.discvillage.com.
Florida Council for Community
Mental Health: Statewide association of
community-based mental health and
substance abuse agencies. 316 E. Park Ave.
224-6048, www.fccmh.org.
Florida Psychological Association:
FPA is a voluntary organization for psychol-
ogists. A person in need of services can call
for a listing of licensed psychologists by
location and by specialty. 408 Office Plaza
Drive; Connie Galietti, 656-2222,
www.flapsych.com, connie@flapsych.com.
Freedom From Smoking: The American
Lung Associations smoking cessation
program. 539 Silver Slipper Lane, Suite A.
386-2065.
Impact Behavioral Health: Mental
health counseling for children, adolescents
and adults. 1965 Capital Circle NE, 671-
4600, www.impactbehavioralhealth.com.
Mothers in Crisis: MIC is a nonprofit
networking organization comprised of
families in recovery from alcohol and other
drug addictions. Offered exclusively online.
222-7705.
Lees Place Grief Counseling Center:
Nonprofit loss, trauma and grief counseling
and training center. Quality, licensed
therapy at sliding fee scales. 841-7733,
www.leesplace.org.
NAMI Tallahassee: Local affiliate of the
National Alliance on Mental Illness. Mental
health education, advocacy and support
organization. 841-3386, www.nami-
tallahassee.org.
Narcotics Anonymous: A nonprofit
fellowship of people who have a problem
with drugs. 224-2321; toll free, 877-340-
5096; www.bigbendna.org.
Overeaters Anonymous: A fellowship of
people recovering from compulsive over-
eating. No dues or fees for members.
Meets in lobby of the TMH Behavioral
Health Center, 1616 Physicians Drive. David,
363-1451.
Townsend Addiction Recovery Center
(ARC): Individual and intensive outpatient
treatment. Also, mental health counseling
and substance abuse evaluations for court
and DOT. 2898 Mahan Drive, Suite 6.
656-5112; www.townsendarc.com.
TMH Behavioral Health Center: Facility
offers inpatient and outpatient mental
health services to children and adults. 1616
Physicians Drive. 431-5100, www.tmh.org/
behavioral.
Tallahassee Memorial Recovery
Center: Inpatient and outpatient help for
drug and alcohol addiction and co-depen-
dence and family concerns. Tallahassee
Memorial Behavioral Health Center, 1616
Physicians Drive. 431-5910;
www.tmh.org/recoverycenter.
Tobacco Free Leon: To empower youth
and adults to create a tobacco-free com-
munity through youth prevention and
cessation activities. 606-8175, tobaccofree-
leon.org.
Turn About Inc.: Specializes in the
assessment, intervention and treatment of
students K-12 and college undergraduates.
2771 Miccosukee Road. 671-1920,
www.turnabout.org.
NEUROMUSCULAR/
NERVOUS SYSTEM
Lafayette Park Center Multiple
Sclerosis Support Group/ Sclerosis
Support Group: Meets the second
Saturday each month. 501 Ingleside Ave.
431-5037.
Multiple Sclerosis Support Group: For
information or dates, call 668-3888.
Muscular Dystrophy Association:
Voluntary health agency working to defeat
neuromuscular diseases. 1574-B Village
Square Blvd., 681-6763, www.mda.org.
National Multiple Sclerosis Society
North Florida Chapter: Offers programs
and services year-round to the 18,000
people affected by MS in the local commu-
nity and raises critical funds to ensure
ongoing scientific research to find a cause.
904-332-6810, www.nationalMSsocie-
ty.org/FLN.
United Cerebral Palsy of Tallahassee:
A private, not-for-profit organization
focused on advancing the independence,
productivity and full citizenship of people
with cerebral palsy and other disabilities.
1930 Buford Court, 878-3313.
NUTRITION & FITNESS
Jenny Craig: Weight loss. 1891 Capital
Circle NE, No. 1, www.jennycraig.com,
219-1700.
Medical Nutrition Therapy of Talla-
hassee Inc.: Registered dietitian and
certified diabetes educator. 120 Reece Park
Lane, Carole Bullock, 212-0383,
CBtheRD@aol.com.
Sweat Therapy Fitness: Small group
training for all levels of fitness. 1122
Thomasville Road and 6265 Old Water Oak
Road, 222-1781,www.sweattherapyfit-
ness.com.
TOPS: Support group for weight loss.
Lafayette Park, 403 Ingleside Ave.,
www.tops.org.
ORGAN TRANSPLANT
Tallahassee Transplant Support
Group: For people waiting for a transplant,
dialysis patients, family members, people
who have received transplants and anyone
interested in information. Meets monthly at
the North Florida Nephrology Associates
office, 1609 Physicians Drive. Dee Wilder,
878-1171.
PARKINSONS
Big Bend Parkinsons Support Group:
Meets monthly at Cherry Laurel Assisted
Living, 1009 Concord Road, off Mahan
Drive. 431-5037.
PREGNANCY/
PARENTHOOD
Capital Area Healthy Start Coalition:
This nonprofit organizations services
include childbirth education, parenting
classes, nutrition counseling, smoking
cessation classes, breast-feeding education,
home visits and more. 1311 N. Paul Russell
Road, Suite A101, 488-0288, www.cap-
italareahealthystart.org.
Planned Parenthood of North Florida:
Provides affordable reproductive health
care and education. 2121 W. Pensacola St.,
574-7455 (clinic), www.ppnfl.org.
Pregnancy Help and Information
Center (PHI): Provides free pregnancy
tests, counseling, infant and maternity
needs, referrals and abstinence education,
as well as parenting classes and support
groups for post abortive, single parenting
and adoption placement. All services free.
1710 S. Gadsden St., 222-7177, phicente-
r.org.
Tallahassee Pregnancy Loss Support
Group: Provides a confidential group
support setting to members who have
experienced the loss of a baby in mis-
carriage or stillbirth. tplsg@yahoo.com,
Facebook.com/TPLSG
PRIMARY CARE
American Care Medical Center:
Specializing in Medicare and Medicaid
populations. 1707 S. Gadsden St., 536-
6145, www.americancare.net.
Bond Community Health Center:
Provides all types of primary care services
including pediatrics; OB/gyn; HIV/AIDS
primary care; mental health/substance
abuse; health care for the homeless;
adolescent and adult medicine; and
geriatrics. 1720 S. Gadsden St. 576-4073,
www.bondchc.com.
Integrative Healthcare: Offers primary
health care, this may include information
on natural therapies. 2016 Delta Blvd.,
878-4434, www.ihcfl.com.
Neighborhood Health Services: A
provider of primary care and urgent care for
the medically underserved, uninsured and
people who are homeless. 438 W. Brevard
St., Tallahassee, 224-2469, www.nhsclin-
ic.org.
PROFESSIONAL
GROUPS
Capital City Doula Services: Local
doulas connect to discuss information
pertaining to childbirth and being a doula.
443-7789.
The Capital Medical Society: A profes-
sional membership organization for
physicians from Leon, Jefferson, Gadsden
and Wakulla counties. 1204 Miccosukee
Road, 877-9018, www.capmed.org.
Community Health Charities of
Florida: Community Health Charities of
Florida is a federation of Floridas top
health charities. 15 A Crescent Way,
Crawfordville, Gwen Cooper, 926-7003,
www.florida.healthcharities.org.
Healing Arts Alliance: A network of
health-care practitioners who offer conven-
tional and complementary or alternative
services. www.HealingArtsAlliance.org.
REHABILITATION
Kessler Rehab Centers: Kessler, one of
the nations leading providers of compre-
hensive physical medicine and rehabilita-
tion services. (888) Kessler, www.kesslerre-
hab.com.
WOMEN
The Womens Imaging Center: Offers a
full range of diagnostic and interventional
imaging services including mammograms,
breast ultrasound, biopsies and DEXA
(osteoporosis scan). 1600 Phillips Road,
32308, 878-4127, www.radassociates.com.
Sisters Alive/Soul Survivors: All
womens support and educational group.
Harriette Hudson, 656-2512.
OTHER GROUPS AND
ORGANIZATIONS
Angel Flight Southeast: Provides
medical transportation. A national, nonprof-
it organization providing a link between
home and hospitals for ambulatory and
medically stable patients and for those who
cannot afford the cost of travel. 800-352-
4256, 352-326-0761, www.angelflight-
se.org.
Community Health Charities of
Florida: Formed by Floridas top health
charities to connect employees in the
workplace with trusted health charities.
3333 W. Pensacola St., Suite 200, 597-
7745, www.florida.healthcharities.org.
Hepatitis and Liver Transplant Sup-
port Group: First Monday of every month,
7-9 p.m. at TMH Diabetes Clinic, 1981
Capital Circle NE. 443-8029, figment@net-
tally.com, www.HEALSoftheSouth.org.
March of Dimes Birth Defects Foun-
dation: Works to give all babies a fighting
chance against prematurity, birth defects
and low birth weight. 1990 Village Green
Way, Suite 3, 422-3152, www.marchof-
dimes.com.
National Stuttering Association:
Support group for people who stutter,
friends and families. 2770 Medical Drive,
878-8235, www.westutter.org.
Prevent Blindness America: The
nations leading volunteer eye health and
safety organization dedicated to fighting
blindness. (800) 331-2020, www.prevent-
blindness.org.
Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare
Auxiliary: TMH Auxilians perform a
variety of tasks to help patients and guests
during their hospital stay. 431-1155,
www.tmh.org.
Capital Area Polio Association:
Supports public education and awareness
about the effects of post-polio syndrome
and ways to manage disability as people
age. Meets monthly. 3909 Reserve Drive
Suite 2811, Mark Ravenscraft 580-2227,
766-3555, www.capitalpolio.blogspot.com.
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 47
Kayla Tomas cant
contain her
excitement during
her Florida State
graduation walk at
the Civic Center. MIKE
EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
IN THIS SECTION
Introduction
Early childhood resources
K-12 schools
Colleges & universities
Parenting help
Education
ONLINE
See an education
video at
TLHlivinghere.com
48 Living Here | 2014-2015
TD-0000252775
Communicate Efectively, Discover Information, Foster Community, Think Critically
Thomas University | 1501 Millpond Road, Thomasville, Georgia 31792-0149
(800) 538-9784 | Fax (229) 227-6888 | admissions.thomasu.edu
THOMAS UNIVERSITY
ABOUTLocated in Thomasville, Georgia 35 miles north of Tallahassee, Florida, Thomas
University is a four-year co-educational private university with a faculty to student ratio of
10:1. Thomas Universitys campus extends to satellite programs throughout Georgia and in
Tallahassee, Florida. In addition, many students complete a degree through one of TUs online
programs. Regardless of delivery model, students are engaged, empowered and transformed
in a highly interactive learning environment. All Thomas University faculty strive for teaching
excellence, scholarly and professional achievement and service to the study body, university
and wider community. At TU, YOU are the focus!
ENGAGEIn dynamic interactive learning environments where rigorous intellectual studies
require creativity, discipline, and personal responsibility.
BE EMPOWEREDBy faculty and staff who value your individual strengths, capabilities,
and will to succeed. YOUR intellectual and personal development is our mission.
TRANSFORMYour life as you prepare for a successful career and responsible leadership
in a rapidly changing and complex world. Flexible learning environments include online, hybrid,
satellite campuses, transfer agreements, and convenient course scheduling.
THOMASVILLE, GEORGIA The historic city of Roses is home to Thomas Universitys
main campus location. Founded in 1950 as Birdwood Junior College on the site of the Birdwood
Plantation, the main campus location includes a complementary combination of old and new
architectural elements. The Thomasville campus includes the West campus locationa short
distance from the main campus and home to the Student Life Center, Athletic Department and
the Nighthawk Gymnasium.
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA In the heart of Floridas state capitol, licensed registered nurses
may further their education in Nursing in hybrid fashion with face-to-face classes meeting once
per month at one of two Tallahassee hospitals. TU partners with Tallahassee Community College
to provide a 4-year Bachelor of Social Work on the TCC campus in Tallahassee.
BAINBRIDGE, GEORGIA Thomas University partners with Bainbridge State College to
offer a 2 year program leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Early Childhood Education,
Middle Grades Education or Secondary Education and Georgia Teacher Certication. Saturday
classes are provided for students who have completed an Associate of Arts degree and the
GACE Admissions Test.
MOULTRIE, GEORGIA Nursing RN-BSN is offered on site at Colquitt Regional Medical
Center.
ONLINE Offers exibility and convenience to working professionals and non-traditional
undergraduate students
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 49
Education Changing times
Tallahassees two universities are in
transition during 2014.
Florida State is hoping to have a new
president in place after four heady years
under Eric Barron, who left in April to be
Penn States next president.
Under Barron, FSU was named one of
two preeminent universities in Florida
and FSU began charting a
path to be one of the na-
tions top 25 public in-
stitutions.
Florida A&M earlier this
year welcomed Elmira
Mangum as its 11th presi-
dent, the first female CEO
in the schools storied
127-year history.
The presidents set the
tone at a university, and we
will be watching to see if we can detect
any changes in the way FSU or FAMU
presents itself.
Why is this important? Very simple.
People who dont really know what Talla-
hassee is all about know our city as the
state capital and the home to Florida
State football.
But those of us who live here know
that Tallahassee is defined by something
far more interesting and enriching than
lawmakers, lobbyists and future NFL
players. Tallahassee is a cradle of educa-
tion, with more than 100,000 students in
our midst between the county school
district and our colleges. And lets not
forget the men and women responsible
for teaching them.
Schools infuse our culture almost
everywhere you turn, bringing us such
rich offerings as the Challenger Learning
Center and the Black Archives.
The cultural opportunities available to
all of us, thanks to having FSU and FAMU
in our backyard were the only city in
Florida with two public universities, by
the way are easy to overlook.
And 12 months a year, our schools
from kindergartens to colleges define
our city and our culture in countless ways.
Doug Blackburn is a senior writer who covers higher
education. His favorite thing about living in Tallahas-
see: He can wear sandals year-round.
FSU, FAMU undergoing transition
Graduates, faculty and invitees participate in FAMU's Commencement Exercise in 2013.
MICHAEL SCHWARZ/DEMOCRAT FILES
FSU Interim President Garnett Stokes smiles at guest speaker Bobby Bowden before
presenting him with an honorary doctorate in May. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
Doug
Blackburn
Democrat
senior writer
EDUCATION SUPPORT
& OUTREACH
Air Force Association, Col. H. M. Bud
West Chapter 419: An independent,
nonprofit, civilian education organization
promoting public understanding of aero-
space power and the pivotal role it plays in
the security of the nation. The Bud West
Chapter supports area AFROTC, AFJROTC
and Civil Air Patrol programs. www.bud-
west.afaflorida.org.
Be Brave School Safety Hotline with
Leon County Sheriffs Office: Offering a
toll-free number that accepts anonymous
reports of guns, drugs and violence in Leon
County schools; 877-7-BE BRAVE.
Communities In Schools of Leon
County Inc.: Program brings community
resources, services, parents and volunteers
into schools to help at-risk students
successfully learn. 444 Appleyard Drive;
www.cisleon.org; 201-9756.
Early Learning Coalition: Provides
services to families, children and child-care
providers in Floridas Big Bend Region:
Gadsden, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, Madison,
Taylor and Wakulla counties. 1940 N.
Monroe St., Suite 70, www.elcbigbend.org,
385-0504.
Educational Success By Design:
Consultants helping parents, teachers, and
school districts on the state and local level
facilitate student achievement. Irene Y.
Gaines, trigaines@yahoo.com, 570-8079.
Florida Diagnostic and Learning
Resources System Miccosukee: 3955
W. Pensacola St; a statewide network of
associate and specialized centers that
provides support services to exceptional
student education programs; www.fdlrsmic-
co.org; 487-2630.
Florida Education Foundation: Helping
foster the development of community and
private sector resources for education. 325
W. Gaines St., Suite 1524; www.floridaedu-
cationfoundation.org; 245-9671.
Florida Prepaid College Board: The
Florida Prepaid College Plan is guaranteed
by the State of Florida to lock in the cost of
college tuition, local fees and dormitory
housing. The new Florida College Investment
Plan offers a variety of investment options to
help save for other college expenses, in
Florida and out of state; www.myfloridapre-
paid.com; 800-552-GRAD (4723).
Florida Virtual School: Providing students
with high-quality, technology-based educa-
tional opportunities to succeed in the 21st
century; www.flvs.net; info@flvs.net;
407-513-3587.
Students at Trinity United Methodist Preschool.
Educational &
parenting resources
50 Living Here | 2014-2015
Education Learning environments
A Little Heavens Child Care, 2521 Mahan Drive, 2015 S. Monroe, 4104 Apalach-
ee Parkway, 656-8668
Advent Parish Day School, 815 Piedmont Drive, 386-5109, www.advent-
church.org; adventschool@advent-church.org
Anns Preschool and Kindergarten, 1777 N. Meridian Road, 386-5827
Annsworth Academy Northampton, 2919 Kerry Forest Parkway, 668-9072,
www.annsworth.com
Betton Hills Preparatory School, 422-2464, 1815 N. Meridian Road, www.bet-
tonhills.com
Boys and Girls Club of the Big Bend, 306 Laura Lee Ave., 656-8100,
www.bgcbb.org
Brandons Place at Lincoln, 438 W. Brevard St., 414-9815
Bright Star Kid Care, 2920 Old Bainbridge Road, 224-7827
Budd Bell Early Learning Center, 306 Laura Lee Ave., 219-0037
Candras Home Preschool, 2414 Gothic Drive, 422-8491
Childcare Network, 2881 E. Park Ave., 877-7729, www.childcarenetwork.com
Covenant Presbyterian Preschool, 2221 Old Bainbridge Road, 385-2512
Creative Child Learning Center, 4390 Grove Park Drive, 878-4846
Dick Howser Center for Childhood Services, 240 Mabry St., 574-3906
Education Inc. Learning Center, 2619 S. Meridian St., 877-2778
Faith Baptist Church Child Development Center, 3333 Apalachee Parkway,
877-7159
First Baptist Church, Weekday Education, 108 W. College Ave., 222-5470,
www.fbctlh.org
First Class Kids, 10223 Woodville Highway, 421-5437
First Presbyterian Preschool, 110 N. Adams St., 222-4587, www.firstpres-
preschool.net, director@firstprespreschool.net
Freedom Church Preschool, 2801 Thomasville Road, 523-0808
Gibsons Learning Academy, 1408 Hendrix Road, 878-9217
Great Beginnings Preschool, 1904 Talpeco Road, 562-5437
Great Oaks Day School Inc., 4840 Tower Road, 562-0489
Growing Room Child Development Centers, 2636 Centennial Place, 668-
4769, growingroomchildcare.com
Jingle Jam, 1260 Timberland Road, 321-5656, jinglejam.net
Jolly Jos Child Care Center, 1702 Gibbs Drive, 224-2002
Kids Incorporated of the Big Bend, 2326 Centerville Road, 414-9800, www.kid-
sincorporated.org
Kids World Academy, 1849 Capital Medical Court, 656-6655
Kidz Academy Education Center, 324 E. Georgia St., 222-4730
Kidz Academy Education Center 2 Inc., 1023 N. Duval St., 224-3004
Killearn Kids After-School & Summer Day Camps, 2800 Shamrock St. S,
508-1777, killearnkids.org
Killearn Kids Preschool, 2800 Shamrock St. S, 893-1278, killearnkids.org
Killearn Lakes Preschool, 8051 Deerlake East, 893-0134
Kinderschool, 3561 Timberlane School Road, 668-1457
Little Folk Haven Day Care, 2311 Monday Road, 878-5677
Little Red School House, 7980 Blountstown Highway, 575-6609
Miracle Temple Day Care Center, 2201 St. Marks St., 575-2632
Miracle Years Child Care Center, 2403 W. Tharpe St., 383-1622
Miracle Years Child Care Center II, 217 Ausley Road, 576-9500
Miracle Years Child Care Center at Old West, 2344 Lake Bradford Road,
906-9378
Precious Years Day Care Center, 4224 Crawfordville Highway, 656-8575
Scottsdale Academy, 3498 Mahan Drive, 219-2400, www.scottsdaleacademy-
.com
Seven Hills Academy, 2205 Thomasville Road, 656-9211
Suttons Too Educational Preschool and Day Care, 7586 Woodville Highway,
421-2843
Tallahassee Museum Pre-School, 3945 Museum Drive, 575-8684, www.talla-
hasseemuseum.org
Timberlane Church of Christ
Pre-School, 3569 Timberlane School Road,
893-9680
Wee Care Child Care at Fellowship Baptist Church, 3705 N. Monroe St.,
562-0047
Early childhood
education & care
3 Tallahassee Locations
386-GROW (4769)
We are Proud to be APPLE
Accredited and a DCF Gold Seal
Quality Preschool
Licenses: C02LE0507, C02LE0518, C02LE0578
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GEOSET Studios at Florida State
University: A global database of freely
accessible, on-demand educational material,
typically presented as a dual-video window
with presenters alongside their slideshow
presentations. www.geoset.info.
Global Ambassador Program: The
Global Ambassador Program receives
requests from K-12 schools, FSU and the
Tallahassee community for international
students, scholars and faculty to give
presentations about their country and
culture. 110 S. Woodward Ave.; Aleks Nesic,
645-4793, anesic@admin.fsu.edu,
cge.fsu.edu/interculturalprog/gap.cfm.
Institute for School Innovation: A
private, nonprofit educational organization
whose mission is to enhance classroom
instruction through technology and active
learning. www.ifsi.org.
Panhandle Educational Consulting
Services: A consulting, coaching and
training firm that provides integrated
educational services for K-12 school im-
provement, college and career preparation,
postsecondary education, and adult educa-
tion. www.phecs.com, feed-
back@phecs.com, 366-3415.
Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten Regis-
tration: For children who are 4 years old by
Sept. 1; facilitated by Arbor E&T, in part-
nership with the Early Learning Coalition of
the Big Bend. 1940 N. Monroe; 385-0504.
West Point Society of Tallahassee: A
nonprofit fraternal, community-service
organization whose members are graduates
and friends of the United States Military
Academy dedicated to promoting the legacy
of West Point and its core ideals. Da-
vidRich78@gmail.com, fl8.westpoin-
taog.com; 212-6720.
World Class Schools of Leon County:
An alliance between the Greater Tallahassee
Chamber of Commerce and Leon County
Schools, promoting excellence in our public
schools through business and community
involvement; www.wcsleon.com; contact:
Laura Rogers; 224-8116.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
Alliance Francaise de Tallahassee:
Offers French classes for adults and children,
other social and cultural activities.
www.aftally.org, 391-8309.
German School of Tallahassee: A
nonprofit organization devoted to teaching
the German language and introducing the
culture to children and adults. www.tally-
surf.com/germanschool, plendl2001@ya-
hoo.com, 294-2179.
Tallahassee Chinese School: The
TCS-Taiwan has a diverse student pop-
ulation that comes to school from neigh-
borhoods all over Leon County. Open from
1:30-3:30 p.m. each Sunday. 2945 Compton
Way; Jianqiang Zhao, jqz1023@gmail.com.
MENTORING &
ENRICHMENT
100 Black Men of the Tallahassee
Area: Group offers mentoring and drop-out
prevention for African-American seventh
graders and up. 766-2210.
Alpha Leadership Program- Alpha Phi
Alpha Frat: Program pairs adult mentors
with minority male students in grades 6-10
to improve academic, social, public speaking,
decision-making skills and financial manage-
ment skills. 723 West Orange Ave;
www.alphagml.org.
Black Male College Explorers Program
at FAMU: Aiming to increase educational
achievements, facilitate college entry and
reduce delinquent referrals for males in
grades 7-12. 501 Orr Drive; www.famu.edu/
index.cfm?a=Black MalesCollege; 561-2407.
College Reach Out Program at TCC:
Scholarships, mentors and sponsorship are
offered for children from low income
families. 444 Appleyard Drive; 201-8311.
Girls2Divas: A mentoring program for 7-12
grade girls. 2301 Pasco St., 305-304-7701,
girls2divas@gmail.com, g2dmentorntrans-
form.webs.com.
Leon County Schools volunteer
program: Program recruits, trains and
coordinates individual and corporate
volunteers to work with students and to act
as mentors in the schools. 723 S Calhoun St;
www.leon.k12.fl.us; 487-4700.
CARE Program at FSU: Program brings
high school juniors and seniors to FSU for
two weeks during the summer to experience
college and to encourage the economically
disadvantaged to pursue higher education.
5400-A University Center; www.care.f-
su.edu; 644-9699.
TUTORING
Advanced Learners: Affordable in-home
tutoring; pre-K-college, all subjects;
www.advancedlearners.com; 866-358-8867.
Club Z In-Home Tutoring Club: In-home
tutoring for all ages, including SAT/ACT prep,
foreign languages and individualized studies
assistance; www.clubztutoring.com.
Kumon Math and Reading Centers:
Developing untapped potential of children
through building confidence and developing
fundamental skills. 3111 Mahan Drive Suite
31-32; www.kumon.com; 219-6284.
Panhandle Educational Consulting
Services: In-home and online tutoring.
www.phecs.com, feedback@phecs.com,
366-3415.
Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic:
Serves as an educational library of audio
textbooks serving people who cannot read
standard print effectively because of visual
impairment, learning disability or other
physical impairment. 2639 N. Monroe St.,
Suite 151-A1; Deborah Cucinella.
Rose Speech & Academic Center:
Serving those in grades pre-K-college in all
subjects, including speech therapy. 1268
Timberlane Road; 893-8743.
Solution Skills: Serving those in grades
K-12 in all subjects, including test prep for
SAT, ACT, FCAT, GRE and GMAT. 545 E.
Tennessee St.; www.solutionskills.com;
681-6543.
Sylvan Learning Center: Serving all ages
in reading, writing, math and study skills, as
well as test prep for SAT and ACT. 2811
Capital Circle N.E, Suite #3;
www.educate.com; 385-8696.
Your College Advisor LLC: Helping
families understand college choices and
make wise decisions. Full service through the
application process. 409 Beard St., 222-
9889, YourCollegeAdvisor.com.
SPECIAL NEEDS
Capital Therapy: Innovative treatment for
communication disorders. 2634-B Capital
Circle NE, 523-3303,
www.capitaltherapy.org.
Childrens Communication Center, Inc.:
Providing comprehensive speech-language
pathology diagnostic, intervention, consulta-
tion and related services to children,
adolescents, adults and their families.
386-8886, childrenscommunicationcen-
ter@comcast.net.
Dyslexia Research Institute: Institute
operates full-time school and provides
educational counseling, diagnostic testing,
tutorial services, parent workshops and adult
support groups. 5246 Centerville Road;
www.dyslexia-add.org; 893-2216.
Rosemary N. Palmer: Provides parent/
teacher seminars on disability discrimination
and how to obtain appropriate services at
school for students who are disabled. 5260
Pimlico Drive; floridalawlady@gmail.com;
668-9203.
Rodney McCoy of the Marine Corps Reserves picks up donated
toys.
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 51
Education Resources
Quality early learning experiences help build the foundation for success in school.
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DID YOU KNOW?
Paid for in part by the Florida Ofce of Early Learning and the Early Learning Coalition of
the Big Bend Region, Inc. www.oridaearlylearning.com
1-866-973-9030
or www.elcbigbend.org
Studies show that early education is one of the most important way to ensure
success in school. Your children are your most precious asset and nding quality
child care can seem impossible. Its not as hard as it seems. The Early Learning
Coalition can help you or a parent you know ensure a childs future by:
Matching you with a highly-rated child care facility in your area and budget.
Providing nancial assistance to working parents who are having difculty
affording quality care (we know its expensive).
Linking all families to other community resources to ensure a healthy start for all.
To nd out more, contact us at
52 Living Here | 2014-2015
Education Cram session
SCHOOL HOURS
Hours for public schools in Leon County
are standardized except as noted. Public
elementary schools are in session from
8:30 a.m. to 2:50 p.m.; middle schools
from 9:30 a.m. to 3:50 p.m.; and high
schools from 7:30 a.m. to 1:50 p.m.
Hours for private and charter schools
may vary. Check with each school for
up-to-date information. Please be aware
that listed times may change.
HIGH-PERFORMING
The Leon County system is recognized
as academically high-performing by
the Florida Department of Education. It
employs more than 2,200 teachers. The
2014-15 school year begins Aug. 18 and
is scheduled to end on June 1, 2015.
SCHOOL BOARD
MEMBERS
The Leon County School Board sets
policy and each of its five members is
elected by the voters in their district.
Currently, the members are:
Forrest Van Camp,
Residential Area 1,
Term Expires: 2014
Dee Crumpler,
Residential Area 2,
Term Expires: 2016
Maggie Lewis-Butler, Resi-
dential Area 3,
Term Expires: 2014
Dee Dee Rasmussen, Resi-
dential Area 4, Term Expires: 2016
Georgia M. Joy Bowen,
Residential Area 5, Term Expires:
2014
BOARD MEETINGS
The board meets on the second and
fourth Tuesdays of each month at 6
p.m. in the back conference room of the
Howell Center, 3955 W. Pensacola
Street. The board meetings can also be
viewed live on WLCS-Cable Channel 23.
FIND MORE ONLINE
For detailed information on Leon County
Schools, including academic calendars,
visit www.leonschools.net.
VIRTUAL SCHOOL
Leon County operates its own local
franchise of the Florida Virtual School,
with online classes and summer pro-
grams available to middle and high
school students. More information can
be found at leongoesvirtual.net.
Godby High teacher Delia
Pogorzelski helps summer school
students with course work. MIKE
EWEN/DEMOCRAT
Elementary schools
To enter kindergarten, a child must be 5
years old on or before Sept. 1 of the year
being enrolled.
To enter first grade, a child must be 6
years old on or before Sept. 1 of the year
being enrolled.
Enrolling at the Leon County school
where the student is scheduled to attend
takes just a short time.
Families will need to bring two proofs
of residency (such as a utility bill), proof
of a recent physical exam, a birth certif-
icate or other evidence of the childs age,
the childs social security number and
proof that the student has received all the
required immunizations.
Immunizations can be obtained from
the public health department or a private
doctor, but they must be current. Your
health-care provider will give you a blue
form to show the school that all shots are
up to date. If you are not sure that you
have all the documents you need, call the
school to ask what you need to bring as
evidence.
You will be asked to complete forms
that show your name, address, phone
number, emergency contact information
and any health problems your child may
have.
Records are kept private and are only
used to contact families when necessary.
Access to these records is limited to a
very few people at the school site and
records are never shared with the public.
Middle schools and high
schools
Middle or high school students enrolling
for the first time in Leon County Schools
will need to show the same types of evi-
dence as elementary students trans-
ferring from another school district.
These include a social security num-
ber, proof of residence, proof of a recent
medical exam and a record of current
immunizations.
Families are encouraged to bring a
copy of the most recent report card or
other proof of academic achievement in
addition to the documents noted above
when they are transferring to the Leon
County School District.
This will allow the school to place each
student quickly. Each schools principal is
responsible for determining the place-
ment of students at the school.
Attendance
The school year includes 180 days of
instruction and students are expected to
be on time and attend each day.
Florida Law requires school atten-
dance for school-age students who are
not registered as being home-educated.
School age means the student is at least 6
years old and not yet 16 years old. Some
absences, such as illness, can be counted
as excused with the proper documenta-
tion.
By law, parents are responsible for
ensuring that students are at school every
day. There are legal consequences for
parents who do not take this responsibil-
ity seriously.
Schools contact families when stu-
dents show a pattern of tardiness or
absence.
Which school?
Students are assigned to Leon County
schools based on their actual residence
address at the time of school registration.
Attendance zone boundaries can be
found on the district website, www.le-
on.k12.fl. us/newLCShomeFiles/
planning_Policy_Dev.html
Leon County also offers a variety of
school choice options for students in-
cluding magnet schools and programs,
McKay Scholarships and special pro-
grams to serve students academic needs.
Contact the School Choice Office at 487-
7546 for information.
Enrolling in Leon Countys public schools
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 53
Education Leon County
ELEMENTARY
SCHOOLS
Apalachee Tapestry Magnet School of
the Arts, 650 Trojan Trail, 488-7110,
www.apalachee.leon.k12.fl.us
Astoria Park, 2465 Atlas Road, 488-
4673, www.astoriapark.leon.k12.fl.us
Bond, 2204 Saxon St., 488-7676,
www.bond.leon.k12.fl.us
Buck Lake, 1600 Pedrick Road, 488-6133,
www.bucklake.leon.k12.fl.us
Canopy Oaks, 3250 Pointview Drive,
488-3301, www.canopyoaks.leon.k12.fl.us
Chaires, 4774 Chaires Crossroads, 488-
5977, www.chaires.leon.k12.fl.us
Conley Elementary School at South-
Wood, 2400 Orange Ave. E., 414-5610,
www.conley.leon.k12.fl.us
Desoto Trail, 5200 Tredington Park Drive,
488-4511, www.desoto-trail.leon.k12.fl.us
Fort Braden School, 15100 Blountstown
Highway, 488-9374, www.ftbraden.le-
on.k12.fl.us
Gilchrist, 1301 Timberlane Road, 893-
4310, www.gilchrist.leon.k12.fl.us
Hartsfield, 1414 Chowkeebin Nene,
488-7322, www.hartsfield.leon.k12.fl.us
Hawks Rise, 205 Meadow Ridge, 487-
4733, www.hawksrise.leon.k12.fl.us
Killearn Lakes, 8037 Deerlake East,
893-1265, www.killearn-lakes.leon.k12.fl.us
Moore, 1706 Dempsey Mayo Road,
488-2858, www.moore.leon.k12.fl.us
Oak Ridge, 4530 Shelfer Road, 488-3124,
www.oak-ridge.leon.k12.fl.us
Pineview, 2230 Lake Bradford Road,
488-2819, www.pineview.leon.k12.fl.us
Riley, 1400 Indiana St., 488-5840, www.ri-
ley.leon.k12.fl.us
Roberts, 5777 Pimlico Drive, 488-0923,
www.roberts.leon.k12.fl.us
Ruediger, 526 W. 10th Ave., 488-1074,
www.ruediger.leon.k12.fl.us
Sabal Palm, 2813 Ridgeway St., 488-
0167, www.sabalpalm.leon.k12.fl.us
Sealey, 2815 Allen Road, 488-5640,
www.sealey.leon.k12.fl.us
Springwood, 3801 Fred George Road,
488-6225, www.springwood.leon.k12.fl.us
Sullivan, 927 Miccosukee Road, 487-1216,
www.sullivan.leon.k12.fl.us
Woodville, 9373 Woodville Highway,
487-7043, www.woodville.leon.k12.fl.us
MIDDLE SCHOOLS
Cobb, 915 Hillcrest St., 488-3364,
www.cobb.leon.k12.fl.us
Deerlake, 9902 Deerlake West, 922-6545,
www.deerlake.leon.k12.fl.us
Fairview, 3415 Zillah St., 617-5353,
www.fairview.leon.k12.fl.us
Fort Braden School, 15100 Blountstown
Highway, 488-9374, www.ftbraden.le-
on.k12.fl.us
Griffin, 800 Alabama St., 488-8436,
www.griffin.leon.k12.fl.us
Montford, 5789 Pimlico Drive, 922-6011,
www.montford.leon.k12.fl.us
Nims, 723 W. Orange Ave., 488- 5960,
www.nims.leon.k12.fl.us
Raa, 401 West Tharpe St., 488-6287,
www.raa.leon.k12.fl.us
Swift Creek, 2100 Pedrick Road, 414-
2670, www.swiftcreek.leon.k12.fl.us
HIGH SCHOOLS
Chiles, 7200 Lawton Chiles Lane, 488-
1756, www.chiles.leon.k12.fl.us
Godby, 1717 West Tharpe St., 617-4700,
www.godby.leon.k12.fl.us
Leon, 550 E. Tennessee St., 488-1971,
www.leon.leon.k12.fl.us
Lincoln, 3838 Trojan Trail, 487-2110,
www.lincoln.leon.k12.fl.us
Rickards, 3013 Jim Lee Road, 488-1783,
www.rickards.leon.k12.fl.us
SAIL, 2006 Jackson Bluff Road, 488-2468,
www.sail.leon.k12.fl.us
DISTRICT-WIDE
SCHOOLS
Adult & Community Education, 283
Trojan Trail, 922-5343, www.ACELeon.org
School hours: 8:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.
Ghazvini Learning Center, 860 Blount-
stown Highway, 488-2087,
www.2ndchance.leon.k12.fl.us
School hours: 7:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Everhart School, 2750 Mission Road,
488-5785, www.everhart.leon.k12.fl.us
School hours: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Lively Technical Center, 480 N. Ap-
pleyard Drive, 487-7555, www.livelytech-
.com
School hours: 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Pace Secondary School, 3413 Zillah
Road, 488-8927, www.pace.leon.k12.fl.us
School hours: 9:15 a.m.-3:15 p.m.
CHARTER SCHOOLS
School of Arts & Sciences, grades K-8,
3208 Thomasville Road, 386-6566,
www.artsandsciences.leon.k12.fl.us
School hours: 9:15 am-3:35 pm
Imagine School at Evening Rose,
grades K-8, 3611 Austin Davis Ave., 877-
5187, www.myiser.com
School hours: 8 a.m.-2:30 p.m.
STARS, middle school, 1234 Blountstown
Highway, 681-7827, www.starsmiddles-
chool.org
School hours: 9:30 a.m.-3:50 p.m.
Steele-Collins, middle school, 412 N.
Bronough St., 681-1929, www.steelecollins
.leon.k12.fl.us
School hours: 8:45 a.m.-3:05 p.m.
Governors Charter Academy, 4351
Mahan Drive, 391-5259, governorscharte-
r.org
School hours: 8 a.m.-3 p.m.
Capital City High School, 324 N. Adams
St., 807-4557,
maverickshigh.com/schools/tallahassee
School hours: Multiple sessions at different
times. Office hours: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Leon County Schools
SCHOOL HOURS
Hours for public schools in
Leon County are stan-
dardized except as noted.
Public elementary schools
are in session from 8:30
a.m. to 2:50 p.m., middle
schools from 9:30 a.m. to
3:50 p.m. and high schools
from 7:30 a.m. to 1:50
p.m. Hours for private
schools vary. Check with
each school for up-to-date
information. Please be
aware that listed times
may change. Students at Springwood Elementary students play Angry Birds in order
to help them learn computer coding. GLENN BEIL/DEMOCRAT
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In the heart of Midtown
AVEDA INSTITUTE OF TALLAHASSEE
2020 W. Pensacola St. Tallahassee, FL
32304
850-222-4299
www.avedaflorida.com
BARRY UNIVERSITY
325 John Knox Road,
Suite A
385-2279
www.barry.edu/pace
EMBRY-RIDDLE
AERONAUTICAL
UNIVERSITY
Located on the Tallahassee
Community College campus,
444 Appleyard Drive
201-8330
www.erau.edu
FLAGLER COLLEGE
Located on the TCC campus,
444 Appleyard Drive
201-8070
www.flagler.edu
Keiser University (KU), a private, not-for-
profit university founded in 1977, serves near-
ly 18,000 students pursuing doctoral, masters
bachelors and associate degrees. The univer-
sity has been regionally accredited by the
Commission on Colleges of the Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools since
1991 and employs more than 3,500 faculty
and staff on 15 campuses. The main Tallahas-
see campus opened in 1992 and the graduate
school campus opened at Metropolitan Bou-
levard in 2011. The largest degree programs
are nursing, culinary arts and occupational
therapy assisting.
Sixty-two percent of KU students graduate
in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering
and Math) and health care fields, providing
the talented workforce necessary for Florida
to compete globally. The university ranks 1st
in Florida and 2nd in the nation in production
of associate of science graduates in health
care professions and 2nd in Florida and 3rd in
the nation in production of associate of sci-
ence in nursing graduates. (Source: Communi-
ty College Week evaluation of US. Dept of
EdIntegrated Postsecondary Education
Data System IPEDS)
Keiser Universitys educational reach ex-
tends globally through its international pro-
grams including the Latin Division, a coopera-
tive agreement in the Eastern European na-
tion of Moldova, and a campus in Shanghai,
China.
WHATS AVAILABLE
Financial aid, available to those who qualify
Career placement assistance
Flexible scheduling options including day,
evening, online and hybrid (combination of
on campus and online) classes
Small class sizes, low student-faculty ratio
Year-round enrollment options
CONTACT KEISER
The main Tallahassee campus is located at
1700 Halstead Boulevard.
To learn more, call 906-9494 or go to
www.keiseruniversity.edu
OTHER AREA INSTITUTIONS
LIVELY TECHNICAL CENTER
500 N. Appleyard Drive
487-7555
www.livelytech.com
NORTH FLORIDA
COSMETOLOGY
INSTITUTE
2424 Allen Road
878-5269
www.cosmetologyinst.com
SMITH CHAPEL BIBLE
UNIVERSITY
Located at 3111 Mahan Drive,
Suite 20
850-656-5950
https://www.scbu.edu
THOMAS UNIVERSITY
1501 Millpond Road, Thomasville, Ga.
229-226-1621
www.thomasu.edu
Keiser
University
Keiser University culinary students work on a recipe during a class in 2013. MIKE
EWEN/DEMOCRAT
54 Living Here | 2014-2015
Education Keiser / Others
K-12 Private and
Laboratory Schools
PRIVATE SCHOOLS
Bethel Christian Academy, 406
N. Bronough St., 222-6605, www.bethel-
tally.org, Grades: PK3-6th
Betton Hills Preparatory, 1815 N.
Meridian Road, 422-2464, www.betton-
hills.com, Grades: PK3-1st
Community Christian, 4859 Kerry
Forest Parkway, 893-6628, www.ccs-
chargers.org, Grades: K-12th
Cornerstone Learning Commu-
nity, 2524 Hartsfield Road, 386-5550,
www.cornerstonelc.com
Epiphany Lutheran School (also
serves infants), 8300 Deerlake Road W.,
385-9822, www.epiphanystar.org, Grades:
PK-18 months (half day), PK3, PK4, Early
Bird, Lunch Bunch, After School, Commu-
nity Kids Club
Grassroots Free School, 2458
Grassroots Way, 656-3629, non-compul-
sory education for children ages 5-11,
www.grassrootsschool.org
Great Oaks Day School, 4840
Tower Road, 562-0489, Grades: PK-8th
Heritage Academy/ Ginger-
bread Day School, 3324 N. Monroe
St., 562-3169, Grades: PK-8th
Holy Comforter Episcopal, 2001
Fleischmann Road, 383-1007, www.holy-
comforter.org, Grades: PK3-8th
John Paul II Catholic High, 5100
Terrebone Drive, 201-5744, Grades:
9th-12th
Maclay School, 3737 N. Meridian
Road, 893-2138, www.maclay.org,
Grades: PK-12th
Magnolia School, 2705 W. Tharpe
St., 385-3834, www.themagnoliaschool-
.net
North Florida Christian, 3000 N.
Meridian Road, 386-6327, www.nflschoo-
l.org, Grades: PK-12th
Rose Academy, LLC, 1268-B Timber-
lane Road, www.roseacademy.org,
893-8743, Grades: K-8th
Seven Hills Academy, 2205
Thomasville Road, 656-9211, Grades:
K-12th
Trinity Catholic, 706 E. Brevard St.,
222-0444, www.trinityknights.org,
Grades: PK3-8th
Woodland Hall Academy, 5246
Centerville Road, 893-2216, www.woo-
dlandhallacademy.org
LAB SCHOOLS
Tallahassees two state universities are
affiliated with laboratory schools. For more
information, contact each school or visit
its website.
FAMU Developmental Research
School, 400 W. Orange Ave., 412-5930,
www.famudrs.org, Grades: K-12th
Florida State University School,
3000 Schoolhouse Road, 245-3700,
www.fsus.fsu.edu, Grades: K-12th
FAMU professor of English Kendra Bryant works with FAMU DRS
students.
Florida CFO Jeff Atwater speaks to students during a ceremony
at Florida State University School in March. MICHAEL
SCHWARZ/DEMOCRAT FILES
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 55
Education Private / Laboratory
Rettau Htlls P:ea:ata:q Ce|aal
P:ea:tuq stueuts ta exeel tu Puhlte se|aal.
Accredifed by AISF, MIPSA, Sfofe of FIorido 0oId SeoI Approved,
DCF Provider License #C0ZLE03o9
Advunced EurIy Leurning Center
PkZ/3 Pk4 VPk kindergurten First Srude
11 N, Meridiun Poud
www,bettonhiIIs,com
Call us (850)422-2464 to learn how affordable
a high quality Private School can be.
Our total cost is often less than Child Care!
TD-0000252890
56 Living Here | 2014-2015
Education FSU
Florida State University is one of the nations elite research
universities, comprised of 16 colleges and 99 institutes and
research centers. It offers more than 300 programs of study, as
well as programs in law and medicine.
ENROLLMENT
More than 41,000 students are enrolled at Florida State. Each
year, the university awards more than 7,900 undergraduate
degrees and more than 3,000 graduate and professional degrees.
TUITION AND FEES
In-state tuition and fees for
the 2013-2014 academic year
were $6,507, based on two
semesters at 15 hours per
semester. Costs are lower for
long-term participants in the
Florida Prepaid College Plan.
Out-of-state tuition and fees
for the 2013-2014 academic
year were $21,673, also based
on two semesters at 15 hours
per semester.
IMPORTANT DATES
Aug. 25, 2014: Fall 2014 term begins.
Jan. 7, 2015: Spring 2015 term begins. The extended Aca-
demic Calendar with all dates for the coming year can be found
at www.registrar.fsu.edu/extended.htm. Consult the website for
the start dates for summer sessions.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Interested in attending Florida State University? Go online to
www.fsu.edu and click on Students, and then click on Pros-
pective Students. All the information you need is there.
Apply online at www.admissions.fsu.edu/apply.
The second key website is Visitor Services: www.visit.fsu.edu.
The Visitor Services staff provides a wealth of information
about the university and can take you on a tour of campus. Call
(850) 644-6200.
CONTACTS
All admissions information is available at www.admis-
sions.fsu.edu.
NOTABLE FACTS ABOUT FSU
Established in 1851, Florida State University is located on the oldest
continuous site of higher education in Florida.
The university boasts an outstanding faculty that includes a Nobel
Laureate; members of the National Academy of Sciences, the Na-
tional Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts
& Sciences; Pulitzer Prize winners; Oscar winners; and Guggenheim,
Fulbright and National Endowment for the Humanities fellows.
In 2011, Florida State students had an average SAT score of 1205.7
and an average ACT score of 26.5. Many undergraduate students
participate in honors programs and work directly with their profes-
sors to conduct research, an activity once reserved for graduate
students.
Since its inception in the spring of 2005, the Florida State University
Office of National Fellowships has assisted some of FSUs most
talented students. In the last seven years, students have won more
than 100 nationally competitive awards, including three prestigious
Rhodes scholarships, three Truman scholarships, six Goldwater
scholarships, 11 Hollings scholarships, four Pickering fellowships
and 48 Fulbright grants.
Nearly 73 percent of black students now graduate from Florida
State within six years, a rate that exceeds the State University
System by more than 20 percentage points and the national aver-
age by 17 percentage points. Florida State currently ranks third
among top public research institutions in the number of bachelors
degrees awarded to blacks.
The university is home to the $812 million National High Magnetic
Field Laboratory, which features the worlds most powerful mag-
nets.
The College of Music is one of the nations oldest and largest, with
a graduate program ranked fifth among public institutions. It holds
hundreds of concerts annually.
With award-winning students whose accolades include numerous
Student Academy Awards and College Television Awards, the
College of Motion Picture Arts is one of the top film schools in the
nation.
Florida State is home to the Flying High Circus, one of only two
collegiate circuses in the nation.
Florida State has foreign study centers in Florence, Italy; London,
England; Valencia, Spain; and Panama City, Panama.
Florida State
University
The Garnet and Gold boys
pose with a young Seminole
fan at the Spring Game in
April. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
Agapanthus blooms around the gate to the FSU medical school.
GERALD ENSLEY/DEMOCRAT FILES
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 57
Education FAMU
Founded on Oct. 3, 1887, Florida
A&M University (FAMU) is part
of the State University System of
Florida and is accredited by the
Southern Association of Col-
leges and Schools Commission
on Colleges.
CAMPUS
Distinguished by lush foliage and
massive oaks, the main campus
is comprised of more than 155
buildings, spread across more
than 422 acres atop the highest
of Tallahassees seven hills. The
university also has several satel-
lite campuses including Orlando,
home to the FAMU College of
Law, and sites in Miami, Jack-
sonville, Crestview and Tampa
for its pharmacy program.
ENROLLMENT
Florida A&M University enrolls
nearly 11,000 students from
more than 40 states and many
countries.
FEES PER CREDIT
HOUR
(Fees as of 2014-15*)
Undergraduate residents:
$151.78
Undergraduate non-residents:
$549.80
Graduate residents: $405.67
Graduate non-residents:
$1,022.04
Law residents: $455.86
Law non-residents: $1,097.89
(*Includes technology, athletic,
health, activity and service fees)
OTHER FEES
Rattler Card ID: $5, Transporta-
tion/Access Fee: $65
HOUSING
Room rent (average range):
$2,530 to $3,543 per semester
FALL 2014 DATES
April 12 - Aug. 24: Regular regis-
tration
Aug. 20 - 22: Residence halls
open
Aug. 25: Late registration and
add-drop period
Aug. 25: First day of class
Dec. 5: Last day of classes
Dec. 8-12: Final examinations
Dec. 12: Fall commencement
ceremony
SPRING 2015 DATES
Nov. 1 - Jan. 6, 2015: Regular
registration
Jan. 7: First day of class
March 9 - 13: Spring Break
April 24: Last day of classes
April 27 - May 1: Final examina-
tions
May 2: Spring commencement
ceremony
ACADEMIC
PROGRAMS
As of June 2014, Florida A&M
University offers 54 bachelors
degrees and 29 masters degrees.
The university also offers three
professional degrees including
the Pharm.D., doctor of physical
therapy and a juris doctor at the
College of Law in Orlando.
Twelve doctoral programs are
offered at FAMU. FAMU has 14
schools and colleges and 16
centers and institutes. FAMU
also offers three online masters
degree programs in nursing,
public health and business ad-
ministration.
FINANCIAL AID &
SCHOLARSHIPS
Grants, scholarships, loans and
employment opportunities are
available to help families meet
the cost of investing in an educa-
tion at Florida A&M University.
For more information, visit
www.famu.edu.
NOTABLE FACTS ABOUT FAMU
FAMU was named one of the Best Colleges in the Southeast in
The Princeton Review 2012 edition.
Florida A&M University was named one of the Top 15 most popular
universities in the nation by U.S. News and World Report. FAMU
was the only historically black college or university that is ranked in
the Top 15 with Ivy League universities such as Harvard, Stanford,
Yale, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Princeton. The
University of Florida is the only other university in Florida to be
listed in the top 20.
For the second year in row, FAMU has been selected by The Prince-
ton Review for its list of the 322 top green campuses in the United
States and Canada. FAMU is the only historically black college and
university to be selected.
Students in the School of Business and Industry won first place in
the National Deloitte Case Study Seminar beating out Notre Dame,
University of Miami (Ohio), University of Washington, University of
Texas and Brigham Young.
The university has been designated as a National Center of Aca-
demic Excellence in Information Assurance Education by the Na-
tional Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Homeland
Security. This designation covers the academic year 2012 through
2017.
FAMU students won the Altitude Award at the NASA University
Student Launch Initiative Competition for launching a rocket clos-
est to one mile without going over.
The College of Laws Hispanic American Law Student Association
(HALSA) Moot Court Team participated for the first time in the
Hispanic National Bar Association 17th Annual Uvaldo Herrera
National Moot Court Competition and finished in the Top Ten at
the competition.
Florida A&M
University
FAMU students walk near the eternal flame on campus. MIKE
EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
58 Living Here | 2014-2015
Education TCC
Tallahassee Community
College is one of the nations
top community colleges and
offers the excitement and
intellectual stimulation of a
mid-size college with the
individual attention that
comes from small classes and
caring faculty. Every semester,
about 14,000 students choose
TCC for their college experi-
ence. Many are preparing for
transfer to a university, while
others are developing the
skills they need to move di-
rectly into the workforce.
LOCATIONS
Main Campus: 444 Appleyard Drive,
850-201-6200
TCC Capitol Center: 300 West
Pensacola St., 850-201-7662
Quincy House: 216 North Adams,
Quincy, 850-558-3620
TCC Wakulla Center: 2932 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawfordville,
850-922-6290
Florida Public Safety Institute: 75
College Drive, Havana, 850-201-
7000
Center for Workforce Development:
444 Appleyard Drive, 850-201-8760
Ghazvini Center for Healthcare
Education: 1528 Surgeons Drive,
850-558-4500
ENROLLMENT
TCC enrolls about 14,000 students
each semester.
FEES
In-state tuition and fees per hour:
$98.83
Out-of-state tuition and fees per
hour: $375.99
KEY DATES
Aug. 25, 2014: Fall main session
begins
Jan. 7, 2015: Spring main session
begins
ACADEMIC OVERVIEW
Programs offered: TCC
offers more than 90 academic
and career programs and 700
courses.
The Associate in Arts
(A.A.) degree is designed for
students planning to transfer
to a four-year college or uni-
versity. Nearly 75 percent of
TCCs A.A. graduates transfer
into the State University Sys-
tem within one year, and TCC
is the number one transfer
school to Florida State Univer-
sity.
The college offers two-year
degrees in nursing, dental
hygiene and other healthcare
fields; computer technology;
health information manage-
ment; environmental technol-
ogy; graphic design; business/
accounting/office; paralegal;
criminal justice; engineering
technology; building construc-
tion; drafting/design; child
development; and more.
TCC offers certificates in
many in-demand fields, in-
cluding healthcare. TCCs
Florida Public Safety Institute
in Gadsden County offers
programs such as law enforce-
ment, corrections, correction-
al probation and firefighting.
FINANCIAL AID AND
SCHOLARSHIPS
The college provides about
$20 million in scholarships
and grants every year.
ATHLETICS
The TCC Eagles compete
in baseball, softball, and men's
and women's basketball. In
2014, the softball team won
the Panhandle Conference and
FCSAA Championships and
advanced to the National
Junior College Athletic Asso-
ciation Division I Softball
National Championship while
the baseball team qualified for
the FCSAA State Tournament.
KEY CONTACTS
Admissions and Enrollment Ser-
vices: 201-8555
Student Success and Retention:
201-8440
Disability Support Services: 201-
8430
Academic Support: 201-8505
Financial Aid and Scholarships:
201-8399
Veterans Affairs: 201-8406
Online: www.GoToTCC.com
Tallahassee Community College
Student Steve Murray poses with TCC mascot. TCC attracts new
and returning students. GLENN BEIL/DEMOCRAT FILES
The TV quiz show Jeop-
ardy makes Tallahassee and
Florida State University
references frequently
some of which baffle the
contestants. In November
2013, the category was birth-
stones and the $1,000 clue
showed photos of a red
stone and the FSU sports
logo. None of the contes-
tants could correctly identify
the birthstone, garnet,
which is one of FSUs colors.
The new St.
Peters Anglican
Church at 4784
Thomasville
Road can hold
700 people. MIKE
EWEN/DEMOCRAT
FILES
IN THIS SECTION
Introduction
Places of worship
Faith & Values
ONLINE
See video on faith at
TLHlivinghere.com
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 59
Come worship God in the beauty of holiness at St. Peters!
Our warm and welcoming church would love to have you join us in celebrating the good work that God is doing in our midst.
Sunday Services:
9:00 a.m. & 11:15 a.m. Our morning worship services are lled with the sound of a beautiful organ and choir, with
passionate preaching and the celebration of Holy Communion. The lovely smell of incense accompanies the 11:15 a.m.
service, reminding us of the mystery of our mighty God.
5:00 p.m. Our evening worship service praises God with joy accompanied by contemporary worship music in a casual,
yet reverent atmosphere.
In addition to Sunday worship, there are opportunities for discipleship and fellowship for adults, youth and children
ofered throughout the week. Wed love to see you here!
Welcome to St. Peters Anglican Church
ST. PETERS ANGLICAN CHURCH
Where Christ is Changing Lives to Change the World
4784 Thomasville Road www.StPetersTallahassee.org
Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
Founded on Biblically-Faithful Worship
Photo By Elizabeth Davis Photo By Mary Beth Tyson Photo By Jill Ashoo
Photo By Fr. Andrew Rowell
Committed to Mission Gracious and Loving
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 61
Faith & Values Spirituality
Tallahassee offers newcomers seeking
a place for worship and spiritual growth
myriad opportunities.
The Leon County Property Appraisers
Office lists 366 properties registered to
faith-based organizations, although that
figure can be misleading in that some
worship centers own multiple properties.
But whether youre seeking a small
congregation that meets in a storefront or
youre more comfortable in a larger sanc-
tuary, chances are you can find what
youre looking for in Talla-
hassee.
There are places for
Hindu studies, Islamic
studies, Buddhism, Chris-
tian Science, Missionary
Baptist, African Methodist
Episcopal, Catholic and
other mainstream denom-
inations. One of the fastest
growing segments of the
faith community is found in
nondenominational, multi-ethnic congre-
gations.
In addition, there are at least four
centers for the study of Judaism, the
largest and most involved being Temple
Israel.
I think faith is an important part of
people moving to a community, said
Canon Ted Monica of Holy Comforter
Episcopal Church.
Seventy percent of Tallahassee is in a
church somewhere on a Sunday morn-
ing, said the Rev. Bill Shiell, pastor of
First Baptist Church in downtown Talla-
hassee. Last year, the church took in
about 130 new members, he said. My
suggestion is not to treat the church like
you would Publix, where you go to buy
something for yourself, to determine
which church to join. Its not what it does
for you, but what you can do for others.
The Rev. Brant Copeland, pastor of
First Presbyterian Church, said Tallahas-
see offers broad diversity among its faith
offerings. In fact, leaders of diverse con-
gregations often meet to increase un-
derstanding between different beliefs and
to build bridges.
Byron Dobson is a staff writer and member of the
Democrats editorial board. He has lived in Tallahassee
since 1990 and is a member of Bethel AME Church.
Mari Parrilla sings at the first ever church service at Cascades Park Amphitheater,
sponsored by Freedom Church First Assembly of God in April. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT
A community
of faith
A community
of faith
Tallahassee offers diverse,
broad spiritual choices
Tallahassee offers diverse,
broad spiritual choices
Byron
Dobson
Associate
Editor
62 Living Here | 2014-2015
Faith & Values Be uplifted
AME
Anderson Chapel AME, 224-2003, 1307
Harlem St.
Bethel AME, 576-7501, 501 W. Orange
Ave., www.bethelame1865.org
Bethelonia AME, 668-9924, 8437 N.
Meridian Road
Flipper Chapel AME, 576-2343, 708
Osceola St., www.flipperchapel.faithweb-
.com
The Greater Fountain Chapel AME,
222-3800, 821 Eugenia St., FountainCha-
pelAMEC@embarqmail.com
Mount Sinai AME, 942-0900, 5998
Apalachee Parkway
New Mount Zion AME, 222-4201, 1401
Old Bainbridge Road, www.newmt-
zionamec.org
St. Phillip AME Church, 893-2328, 6200
Centerville Road, stphillip@nettally.com
ANGLICAN
All Saints Anglican Church, 325-1200,
3840 N. Monroe St., Unit 303, www.tall-
saints.com
Holy Cross Anglican Church, 553-4659,
2915 Kerry Forest Parkway, Suite 401,
www.hcchurch.com
St. Andrews Anglican Catholic,
893-5164, 401 Timberlane Road,
www.StAndrewsAnglicanCatholicChur-
ch.org
St. Lukes Anglican Church, 385-7889,
3725 Apalachee Parkway, www.commun-
ityoflife.net
St. Peters Anglican Church, 701-0664,
4784 Thomasville Road, www.stpeterstalla-
hassee.org
APOSTOLIC
Apostolic Church of Tallahassee,
877-2287, 228 Gaile Ave., www.actlh.com
Miracle Temple Apostolic Holiness
Church, 575-2933, 2201 St. Marks St.
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Evangel Assembly of God, 385-1815,
2300 Old Bainbridge Road, www.evangela-
g.org
Freedom Church First Assembly of
God, 386-4924, 2801 Thomasville Road,
www.freedomplace.org
Heritage Assembly Of God, 656-1755,
298 Crossway Road, www.heritageaog.org.
Mosaic Church, 575-1122, 418 Hayden
Road, www.mosaicichurch.com.
Generations Church, 575-4054, 3080
W. Tennessee St.
Renaissance Church, 877-3333, 4852
Mahan Drive, www.Renaissanceag.org
BAPTIST
Baptist Collegiate Campus Ministry
FSU, 222-2605, 200 S. Woodward Ave.,
www.fsubcm.org
Calvary Baptist, 681-6864, 1915 Dale St.,
pastorkjohnson@yahoo.com
Chapel Hill Baptist, 222-6900, 3413 Old
Bainbridge Rd.
Connections Fellowship, 447-4115.
Meets at Fort Braden Community Center,
16387 Blountstown Hwy. www.connection-
stally.com
Crossway Baptist, 877-5216, 405 Cross-
way Road, www.crosswaybaptistchurch.us
Leon Ebenezer Baptist Church, 576-
1404, 8459 Blountstown Highway
Maranatha Baptist, 386-8909, 2532 W.
Tharpe St., www.mbctal.org
North Florida Baptist, 385-7181, 3000
N. Meridian Road, www.nflchurch.com
BAPTIST
INDEPENDENT
Gospel Light Baptist Church, 222-
2232, 3415 Apalachee Parkway,
www.glbctallahassee.com
Providence Baptist Church, 574-4171
or 942-4816, 1901 Hillsborough St.
Southwood Baptist Church, 878-1117,
5177 Capital Circle SW, www.southwood-
baptist.com
BAPTIST
MISSIONARY
Bethel Missionary Baptist Church,
222-8440, 224 North Martin Luther King Jr.
Boulevard, www.betheltally.org
Gethsemane Missionary Baptist
Church, 877-3311, 302 Wallis St.
St. John Missionary Baptist Church,
576-7012, 835 Palm Beach St.
St. Johns Missionary Baptist, 942-
7551, 10770 Capitola Road
Spring Hill Missionary Baptist, 878-
5808, 3018 Hill Court
Tabernacle Missionary Baptist,
575-2739, 615 Tuskegee St., www.tmbcon-
line.com
BAPTIST PRIMITIVE
The Greater Saint Mark P.B. Church,
562-6447, 5820 N. Monroe St.
Macedonia Primitive Baptist Church,
222-7129, 1027 N Dewey St.
Mount Bethlehem Primitive Baptist
Church, 877-6606, 2130 Midyette Road
Mount Zion Primitive Baptist Church,
386-3994, 3115 North Meridian Road
Places of worship
TD-0000253141
Holy Eucharist, Sundays, 8:00 & 10:30 am
The Rev. Canon Ted J. Monica, Rector
The Rev. Teri A. Monica, Assistant Priest
2015 Fleischmann Road
Tallahassee, FL 32308 850-877-2712
holycomforterchurch@comcast.net holycomforteronline.org hhho ho hol oly hhhho hol oly
The mission of Holy Comforter Church is to
live out our faith by service to God and others.
HOLY COMFORTER EPISCOPAL CHURCH
!20 w. Pork Ave. - tumct.org

850.877.2650
1983 Mahan Drive (Corner of Mahan/Blairstone)
Visit us @ www.tfcn.org
'$#%%%%"!"&"%
Making Christ-Like Disciples in the Nations
Rev. Dave Pullen, Lead Pastor
Rev. Ashok Dhanarajan, Family Pastor of Kidz
Where HOPE
is Renewed
T
D
-
0
0
0
0
2
5
2
8
9
4
PEACE WORSHIP COMMUNITY PRAISE
Faith Directory
Hope Faith Community
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 63
Faith & Values Places of worship
Philadelphia Primitive Baptist
Church, 222-5549, 840 West Dunn St.
St. Rosa Primitive Baptist Church,
386-1011, 3148 Mission Road, www.stro-
sapbc.org
BAPTIST SOUTHERN
Aenon Baptist Church, 576-6911, 6073
Blountstown Highway
Antioch Baptist Church, 576-7315,
5605 Gum Road
Bradfordville First Baptist, 893-0893,
6494 Thomasville Road, www.b-fbc.org
Canopy Roads Baptist, 906-0047, 925
Bannerman Road, www.canopyroads.org
Celebration Baptist, 893-1709, 3300
Shamrock St. E., www.icelebration.org
City Church, 347-4100, 550 E. Tennessee
St., www.CityChurchTallahassee.com
Crossway Baptist Church, 877-5216, 405
Crossway Road, www.CrosswayBaptist-
Church.us
East Hill Baptist, 224-9911, 912 Miccosu-
kee Road, www.easthill.net
Faith Baptist, 877-7159, 3333 Apalachee
Parkway
Fellowship Baptist, 562-2040, 3705 N.
Monroe St., www.fellowshipbaptist.org
First Baptist Church of Tallahassee,
222-5470, 108 W. College Ave.,
www.fbctlh.org
First Baptist Woodville, 421-3315, 9500
Woodville Highway, www.firstbaptistwood-
ville.com
Immanuel Baptist, 878-1021, 2351
Mahan Drive, www.immanuelonline.com
Lake Bradford Baptist Church, 576-
2721, 3024 S. Lake Bradford Road
Lake Talquin Baptist, 576-4641, 21335
Blountstown Highway, ltbc@embarq-
mail.com
Lakeview Baptist Church, 222-5946,
222 W. Seventh Ave., www.Lakeview-
BaptistTallahassee.com
LIFEBASICS Church, 877-4141. Meeting
at Florida High School, 3000 School House
Rd. www.lifebasics.tv
Morningside Baptist, 878-5503, 1560
Pedrick Road, www.morningsidebc.org
Northwoods Baptist, 562-1188, 3762
Capital Circle N.W., www.sharethejoy.com
New Life Baptist, 877-2215, 3625
Woodville Highway, www.newlifeforall.org,
newlife@nettally.com
Seminole Baptist, 562-8069, 3330
Mission Road, www.the365church.com
Thomasville Road Baptist, 386-4288,
3131 Thomasville Road, www.thomas-
villeroad.org
Unity Baptist, 575-2288, 4219 Springhill
Road, www.myunitybaptist.com
Woodland Hills Community Church,
422-1919, 2720 Blair Stone Road, Suites F
and G, www.woodlandhillstallahassee.com
BUDDHIST
Cypress Tree Zen Group, 877-4663,
647 McDonnell Drive, www.webdhar-
ma.com/ctzg
Dhyana Sitting Group, 228-8805, 647
McDonnell Drive, www.tallahasseebudd-
histcommunity.org
Drikung Dzogchen Community,
524-2556, 647 McDonnell Drive
Pema Tallahassee, 274-4270, pematal-
li@gmail.com
Tallahassee Buddhist Community,
228-8805, 647 McDonnell Drive, www.tal-
lahasseebuddhistcommunity.org
Tallahassee Chan Group, 274-3996,
647 McDonnell Drive, www.tallahas-
seechan.com
Tallahassee Shambhala Meditation
Group, 270-7144, 647 McDonnell Drive,
www.tallahassee.shambhala.org
CATHOLIC
Blessed Sacrament Catholic, 222-1321,
624 Miccosukee Road, www.blessedsacra-
ment-parish.com
Co-Cathedral of St. Thomas More and
Catholic Student Center, 222-9630,
900 W. Tennessee St., www.cocathedral-
.com
Good Shepherd Catholic, 893-1837,
4665 Thomasville Road, www.goodshep-
herdparish.org
Immaculate Heart of Mary Tradition-
al Catholic Mission, 401 Timberlane
Road, 893-9090, www.ihmmission.word-
press.com
St. Eugene Catholic Chapel and
Student Center, 222-6482, 701 Gamble
St.
St. Louis Catholic, 562-5140, 3640 Fred
George Road, www.stlouis.ptdiocese.org
CHARISMATIC
Abundant Life Fellowship World
Outreach Center, 576-3593, 1110
Capital Circle N.E. Suite I, www.alfonline-
.org
Lifepoint Church, 219-8088, 1224
Pedrick Road, www.lifepointtallahassee-
.com
Christian Heritage, 562-3156, 2820
Sharer Road, www.chctoday.com
Faith Christian Center, 224-6322, 3361
Raymond Diehl Business Lane Road,
www.fcctally.com
Fresh Fire Worship Center, 350-2020,
102 Chapel Drive, www.freshfireworship-
.com
Restoration Life Church, 656-1219,
2302 Jim Lee Road, www.restoration-
placetallahassee.com
CHRISTIAN
Capital City Christian Church, 877-
7315, 6115 Mahan Drive, www.cap-
italcitychristianchurch.org
First Christian Church, 224-7329, 1319
High Road, www.fcctlh.org
Restoration Place, 727-7307, 3881 N.
Monroe St., www.MyRPT.org
CHRISTIAN
METHODIST
EPISCOPAL
Allen Temple CME Church, 574-1976,
849 Kissimmee St.
CHRISTIAN
MISSIONARY AND
ALLIANCE
Piedmont Park Alliance, 386-7157,
3210 Thomasville Road, www.piedmont-
parkalliance.org
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Church of Christ, Scientist,
385-1490, 122 N. Adams St.,
www.cschurchtallahassee.org
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Capital City Church of Christ, 224-
0914, 2002 Williams Rd., www.cap-
italcitycoc.org
Church of Christ, 422-3720, 4015
Centerville Road, www.centervilleroad.com
Church of Christ, 878-0085, 916 Paul
Russell Road
Meridian Woods Church of Christ,
422-3657, 2870 N. Meridian Road,
www.meridianwoods.org
Temple Israel Rabbi Jack Romberg reads from the prayer book
during the opening day of Sukkot. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
TD-0000252614
discover
2351 Mahan Dr.
878-1021 www.immanuelonline.com
Sunday Worship
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9:15 am Contemporary 10:45 am Traditional 11:59 am Contemporary
64 Living Here | 2014-2015
Faith & Values Places of worship
Timberlane Church of Christ, 893-
6469, 3569 Timberlane School Road,
www.timberlane-coc.org
CHURCH OF GOD
IN CHRIST
Life Changers Church of God in
Christ, 656-3940, 601 Miccosukee Road,
www.lifechangerscogic.org
Life Deliverance Ministries, 671-2982,
3377 Jim Lee Road, www.lifedeliverance-
ministries.org
First Mission Christ Temple, C.O.G.I.C,
510-7820, 419 W Carolina St., www.first-
missioncogic.com
New Harvest Christian Center Church
of God in Christ, 421-6422, 6205
Woodville Highway
Powerhouse Church of God In Christ,
583-1758, 454 Belair Drive, www.power-
housecogic.biz
Prayer Temple, 574-4206, 1936 Saxon
St.
Watson Temple Institutional Church
of God in Christ, 224-0646, 665 W.
Brevard St., www.watsontemple.org
CHURCH OF GOD
OF PROPHECY
Church of God of Prophecy, 222-5611,
1221 Dade St., dscogop1221@embarq-
mail.com
CHURCH OF JESUS
CHRIST OF
LATTER-DAY SAINTS
Church Of Jesus Christ of Latter- Day
Saints, Mission offices, 893-4243, 1535
Killearn Center Blvd
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-
day Saints, STAKE offices, 224-2289, 312
Stadium Drive
Institute (for college-age religious
instruction and activities), 224-5744, 314
Stadium Drive, www.ldsces.org/iws1/
index.aspx?p=60164
Crawfordville Chapel, 926-7090, 3251
Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville
Thomasville Road Chapel, 893-5563,
3717 Thomasville Road Tallahassee,
Madison Branch, 971-2133, 1374 W Base
St., Madison
Quincy Branch, (Spanish Speaking),
627-6342, S.Roberts St. Quincy; Thom-
asville Ward, 229-226-0957, 807 Reming-
ton Ave, Thomasville, Ga.
EPISCOPAL
Chapel of the Resurrection at the
Episcopal University Center, 222-
4053, 655 W. Jefferson St. www.rugehal-
l.org
Church of the Advent, 386-5109, 815
Piedmont Drive, www.advent-church.org
Holy Comforter Episcopal, 877-2712,
2015 Fleischmann Road, www.holycom-
forteronline.org
St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal Church,
562-1595, 3413 Old Bainbridge Road
St. Johns Episcopal, 222-2636, 211 N.
Monroe St., www.saint-john.org
St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal
Church, 681-0844, 1405 Melvin St.,
www.stmichaelandallangels.org
EVANGELICAL FREE
Four Oaks Community Church, 385-
0004, 4500 W. Shannon Lakes Drive, Suite
12, www.fouroakschurch.com
EVANGELICAL
PRESBYTERIAN
Blessed Hope of the Living God,
559-0918, 1455 Woodville Highway, St.
Marks
Covenant Church, 385-2512, 2221 Old
Bainbridge Road, www.covenant-tlh.org
Hope Evangelical Presbyterian
Church, 216-1234, 4680 Thomasville Road
FREEWILL BAPTIST
Jacob Freewill Baptist Church, 574-
3150, 2333 Lake Bradford Road, Jacob-
chapel.org
FOURSQUARE GOSPEL
Abundant Life Foursquare Church,
877-6360, 3721 Crawfordville Road
GREEK ORTHODOX
Holy Mother of God Greek Orthodox
Church, 878-0747, 1645 Phillips Road,
www.hmog.org
HEBRAIC
Lion of Judah Hebraic Christian
Congregation, 566-2436, 2809 Sharer
Road, www.lionofjudahtallahassee.com
HINDU
Gujarati Samaj Hindu Temple, 877-
8823, 9100 Apalachee Parkway
HOLINESS
First Church of the Nazarene, 877-
2650, 1983 Mahan Drive, Tallahassee,
www.tfcn.org
True Fellowship Holiness Church,
222-7104, 123 FAMU Way
INDEPENDENT
Bible Believers Fellowship, 576-5698,
6341 Blountstown Highway,
www.bbfchurch.com
Faith Christian Family Center, 671-
5755, 310 Laura Lee Ave
Trinity Revival Church, 321-2635, 3626
Apalachee Parkway, www.trinityrevival.org
ISLAMIC
Islamic Center Al-Ansar, 681-9022,
1020 W. Pensacola St., www.ictallahassee-
.org
Islamic Center Al-Furqan, 514-0100,
3617 Old Bainbridge Road, www.ictalla-
hassee.org
JEHOVAHS WITNESS
Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witnesses
Astoria Park, 386-4255, 2641 Old
Bainbridge Road, www.jw.org
Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witnesses
Arbor Hill, 893-7478, 2991 Raymond
Diehl Road, www.jw.org
Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witnesses
SouthWood, 878-2084, 4750 Capital
Circle S.E., www.jw.org
Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witnesses
West, 575-3038, 4010 W. Orange Ave.,
www.jw.org
JUDAISM
Chabad Lubavitch of the Panhandle/
Tallahassee, 523-9294, 2601 N. Meridian
Road, www.chabadtallahassee.com
Congregation Shomrei Torah, 893-
9674, 4858 Kerry Forest Parkway,
www.shomreitorahonline.org
Hillel at FSU Foundation Jewish
Student Center, 222-5454, 843 W.
Pensacola St., www.hillelatfsu.org
Temple Israel Reform, 877-3517,
2215 Mahan Drive, www.templeisraeltl-
h.org
LUTHERAN
Epiphany Lutheran Church and
School, 385-7373, 8300 Deerlake Road
W, www.epiphanystar.org
Faith Lutheran Church, 383-1125, 2901
Kerry Forest Parkway, www.faithluth-
erantallahassee.com
Grace Lutheran Church (ELCA), 877-
5423, 2919 Miccosukee Road, www.glctal-
ly.org
St. Stephen Lutheran Church (ELCA),
385-2728, 2198 N. Meridian Road,
www.st-stephen-lutheran.net
University Lutheran Church and
Student Center, 224-6059, 925 W.
Jefferson St., www.universitylutheranchur-
ch.org
MESSIANIC JUDAISM
Tikvat Ami Messianic Synagogue,
364-8925, 3324 N. Monroe St., www.sha-
lomnorthflorida.org
METHODIST
Bethel United Methodist Church,
576-1454, 1470 Bethel Church Road,
www.bethelumctlh.com
Calvary United Methodist Church,
576-3124, 218 Ausley Road, cumc@my-
way.com
Chaires United Methodist Church,
219-9361, 9243 Parkhill Road, www.chai-
resumc.org
Deer Lake United Methodist, 668-
0314, 8013 E. Deerlake Road S., www.deer-
lakeumc.org
Good Samaritan United Methodist
Church, 893-4919, 3720 Capital Circle SE,
www.goodsamaritantallahassee.org
Gray Memorial United Methodist,
385-6441, 2201 Old Bainbridge Road,
www.graymemorialumc.org
John Wesley United Methodist
Church, 877-1738, 1689 Old St. Augustine
Road, www.johnwesleyumc.com
Killearn United Methodist, 893-1116,
2800 Shamrock St. S., www.kumconline-
.org
Lake Jackson United Methodist
Church, 562-1759, 4423 N. Monroe St.,
www.lakejacksonumc.org
Pisgah United Methodist, 668-4777,
7000 Pisgah Church Road, www.pis-
gahumc.org
St. Pauls United Methodist, 385-5146,
1700 N. Meridian Road, www.saint-
paulsumc.org
Tallahassee Heights United Method-
ist, 877-6276, 3004 Mahan Drive,
www.heightsumc.com
Trinity United Methodist, 222-1120,
120 W. Park Ave., www.tumct.org
Wesley Foundation, 222-0251, 705 W.
Jefferson St., www.fsuwesley.com
Woodville United Methodist, 421-
7205, 10322 Old Woodville Road, Wood-
ville
METROPOLITAN
COMMUNITY
Gentle Shepherd Metropolitan
Community Church, 878-3001, 4738
Thomasville Road, www.gentleshe-
pherdmcc.com
MISSIONARY
Restoration and Refuge Center,
561-3900, 202 Hazelwood Road, ref-
ugestore@embarqmail.com; Tallahassee
Mission, 893-4243, 1535 Killearn Center
Blvd
Wherever you are on your spiritual journey,
St. Johns welcomes you!
How does a church family show Gods love in action?
Meaningful worship
A lively parish life
Outreach to community
Glorious music
Care during crisis
A foundation for children and youth
See how were right for you:
www.saint-john.org
St. Johns Episcopal Church
211 North Monroe Street
Tallahassee, FL 32301
850-222-2636
'%$&&&&"!"#&!
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 65
Faith & Values Places of worship
PAGAN
Red Hills Pagan Council, 212-0145,
2415 North Monroe St., Suite 2064,
www.redhillspagans.org
PENTECOSTAL
Faith Chapel Pentecostal, 385-8074,
108 Henderson Road,
www.faithchapelchurch.org
Warehouse of Worship, 443-7535, 32 E.
Washington St., Chattahoochee
PENTECOSTAL
HOLINESS
Anointed Tabernacle of Praise Minis-
tries Inc., 562-6401, 2312 Apalachee
Parkway
Praise Cathedral Pentecostal Holi-
ness, 562-3018, 3206 Capital Circle N.W.
Christian Life Fellowship, 385-6111,
3608 Centerville Road, www.christianlife-
fellowship.tv
Greater Praise Temple of Truth,
893-4875, 4377 Crawfordville Road,
www.greaterpraisetot.com
PRESBYTERIAN
Calvary Orthodox Presbyterian,
222-8553, 814 N. Gadsden St., www.calva-
ryopc.net
CenterPoint Church (PCA), 222-4884,
1212 S. Monroe St., www.cptchurch.com
Christ Presbyterian, 893-7472, 2317
Bannerman Road, www.cpcusa.org
Cornerstone Presbyterian, 668-9504,
2904 Kerry Forest Parkway, www.corner-
stonetlh.org
Covenant Presbyterian Church,
385-2512, 2221 Old Bainbridge Road,
www.covenant-tlh.org
Faith Presbyterian, 385-6151, 2200 N.
Meridian Road, www.faithpcusa.org
Fellowship Presbyterian, 893-0617,
3158 Shamrock St. S., www.fellowshipp-
c.org
First Presbyterian, 222-4587, 110 N.
Adams St., www.oldfirstchurch.org
Lafayette Presbyterian, 877-4428,
4220 Mahan Drive, www.l-p-c.net
Presbyterian University Center,
222-6320, 548 W. Park Ave., www.pucf-
su.com
Tallahassee Korean Church, 228-1414,
2800 Shamrock St. S., www.tkoreanchur-
ch.org
Trinity United Presbyterian, 576-2320,
620 Gore Ave.
Westminister Presbyterian Church
(PCA), 894-4233, 4501 Centerville Road,
www.wpctlh.org
Wildwood Presbyterian, 894-1400, 100
Ox Bottom Road, www.wildwoodchurchon-
line.org, info@wildwoodchurchonline.org
SALVATION ARMY
The Salvation Army Church, 222-0304,
2410 Allen Road, uss.salvationarmy.org
SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST
Ohana Ministries, 566-8194, 1126
Central St.
Tallahassee First Seventh-day Ad-
ventist Church, 877-9901, 618 Capital
Circle N.E., tallahasseefirstsda.org
TAOIST
Fung Loy Kok Institute of Taoism,
224-5438, 2100 Thomasville Road,
www.taoist.org
UNITARIAN
Unitarian Universalist Church of
Tallahassee, 385-5115, 2810 N. Meridian
Road, www.uutallahassee.org
UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
United Church in Tallahassee, 878-
7385, 1834 Mahan Drive, www.uctonline-
.org
UNITED PENTECOSTAL
Souls Port, 877-7900, 9301 Mahan
Drive, www.souls-port.org
UNITY
Unity Eastside, 656-1678, 8551 Buck
Lake Road, www.unity-eastside.org
Unity of Tallahassee, 562-5744, 2850
Unity Lane, www.unityoftallahassee.org
VARIOUS
DENOMINATIONS/
NON-DENOMINATIONAL
Abundant Living Faith Ministry,
671-4390, 4213 Woodville Highway,
www.alfmonline.org
Agape Covenant Fellowship Church
Inc., 536-0777, 3471 N. Monroe St.,
www.agapecovenant.org
Aglow International Tallahassee
Community Lighthouse. Meets every
fourth Saturday. 2055 Thomasville Road,
CMoore@cpservices.net
ALARM International, 216-1800, 367
Marpan Lane, www.alarmministries.org
Bahai Center, 219-2111, 1310 Cross
Creek Road
Calvary Chapel, 514-1929, 8614 Mahan
Drive, www.calvarytlh.com
Celebrate New Life Tabernacle,
671-4519, 3050 Agape Lane, www.cnlt.org
Chosen Generation Worship Center,
224-8303, 2025 S. Adams St., chosengen-
erationworshipcenter@yahoo.com
Community of Christ, 668-0826, 400
Timberlane Road, www.cofchrist.org
Destiny Church of God International,
524-0617, 310 Blount St., Suite 109
Ebernezer Outreach Ministries Inc.,
2729 W. Pensacola St., pconeil6@com-
cast.net
Eckankar Florida Satsang Society,
894-3706, 3602 Bellingrade Court
Element 3 Church, 309-0980, 1184
Capital Circle N.E. Unit E, www.ele-
ment3.org
Every Nation Tallahassee, 205-0140,
2555 N. Monroe St., www.everynationtalla-
hassee.com
Family Worship and Praise Center,
656-9378, 1609 Branch St.
Fellowship @ Midway Church, 702-
0700, 32319 Blue Star Highway, Midway,
www.fellowshipmidway.com
Genesis Church, 942-5433, 4070 Mission
Road, www.genesischurch.tv
Grace Church of Tallahassee, 224-
9606, 731 N. Gadsden St,, www.gcot.org
Grace Covenant Church Interna-
tional, 575-9700, 1560 Capital Circle
N.W., www.gracecci.com
Greater Praise Temple of Truth,
893-4875, 4377-C Crawfordville Road,
www.greaterpraisetot.com
Greater Works Outreach Ministries,
224-8303, 2025 S. Adams St., great-
erworksoutreachministries@yahoo.com
Hare Krishna Temple, 224-3803, 1321
Nylic St.
International House of Prayer Talla-
hassee, 906-9170, 2555 N. Monroe St.,
www.ihoptallahassee.org
Kingdom Word Ministries, 2934 Royal
Oaks Drive
Lifepoint Church, 219-8088, 1224
Pedrick Road, www.thelifepointchurch.org
The Lighthouse Praise and Worship
Center, 877-5306, 1160 Capital Circle
S.E., www.lmin.org/lpwc_tallahassee__fl
Living Stones International, 765-0320,
604 Eugenia St., www.welivingstones.org
Love And Faith Community Church,
878-4930, 1410 East Indian Head Drive,
www.thelfcc.org
New Covenant Church, 561-1001, 548
Bradford Road
New Hope International Outreach
Ministries, 219-9950, 3426 Crawfordville
Road, www.newhopeiom.com
New Life Deliverance Ministries,
574-3400, 2710 Country Club Drive;
229-243-0075, 115 Lynnwood Drive,
Bainbridge, Ga., www.familylobby.com/
newlifedeliveranceministries
New Life International Outreach
Center, 386-6129, 2633 Hartsfield Road,
www.newlifetv.com
Restoration and Praise Christian
Fellowship Center, 656-1265, 1098 Paul
Russell Road, www.restorationand-
praise.org
Restoration Life Church and Outreach
Center, 656-1219, 2302 Jim Lee Road,
www.restorationlife.net
Science of Mind Tallahassee Commu-
nity for Spiritual Living, 574-1037,
Abundance Wellness Center, 325 John
Knox Road
Tallahassee Korean Baptist, 942-1018,
4225 Crawfordville Road, www.etkbc.org
Trinity Community Church, 893-5303,
2285 Bannerman Road, www.trinitytalla-
hassee.com
True Wisdom New Hope Ministries
International, Development Center,
504-0730, 1477 Capital Circle N.W.,
twnhmidc@yahoo.com
Turning Point International Church,
350-0218, 6866 Blountstown Highway
Woodland Hills Community Church,
422-1919, 2720 S. Blair Stone Road, Units
F and G, www.woodlandhillstallahassee-
.com
were here for you!
Sundays
9:00
AM
10:00
AM
11:15
AM
Traditional
Worship Service
Bible Study
for all ages
Contemporary
Worship Service
Wednesdays
There is something for everyone
preschoolers to senior adultsat
FBCTLH on Wednesday nights. The
schedule changes occasionally, but
the excitement lasts all year! For a
detailed schedule each week, please
visit fbctlh.org/wednesday.
66 Living Here | 2014-2015
IN THIS SECTION
Introduction
Helping organizations and services
Social service and
special interest groups
Resources for seniors
Community
Big Brothers Big Sisters CEO
Louis Garcia is passionate
about helping children. MIKE
EWEN/DEMOCRAT
ONLINE
See video on community
at TLHlivinghere.com
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 67
Community Nonprofits and volunteers
Nonprofits this year have more places to turn for resources
and residents eager to volunteer.
The Institute for Nonprofit Innovation and Excellence
opened on June 24 as a one-stop center to serve nonprofits. It
offers a menu of tools previously out of reach for 700 to 800 Big
Bend-based nonprofits, from the large, more established groups
to small mom-and-pop operations.
Leadership Tallahassee launched an in-
novative web-based program LeaderBoard
that matches nonprofits with potential board
members based on experience and interest.
Advocates say collaboration is the name of
the game for many nonprofits. Several, such as
The Shelter, Renaissance Community Center
and HOPE Community, modified their missions
to better serve the homeless in preparation for
the Comprehensive Emergency Services Center
slated to open early next year.
Other nonprofits are teaming up for joint
grants and pool resources to better serve, for example, children
and senior citizens.
None of us can do this work by ourselves in silos, said
Heather Mitchell, president and CEO of the United Way of the
Big Bend.
The Institute for Nonprofit Innovation and Excellence is
located on the third floor of the former Mary Brogan Museum of
Arts and Sciences at Kleman Plaza. Rather than competing, its
meant to complement programs already in place in Tallahassee.
The United Way is the funding lifeline for its certified agen-
cies. In addition, United Partners for Human Services is an ad-
vocacy voice and resource. Leadership Tallahassee puts on
nonprofit-focused training seminars, such as Building Better
Boards.
I think that its going to provide a lot of opportunities for
nonprofits across the board, Mitchell said of the Institute.
TaMaryn Waters reports on nonprofits, local government, restaurants and more.
Her favorite thing about living in Tallahassee: No snow, good eats and short drives
to the beach.
RESOURCES FOR NONPROFITS
AND VOLUNTEERS
Institute for Nonprofit Innovation and Excellence a new
one-stop nonprofit resource that launched in June. For details, visit
www.theinstitutefornonprofits.org.
Building Better Boards A training seminar designed by Leader-
ship Tallahassee for novice and veteran nonprofit board members
and staff, as well as agency professionals. Training topics range from
fundraising tips and legal obligations to governance and strategic
planning. Learn more at leadershiptallahassee.com/events/building-
better-boards or call 224-8116.
LeaderBoard If youre interested in serving as a board member
and dont know where to turn, LeaderBoard allows you to set up a
profile indicating interest. Nonprofits focusing on everything from
the environment to arts to human services can then set up profiles to
find those residents. To sign up, visit LeadershipTallahassee.com, and
click on the LeaderBoard banner at the bottom left.
The United Way's Heather Mitchell thanks local organizations
for volunteer hours and dollars. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
New efforts geared
toward nonprofits
TaMaryn
Waters
Democrat staff
writer
VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR
Volunteer of the Year is one of the Tallahassee Democrats
premier events, and we ask the public to nominate the organiza-
tions and people who volunteer their time and effort to make
our community great. The 2015
event will be held in early May.
There are seven categories for
nominations: business/government
agency, health/wellness, nonprofit
organization, social/civic services,
education, arts and student. Any-
one who contributes of their time
and energy to helping others in
any way can be nominated.
The Tallahassee Democrat also
donates $300 to a local charitable
cause or organization in the names
of each of the top finalists in eight
of the nine categories. Recipients
of these donations are announced
at the annual luncheon.
Individual nominees will also be
eligible for the prestigious Jef-
ferson Awards for Public Service. Started in 1973 by Jacqueline
Kennedy Onassis, U.S. Senator Robert Taft Jr. and Sam Beard, the
award recognizes outstanding volunteer and public service by
individuals around the country and culminates in a two-day, all
expense paid trip to Washington D.C., where individuals are
recognized at an evening banquet. You can learn more at
www.jeffersonawards.org.
Nathan Ballentine with
mother Sue Wiley after
winning the local Jefferson
award. DEMOCRAT FILES
TD-0000252617
The Tallahassee
Senior Center
Celebrates Active Living
Visit us at
1400 North Monroe Street
850-891-4000
at talgov.com/seniors or on Facebook

Learning Recreation
Fitness Travel Wellness
68 Living Here | 2014-2015
Community Organizations
KIDS AND FAMILIES
Boys & Girls Clubs of the Big Bend: Offers safe,
affordable, structured after-school programs for children
ages 5-18. 656-8100, www.bgcbb.org.
Capital Region YMCA: Promotes youth devel-
opment, healthy living and social responsibility through
recreational programs. 2001 Apalachee Parkway,
877-6151, www.capitalregionymca.org.
Capital City Youth Services: Operates an emergen-
cy shelter for runaway, homeless, abused and youth in
crisis, ages 10 to 17; family counseling and other
services to school-age youth in crisis and their families;
and Project Safe Place, a national outreach program.
576-6000, www.ccys.org.
Childrens Home Society of Florida: Programs
include adoption, foster care, counseling, residential
transitional and independent living. 1801 Miccosukee
Commons Drive. 921-0772. www.chsfl.org/NorthCen-
tral.
Daughters & Sons of Destiny Outreach Minis-
tries: Religious organization established to help
hurting individuals, individuals who are homeless and
ex-offenders. 8430 Black Jack Road, 524-0617,
www.daughterofdestinywvp.webs.com.
Family Learning Center: Under the umbrella of
Literacy Volunteers of Leon County Inc., whose mission
is to promote and increase literacy through volunteers.
200 W. Park Ave. 606-2644. www.literacyvolunteersle-
on.org.
Girl Scouts of the Florida Panhandle: Nonprofit
organization aims to build girls of courage, confidence
and character. 250 Pinewood Drive. 386-2131,
www.gscfp.org.
Live the Life: Works with children and adults and
through coaching, counseling, classes and retreats,
improves relationships and keep families together.
668-3700, www.livethelife.org.
Leon County 4-H: Helping youth ages 5-18 develop
the skills to become productive citizens. Promotes
activities that encourage positive values, social respon-
sibility and community involvement. 615 Paul Russell
Road. 606-5200, leon.ifas.ufl.edu.
Lutheran Social Services of North Florida:
Develops, funds, implements and administers programs
to address the unmet needs of the low-income resi-
dents. 606 W. Fourth Ave. 575-2868, www. lssnf.org.
National Center for Missing and Exploited
Children: Provides services nationwide for families and
professionals in the prevention of abducted, en-
dangered and sexually exploited children. 24-hour
hotline, 800-843-5678, www.missingkids.com.
Tallahassee/Leon County Human Services
Center: Specific divisions of support groups for parents
and adolescents. 918 Railroad Ave. 606-1900.
Tallahassee 25: Organization of young professionals
who help local children. www.tallahassee25.org.
LITERACY
Capital Area Community Action Agency: Pro-
grams include job training and placement, trans-
portation, information and referral and senior services.
309 Office Plaza Drive, 222-2043, www.cacaainc.org.
Literacy Volunteers of Leon County: Enables
trained volunteers to work one-on-one with adults,
helping them learn how to read and write or speak
English. 606-2644, www.literacyvolunteersleon.org.
SEXUAL ORIENTATION
The Family Tree Community Center: A resource
for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered people in
Tallahassee. 222-8555, www.familytreecenter.org.
Gentle Shepherd Metropolitan Community
Church: An inclusive, Protestant church, welcoming
people of any sexual orientation, and rooted in the
LGBT community. 4738 Thomasville Road, 878-3001,
www.gentleshepherdmcc.com.
Safe Zone: Helps identify allies of LGBT people in the
community. Participants display the Safe Zone symbol
(a pink triangle in a green circle). 644-4850, www.safe-
zone.fsu.edu.
VOLUNTEERS
Center for Leadership and Social Change :
Provides community service opportunities for students
and faculty and collaborates on community improve-
ment projects. 644-3342, www.fsu.edu/~service.
Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of North
Florida: A nonprofit organization representing re-
turned Peace Corps volunteers. www.rpcvsf.org.
Road to Recovery: Provides volunteer drivers to
transport cancer patients to and from life-saving cancer
treatments. 1-800-227-2345.
VolunteerLEON: To strengthen individuals and
organizations through volunteerism. 918 Railroad Ave.
606-1970, www.VolunteerLEON.org.
Volunteer Florida: Strengthening Floridas communi-
ties through volunteerism and service. 3800 Esplanade
Way. 414-7400, www.volunteerflorida.org.
WOMENS RESOURCES
Refuge House: Offers domestic violence and sexual
assault emergency services, counseling, safety planning
and advocacy services.Emergency shelter and rape crisis
response. 24-hour hotline, 681-2111. Toll free, 800-500-
1119. www.refugehouse.com.
OTHER RESOURCES
Celebrate Recovery: A God-centered, 12-step
program focused on recovery and healing. 2800
Shamrock S. 893-1116. www.kumconline.org/Minis-
tries_Outreach.cfm.
The Compassionate Friends of Tallahassee: A
nonprofit organization that supports families after the
death of a child. 2198 N. Meridian Road. 422-8404,
www.compassionatefriends.org.
Florida Commission for the Transportation
Disadvantaged: Helps disadvantaged people with
transportation information. 2740 Centerview Drive.
410-5700, 1-800-983-2435. www.dot.state.fl.us/ctd.
Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD): To stop
drunk driving, support its victims and prevent underage
drinking. 681-0061, 877-623-3435. www.madd.org/fl.
NID-Housing Counseling Services: HUD-approved
agency for providing services, with no charge, for those
threatened with foreclosure, in foreclosure, problems
with mortgage payments and/or credit. 128 N. Bro-
nough St., 222-1087, makinghomesaffordable.org.
Support groups and
help organizations
AFFINITY
The Faculty & Friends Club of Florida State University:
For faculty, administrative, professional and support staff,
retired faculty and families to meet and exchange ideas.
893-1272.
Tallahassee Amateur Radio Society: For anyone interested
in radio communications. www.K4TLH.net.
Tallahassee Freethinkers Forum: Meets each Tuesday to
discuss religion, philosophy, science, politics and current events.
997-5307, www.uutallahassee.org/calendar.
Tallahassee Old Timers Club: Mostly retired professional
citizens, interested in the Tallahassee areas present, past and
future. 599-5464, 545-6858, dapfarms@comcast.net.
Tallahassee ParrotHead Club: Nonprofit organization for
those who enjoy the music of Jimmy Buffett, donating services
to the community. www.tallahasseeparrotheadclub.com.
Tallahassee Seminole Club: For alumni and friends of FSU.
www.tallahasseeseminoleclub.com.
Taoist Tai Chi Society: According to Taoist teachings body
and mind cannot be separated. 224-5438, www.Taoist.org.
CIVIC
Citizens For Responsible Government/Tallahassee:
Nonpartisan political action group focusing on political issues
and candidates. citizensforresponsiblegovernmenttallahassee-
.webs.com.
Democratic Club of North Florida: Meets on the third
Monday to socialize and listen to speakers.
www.dcnf.blogspot.com, 385-6504.
League of Women Voters of Tallahassee: Nonpartisan
political organization encouraging the informed and active
participation of citizens. 219-9966, lwvtallahassee.org.
Springtime Tallahassee: Dedicated to the promotion of
Tallahassee. Sponsors community celebrations. 224-5012,
www.springtimetallahassee.com.
The Village Square: A nonprofit devoted to discourse across
the partisan divide. www.tallahassee.tothevillagesquare.org,
264-8785.
Holli Baer hugs volunteer Keith Vergeson at
the Chelsea House, a transitional home for
women in need. DEMOCRAT FILES
Social, service
and special
interest clubs
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 69
Community Organizations
COLLECTING
Tallahassee Stamp & Cover Club:
Promotes stamp and cover collecting.
284-4712, 385-1060. www.tsandcc.info.
Tally Town Collectors Club: Local
Hallmark Christmas ornament club.
jag0370@comcast.net, 566-8077.
CULTURE & HERITAGE
Alliance Francais of Tallahassee :
Offers French classes and cultural events.
www.aftally.org, 391-8309.
Asian Coalition of Tallahassee: Aims to
heighten awareness and understanding of
Asian cultures. www.asiantlh.org, 219-
9799 or 339-2699.
Capital Italian American Organiza-
tion (CIAO!): Monthly family-friendly
events and more. www.ciaotally.com
Chabad Lubavitch of the Panhandle:
Provides Jewish services to all Jewish
people. www.chabadtallahassee.com,
523-9294.
Civil War Civilians Society: Opportuni-
ties to participate in Civil War era living
history events. Facebook.com/CWCSociety.
Daughters of the American Revolu-
tion, Caroline Brevard Chapter: For
female descendants of ancestors who
served the American cause during the
Revolutionary War. www.fssdarchap-
ters.org/carolinebrevard.
Daughters of the American Revolu-
tion, Fort San Luis Chapter: Women
who trace their ancestors to those who
served the American cause in the American
Revolution. 385-9655, www.fortsanluis-
dar.org.
Daughters of 1812, Treaty of Ghent
Chapter: A volunteer womens service
organization dedicated to promoting
patriotism and preserving history of the
American people.
www.usdaughters1812.org.
Falun Dafa Practitioners Association
of Florida: A traditional Chinese qigong
practice. Falundafa-florida.org, 847-1918.
Florida Society of Mayflower De-
scendants: Men and women who trace
their ancestors to passengers of the
Mayflower in 1620. flmayflower.com.
Haitian Cultural Club of Tallahassee:
Residents united in their interest in the
culture of Haiti. haitiancc.weebly.com,
239-304-6871, 754-422-3583.
India Association of Tallahassee: A
nonprofit organization devoted to promot-
ing the activities of people from India.
www.iatlh.org.
Italian-American Club of Tallahassee:
Aims to preserve Italian heritage and
promote Italian culture. italamerclub-
.webs.com.
Jewish Genealogical Society of
Tallahassee: Meets quarterly at Temple
Israel, assists members searching for
ancestors. www.jgst.org.
North Florida Hispanic Association:
Seeks to keep the Spanish-speaking culture
alive in this community. www.tnfha.org,
216-6049.
St. Andrews Society of Tallahassee:
Honors contributions made by Scots and
Ulster Scots. www.saintandrewtallahassee-
.org.
The Taiwanese American Association
of Tallahassee: Encourages members of
the local Taiwanese community to interact.
443-1613, taiwanhaung@hotmail.com.
Tallahassee Genealogy Society:
Meetings to share and promote family
history research methods. www.talgensoc-
.com, 566-8479.
Tallahassee Tamil Sangam: Cultural
events and programs that promote Tamil,
the ancient language of India. sites.goo-
gle.com/site/tallahasseetamilsangam.
FINE ART, LITERATURE
& CRAFTS
American Sewing Guild, Tallahassee
Chapter: People who believe sewing is a
rewarding and creative activity. All levels of
skill welcome. sewingaroundthebend.org.
Canopy Oaks Chapter of the Embroi-
derers Guild of America: www.geoc-
ities.com/nonprof01/SR_EGA/chaps/
canopy.html.
Magnolia Decorative Painters: Meet-
ings are the third Saturday of every month.
893-4616, home.comcast.net/~rbfisher1.
Quilters Unlimited of Tallahassee:
www.quilttallahassee.com.
Seven Hills Handweavers Guild: Meets
2 p.m. on second Sunday of each month .
sevenhillshandweavers.org.
Tallahassee Polymer Clay Art Guild:
Meets at 1 p.m. on the first Sunday of the
month. www.polymerclayart.org.
Tallahassee Writers Association :
Meets third Thursdays at the American
Legion Hall at Lake Ella. www.twaonline-
.org.
GAMES
Game Tally: An organization for game
players of all ages. www.facebook.com/
GameTally.
Tallahassee Duplicate Bridge Club: A
friendly group that enjoys a competitive
bridge game. 296-ACES, www.tdbc.info.
HISTORY & SCIENCE
Center for Inquiry, Tallahassee:
Sponsors monthly talks on science and
religion. 229-221-0338,
www.centerforinquiry.net/tally.
Panhandle Archaeological Society of
Tallahassee: Monthly talks about archae-
ology. sites.google.com/site/panhandlear-
cheologyevents.
Tallahassee Astronomical Society: TAS
produces a monthly free planetarium show
and holds sidewalk astronomy. 980-0887,
www.stargazers.org.
Tallahassee Historical Society: Explores
the history of Tallahassee, the Big Bend and
Florida. Meetings at 7 p.m. and take place
on second Thursdays, October through
May, at the Governor Martin House.
Tallahassee Trust for Historic Preser-
vation: Organization supporting historic
preservation. 423 E. Virginia St. 488-7334,
www.taltrust.org.
MENTAL PURSUITS
Tallahassee Mensa: Local chapter of
Mensa, the society for those who rejoice in
the exercise of the mind. www.tallahas-
see.us.mensa.org.
MILITARY
American Legion Auxiliary Sauls-
Bridges Unit 13: Advocates for veterans,
mentors youth and promotes patriotism.
391-0445. www.alaunit13.com.
Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3308:
Meetings at 7 p.m. on first and third
Wednesdays at 2769 W. Tennessee St.
post3308@flvfw.org.
PARANORMAL
Big Bend Ghost Trackers: Investigates
reported hauntings in the Big Bend and
Southeast. 508-8109, www.bigbendghost-
trackers.com.
PROFESSIONALS
Business and Professional Women/
Tallahassee: Members have opportunities
for community service, mentoring and
networking. www.bpwtallahassee.com.
Tallahassee Network of Young
Professionals: Connecting members
through fun activities while offering career
enhancing opportunities. 508-4408,
www.TallahasseeNYP.com.
SERVICE CLUBS
Benevolent and Protective Order of
Elks: To support veterans and youth and to
serve the community. 877-1652, www.Tal-
lahasseeElks.org.
Pilot Club of Tallahassee: Spearheads
efforts in the areas of brain disorders,
including Alzheimers disease. 294-1188,
www.tallahasseepilot.org.
TECHNOLOGY
Tallahassee Apple Computer User
Group (T-Apple): Meetings at 7 p.m. on
second Thursdays at Gabrielle Consulting
Center. www.tapple.org.
WOMENS CLUBS
GFWC Womans Club of Tallahassee:
Meets for lunch and program on the
second Thursday of each month. 224-0825,
www.gfwcwomanscluboftallahassee.org.
Junior League of Tallahassee: A
nonprofit organization of women commit-
ted to improving the lives of children and
families. 224-9161, www.jltallahassee.org.
Junior Womans Club of Midtown: A
volunteer organization with a mission to
enrich lives and connect our community.
224-2300, www.gfwcmidtownjuniors.org.
Tallahassee Womens Newcomers
Club: New and longtime residents wel-
come. 668-1462, 668-0884. www.tallahas-
seenewcomers.com.
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(850) 878-1136
4449 Meandering Way
Tallahassee, FL 32308
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70 Living Here | 2014-2015
Community Special Needs / Seniors
Ability1st, the Center for Independent Living
of North Florida: A community-based nonprofit
that provides services to persons with disabilities in
Leon, Jefferson, Madison, Taylor, Gadsden, and
Wakulla counties. 1823 Buford Court, 575-9621,
www.ability1st.info.
The Able Trust/The Florida Governors Alliance
for Employment of Citizens With Disabilities:
Supports on-the-job coaching, supported employ-
ment, job skills training. 3320 Thomasville Road,
224-4493, Voice/TDD 888-838-ABLE, www.abletrus-
t.org.
Agency for Persons with Disabilities: Assists in
helping people who have developmental disabilities.
4030 Esplanade Way, 488-4257, www.apd.myflori-
da.com.
The ARC of Florida: Advocacy organization for
rights and freedoms of people with developmental
disabilities. 2898 Mahan Drive, 921-0460, www.ARC-
Florida.org.
Disability Rights Florida: A nonprofit organization
providing protection and advocacy services. 2728
Centerview Drive, TDD 800-346-4127, 800-342-
0823, 850-488-9071, www.disabilityrightsflorida.org.
FSUs Autism Institute: Provides services to
autistic individuals and their families. 1940 N.
Monroe Street Suite 72, 644-4367, www.autism.f-
su.edu.
Childrens Home Society of Florida: Provides
early intervention screenings for infants and toddlers
with disabilities. 1801 Miccosukee Commons Drive,
www.chsfl.org/northcentral, 921-0772.
Childrens Medical Services: Offers medical
services for children from birth to age 21 with special
health-care needs. 2390 Phillips Road, 487-2604,
www.www.cms-kids.com/index.html.
Dick Howser Center for Childhood Services:
Offers services for children from birth to 5 years
including child care, educational services and early
intervention. 240 Mabry St., www.dickhowser.org.
Florida Alliance for Assistive Services &
Technology: Serves Floridians with disabilities.
487-3278, 1-888-788-9216, 3333 W. Pensacola St.,
Building 100, www.faast.org.
The Florida Developmental Disabilities
Council Inc.: Helps coordinate federal, state and
local agencies providing assistance. 124 Marriott
Drive, 488-4180, TDD 888-488-8633, www.fddc.org.
Florida Blind Services: Organization dedicated to
helping the visually impaired. 1320 Executive Center
Drive, 800-672-7038. dbs.myflorida.com.
The Florida Disabled Outdoors Association:
Provides information and education about the
therapeutic value of recreation, promoting participa-
tion in leisure activities. 2475 Apalachee Parkway,
201-2944, www.fdoa.org.
Florida Division of Vocational Rehabilitation:
Aims to enable individuals with disabilities to obtain
and maintain employment. 4070 Esplanade way,
Voice/TDD 245-3399, Voice/TDD 800-451-4327,
www.rehabworks.org.
Florida Independent Living Council Inc.:
Promotes independent living opportunities for
persons with disabilities. 1416 N. Adams St., 488-
5624, Voice/TDD 877-822-1993, www.ilcflorida.org.
Florida Telecommunications Relay Inc.: A
nonprofit organization providing specialized telecom-
munications equipment for residents who are hard of
hearing, deaf, deaf/blind, or speech impaired. 1820 E.
Park Ave., Voice 800-222-3448, TTY 888-447-5620,
www.ftri.org.
Goodwill Industries Big Bend, Inc.: Offers job
training and placement assistance to anyone needing
help finding a job, especially people with disabilities.
300 Mabry St., 576-7145, www.goodwillbigbend-
.com.
Leon Advocacy and Resource Center Inc.:
Provides vocational services, referrals, community
activities for people with disabilities. 1949 Common-
wealth Lane, 422-0355, www.leonarc.com.
Lighthouse of the Big Bend: A nonprofit agency
dedicated to guiding people through vision loss and
assisting them in their pursuit of independence. 3071
Highland Oaks Terrace; 942-3658; toll free, 888-827-
6033, www.lighthousebigbend.org.
Partner in Communication: Provides sign-
language interpreters for medical and legal services.
942-6882, e-mail requestpic@embarqmail.com.
Pyramid Inc.: Providing training to adults with
developmental disabilities. 2645 W. Tennessee St.,
574-4978, www.pyramidinc.org.
Respect of Florida: Provides Florida agencies with
products and services produced by the disabled and
helps employ those with disabilities. 2475 Apalachee
Parkway, Suite 205. 877-4816, www.respectofflori-
da.org.
Special OlympicsLeon County: Provides year-
round sports training and athletic competition for
children and adults with intellectual disabilities.
2898-1 Mahan Drive; 597-9265, www.specialolym-
picsleon.org.
Sunrise Community Inc.: Nonprofit organization
that seeks to provide people with developmental
disabilities assistance. 1830 Buford Court, 922-5630,
www.sunrisegroup.org.
Tallahassee Developmental Center: Provides
care for people with developmental disabilities. 455
Appleyard Drive, 575-0619.
Workshop for Adult Vocational Enhancement:
A nonprofit organization empowering adults with
developmental disabilities by providing employment
opportunities and social support. 2898 Mahan Dr.,
412-9279, www.waveonline.org.
SPECIAL NEEDS
EDUCATIONAL
RESOURCES
Leon County Schools Exceptional Student
Education: Specialized, educational services for
infants, children and adults with exceptional needs.
2757 W. Pensacola St., 487-7158, www.le-
on.k12.fl.us.
FSU Regional Multidisciplinary Evaluation and
Consulting Center: Assessment of school-age
children suspected of having learning disabilities.
FSU, 715 W. Gaines St.; 644-2222, csw.fsu.edu.
Florida Diagnostic and Learning Resources
Systems: A network of centers providing support
services to educators, parents. 3955 W. Pensacola St.,
487-2630, www.fdlrs.leon.k12.fl.us.
Special
needs
resources
The Tallahassee Senior Center and Founda-
tion welcomes adults of all ages and offers
activities from art to yoga. Come play and learn
at the center, where youll find a dynamic Life-
Long Learning program, award-winning art
instructors and opportunities for recreation and
travel, as well as myriad special events.
September is National Senior Center month,
and the Tallahassee center will celebrate with
an Active Living Expo featuring more than 100
exhibitors.
Besides events at the Senior Center on Mon-
roe Street, neighborhood sites take some of the
most popular programs to local community
centers. Lunch and Learns, Senior Days, Well-
ness Circles, art classes and more are available
throughout the area.
Transportation: For those with cars, park-
ing is available outside the Senior Center. Three
StarMetro bus routes (B, E and G) within two
blocks of the Senior Center are also available
for transportation to the center. For more in-
formation on bus transportation, visit www.tal-
gov.com/starmetro. For individuals ages 60+ or
disabled living within the city limits, Dial-a-Ride
services are available through StarMetro as
well.
Want to become involved? The Senior
Center welcomes volunteers. Want to offer
support? Become a member of the Tallahassee
Senior Foundation or sponsor an event.
Tallahassee Senior Center, 1400 N Monroe
St., 891-4000, www.talgov.com/seniors
Edna Owens attends a workshop at the
Tallahassee Senior Center. DEMOCRAT FILES
The Senior
Center
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 71
Community Seniors
We all know the old saying
about old dogs and new tricks.
Well, while the thought that
learning has an age limit might
still apply in the canine world,
scientists have been discover-
ing that for humans, its just a
myth.
As a matter of fact, the
brain activity associated with
acquiring new knowledge and
skills can help seniors live
better, healthier, longer lives.
According to the Bernard
Osher Foundation, which
provides funds for the Osher
Lifelong Learning Institute
(OLLI) at Florida State Univer-
sity, The interest of older
adults, many of whom are at
retirement age, is in learning
for the joy of learning with-
out examinations or grades.
Courses at OLLI at FSU
span art, culture and music,
current events, genealogy,
history, language and litera-
ture, science and writing.
The yearly cost of mem-
bership in OLLI at FSU is $110
or $60 per semester. Class fees
range from $30 to $55.
Osher offers
lifelong learning
TO LEARN MORE
For more information about
OLLI at FSU, go to olli.fsu.edu,
email taaronson@fsu.edu or call
644-7947.
AARP: National organization that con-
ducts community-service programs such as
crime prevention, defensive driving and
tax assistance. Offers group health
insurance policies, discounts on travel and
a motoring plan. Anyone age 50 and older
may join. www.aarp.org.
AARP Florida Legislative Repre-
sentative: Legislative advocacy program
for state issues affecting Floridians age 50
and over. Legislative Advocate, 577-5180,
200 W. College Ave., Suite 304; 866-595-
7678, www.aarp.org.
AARP 55-Alive/Mature Driving
Program: Driver-improvement course
intended to help drivers 50 and older
improve their skills. This class could qualify
you for a discount on insurance. 888-
AARPNOW.
Aging with Dignity: This organization
strives to provide practical information,
advice and the legal tools necessary to
ensure that aging loved ones wishes will
be respected. 888-594-7437 or 681-2010,
www.agingwithdignity.org.
American Home Patient: Provides
skilled nursing visits, medical social worker
visits, physical, speech and occupational
therapy and home health aides. Oxygen,
wheelchairs, hospital beds, bedside
commodes, walkers, canes and other
equipment are available through Medi-
care, Medicaid and private insurance.
2432 N. Monroe St., 222-1723.
Alzheimers Project, Inc: Provides
comfort, support and assistance to
persons with memory disorders and their
caregivers in the Big Bend. All services
available to caregivers are provided free of
charge and include support groups,
caregiver training, respite care, counseling,
information and referrals. 301 E. Tharpe
St., 386-2778.www.alzheimersproject.org.
Area Agency on Aging: An Aging and
disability resource center, providing
information and assistance in linking
individuals to resources such as Medicare,
Medicaid, elder abuse, health and well-
ness, and other programs and services for
seniors and caregivers. 2414 Mahan Drive.
800-963-5337, 488-0055.
Bill Sittig CPA, LLC: Full service tax and
investment advisory firm specializing in
services to seniors. 1695-7 Metropolitan
Circle, 386-2639, www.jscpaonline.com,
billsittig@ jscpaonline.com.
Comfort Keepers: Tailored services
available by the hour, day or week.
Serving Leon, Wakulla, Jefferson and
Gadsden counties. 2709 Killarney Way
Suite 3, 402-0051, tallahassee@comfort-
keepers.com, www.comfortkeepers.com.
Elder Care Services Inc.: Our mission is
to improve the quality of life for seniors
and their caregivers. Programs and
services include: care management,
information and referral, in-home and
community based services, Meals on
Wheels, Elder Day Stay and senior volun-
teer opportunities. 2518 W. Tennessee St.
921-5554, www.ecsbigbend.org.
Florida Council on Aging: Committed
to serving Floridas diverse aging interests
through education, information-sharing
and advocacy. 1018 Thomasville Road,
Suite 110, 222-8877, moreinfo@fcoa.org,
www.fcoa.org.
Florida Department of Elder Affairs:
This is the primary state agency respon-
sible for administering human services
programs for the elderly. Its purpose is to
serve elders in all aspects to help them
keep their self-sufficiency and self-
determination. All services are confidential
and free. 888-831-0404, 4040 Esplanade
Way, 414-2000, elderaffairs.state.fl.us;
ombudsman.myflorida.com.
Good News Outreach Elder Services:
Provides food delivery, transportation to
medical facilities, social and religious
activities, house repairs, lawn work and
counseling to economically disadvantaged
elderly persons. 242 Lafayette Circle,
412-0016; www.goodnewsoutreach.org.
Heuler-Wakeman Law Group: Elder
law attorneys: estate planning, guard-
ianships, probate and long term care
planning. 1815 Miccosukee Commons
Drive, Suite 104, 421-2400, www.hwelder-
law.com.
Hopewell Home Heath Care : Special-
izing in affordable, in-home health
services. 2121-H Killearny Way, 386-5552,
www.hopewellcare.com.
Home Instead Senior Care: Provides
companionship and home helper services.
2528-2 Barrington Circle, 297-1897.
Interim Home Health Care: Home
health services including skilled nursing,
home health aides, physical therapists and
companion/homemakers. 1962-B Village
Green Way, 422-2044. www.interim-
healthcare.com/tallahassee.
LocalSeniorDiscounts.com: This
website serves as a resource for seniors,
publicizing special offers from merchants,
plus local events and senior-specific
information. www.LocalSeniorDiscount-
s.com.
The Osher Lifelong Learning In-
stitute at FSU: Activities for the fun of
learning including courses, field trips,
guest speakers, and social and cultural
activities for mature learners. 644-7947,
www.olli.fsu.edu.
Senior Life Resources Center: A
faith-based ministry of the Capital City
Christian Church that offers lectures,
classes, concerts, community service,
trips, fellowship, arts and crafts
festival, art show, retreats and more.
6115 Mahan Drive, 877-7315.
Social Security Administration:
Office hours: 8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.,
2002 Old St. Augustine Road, Build-
ing B, Suite B12, 800-772-1213, or
800-325-0778 TDD, www.socialsecur-
ity.gov.
Kaypro Computer Group: In-
formal, small, round-table group.
Meets at Senior Center, North Monroe
Street and Seventh Avenue the
second Thursday of the month from
7:30 to 9 p.m. 222-3091.
Tallahassee Memory Disorder
Clinic: Free public screenings, diagno-
sis, care plans plus caregiver training
for memory disorders. Professional
Office Building, Suite 504, Tallahassee
Memorial Healthcare, 1401 Centerville
Road, 431-5001.
TMH Adult Day Care Services:
Services include: nursing care, social
activities, recreation and rehabilitation
services. 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Monday
through Friday. 2039 N. Monroe St,
531- 0712, www.tmh.org/adultday.
Tallahassee Old Timers Club:
Primarily for retirees interested in
whats going on in Tallahassee. New
Times Country Buffet, 1701 N. Monroe
St. Meetings at 11 a.m. third Mondays.
599-5464, 385-2290.
Tallahassee YMCA: Three locations
provide opportunities for seniors to
continue to improve their spirit, mind
and body through social activities and
fitness programming, including senior
fitness classes and water aerobics.
www.capitalregionymca.org.
Wadesboro Place: Residential
senior living: home-cooked meals,
utilities, cable, housekeeping. 9704
Wadesboro Road, 364-3167 or
284-4892, www.wadesboroplace-
.com.
Senior resources
Bill Thomas greeted guests
before the Annual Active
Living Expo in 2013. MIKE
EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
The best care
for your
loved-one
Assisted Living Facility # AL9730
100 John Knox Road, Tallahassee, FL 32303
888-684-0674 | HarborChase.com
72 Living Here | 2014-2015
IN THIS SECTION
Introduction
Major employers
Employment agencies
Financial institutions
The Chamber
Business resources
Rajan Kumar explains the
workings of the mach 5 wind
tunnel at the Florida Center
for Advanced Aero-Propulsion
in Innovation Park. GLENN
BEIL/DEMOCRAT FILES
Business & Services
ONLINE
See video on business
at TLHlivinghere/com
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 73
Business & Services In the workplace
Two now-expired television shows fea-
tured fake institutions in Tallahassee. In
Dexter, Edward James Olmos played a char-
acter who was a professor at the University
of Tallahassee. In The Office, the Dunder-
Mifflin company was acquired by Sabre, a
company based in Tallahassee. After Steve
Carrell presented Sabre owner Kathy Bates
with a lump of coal, she said We dont have much coal in Tallahassee. Just alliga-
tors and the worst Chinese food you ever tasted.
In Leon County, the public sector employs
more people than any other job category, as
shown by these numbers from the Econom-
ic Development Council of Tallahassee-
Leon County Inc. The areas largest employ-
ers rank as follows:
MAJOR EMPLOYERS
State of Florida (non-university) 19,322
Florida State University 14,436
Leon County Schools 4,496
Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare Inc. 4,483
City of Tallahassee 2,800
Publix Supermarkets Inc. 1,983
Tallahassee Community College 1,862
Florida A&M University 1,774
Leon County 1,718
Walmart Stores Inc. 1,300
Capital Regional Medical Center 1,038
ACS, A Xerox Company 800
Capital City Bank Group 502
Capital Health Plan 425
St. Marks Powder 400
Westminister Oaks 365
Florida Bar 328
CenturyLink 278
General Dynamics Land Systems 250
Tallahassee Primary Care Associates 244
Big Bend Hospice 235
Danfoss Turbocor 202
Dale Earnhardt Jr. Chevrolet 200
Comcast Cable 175
Tallahassee Democrat 175
Telligent EMS 170
T-Formations 170
Miracle Hill Nursing & Convalescent 165
The Zimmerman Agency 160
First American Title Co. 160
Syn-tech Systems 165
Culpepper Construction 154
GT Technologies 156
Tandem Health Care 152
Apalachee Center for Human Services 150
Proctor Dealerships 130
HealthSouth 119
In a community where small busi-
nesses comprise most of the local
private-sector economy, theres a dis-
tinct emphasis on the kinds of support
necessary not only for such firms to
get going, but to thrive as they develop.
And the newest ventures reflect
various industries
from the opening of
Proof Brewing Co. in
the Railroad Square
Art Park to mobile
technology firm Shop
X, which developed a
shopping app for users
of Google Glass, the
wearable device.
Our startups, the
entrepreneurial
growth, we have continued to see
especially in the last couple of years.
That momentum has really become
the new normal for our community. It
has become our tagline, of saying we
are an innovative community, said Sue
Dick, president of the Greater Talla-
hassee Chamber of Commerce.
There is talent being drawn to Talla-
hassee because of this progress, as
well as more investment capital and
there is an increasing amount of col-
laboration occurring among business
advocates to create the right environ-
ment.
The clearinghouse-style website
BigBendBiz.com is the work of the
Alliance of Entrepreneur Resource
Organizations. Those partner organiza-
tions wanted to establish a single ac-
cess point for all the various providers
and their business programs.
Another resource is Domi Station,
the first of what is expected to be
many small business incubators avail-
able to the community. Located in a
former warehouse off Railroad Ave-
nue, Domi Station has shared work
space for entrepreneurs, as well as a
more structured program for new
enterprises that may well become
candidates for venture capital.
The Entrepreneurial Excellence
Program of the Economic Develop-
ment Council of Tallahassee-Leon
County Inc. provides a series of work-
shops that acquaint entrepreneurs with
the basics of the business launch and
local mentors who can offer advice.
At the Leon County Research &
Development Authority, theres the
annual Technology Commercialization
Grant program, which awards up to
$15,000 for innovations that have defi-
nite market potential.
Building the right environment
to encourage small business
Dave
Hodges
Democrat
Business
Editor
Proof Brewing Co. operates a facility at
644 McDonnell Drive where it produces
up to 15 different kinds of beers. MIKE
EWEN/DEMOCRAT
SEND US YOUR
BUSINESS NEWS
Twice each week the Tallahassee Democrat
publishes news of the local business communi-
ty. Briefcase is a roundup of new hires, staff
promotions, appointments and new offices
opened. Milestones covers staff awards,
professional achievements and business honors
received. To submit items, email them to TLH-
Briefcase_Milestones@tallahassee.com or fax to
599-2295. Details: 599-2186.
74 Living Here | 2014-2015
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Credit unions are not-for-profit
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Call the credit union for details.
BANKS
Ameris Bank
150 S. Monroe St., 656-2110
2121 Killarney Way, 383-9999
BB&T
102 N. Blair Stone Road, 877-0140
123 S. Monroe St., 688-9385
3233 Thomasville Road, 385-3300
Bank of America
2262 N. Monroe St., 385-4473
2930 Apalachee Parkway, 942-6390
3003 Mahan Drive, 402-8880
315 S. Calhoun St., 561-1876
3430 Thomasville Road, 668-6200
5676 Thomasville Road, 668-1717
803 Lake Bradford Road, 576-4246
Cadence Bank
2721 Capital Circle NE, 385-3221
Capital City Bank
1828 W. Tennessee St., 402-8410
1401 Oven Park Drive, 385-3972
2111 N. Monroe St., 523-4093
3528 Thomasville Road, 402-8340
1301 Metropolitan Blvd., 402-8000
1801 Apalachee Parkway, 402-8500
217 N. Monroe St., 402-7700
6691 Thomasville Road, 402-8080
1456 Capital Circle NW, 402-8100
2375 Centerville Road, 402-4020
3255 Mahan Drive, 402-8140
3404 S. Monroe St., 402-8400
3513 Apalachee Parkway, 402-8300
3815 N. Monroe St., 402-8180
Centennial Bank
1953 Thomasville Road, 386-2225
2780 W. Tennessee St., 386-2225
3110 Capital Circle NE, 386-2225
3615 Apalachee Parkway, 386-2225
6529 Thomasville Road, 386-2225
702 Pat Thomas Parkway, 386-2222
2101 Capital Circle NE, 386-2222
8232 Woodville Highway, 421-5747
Farmers & Merchants Bank
2000 Apalachee Parkway, 878-2626
2626 Mahan Drive, 942-2626
3320 Thomasville Road, 893-5100
3490 N. Monroe St., 514-2626
4210 W. Tennessee St., 224-2626
Florida Bank
2915 Kerry Forest Parkway, No. 501,
894-2870
3425 Thomasville Road, No. 23, 668-9994
Hancock Bank
2437 N. Monroe St., 425-6100
2613 S. Monroe St., 425-3300
101 N. Monroe St., No. 150, 425-6140
2105 Capital Circle NE, 298-6260
2453 Mahan Drive, 325-6595
2920 Kerry Forest Parkway, 907-3200
Prime Meridian Bank
1471 Timberlane Road, Suite 124, 907-2300
1897 Capital Circle NE, 907-2301
Pro-Bank
536 N. Monroe St., 681-7761
1812 Martin Luther King Blvd., 222-2488
8110 Killearn Plaza Circle, Suite 101,
668-6336
Regions Bank
2000 Capital Circle NE, 523-4600
201 S. Monroe St., 222-3727
2266 N. Monroe St., 386-1191
3516 Thomasville Road, 894-2370
3621 Apalachee Parkway, 942-2977
Sunshine Savings Bank
1400 E. Park Ave., 219-7200
3534-A Thomasville Road, 219-7427
1700 N. Monroe St., 219-7229
3266 Mahan Drive, 219-7421
Sun Trust Bank
1401 Miccosukee Road, 877-7157
104 N. Woodward Ave., 561-9170
4021 Lagniappe Way, 878-1860
3522 Thomasville Road, 907-5172
2051 Thomasville Road, 298-1577
215 S. Monroe St., 425-6724
2727 Apalachee Parkway, 878-4397
3535 Apalachee Parkway, 671-2630
3575 Blair Stone Road, 325-2078
6779 Thomasville Road, 894-0222
Tallahassee State Bank
3471 Thomasville Road, 576-1182
601 N. Monroe St., 576-1182
1868 Capital Circle NE, 567-1182
2720 W. Tennessee St., 576-1182
Wells Fargo Bank
1201 N. Monroe St., 425-2500
1701 W. Tharpe St., 425-2530
3121 Mahan Drive, 425-6035
3400 S. Monroe St., 425-2503
3529 Thomasville Road, 425-6030
3652 Coolidge Court, 656-5466
1997 Capital Circle NE, 668-4034
CREDIT UNIONS
Campus USA Credit Union
1511 Killearn Center Blvd., 894-9098
Credit Union 24
2120 Killarney Way, 701-2824
Envision Credit Union
440 N. Monroe St., 942-9000
421 Appleyard Drive, 942-9000
3618 N. Monroe St., 942-9000
3190 Apalachee Parkway, 942-9000
3519 Thomasville Road, 942-9000
First Commerce Credit Union
2330 Mahan Drive, 488-0035
1741 Old St. Augustine Road, 488-0035
1460 Capital Circle NW, 488-0035
6725 Thomasville Road, 488-0035
3343 Thomasville Road, 488-0035
First Florida Credit Union
2928 Apalachee Parkway, 488-2880
2521 S. Blair Stone Road, 414-7290
1661 Raymond Diehl Road, 922-7855
Flag Credit Union
3115 Conner Blvd., 488-6781
Florida A&M University Federal Credit
Union
1610 S. Monroe St., 222-4541
Florida Rural Electric Credit Union
2916 Apalachee Parkway, 219-0468
Florida State University Credit Union
3534 B Thomasville Road, 224-4960
2806 Sharer Road, 224-4960
1412 W. Tennessee St., 224-4960
834 W. St. Augustine St., 224-4960
1612 Capital Circle NE, 224-4960
Gulf Winds Credit Union
1447 Mahan Drive, 488-1015
3218 N. Monroe St., 562-6702
Southeast Corporate Credit Union
3692 Coolidge Court, 576-8900
State Employees Credit Union
2711 Blair Stone Road, 402-5858
2770 Capital Circle SE, 402-5838
Tallahassee Federal Credit Union
216 W College Ave., 222-1421
Tallahassee-Leon Federal Credit
Union
1827 Capital Circle NW, 576-8134
2020 W. Pensacola St., Suite 180, 576-8134
TMH Federal Credit Union
345 S. Magnolia Drive, 402-5301
3515 Maclay Blvd. S., 402-5301
1300 Miccosukee Road, 402-5301
Financial institutions
76 Living Here | 2014-2015
Business & Services Money & jobs
Action Labor / Staffing Connection
447 FAMU Way, 385-0365
Adecco USA
716 N. Calhoun St., 561-8715
Aerotek
1820 E. Park Ave., 219-4700
American Employment
Agency Inc.
905 E. Park Ave., 222-6674
Capital Career Solutions Inc.
P.O. 3370, Tallahassee, FL 32315, 385-
5550
Cardinal Staffing Services
3375 Capital Circle NE, Bldg. H, Suite 3,
513-3000
CareerSource Capital Region
2525 S. Monroe St., 922-0023
IntegriSource Inc.
1689 Mahan Center Blvd., Suite B,
575-0894
Kelly Services
2282 Killearn Center Blvd., 297-2040
Labor Finders
520 W. Brevard St., 222-7378
Labor Ready
2525 S. Monroe St., Suite 54, 222-4889
Legal Ease Temp Services
2709 Killarney Way, Suite 1, 894-6565
Management Recruiters of
Tallahassee Inc.
743 E. Tennessee St., 656-8444
Manpower Inc.
2417 Mill Creek Court, Suite 3, 386-8150
Remedy Intelligent Staffing
1550 Village Square Blvd., Suite 2, 523-
0005
Tri-State Employment Services
325 John Knox Road, 523-0099
Trojan Labor
509 Saint Francis St., 222-2030
Employment agencies
ONLINE
Watch a video about local
small business development at
TLHlivinghere.com.
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Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 77
Business & Services Resources
American Public Works Association,
Big Bend Branch: A professional organi-
zation made up of public works employees
and officials. Main goal is to educate the
public. Meetings are the first Thursdays
from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. at Golden Corral,
1630 N. Monroe St., 606-1540, www.ap-
wabigbend.net.
Big Bend Minority Chamber of
Commerce: Founded in 2012, this
regional organization serves Leon and the
four surrounding counties. Its mission is to
create and promote a business climate in
which minority and woman-owned firms
can operate in a productive, profitable
manner and thereby contribute to the
areas economic growth. www.mybbm-
c.org.
Big Bend Society for Human Re-
source Management (BBSHRM):
Organizations mission is to further the
professional growth and development of
members and to provide them with a
forum. president@bigbendshrm.org,
www.bigbendshrm20.wildapricot.org.
Business Among Moms: To provide
moms running their own business with
educational, networking and advertising
opportunities. 321-5477, www.face-
book.com/groups/TallahasseeBAM.
Business & Professional Women/
Tallahassee: Hosts monthly professional
development meetings where BPW
members and non-members can network
with other business owners, self-employed
individuals and individuals working in
various businesses. www.BPWTallahassee-
.com.
Capital City Chamber of Commerce:
The Chambers mission is to help member
businesses succeed in the marketplace. The
Chamber works to expand the local
economy by attracting new jobs and
creating economic opportunities. 1602 S.
Monroe St., 224-0152, info@capitalci-
tychamber.com; www.capitalcitychamber-
.com.
Downtown Improvement Authority:
Hosts Tallahassees premier open air
market every Saturday, March through
November. Also working on the Downtown
Connectivity Plan to transform downtown
into an 18-hour walkable community. 106
E. Jefferson Street, 3rd Floor, 224-3252,
www.tallahasseedowntown.com.
Downtown Merchants & Business
Association This group focuses on all
aspects of downtown community life. The
association covers a wide area from
Gaines Street to Georgia Street and from
the FSU Campus to Franklin Boulevard 110
S.Monroe St., 385-8881.
FAMU Small Business Development
Center: Provides free or low-cost educa-
tional programs for small businesses.
Morgan Building, Ste. 130, 2035 E. Paul
Dirac Drive, 599-3407, www.sbdcat-
famu.org.
Florida Chamber of Commerce:
Floridas largest federation of businesses,
chambers of commerce and business
associations. This group serves as the
lobbying and political arm for the state-
wide business community. 136 S. Bro-
nough St., 521-1200, www.flchamber.com.
Florida Public Interest Foundation:
Support organization for nonprofit groups,
providing training, coaching, capacity
building and other organizational services.
Sponsor of educational programs on
public-interest topics. 997-2837, www.for-
thepublic.org.
Other business resources & organizations
The 2014 Tech Expo conference at FSU's Turnbull Conference
Center took center stage in May. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
For more than 120 years, Capital City Bank has made Tallahassee the place we call home. While other banks have come and gone, we
continue to operate from a position of strength and in the best interests of our clients. We believe a relationship with your banker is one
of the most important connections youll make in this community. And you can trust your Capital City Bankers to make decisions that
are right for you and for our community. Welcome home.
402.7500
www.ccbg.com
Hometown
is
our Tallahassee
TD-0000252266
78 Living Here | 2014-2015
Business & Services Resources
The Global Ambassador Program:
This group makes it possible for organiza-
tions to meet international students and
scholars from more than 100 countries.
Requests for speakers are filled throughout
the year. Request a speaker online via the
website by clicking on Campus and
Community Programs. International Center,
644-1324; www.cge.fsu.edu.
Locally Owned Tallahassee: Locally
Owned Tallahassee is a collective of
licensed independently owned businesses
and community organizations. The groups
purpose is to promote and sustain a
vibrant and unique Tallahassee community.
607 McDonnell Drive. 224-6666, www.lo-
callyownedtallahassee.com.
Jim Moran Institute of Global En-
trepreneurship at Florida State
University: An institute within the FSU
College of Business formed to help
entrepreneurs succeed by offering educa-
tional assistance and information at no
charge. 644-3372, www.jmi.fsu.edu.
Moms Time Out: Organized by local
moms-in-business who want to help
promote each other. www.momstimeout-
tallahassee.com.
National Association of Investors
Corporation (NAIC), Big Bend Chap-
ter: This group, also known as Better-
Investing, is an independent, nonprofit,
member-driven organization committed to
teaching individuals how to become
successful long-term investors. Better-
Investing makes no stock recommenda-
tions and receives no commissions or fees
from member investing activities. con-
tact@bigbend.betterinvesting.net,
www.betterinvesting.org.
Network of Entrepreneurs and
Business Advocates (NEBA): A diverse
group of Tallahassee business profession-
als, retailers and restaurateurs whose
objective is to advance the interests of
small business with state and local govern-
ment officials and to promote local
commerce. 2791 Capital Circle N.E., www.
NEBATallahassee.org, peggy@talstar.com.
Office of Supplier Diversity, DMS: The
OSD is responsible for measuring the
states success as it relates to minority
spending, matchmaking viable minority
businesses with purchasing/contract
opportunities, investigating complaints of
discrimination and enhancing minority
business development. Florida Department
of Management Services, 4050 Esplanade
Way, Suite 380, 487-0915; www.dms.my-
florida.com/other_programs/office_of_sup-
plier_diversity_osd/.
PMI Tallahassee: Tallahassee Chapter of
the Project Management Institute pro-
motes professional project management
practices and education. P.O. Box 15511,
www.pmitlh.org.
SouthWood Toastmasters Club: Meets
every Wednesday. The environment is
friendly and supportive, and the self-paced
program allows you to build confidence
with each speaking assignment. Each time
you give a prepared speech, an evaluator
will point out strengths and suggest
improvements. Department of Health,
4025 Esplanade Way, Room 301.
www.5459.toastmastersclubs.org, con-
tact-5459@toastmastersclubs.org.
Tallahassee Chapter, Womens
Prosperity Network: A community of
impassioned, determined women, commit-
ted to supporting each others pursuit of
excellence. 997-4595, TLH@women-
sprosperitynetwork.com, www.WPNGlo-
bal.com/Tallahassee.
Tallahassee Lenders Consortium:
Comprehensive homeownership center
offering prepurchase counseling and
education including financial literacy, down
payment and closing costs assistance, post
purchase education, delinquent mortgage
counseling, and reverse mortgage counsel-
ing. TLC is a registered nonprofit organiza-
tion. 224 Office Plaza, 222-6609,
www.tallahasseelenders.org, neverett@tal-
lahasseelenders.org.
Tallahassee Society of Association
Executives (TSAE): Local group com-
posed of executives and staff from various
associations. 561-6124, www.tallysae.org,
info@tallysae.org.
Tallahassee Technology Alliance: A
nonprofit association of businesses,
academic centers, entrepreneurs and
individuals invested in promoting technol-
ogy-based entrepreneurship, business
expansion and innovation. It has 250
members representing more than 75 area
technology-based companies, institutions
and organizations. TalTech is the recog-
nized technology roundtable of the
Economic Development Council of Talla-
hassee/Leon County. 383-8237. www.tal-
tech.org; admin@taltech.org.
The Tallahassee Community College-
Division of Economic & Workforce
Development: Dedicated to providing
quality services and promoting economic
and work force development, the college
assists companies relocating to this region.
444 Appleyard Drive, 201-6200;
www.tcc.fl.edu/Current/Academics/
WorkforceDevelopment/Pages/default.aspx
Urban Tallahassee: This website pro-
vides up-to-date information on Tallahas-
sees growth and development. The site
tracks all major construction projects in
and around the Tallahassee area, provides
news updates and links to local resources,
special reports and more. www.urbantalla-
hassee.com, info@urbantallahassee.com.
Visit Tallahassee: Promotes local
tourism. 106 E. Jefferson St., 606-2305,
800-626-2866, www.visittallahassee.com.
Working Well: A nonprofit whose goal is
to teach employers to design and deliver
wellness programs to employees. We hold
monthly meetings to educate company
wellness teams on different ways to bring
wellness to their workplace as well as
provide them with local resources (most
free) to include in their programs.
www.workingwellonline.com.
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Federally insured by NCUA
The focus of the Greater
Tallahassee Chamber of Com-
merce and its affiliate pro-
grams is to collectively play a
role in creating a positive
business environment.
Affiliate programs
Access Tallahassee is the
regions premier organization
for young professionals with
more than 350 members. It
connects and engages them in
programs designed to help
them build business relation-
ships.www.accesstallahassee-
.com
The Economic Devel-
opment Council of Talla-
hassee-Leon County Inc. is
a public/private partnership
between the city, county and
private investors who are
committed to creating jobs
and building a stronger busi-
ness community. www.Ta-
lEDC.com.
Leadership Tallahassee
is a yearlong program that
educates and encourages
adults to seek positive
changes in the community
through leadership roles. The
organization also offers Youth
Leadership Tallahassee, which
prepares high school juniors to
become leaders. www.leader-
shiptallahassee.com.
World Class Schools of
Leon County Inc. hones the
partnership between local
businesses and the Leon
County school system.
www.wcs leon.com.
Contact the Greater
Tallahassee Chamber of
Commerce at 224-8116, online at
www.talchamber.com or stop by
the office downtown at 300 E.
Park Ave.
Chamber supports business
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 79
IN THIS SECTION
Introduction
Community centers and
recreational programs
The Seminoles, The Rattlers
Sports clubs, Garden clubs
Environmental groups
The Coast
FSU senior Kenny Shaw leaps
over Jesus Wilson after
catching a pass during a
game last season. MIKE
EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
Sports & Recreation
ONLINE
See sports video at
TLHlivinghere.com
80 Living Here | 2014-2015
Sports & Recreation Fun and games
The Department of Parks,
Recreation and Neighborhood
Affairs is woven tightly into
the fabric of our community.
It is also one of Tallahas-
sees most diverse, offering
numerous recreational oppor-
tunities for youth and citizens
of all ages living in Tallahassee
and Leon County. Animal
Services and
Senior Services
are included
under the
departments
umbrella as
well.
Many of
citys most
popular special
events are
staged by the Department of
Parks, Recreation and Neigh-
borhood Affairs, including the
Celebrate America event on
July 4, Springtime Tallahassee,
Red Hills Horse Trials and the
Winter Festival and Cele-
bration of Lights.
Theres so much to do in
this community, Dee Crum-
pler, the departments director,
said recently, further explain-
ing the department is viewed
as a core city service.
From A to Z, we try to do
everything.
Named Best in America
by the National Recreation
and Park Association, the
department operates and
maintains more than 4,500
acres of well-managed park-
land.
The park system includes
both active recreational com-
plexes, complete with a wide
variety of athletic facilities,
and parks where visitors may
simply enjoy the quiet natural
surroundings.
Additionally, the depart-
ment operates seven aquatic
facilities, two golf courses, a
skate park and a Miracle
League Baseball field for those
with disabilities.
Crumpler stressed the
departments objective is not
to develop the next profes-
sional baseball, football and
basketball player.
Instead, its role is to expose
specifically the children in the
community to all types of
recreation opportunities and
hopefully make that a part of
their daily activity.
Individual sports offered
range from aquatics to tennis.
Youth team sports include
cheerleading, volleyball, base-
ball, basketball, tackle football
and track.
Jim Henry has been living here since
1988. He and wife Dawn, married for 32
years, have three children and one
grandson. His favorite thing about
Tallahassee is the small-town charm.
Parks & Rec is a winner
Michael Pollard on Tsetserleg on the cross country course at the
Red Hills Horse Trials in March. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
Joe Knox, C.J. Nicoll and A.J. Knox at the Splash and Jam at the
Lawrence-Gregory Community Center in June. DEMOCRAT FILES
Jim Henry
Democrat
sports editor
TALLAHASSEE-
LEON BABE RUTH
Tallahassee Babe Ruth Base-
ball is a nonprofit organiza-
tion that administers and
promotes amateur baseball
for youth ages 13 to 15 in
Leon County. It is affiliated
nationally with Babe Ruth
League Inc., the largest youth
baseball organization in the
world. The Tallahassee-Leon
County Babe Ruth organiza-
tion is the established ad-
vanced league play struc-
ture, with open try-outs and
evaluations to fill 52 13-year-
old positions each year. To
learn more, visit www.talla-
hasseebaberuth.org, or e-mail
info@tallahasseebabe-
ruth.org.
LEON COUNTY
CENTERS &
PROGRAMS
COMMUNITY CENTERS
Dorothy Cooper Spence
Community Center
(Chaires): 4768 Chaires Cross
Road, 606-1480.
Bradfordville Community
Center: 3439 Bannerman
Road, 606-1480.
Fort Braden Community
Center: 16387 Blountstown
Highway, 606-1480.
Lake Jackson Community
Center: 3480 N. Monroe St.
Suite 301, 606-1480.
Miccosukee Community
Center: 13887 Moccasin Gap
Road, 606-1480.
Woodville Community
Center: 8000 Old Woodville
Road, 606-1480.
SPORTS OFFERED
Leon County offers the fol-
lowing sports: Pop Warner
football, tackle football,
cheerleading, soccer, Little
League baseball, Little
League softball.
BACKGROUND CHECKS
All coaches and volunteers
participating in Leon County
youth sports programs are
required to undergo a local
law enforcement assisted
background check. For more
information on how you may
become involved in youth
sports programs, please call
606-1470.
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 81
Sports & Recreation Centers & programs
COMMUNITY CENTERS
The city of Tallahassee Parks, Recreation
and Neighborhood Affairs Department has
six multi-purpose community centers, two
neighborhood service centers and one
specialty arts and crafts center. The
community centers offer classes for youth
and adults including karate, aerobics,
dance, cooking and arts and crafts.
Community meetings and social functions
can be scheduled at these facilities.
Palmer Munroe Teen Center is Talla-
hassees first facility designed as a safe and
enriching center specifically for teens. It
includes rooms for teens to study, develop
computer and business skills, engage in
recreation and cultural endeavors and help
them mature through their teenage years.
1900 Jackson Bluff Road, 891-2569.
Jack L. McLean Jr. Community Cen-
ter: Picnic shelters, tennis court, ball fields,
playground. 700 Paul Russell Road,
891-2505. Aquatics facility adjacent,
891-2500.
Jake Gaither Community Center:
Playground, gymnasium, tennis courts,
picnic area and ball fields. 801 Bragg Drive,
891-3940.
Lawrence Gregory Community
Center at Dade Street: Gymnasium and
playground. 1115 Dade St., 891-3910.
Robinson Trueblood Aquatics facility
adjacent, 891-3911.
LeVerne F. Payne Community Center:
Playground, tennis courts adjacent. 450 W.
Fourth Ave., 891-3930.
Sue Herndon McCollum Community
Center (Lafayette Park): Playground,
picnic facilities, gymnasium. 501 Ingleside
Ave., 891-3946.
Walker-Ford Community Center:
Gymnasium, playground. 2301 Pasco St.,
891-3970. Pool adjacent, 891-3973.
Lafayette Arts and Crafts Center:
Offers a variety of arts and crafts classes,
ceramics, painting, etc. 501 Ingleside Ave.,
891-3945.
AQUATICS
The Levy Park, Forestmeadows, Walker
Ford, Robinson Trueblood (at Lawrence
Gregory Community Center at Dade
Street), and Jack McLean Aquatics Center
pools are open seasonally, and the Wade
Wehunt Pool (at Myers Park) and the
Trousdell Aquatic Center are open year-
round. Swim lessons for all ages, water
aerobics, as well as junior lifeguard
training, are offered seasonally. Visit
www.talgov.com.
Forestmeadows Pool: 4750 N. Meridian
Road, 891-3922.
Jack McLean Aquatics Center: 700
Paul Russell Road, 891-2500.
Levy Pool: 625 W. Tharpe St., 891-3950.
Robinson Trueblood Pool: 1115 Dade
St., 891-3911.
Trousdell Aquatics Center: 298 John
Knox Road, 891-4901.
Wade Wehunt Pool: 907 Myers Park
Drive, 891-3985.
Walker-Ford Pool: 2301 Pasco St.,
891-3973.
TENNIS
Instructional Programs: The city offers
recreational tennis instruction to players
from tiny tots to adults of various levels of
ability. Certified professionals introduce the
adult beginner to the basics of playing
tennis. For more information, call 891-
3920.
Forestmeadows Parks & Athletic
Center: Nineteen lighted tennis courts (14
clay and 5 hard), tennis backboards, three
indoor racquetball courts, an indoor squash
court, two weight rooms and locker rooms.
Play available only during supervised
hours. 4750 N. Meridian Road, 891-3920.
Winthrop Park Tennis Center: Six
lighted hard courts, two outdoor racquet-
ball courts. Free walk-in play during
unsupervised hours. 1601 Mitchell Ave.,
891-3980.
Tom Brown Park Tennis Center:
Twelve lighted hard courts, 12 outdoor
racquetball courts. Free walk-in play during
unsupervised hours. 501 Easterwood Drive,
891-3966.
SKATE PARK
The Mike Blankenship Skate Park
(Messer Park): The park is a state-of-the
art, 26,000-square-foot facility designed to
provide maximum enjoyment and chal-
lenge to all who utilize it. Operates from
sunrise to midnight. 2730 Jackson Bluff
Road (Jackson Bluff Road and Dupree
Street).
GYMNASTICS
The Trousdell Gymnastic Center: The
city of Tallahassee provides gymnastic
classes for all ages and ability levels at the
Trousdell Gymnastic Center. Recreational
classes and competitive gymnastics and
dance are available. 326 John Knox Road,
891-4908.
YOUTH/ADULT
SPORTS
The city offers cheerleading, girls volleyball,
baseball, basketball, flag football, soccer,
softball, tackle football and track. Adult
sports include basketball, flag football,
softball and volleyball. Information regard-
ing registration is available at
www.talgov.com or 891-3866.
City of Tallahassee centers & programs
A
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Tallahassee Ford
Changing the Game
Our Newest
Game Changers
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243 North Magnolia Drive
Tallahassee, FL 32301
www.tallahasseefordlincoln.com
866-785-9335
TD-0000252794
82 Living Here | 2014-2015
Sports & Recreation Facilities
Open to adults and children (ages 4 and
up). 2785 Capital Circle NE, 878-3900,
www.tallytkd.com.
PAINTBALL
Tallahassee Paintball Park: Netted
playing fields, pro shop, target range.
Groups, parties and rentals welcome. 427
Crossway Road, 656-1133.
ROCK CLIMBING
Tallahassee Rock Gym: Learn and
practice the sport of rock climbing. Railroad
Square, 629 Industrial Drive, 224-ROCK
(7625), www.tallyrockgym.com.
ROPE AND ZIP-LINE
COURSES
The FSU Challenge Program: Low-
challenge and high-challenge ropes courses.
Open to most classes, club and organiza-
tions. Reservation required. FSU Reservation.
644-6124.
Tallahassee Tree to Tree Adventures:
Zip through tree-tops and soar over cypress
swamps at the Tallahassee Museum. 3945
Museum Drive, 575-8684, www.tree-
totreeadventures.com.
SCUBA DIVING
Down Under Dive Center: Equipment,
sales and service, air fills and diver training.
637 Wakulla-Arran Road, Crawfordville,
926-4040, www.downunderdivecenter.com.
SKATING
Mike Blankenship Skate Park: Open to
skate boards and in-line skaters, sunrise to
midnight. Between James Messer Fields and
TalTran Administrative Offices, Jackson Bluff
Road at Appleyard Drive, 891-3879.
Skate World: Roller skating, speed skating
team, birthday parties and more. 2563
Capital Circle NE, 386-4807, www.skate-
world1.com.
Tallahassee Skate Inn: Indoor roller
skating using quad or inline skates. 1368
BOWLING
Capital Lanes: Forty lanes, laser tag,
arcade. 820 Capital Circle NE, 422-2695,
www.bowlsrc1.com.
Crenshaw Lanes: Primarily a student
bowling center, but open to the public. 12
lanes, auto scorers and billiard tables. 104
Crenshaw Building, Oglesby Union, 644-
1819, www.union.fsu.edu/crenshaw.
Galimore Lanes: Eight lanes and auto
scorers. 404 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.,
Florida A&M University, downstairs at the
Student Union, 599-8081.
Seminole Bowl: 24 wood lanes, auto
scorers, snack bar, lounge, billiards and
birthday parties. 1940 W. Tennessee St.,
561-0894, www.bowlsrc1.com.
BOATING, CANOEING
AND KAYAKING
Shields Marina: A full-service marina and
boat retailer. Also offers bicycle, kayak,
pontoon and float boat rentals. 95 Riverside
Drive, St. Marks, 925-6158, www.shield-
smarina.com.
TnT Hideaway: Canoe and kayak rentals,
green guides, kayak instruction and shuttle
trips. 6527 Coastal Highway, 925-6412,
www.tnthideaway.com.
The Wilderness Way: Rentals, guided
trips, kayak fishing, kayak birthday parties,
summer kids camps, sales and instruction
for beginners. 3152 Shadeville Road,
877-7200, www.thewildernessway.net.
CHEERLEADING
Cheer Company Allstars: A competitive
all-star cheerleading gym that also offers
recreational tumbling and dance. 2615-B
Capital Circle NE, 894-5867, www.cheer-
co.squarespace.com.
DISC GOLF
Tom Brown Park Disc Golf Course: 24
holes. Tallahassee Parks and Recreation,
891-3866, www.talgov.com.
Jack McLean Disc Golf Course: 24
holes, old trees throughout, heavily wooded
in most areas. Paul Russell Road. Tallahas-
see Parks and Recreation, 891-3866,
www.talgov.com.
FAMILY FUN
Fun Station Inc.: GoCart track and thrill
ride, 36-hole miniature golf course, arcade,
bumper boats, batting cages, pizza kitchen
and laser tag. 2821 Sharer Road, 383-0789,
www.itsfunner.com.
FISHING AND
HUNTING
Shell Island Fish Camp: Fishing, boating,
dry and wet storage plus rental boats,
cabins and motel rooms. 440 Shell Island
Road., St. Marks, 925-6226, www.shellis-
landfishcamp.com.
Whippoorwill Sportsmans Lodge:
Rental lodge suites, RV sites, cottages and
boats. Waterfront Pub-n-Grub, store, pier,
boat ramp, covered boat stalls. On Lake
Talquin. 3129 Cooks Landing Road., Quincy,
875-2605, www.fishthewhip.com.
HORSE RIDING
Cavallo Farms: A full-service hunter/
jumper equestrian center offering lessons,
training, boarding, showing and camps in
Lloyd. 997-1655, www.cavallofarms.com.
Happy Trails Ranch: Birthday parties,
Western riding lessons, field trips,summer
camps and horse boarding. 6776 Quail
Valley Road, 893-0771, www.happytrails-
ranch.com.
KITES AND JUGGLING
Lofty Pursuits: A selection of yo-yos,
juggling equipment and kites. 1415 Timber-
lane Road #410, 521-0091, www.lofty-
pursuits.com.
MARTIAL ARTS
Killearn Lakes TaeKwonDo: For children
and adults of all ages and abilities. 6808
Thomasville Road, 668-0469, www.killearn-
lakestkd.com.
Tallahassee Taekwondo Academy:
Blountstown Highway, 575-4877, www.tal-
lahasseeskateinn.com.
SKYDIVING
School of Human Flight: Take your first
jump or train to become a nationally
licensed skydiver. Quincy Airport, Highway
12, Quincy, 627-7643, www.skydivetalla-
hassee.com.
Seminole Skydiving: Mission is to
introduce the public to skydiving in a safe,
environment. Also offers airplane and
helicopter rides. 45 Monocoupe Circle,
Panacea. 984-3483.
SOCCER
Warner Soccer: Year-round, professional
soccer company that runs programs, camps
and leagues for ages 3 through adult.
1695-4 Metropolitan Circle, 386-3866,
www.warnersoccer.com.
TENNIS
Randy Hock Tennis: Private and group
lessons for all ages and ability levels;
summer camps for kids. 1771 Woodgate
Way, 385-2262, rhock63@aol.com.
USTA 10 and Under Tennis: QuickStart
format tennis league for ages 10 and
younger. 3711 Overlook Drive, 508-5082,
www.10andundertennis.com.
WORKOUTS
Boot Camp Fitness and Training:
Nontraditional fitness programs. 2815-2
Industrial Plaza Drive, 445-0222,
www.BootCampFitnessandTraining.com.
Pilates with Joyce: A low-impact exercise
program for all ages. 891-3920, www.pila-
teswithjoyce.com.
OTHER PURSUITS
Tallahassee Indoor Shooting Range:
Indoor facility for firearms and archery. 499
Capital Circle SW, 727-4867, tallyindoor-
shooting.com.
Other sports facilities & businesses
The big happening in the
parks world this year has been
the long-awaited opening of
Cascades Park. Constructed
by Blueprint 2000 in part-
nership with the City of Talla-
hassee and Leon County
through the use of a one-cent
local option sales tax, Cas-
cades is a stormwater facility
cleverly disguised as an urban
park.
The 24-acre park on Gads-
den Street is home to the
Prime Meridian Plaza, Smokey
Hollow Commemoration,
Capital City Amphitheater,
Imagination Fountain, Discov-
ery Playscape and miles of
multi-use trails.
Here are a few things you
need to know about Cascades
Park:
Park hours are sunrise to
sunset except in lighted areas.
There is parking on the
property and several roadside
parking spaces. On weekends
and after 6 p.m. weekdays
there are three additional lots
available. You can find a park-
ing map at DiscoverCasca-
des.com.
Cascades Park is pet-
friendly, as long as your pet is
on a leash.
Imagination Fountain
features 73 jets that randomly
shoot filtered water into the
air. On Friday, Saturday and
Sunday nights at 8, 8:30 and 9
p.m., the fountain features an
eight-minute light and music
show with songs that include
Celebrate by Kool and the
Gang and Mess Around by
Ray Charles, who once lived in
Tallahassee.
Cascades Park
AQUATIC
Tallahassee Serinas: A recreational
league and a competitive team. Ages 7-19.
891-4905, www.serinas.org.
ARCHERY AND GUN
CLUBS
Project Appleseed: An activity of the
Revolutionary War Veterans Association,
dedicated to teaching every American
marksmanship skills. 668-0410, www.ap-
pleseedinfo.org.
Tallahassee Bowhunters Association:
For those who enjoy all types of archery.
www.bigbendarchery.com.
Tallahassee Rifle & Pistol Club: Private
outdoor range, memberships available.
421-3998, www.trpc.net.
AUTO, MOTORCYCLE,
TRAIN, PLANE CLUBS
Airstream RV Owners Club: A family
oriented nonprofit camping club for owners
of Airstream and Argosy recreational
vehicles. 894-4416,
www.bigbendfl.wbcci.net.
Big Bend Model Railroad Association:
Aims to promote and preserve model
railroading. 410-8425, www.bbmra.org.
Canopy Road Cruisers: The local chapter
of the Gold Wing Road Riders Association
(GWRRA). 539-5084, www.canopyroad-
cruisers.com.
Capital City Riders: An independent
motorcycle riding club welcoming all
brands of motorcycles and safe riders.
groups.yahoo.com/group/capitalcityriders.
Chrome Divas: The clubs mission is to
give a new name to women bikers.
www.chromedivas.com.
Crosstrails Sams Club: National Good
Sams RV Club chapter. Social club with
monthly outings. 894-5557, www.cross-
trailssams.com.
Cruisin Corvettes: Meets at various
locations. www.cruisincorvettes.com.
Harley Owners Group, Tallahassee
Chapter: Sponsored by Capital City
Harley-Davidson. 205-4294, www.tallahas-
seehog.com.
North Florida Mopar Association:
Dedicated to Chryslers, Dodges, Plymouths,
DeSotos, Imperials and AMCs. www.my-
webpages.comcast.net/nfma.
Panhandle Ponies Tallahassee Mus-
tang Club: Ownership of a Mustang not
required to join. www.panhandlepo-
nies.com.
Seminole Radio Control Club: Model
aviation enthusiasts of all ages who design,
build and fly model aircraft. www.semino-
lerc.com, 656-5932.
Sports Car Club of America Dixie
Region: A regional volunteer nonprofit car
club. 591-0856, www.dixiescca.com.
Southern Cruisers Riding Club: A
family-oriented club. Meets weekly at
Whataburger, Thomasville Road.
Tallahassee Streetrodders: Encourages
restoration and/or preservation of autos,
trucks and other projects. www.tallahas-
seestreetrodders.com.
Tallahassee Region Antique Automo-
bile Club of America: The regional club
of the National Antique Automobile Club
of America (AACA). www.traaca.org.
The Temple of Triumph: Much more
than just another British car club, its a
state of mind. www.templeoftriumph.org.
BASEBALL
Society for American Baseball Re-
search Buck ONeil Chapter: Fostering
the research, preservation and dissemi-
nation of the history and records of
baseball. 459-4703, www.sabr.org.
BASKETBALL
Tallahassee Comets: A nonprofit
organization for student-athletes in
competitive girls basketball. 559-1351,
www.cometsget.net.
BOATING AND
ROWING
Apalachee Bay Yacht Club: Promotes
sailing, cruising or racing. Power-boat
owners also welcomed as members.
926-7775, www.abyconline.org.
Apalachee Canoe and Kayak Club: A
local paddling club that canoes and kayaks.
www.clubkayak.com/ackc/default.asp.
Capital City Rowing: A competitive
rowing team open to male and female
middle and high school students. 933-
5217, www.capitalcityrowing.org.
St. Marks Yacht Club: Slips lease to
members. Clubhouse available for rent. You
dont have to own a boat to join. On the
Wakulla River, 925-6606.
Shell Point Sailboard Club (SPSC):
Supports sailing for all ages and levels,
offering free lessons, races. 273-1004,
www.20knotsnob.com.
Tallahassee Rowing Club: Nonprofit
club to promote and teach rowing.
www.nettally.com/trc.
BOXING
Lincoln Center Boxing Club: Provides
boxing training for youth ages 8-18. 438 W.
Brevard St., 891-4181, www.talgov.com/
parks/cc/lincoln.cfm.
CIRCUS
FSU Flying High Circus: Annual home
shows in April under the Big Top and road
shows throughout the academic year.
644-4874, www.circus.fsu.edu.
CYCLING
Capital City Cyclists: Promotes bicycling
for fun, exercise and commuting. 545-
6406, www.cccyclists.org.
EQUESTRIAN
ACTIVITIES
Big Bend Horsemans Association:
Sponsors an open horse show the second
Saturday of every month. 524-4442,
bigbendhorse@yahoo.com.
Leon County Horsemens Association:
Monthly shows are open to the public on
the first Saturday of the month. 544-0302,
www.showlcha.org.
North Florida Paso Fino Horse Associ-
ation: A regional affiliate of PFHA,
covering all of North Florida. 673-9579,
www.NorthFLPaso.com.
Southern Trailriders Association:
Promotes and develops public horse trails
and conducts organized trail rides in the
area. www.southerntrailriders.org.
Tallahassee Riding Academy: An
Interscholastic Equestrian Association team
for middle and high school students in
Lloyd. www.cavallofarms.com, 997-1655.
FRISBEE
Tallahassee Disc Golf Association:
www.discgolftally.org.
Tallahassee Ultimate: Co-ed community
Ultimate Frisbee league. www.tallahas-
seeultimate.com.
GOLF
Classical School of Golf: Teaches men,
women and children how to play golf
and/or improve their skills. 309-7888,
www.beckysauersgolf.com.
Lady Links: A fun group that like to play
and learn golf in a non-threatening
environment. 309-7888, www.becky-
sauersgolf.com.
HIKING
Apalachee Chapter of the Florida
Trail Association: Provides opportunities
for hiking and camping. Meets monthly.
386-1494, 668-4334. www.apalachee.flori-
datrail.org.
HUNTING
Safari Club International: Aims to
protect the right to hunt. 556-2237,
talsci@earthlink.net
ROLLER DERBY
Tallahassee RollerGirls: A league of
roller derby skaters, officials and volunteers.
Skaters range in age from 20 to 50.
228-6818, tallyrg.com.
SOCCER
Capital Soccer Association: Providing
quality recreational soccer in Tallahassee
for over 25 years. Serving ages 4-17.
www.capitalsoccer.info.
TRACK
Gulf Winds Track Club: The club orga-
nizes races each year from 1 to 50 miles,
including Springtime Tallahassee and the
Tallahassee Turkey Trot. www.gulfwind-
s.org.
WRESTLING
Beat the Streets of Tallahassee: A
nonprofit organization promoting wrestling
in the Big Bend area. bts.tally@gmail.com,
264-9718.
Sports clubs & organizations
TALLAHASSEE TENNIS CHALLENGER
The USTA Tallahassee Tennis Challenger takes place every year
in late April/early May at the City of Tallahassees Forest Mead-
ows Tennis Complex. This professional event, the only USTA
Pro Circuit $50,000 Mens Challenger tennis tournament in
North Florida and South Georgia, was begun in 2000 and
includes an international player list from more than 24 coun-
tries each year. 545-8740, TallahasseeChallenger.com.
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 83
Sports & Recreation Clubs and organizations
her parents received a letter
from Tallahassee when she
was born. Clearly, receiving
mail was a bigger deal in the
1950s.
In the old TV series, The
Real McCoys (1957-1963),
the teenage girl character
(played by Lydia Reed) was
named Hassie because
84 Living Here | 2014-2015
Sports & Recreation Florida State University
The expectations have
never been higher for a Flori-
da State football team.
And considering the
amount of success the pro-
gram has had in the last quar-
ter century,
thats saying
something.
The 2014
Seminoles are
the reigning
national cham-
pions, return
the 2013 Heis-
man Trophy
winner at quar-
terback and will
be the No. 1 team in the coun-
try again when the preseason
polls are officially released in
August.
But its more than that.
Florida State is expected to
be a double-digit favorite in
every game it plays this sea-
son. Thats never happened
before in FSU history. And in
fact the Seminoles could very
well be a 14-point favorite in
every regular-season game
they play something that
hasnt happened in college
football since 1980.
The reason for the unprec-
edented expectations start
with the quarterback, of
course.
Jameis Winston became
the youngest Heisman winner
ever in 2013, shattering NCAA
freshman records with 4,057
passing yards and 40 TD
passes. He also rushed for four
more scores and led the Semi-
noles in the final minute to
beat Auburn in the BCS Cham-
pionship game.
But the Seminoles offense
is about more than just one
person.
Florida State returns five
seniors on the offensive line
four of whom started all of last
season, including All-Amer-
ican Cameron Erving at left
tackle. The Seminoles also
return Nick OLeary at tight
end and senior Rashad
Greene at wide receiver.
Standout receivers Kelvin
Benjamin and Kenny Shaw will
both have to be replaced, but
the cupboard is full of veter-
ans and five-star freshmen
competing to fill those shoes.
On defense, the Seminoles
once again will be absolutely
loaded in the secondary.
Starting cornerbacks P.J.
Williams and Ronald Darby
are both considered possible
NFL first-round picks and
sophomore safety Jalen Ram-
sey might be the most talented
player on the defense. If he
isnt, then that title would
likely go to junior defensive
end Mario Edwards Jr.
Both Edwards and Williams
were named to the preseason
watch list for the Bednarik
Award, which goes to the best
defensive player in college
football.
So, yes, the expectations
are sky high in 2014.
The season starts in Dallas
with a neutral-site game
against Oklahoma State. And
the Seminoles hope it ends
there as well, in the national
championship game to be
played on Jan. 12.
Corey Clark has been covering sports for
the Democrat for seven years. His
favorite thing about living in Tallahas-
see is raising his son here.
Big expectations for the Seminoles
FSU football aims
to repeat as
national champs
The Florida State Seminoles during a game against the Boston College Eagles last year. GLENN
BEIL/DEMOCRAT FILES
2014 FOOTBALL
SCHEDULE
Aug. 30 vs. Oklahoma State
(Arlington, Texas)
Sept. 6 vs. The Citadel
Sept. 20 vs. Clemson
Sept. 27 at North Carolina State
Oct. 4 vs. Wake Forest
Oct. 11 at Syracuse
Oct. 18 vs. Notre Dame
Oct. 30 at Louisville
Nov. 8 vs. Virginia
Nov. 15 at Miami
Nov. 22 vs. Boston College
Nov. 29 vs. Florida
Corey
Clark
NoleSports.com
editor
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 85
Sports & Recreation Florida A&M University
Football rules and certainly
gets everyones attention
during the fall,
with high ex-
pectations for
the Florida
A&M Rattlers.
And not just
because this
will be the first
year that Earl
Holmes will be
adding his first
recruiting class.
The bar was
raised by the
Rattlers success in softball, as
coach Veronica Wiggins team
captured the MEAC title this
year.
Baseball was even more
amazing under first-year
coach Jamey Shouppe. The
Rattlers won a share of the
MEACs South Division and
set several school records
along the way. And who could
forget the historic 4-3 victory
over the Florida Gators.
Theyve given FAMU fans
something to cheer about.
They would be glad to see
football win, too.
This could be the year that
Holmes, who is in his second
season as head coach, re-
establishes the football pro-
gram as the one that sets the
standard for the rest.
This is where it starts,
Holmes said. When youre
talking about the guys we
brought in, the mature guys
from December, and the kids
we signed in February, all
those kids fit the mold of
football that we are trying to
build.
Holmes has quarterback
Damien Fleming coming back
for his senior year after rehab-
bing from a foot injury. Backup
Carson Royal is expected to
be even better than he was
when he had to finish the final
two games last year.
Fans will get five opportu-
nities to see the Rattlers at
home this year. After opening
on the road at Jackson State
and Miami, the first home
game against Coastal Carolina
could tell a lot about the cali-
ber of team Holmes will put
on the field. Its trip to Talla-
hassee will be a first and it
should be entertaining.
The matchup should be
even more intriguing than the
Nov. 1 homecoming game
against Norfolk State.
St. Claire Murraine has been covering
sports for the Democrat since 1988.
High hopes for Rattlers football
Holmes is building
up the team: This
is where it starts
FAMU fans will see a team that has several underclassmen returning for the 2014 season. GLENN BEIL/DEMOCRAT
2014 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
Aug. 30 at Jackson State
Sept. 6 at Miami
Sept. 20 vs. Coastal Carolina
Sept. 27 at Tennessee State
Oct. 4 vs. Morgan State
Oct. 11 vs. Savannah State
Oct. 18 at Howard University
Oct. 25 at North Carolina A&T
Nov. 1 vs. Norfolk State (home-
coming)
Nov. 8 vs. South Carolina State
Nov. 15 at Delaware State
Nov. 22 vs. Bethune-Cookman
(Orlando)
All home games are scheduled
for 5 p.m., except homecoming
which is a 3 p.m. start
St. Clair
Murraine
Democrat
staff writer
@boxingbuff
on Twitter
86 Living Here | 2014-2015
Sports & Recreation Back to nature
APALACHICOLA
NATIONAL FOREST
The 571,000-acre Apalachicola National
Forest, the largest national forest in Florida,
lies just southwest of Tallahassee. It offers
boating and fishing along the Ochlockonee
and Apalachicola rivers and swimming in
the numerous lakes. Trails and roads
accommodate hiking, mountain-bike riding,
horseback riding, and off-road ATV and
motorcycle riding. Primitive camping is
allowed throughout the forest. Camping
fees start at $10 per night. Some areas
require a day-use fee of $3 per vehicle.
Annual passes are $40 per vehicle. For
more information visit www.fs.fed.us/r8/
florida.
REGIONAL
STATE PARKS
Florida state parks are open from 8
a.m. until sundown, 365 days a year.
Museums, visitor centers and historic sites
may close on holidays and two days a
week. The entrance fee into most parks is
$4-$5 per carload, up to eight people.
Extra people, walk-ins and bicyclists are
$2-$5 per person. Annual individual passes
are $60 plus tax, and annual family passes
(up to eight people per car) are $120 plus
tax. Parks that have Honor Stations charge
$2-$10 per vehicle. Camping and lodging
reservations may be made by calling the
Florida State Park Central Reservation
System at 800-326-3521, 8 a.m.-8 p.m., or
visit online at www. reserveamerica.com.
Contact the Florida State Parks Information
Center at 245-2157 or visit www.floridas-
tateparks.org.
Falling Waters State Park: Hundred-
foot deep, 20-foot wide cylindrical sinkhole.
A small stream drops 73 feet to the bottom
of the sink, eventually flowing into the
aquifer. Chipley, 850-638-6130.
Florida Caverns State Park: Caves
contain dazzling formations of stalactites,
stalagmites and other geological features.
Boating, fishing, camping, nature trails and
more. Nine-hole, Robert Trent Jones-
designed Florida Caverns Golf Course. $8,
$5 for ages 3-12, kids under 3 free. Closed
Tuesday and Wednesday. 3345 Caverns
Road, Marianna, 850-482-9598.
Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation
Commission: Discover the scenic Rivers
of AWE - Aucilla, Wacissa and Econfina
Rivers, all three designated National
Recreation Trails. Outstanding paddling
adventures and wildlife viewing opportuni-
ties close to Tallahassee. Order map from
wildlifefoundationofflorida.com.
Forest Capital Museum State Park:
Dedicated to longleaf pines and the timber
industry. Perry, 850-584-3227.
Ichetucknee Spring State Park:
Springs discharge millions of gallons of
water a day giving rise to the clear Iche-
tucknee River. Tubing and canoeing rentals
available. Scuba diving permitted October
through March. Fort White, 386-497-4690.
Letchworth-Love Mounds State Park:
One of the tallest and most architecturally
complex pre-Colombian earthen mounds in
Florida. 4500 Sunray Road S., Tallahassee,
922-6007.
Lake Jackson Mounds State Archae-
ological Site: One of the most important
archaeological sites in Florida. Picnic tables
and shelter, bathrooms, trails. $3 per
vehicle, $2 per pedestrian. Group tours may
be scheduled 14 days in advance. 3600
Indian Mounds Road, Tallahassee, 922-
6007.
Lake Talquin State Park: Largemouth
bass, shellcracker and speckled perch sport
fishing. 10 miles west of Captial Circle,
14850 Jack Vause Landing Road, Tallahas-
see, 922-6007.
Natural Bridge Battlefield State
Historic Site: Site of the Battle of Natural
Bridge, which preserved Tallahassee as the
only Confederate capital east of the
Mississippi not to fall into Union hands.
Re-enactment of battle held in March.
Woodville, 922-6007.
San Marcos de Apalache State
Historic Site: Nature trails through
historic ruins. No admission fee for trails.
Museum, $2 entry. 148 Old Fort Road, St.
Marks, 925-6216.
Torreya State Park: Bluffs overlooking
the Apalachicola River, rising more than
150 feet. Bristol, 850-643-2674.
LEON COUNTY PARKS
One of Leon Countys best-kept secrets
is the 30 or so public recreation areas
strung along its magnificent array of lakes
and rivers. Designed for use such as
boating, picnicking and bird-watching; no
swimming, alcohol, shooting, hunting or
loud stereos. Pets must be leashed. Some
fees and reservations required at some
locations. Except for overnight campers,
parks are off-limits from 30 minutes after
sunset until 30 minutes before sunrise. Call
606-1470, or visit the www.leoncountyfl-
.gov.
Apalachee Regional Park: Four multi-
purpose fields (two lighted), soccer and
football fields. 7550 Apalachee Parkway.
Canopy Oaks: Two Little League fields
(one lighted), two lighted tennis courts,
lighted multipurpose field, playground.
3250 Point View Drive.
Daniel B. Chaires Community Park:
Four lighted tennis courts, two basketball
courts, two lighted standard Little League
baseball fields, one T-ball field. 4768
Chaires Cross Road.
Fort Braden Community Park: Two
lighted Little League baseball fields, lighted
multipurpose field. 15100 Blountstown
Highway.
Jackson View Park: Walking trails, picnic
area, open space and observation deck.
2585 Clara Kee Blvd.
J. Lee Vause Park: Six picnic pavilions,
1-mile paved trail, boardwalk, playground,
volleyball net. 6024 Old Bainbridge Road.
J. Lewis Hall Sr. Woodville Park &
Recreation Complex: Multipurpose field,
four Little League fields (two lighted),
full-size baseball and softball fields, two
basketball courts, two picnic pavilions, tot
lot and playground. 1492 J. Lewis Hall Sr.
Lane.
Kate Ireland Park: Picnic shelter, play-
ground, trail. 12271 Iamonia Landing Road.
Lake Henrietta Park: 1.2 mile long
paved walking trail. 3305 Springhill Road.
Lake Munson Park: Picnic shelter, nature
trail, dock. 5800 Crawfordville Highway.
Miccosukee Park: Lighted adult baseball
multipurpose field, two picnic pavilions,
two lighted basketball courts, playground,
walking trail. 15011 Cromartie Road.
Pedrick Pond: Walking trails. 5701
Mahan Drive.
Stoneler Road Park: Baseball field,
picnic shelter, playground, basketball hoop,
trail. 5225 Stoneler Road.
Tower Road Park: Multipurpose field,
playground, picnic shelter. 5971 Tower
Road.
TALLAHASSEE PARKS
The city of Tallahassee operates and
maintains parks, many with amenities such
as playgrounds, open grass areas, picnic
tables, sports fields, tennis courts and more.
To Call 891-FUNN or visit www.talgov.com/
parks.
A.J. Henry Park: 71.4 acres, picnic tables,
playground. A.J. Henry Park Drive.
Brinkley Glen Park: 8.2 acres. North
Meridian Road.
Carter Howell Strong Park: 11.4 acres,
picnic tables. West Georgia Street.
Chittenden Park: 1.5 acres. Spruce
Avenue.
Dorothy B. Oven Park &
Meeting House: 7.5 acres. Picnic tables.
3205 Thomasville Road.
Elinor Klapp Phipps Park: 656.1 acres,
picnic tables. 4000 N. Meridian Road.
Guyte P. McCord Park: 21.2 acres, picnic
tables. Thomasville Road.
Harriman Circle Park: 8 acres, picnic
tables. Harriman Circle.
John G. Riley Park: 4.8 acres, picnic
tables. Alabama Street.
Lake Ella Park: 16 acres, picnic tables.
Monroe Street.
Levy Park: 609 West Tharpe Street.
Los Robles Park: 1.7 acres, picnic tables.
At the intersection of Thomasville and
Meridian roads.
Macon Community Park: 12.9 acres,
picnic tables, playground. Henderson Road.
Mabry Manor: 2.1 acres. Villamore
Avenue.
Mabry Park: 21.5 acres. Roberts Avenue
and Mabry Street.
Ninth & Terrace Park: 2 acres, play-
ground. Corner of Ninth Avenue and
Terrace Street.
Park Avenue Chain of Parks: Park
Avenue, downtown Tallahassee.
Ruthenia Park: 3.1 acres. Ruthenia Road.
San Luis Mission Park: 69.1 acres,
playground, picnic tables. 1313 San Luis
Road.
Springsax Park: 35.4 acres, Springsax
Road.
Sweetbay Swamp Park: Yaupon Drive.
Tom Brown Park: 297.3 acres, play-
ground, picnic tables, disc golf, trails. 1125
Easterwood Drive, off Capital Circle SE.
Waverly Pond: 7.5 acres, picnic tables.
Waverly Road.
Winthrop Park: 14.4 acres, picnic tables,
playground. Mitchell Avenue.
GREENWAYS & TRAILS
Alfred B. Maclay Gardens State
Park Trails: Located between urban
Tallahassee and suburban Leon County,
offering a blend of Southern charm and
recreational activities. The park has formal
gardens, two lakes and a series of trails, all
on former plantation lands at the foot of
the Red Hill district. Many trail-enthusiasts
enjoy the unpaved trails in the Lake
Overstreet portion of the park. Recreation
includes biking, hiking, horseback riding
and paddling by canoe or kayak.
Elinor Klapp-Phipps Park Red
Bug Trail: The Redbug Off-Road Bicycle
Trail is about 3 miles long and offers a
Parks & trails
TD-0000252064
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 87
Sports & Recreation Back to nature
technically challenging ride with
numerous roots, rocks and wetland
areas through several ecosystems.
Access the trail from Meridian Park or
the Forestmeadows Sports Center.
Lafayette Passage Paddle Trail:
Six-mile loop trail accessed from Piney
Z Lake. This trail requires a short
portage over a small dam to access the
entire trail. The 200-acre Piney Z Lake
is accessible without a portage.
Miccosukee Canopy Road
Greenway: Parallels six miles of
Tallahassees historical canopy roads
through 500 acres of the Red Hills
region of North Florida. Along the trail,
users may observe more than 46
species of birds. Recreation also
includes hiking, bicycling and horse-
back riding.
Munson Hills Off-Road Bicycle
Trail: Offers a scenic and challenging
ride through some of the most varied
terrain in the Apalachicola National
Forest. Munson Hills consists of sand
dunes associated with a million-year-
old shoreline that forms a foundation
for a towering longleaf pine forest
intermixed with ponds and wetlands.
Tallahassee-St. Marks Historic
Railroad State Trail: Runs from
Floridas capital city, past the Apalachi-
cola National Forest, ending in the
coastal community of St. Marks. This
historic railroad corridor was used to
carry cotton from the plantation belt to
the coast for shipment. Today, the
paved trail provides a workout for road
cyclists, walkers and skaters.
OFF-ROAD TRAILS
Alfred. B Maclay State Gardens:
2.8 miles of trail.
Cadillac Trail: 4.8 mile path from
Tom Brown Park past Lake Lafayette
and Piney Z Lake. Intermediate level
trail with some challenging features.
Lafayette Heritage Trail Park in
Piney Z: Three miles of shared-use
trail through forest and along the
shore of Piney Z Lake. This trail in-
tersects the Cadillac bike trail.
Munson Hills: 8.3 miles of main trail.
Short loop is 4.2 miles. Runs through
Apalachicola National Forest off St.
Marks Trail. The Twilight trail is 10
miles.
Phipps-Overstreet Trail: 8.2 miles
of sometimes rough terrain with
multiple entries off Meridian Road
north of Maclay School.
Red Bug Trail: A challenging 3.6
miles, with 1.8 mile addition near
Forestmeadows Center. Meridian Road
near Miller Landing Road.
San Luis Trail: Numerous trails in San
Luis Mission Park off San Luis Road.
St. Marks Trail: 19-plus miles running
one way along U.S. Highway 319 from
just south of Capital Circle to St. Marks
River.
Tom Brown Park: 4.5 mile woodsy
loop.
The Capital City Garden Club: Encour-
ages the art of gardening and promotes
cooperative gardening. 626 Tram Road.
656-7224.
Florida Native Plant Society, Magnolia
Chapter: To promote the preservation,
conservation and restoration of the native
plants and native plant communities of
Florida. The Magnolia Chapter serves Leon,
Gadsden, Hamilton, Jefferson and Madison
counties. www.magnolia.fnpschapters.org.
Friends of Maclay Gardens Inc.: A
volunteer organization that supports the staff
of the Alfred B. Maclay Gardens State Park.
3540 Thomasville Road, 487-4115, in-
fo@friendsofmaclaygardens.com.
Gardening Friends of the Big Bend:
Promotes gardening and gardening research
by supporting and assisting the faculty and
staff of NFREQuincy, an arm of the Univer-
sity of Floridas Institute for Food and Agricul-
tural Sciences. 155 Research Road, Quincy,
www.thegfbb.com.
The Growers Market: The Growers
Market at Lake Ella provides fresh seasonal,
locally grown produce, including vegetables,
sprouts, transplants, flowers and more.
Wednesdays from 3-6 p.m. 229 Lake Ella
Drive.
iGrow Whatever You Like: A Frenchtown-
based youth empowerment and urban
agriculture program of the Tallahassee Food
Network. iGrow runs the Dunn Street Youth
Farm, grows good food for the community,
provides meaningful employment to young
people and works to grow community-based
food systems. www.igrow-whateveryou-
like.weebly.com.
Tallahassee Area Rose Society: Encour-
ages rose culture and interest in our national
flower. Membership is open to anyone with a
love of roses. Meetings are held at Good-
wood Museum and Gardens. Visitors are
welcome. www.tallahasseearearosesocie-
ty.org.
Tallahassee Camellia Society: Encourages
the culture of camellias, our winter flower.
Affiliated with the American Camellia Society.
Contact Alex Hinson, 627-7814, ahinson@li-
neshinson.com.
Tallahassee Daylily Society: Promotes
knowledge and encourages daylily gardens.
Sponsors annual daylily show and plant sale
in mid-May. Joe Agosta, 668-1368, j.agos-
ta@mindspring.com, www.thsgardens.org.
Tallahassee Garden Club: An organization
dedicated to providing education on garden-
ing, nature and the preservation of the
environment. New members welcome. 507 N.
Calhoun St., 224-3371, www.tallahasseegar-
denclub.com.
Tallahassee Orchid Society: A gathering
of orchid hobbyists and enthusiasts. Guest
speakers present programs at monthly
meetings. 320-6566, www.tallyorchid.org.
Plant & garden clubs
VisitWakulla
The Natural Place to Be in Florida
Forget the crowded rush of beach towns and theme parks.
This is Wakulla County, and were all about enjoying life.
Visit our website and plan your trip today.
VisitWakulla.com or call (850) 984-3966
They call our stretch of coastline, from
Mexico Beach on the west to St. Marks on
Apalachee Bay on the east,
the Forgotten Coast and
for good reason.
Spared the over-devel-
opment of so much of
Floridas coastal areas,
dotted with no less than 10
protected natural areas, the
coast nearest to Tallahas-
see is largely unspoiled and
boasts abundant wildlife,
clean, family-friendly
beaches and outstanding recreational
fishing opportunities.
Travel to St. George Island, home to a
national award-winning state park, on the
busiest weekend in the summer, and there
is still plenty of room on the sugar-sand
for the family to spread their towels. And
while the calm Gulf may not be a surfers
Mecca, the clear water is perfect for
stand-up paddling boarding, swimming
and dolphin watching.
Other nearby beaches are worth a visit,
particularly St. Joseph Peninsula State
Park, where both the Gulf and St. Joe Bay
are just steps away from each other.
But the beauty of the Forgotten Coast
is about far more than its outstanding
beaches. It is a paradise for fishermen,
scallopers, crabbers and just plain oyster
eaters, who can indulge themselves on the
bounty provided by the struggling, but still
amazing Apalachicola Bay.
The regions protected wild areas also
are a world-renown destination for bird-
ers, native plant enthusiasts, hikers and
paddlers. St. Marks National Wildlife
Refuge, Tates Hell State Forest and the
Apalachicola National Estuarine Research
Reserve should not be missed.
The communities that connect the
coast Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, East-
point, Carrabelle, Alligator Point, Panacea
and Shell Point all evoke the laid-back
spirit of Old Florida, where hospitality
and seafood reign.
Dont miss out on our coast but
remember, we like to keep it forgotten.
Senior writer Jennifer Portman loves the beach and
paddling in both salt and freshwater.
Forgotten Coast offers plenty to explore
A flock of black skimmers fly
along the coast of bird island
near Apalachicola. DEMOCRAT
FILES
Jennifer
Portman
Democrat
senior writer
88 Living Here | 2014-2015
Sports & Recreation Environment
Apalachee Audubon Society: Monthly
bird trips. 813-293-1081, www.apalachee-
.org.
Audubon of Florida: Aims to conserve
and restore ecosystems, focusing on
wildlife. www.fl.audubon.org.
Big Bend Environmental Forum: An
alliance of organizations committed to
conserving the regions environment.
www.bbef.org.
Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection (DEP): The lead
state agency for environmental manage-
ment and stewardship. 3900 Common-
wealth Blvd. 245-2118, www.dep.sta-
te.fl.us.
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission: Manages fish and
wildlife resources. 620 S. Meridian St.,
488-4676, www.myfwc.com.
Florida Trail Association: A nonprofit
organization that builds, maintains,
protects and promotes the 1,400 mile
Florida Trail. www.apalachee.floridatrai-
l.org.
Florida Wildlife Federation: A state-
wide, nonprofit conservation education
organization. 656-7113, www.fwfonline-
.org.
Keep Tallahassee-Leon County
Beautiful: A nonprofit organization
committed to keeping the community
litter-free and educated about recycling,
solid waste and the environment. 681-
8589, www.ktlcb.com.
The Nature Conservancy, Florida
Chapter: Has protected more than 1
million acres of critical natural lands.
222-0199, www.nature.org.
North American Butterfly Associa-
tion Hairstreak Chapter: A non-
profit organization working to increase
public enjoyment and conservation of
butterflies. 668-2371, naba.hair-
streak@gmail.com.
Sierra Club, Big Bend Group: Dedicat-
ed to exploring, enjoying and protecting
wild places. www.florida.sierraclub.org/
bigbend.
Sustainable Tallahassee: Promotes
environmental stewardship and economic
vitality in our community. 597-9836,
www.sustainabletallahassee.org.
Tall Timbers Research Station and
Land Conservancy: Programs focus on
wildlife research, conservation, land
management, fire technology and educa-
tion. 13093 Henry Beadel Drive, 893-4153,
www.talltimbers.org.
The Wild Classroom: Offers wildlife
programs for groups, meetings and special
events. Features disabled birds of prey
from the St. Francis Wildlife Association.
562-8542, www.wildclassroom.net.
Environmental groups
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 89
Sports & Recreation Environment
Bald Point State Park: Some of the most
picturesque scenic areas along north
Floridas Gulf Coast can be found at this
nearly 5,000-acre park. Located on Alligator
Point where Ochlockonee Bay meets
Apalachee Bay, Bald Point offers land and
water activities including canoeing, kay-
aking, windsurfing and hiking. Facilities
include a fishing dock and picnic pavilions.
850-349-9146.
Beacon Hill Community Park: A small,
public beach with roadside parking offering
open and covered picnic tables, restrooms,
a playground, two softball/baseball fields, a
boardwalk to Highway 98 with dedicated
beach access, a walking track and a great
view. U.S. 98 in Port St. Joe. 850-227-1223.
Cape San Blas/St. Joseph Peninsula
State Park: With 10 miles of white sugar
sand, this park has one of the top-rated
beaches in the United States. Sunbathing,
snorkeling, swimming, canoeing and
kayaking. Outdoor enthusiasts can enjoy
camping, fishing, hiking, bird watching and
bicycling. Campers can stay in a full-facility
campground or at primitive campsites.
Hours 8 a.m.-sunset. $4, per vehicle; $1
pedestrians/bicyclists; $100/night for cabins;
camping, $20/night. 850-227-1327.
Carrabelle Beach: Sunbathing, swimming
and surf fishing. Campgrounds, restaurants
and the Crooked River Lighthouse are
nearby. The park is 1 mile west of Carrabelle
on U.S. 98. 850-697-2585, www. carrabel-
le.org.
Dog Island Beach/John F. Lewis
Preserve: Wildlife abounds along miles of
salt marshes and sand dunes, as more than
half of the island is a protected nature
preserve. Only accessible by boat, this
barrier island is not a public beach no
public facilities and dogs are not allowed.
The Nature Conservancy, 850-643-2756.
Grayton Beach State Recreation Area:
Has consistently been ranked among the
most beautiful and pristine beaches in the
U.S. The beach provides an idyllic setting for
swimming, sunbathing, and surf fishing.
Visitors can paddle a canoe or kayak on
scenic Western Lake. Options for overnight
stays include modern cabins and a full-
facility campground. South of U.S. 98,
halfway between Panama City Beach and
Destin. 850-267-8300.
Hagens Cove: The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission owns this
facility, which features picnic pavilions,
hiking trails and an observation tower for
birdwatching. 386-758-0525, www.myfwc-
.com.
Henderson Beach State Park: This
208-acre park, just east of Destin, is an
oasis in the midst of urban growth. Activ-
ities include swimming, surf fishing, pic-
nicking, camping, bicycle riding and nature
trails. Admission $6, per vehicle; $4, for
single occupant; $2, per person/ bicyclists.
$30 camping fee. ADA-accessible park,
three beach wheelchairs are available.
850-837-7550.
Mashes Sands/Mash Island Park: Boat
ramps can be found where the wide,
shallow river empties into Apalachee Bay.
This is the northernmost point in the Gulf of
Mexico. Mash Island Park offers a sandy
beach with picnic cabanas bordering
Apalachee and Ochlockonee Bays and a
public beach with shallow bay water thats
seldom overrun. 926-7227.
Mexico Beach: Just a few miles west of
Port St. Joe, there are many points of access
to the emerald Gulf waters, a pier, board-
walks to the beach and beachside parks at
two convenient locations. 850-648-8196 or
888-723-2546.
Shell Point: A small community located on
the Apalachee Bay in the north Gulf Coast
of Florida. Has become a popular spot for
windsurfing and sailing and also offers
wildlife and bird watching, swimming,
hiking, biking, snorkeling and golf. 850-
926-1848.
St. Andrews State Park: Boasting just
more than 1.5 miles of beach and known
for its sugar-white sands and crystal-clear
emerald green water, this 1,063-acre park
offers full facility camping, showers, swim-
ming, canoeing, kayaking, snorkeling, scuba
diving, boat ramp, boat tours, hiking trails,
two playgrounds and picnicking. Park
entrance costs $8 per vehicle; $2 pedestrian
or bicyclist. 233-5140; www.floridastate-
parks.org.
St. George Island State Park: A favorite
of Tallahasseeans, this island boasts a north
side facing Apalachicola Bay and a south
side looking out on the Gulf of Mexico. The
island has exceptional beaches, good
fishing and plenty of beach houses for rent
for weekend getaways. Offers camping and
has bathrooms, showers and picnicking
facilities. $6, per vehicle; $2 pedestrian or
bicyclist. 850-653-9419; 850-927-2111;
www.floridastateparks.org.
St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge:
70,000 acre coastal refuge just south of
Tallahassee includes marshes islands and
estuaries and abundant wildlife and birds.
Home to St. Marks Lighthouse. Three miles
south of U.S. 98 on County Road 59.
925-6121, www.fws.gov/saintmarks.
Area rivers, lakes & springs
Florida State University Reservation:
Waterfront park and conference room
rentals, a 73-acre facility with 10 active
acres, located on Lake Bradford. The Rez
is located 1/4 mile from the airport and four
miles from the FSU campus. Offers canoe-
ing, kayaking, picnicking, swimming and
other activities. No pets allowed. FSU
students free; Adults $2; children 7-15 $1; 6
and under free. 3226 Flastacowo Road,
Tallahassee, FL. 644-6892; 644-2449;
fsu.campusrec.com/reservation.
Lake Hall at Maclay Gardens State
Park: Provides opportunities for swimming,
fishing, canoeing and kayaking. Only boats
without motors or with electric motors are
allowed. Hikers, bicyclists, and equestrians
can enjoy five miles of multi-use trails
winding through the woods. $6, per car,
single occupancy, $4; $2, pedestrian or
bicyclist. Alfred B. Maclay Gardens State
Park, 3540 Thomasville Road, 487-4556,
www.floridastateparks.org.
Ochlockonee River State Park: Picnic
facilities and a swimming area are near the
scenic point where the Ochlockonee and
Dead rivers intersect. A boat ramp provides
easy access to the river. There are full-facility
campsites with access to restrooms and
showers. Located 4 miles south of Sop-
choppy, on U.S. 319. 8 a.m. to sunset.
Fishing areas, short nature trails through a
pine forest, swimming in designated areas.
$4/per car; $2/ pedestrians/ bicyclists;
$4/boat launching fee; $18/camping fee.
962-2771.
Wakulla Springs State Park: Home of
one of the largest and deepest freshwater
springs in the world, this park plays host to
an abundance of wildlife, including alliga-
tors, turtles, deer and birds. Daily, guided
riverboat tours provide a closer view of
wildlife. The Wakulla Springs Lodge was is
open year-round. A full-service dining room
overlooks the Spring; lodge meeting
facilities offer a place for retreats. Lifeguard,
restrooms, picnic tables, grills, boat tours,
restaurant, lodge and nature trails. $6, per
carload; $2, pedestrian or bicyclist. Located
14 miles south of Tallahassee on State Road
267 at State Road 61. 850-561-7276;
www.floridastateparks.org.
On the waterfront
Chaires Creek in Bald Point State Park is one of 10 trips that make
up the new Apalachee Bay Maritime Heritage Paddling Trail
System. DOUG ALDERSON/SPECIAL TO THE DEMOCRAT
Create a Refuge ln
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1505-2 6overoor's Sg0are 8|vd
Ta||ahassee, FL 850-576-0002
taI I ahassee. wbu. com
veryth|og Ior backyard b|rd|og
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TD-0000252796
THE FINEST SOCCER
EDUCATION PROGRAMS
FOR BOYS AND GIRLS
AGES 3 TO ADULT
It didnt take long for me to catch the
Tallahassee running bug.
It couldve been the many trails the
city has to offer, or possibly the abun-
dance of races. Whatever it is, Ive caught
the capital citys runners high.
Tallahassees running scene is pow-
ered by individuals who simply love to
run and want to share that joy with every-
one a characteristic you dont find just
anywhere. The Gulf Winds Track Club,
Capital City Runners,
Moms on the Run and Girls
on the Run program are all
proof that the city is boom-
ing with passionate run-
ners.
The top notch parks
and trails make the town
every runners dream.
Wooded to concrete to
grass, theres every type of
running course available.
The Miccosukee Greenway Trail offers an
off-road experience through forested
areas, meadows and bridges. This was
one of the first places I broke a sweat
with my Move.Tallahassee.com friends.
Theres also Tom Brown Park on the east
side that has plentiful wooded and asphalt
paths.
The downtown area offers a different
perspective of the city. The area is
packed with local art, the Capitol com-
plex and the Florida Supreme Court that
add to the overall running experience.
This is also the center of the Springtime
Tallahassee 10K/5K race, which was my
first race in Tallahassee. Its a must-try,
although you better be ready for some of
those hills!
The SouthWood trails are right in my
backyard. There are concrete pathways
dotted throughout the community that
are relatively flat. This is a great place for
beginners. Its also the site for the Novem-
ber Turkey Trot on Thanksgiving Day. Ill
be trying that before enjoying some tur-
key that day.
Nicole Tschetter is a marathoner, adventurer and
hot-sauce addict. Her favorite part about living in
Tallahassee is exploring all the hidden gems the city
has to offer.
Exploring the capital city on the run
Tallahassee Democrat Executive Editor Bob Gabordi leads a Move.Tallahassee.com walk
at Premier Health & Fitness Center. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT
TALLAHASSEE
RACE SCHEDULE
January
Gulf Winds Track Club 30K/15K
February
Tallahassee Marathon and Half Marathon
March
Springtime 10K/5K/1 mile
Education for Life 5K
April
March of Dimes March for Babies 5K
May
Girls on the Run 5K
August
St. George Island Sizzler 5K
September
Womens Distance Festival 5K/1M
October
Tallahassee Democrat 5K
November
Turkey Trot 15K/10K/5K/1Mile (Thanks-
giving Day)
December
Tannenbaum 6K
For a complete calendar, go to
www.gulfwinds.org.
CALLING ALL
RUNNERS AND WALKERS
Move.Tallahassee.com is a social net-
working community created by the Talla-
hassee Democrat and Tallahassee.com to
support health and fitness activities. Move
brings together members from all walks
of life and provides them with walking
meet-ups. It also gave them the chance to
learn about their city through these walks.
Movers walked many places in the Big
Bend area in 2014 including Birdsong
Nature Center, Tall Timbers, downtown,
Town Brown park, Miccosukee Greenway.
Theres no telling where they will lace up
their walking shoes next.
Visit Move.Tallahassee.com or find it on
Facebook or Twitter to keep up-to-date
on events.
Nicole
Tschetter
Democrat
staff writer
90 Living Here | 2014-2015
Sports & Recreation
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 91
IN THIS SECTION
Introduction
Festivals & events
Things not to miss
Attractions
Galleries & museums
Music & Dance groups
Theaters and movie theaters
Nightlife
Singer Darius Rucker of Hootie and the
Blowfish fame played a dynamic show at the
Civic Center in April which included a
spectacular light show. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
Arts & Entertainment
ONLINE
See arts and entertainment
video at TLHlivinghere.com
92 Living Here | 2014-2015
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TD-0000252310
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 93
Arts & Entertainment Oh, the humanities!
There is a popular joke that Tallahassee is a drinking town
with a football problem.
That is easy to believe if you drop in during a fall weekend
when the citys two football stadiums are packed with loud and
boozy fans.
Ah, but there is another side to the city where you can bump
into world-famous opera composer Carlisle Floyd at brunch,
National Book Award finalist David Kirby at the movie theater,
Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Ellen Taaffe Zwilich at Publix
or jazz piano great Marcus Roberts at the Bone-
fish Grill.
The arty side of Tallahassee also helps keep
the performing arts alive and well in the city. The
scene is always re-inventing, itself, too.
The inaugural Word of South, which aims to
mix literature and music, is booked for early April
at the new amphitheater in Cascades Park. Au-
thors such as Ann Patchett and Emmy-winning
Tallahassee actor Tony Hale (Veep) have al-
ready signed on.
The following weekend in April, the Southern
Shakespeare Festival is being re-born in Cascades Park with a
production of A Midsummer Nights Dream.
If you are new to this ZIP code, the easiest way to get the lay
of the artistic landscape is by attending a First Friday Gallery
Hop in Railroad Square Art Park. Early each month, the col-
lection of studios and warehouses becomes a street festival with
live music, performances and art shows.
The three colleges in town also keep the jazz scene alive with
a steady stream of talent. Jazz students, their professors and big
names, usually someone named Marsalis, often drop by to sit in
on sets at Waterworks in Midtown, B Sharps Jazz Cafe in
Frenchtown, the Hi Fi Jazz Cafe near FAMU and the Saturdays
in the Park Concert Series.
Every February, the Opening Nights arts festival cranks up at
Florida State and brings in an onslaught of major-league talent
to Ruby Diamond Concert Hall.The Florida State Opera and
FSU College of Music also keep Ruby Diamond Concert Hall
filled with great music.
Because Tallahassee is a young, college town, there is always
an underground music scene that likes to throw edgy shows at
places with names such as the Shark Tank.
The dance scene is also lively with everything from several
ballet companies to the Florida African Dance Festival, held
every June. Heck, even the citys biggest football stadium is
home to the nationally known FSU film school.
Maybe this is a football town with an arty problem?
Mark Hinson has covered arts in Tallahassee for 23 years. His favorite things about
living here are the attentive drivers, intellectual politicians and polite yellow flies.
There is an arty crowd to bump
into in this football-crazy city, too
Bassist Rodney Jordan plucks away as the Marcus Roberts Trio
plays at B Sharps. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
Mark
Hinson
Democrat
senior writer
Charlie Wilson performed on April 13 at the Capital City
Amphitheater. CHUCK MCCLENTON/DEMOCRAT
94 Living Here | 2014-2015
Charming, quaint, hip, chic and overfowing with southern hospitality, this is Havana. A place like no other
where you will discover many stores full of contemporary home furnishings, the latest in kitchen gadgets,
gourmet food, vintage collectibles in 6 antique malls and jewelry. For one of a kind gifts you will fnd fne
European soaps, fragrances from Ireland, bags and clothing with monogramming available, candies and fne
wine. Spend the day and dine in one of the many gourmet cafes and tea room. We even have a nostalgic soda
fountain and ice cream shop! Its not just charming, its HAVANA!
OCT. 11
th
Pumpkin Fest
NOV. 8
th
& 9
th
Holiday Open House
DEC. 13
th
Lawn Mower Parade
& Holiday Fest
Kellums Fine Furniture
Where comfort & style come together
Wanderings Decor & More
Cool People Cool Products
Yep, were just that good!
Joanies Gourmet Market Fun Folks & Fabulous Food
is the place to
recreate your living space
TD-0000252802
The North Florida Fair, set for Nov. 6-16 this year, is always a blaze of color and sound, thrilling
rides and local music. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
Looking for a celebration? Heres a
sampling of the areas many events.
Experience Asia 2014: Each fall, the
Asian Coalition of Tallahassee showcases
the cultural diversity of the Asian commu-
nity in the downtown Chain of Parks. This
yearss colorful pageant of food, perfor-
mances and art takes place October 11.
www.asiantlh.org.
Florida A&M University Homecom-
ing: The Rattler Nation converges on
Tallahassee for festivities that include
step-dancing, receptions, luncheons, a
parade and the game Nov. 1. www.fa-
mu.edu.
Florida African Dance Festival:
Drummers and dancers from around the
globe are drawn to this three-day festival
each early June. 539-4087, www.fadf.org.
Florida Seafood Festival: Apalachicola
is jammed with seafood lovers hungry for
the bounty of the Gulf and some great
entertainment. This years event takes
place Oct. 31-Nov. 1. www.floridaseafood-
festival.com.
Florida State Homecoming: The big
game and the parade are always a hit,
but the celebration is also big on laughs.
The Pow Wow in the Civic Center always
features a big name comic. For 2014, the
game is Nov. 8 vs. Virginia. Homecoming
week is Nov. 2-8. homecoming.fsu.edu.
Goodwood Jams: Set up a chair and
grab a drink on the front lawn of one
Tallahassees most beautiful sites, Good-
wood Museum & Gardens, for this annual
outdoors concert on Nov. 1. Past perform-
ers include The North Mississippi Allstars
and Donna The Buffalo.
Halloween Howl: Goblins and ghosts
will be lurking at the Tallahassee Museum
as it is transformed into a fantasyland of
terrifying haunted trails and childhood
make-believe in late October.
www.tallahasseemuseum.org.
LeMoyne Chain of Parks Art Festi-
val: A two-day outdoor fine art festival
held April 18-19, 2015, featuring more
than 150 fine artists from the region and
all around the country. www.chainof-
parks.com.
Market Days: This benefit for the
Tallahassee Museum is always much
anticipated. On Dec. 6 and 7, creations
from more than 300 artists and artisans
fill buildings and plazas at the North
Florida Fairgrounds. www.marketdays.org.
North Florida Fair: From Nov. 6 to 16,
folks flock to the fairground to ride the
rides, catch musical acts, peruse exhibits
and gobble down corn dogs, funnel cakes
and other fair fare.
www.northfloridafair.com.
Opening Nights Performing Arts at
Florida State University (formerly
Seven Days of Opening Nights): Presents
more than 70 world-class performances,
events and educational opportunities in
music, theater, dance, film, creative
writing and visual arts annually. 644-
7670, openingnights.fsu.edu.
Panacea Blue Crab Festival: The
delectable beautiful swimmer and the
seafood industry in general are show-
cased in Panacea. After a parade down
U.S. 98, folks flock to Woolley Park to
enjoy music, seafood and fireworks on
the first Saturday in May. www.bluecrab-
fest.com.
Plantation Wildlife Arts Festival:
Some of the finest sporting and wildlife
artists in the Southeast display their
works at the Thomasville Cultural Center
in Thomasville, Ga., on Nov. 21-23.
www.pwaf.org.
Red Hills Horse Trials: Each March,
some of the worlds finest equestrians
and their horses come to Elinor Klapp
Phipps Park for the three-day competition.
It takes place in early March.
www.rhht.org.
Springtime Tallahassee: Known as
one of largest festivals in the Southeast,
Springtime Tallahassee has been cele-
brating the capital city for over 45 years
with a grand parade, arts and crafts
jubilee, entertainment stages, food court
and a kids park. In 2015, it takes place
March 28. www.springtimetallahassee-
.com.
Stephen C. Smith Regatta: Spend a
weekend at Shell Point in April watching
boats and windsurfers compete. This
beach party and charity auction takes
place at the end of April. www.smithre-
gatta.com.
St. Marks Stone Crab Festival:
Features a golf cart parade, live music, a
kids zone and some of the finest artists
and craftsmen plus the main event of
delicious Florida Fresh Stone Crabs and
seafood. 20 miles south of Tallahassee on
Highway 363. This years festival is Oct.
25. www.stmarksstonecrabfest.com.
Swamp Stomp: Savor the summertime
flavor of outdoor performances by
singer-songwriters at the Tallahassee
Museum's annual Swamp Stomp in July.
www.tallahasseemuseum.org.
Tallahassee Celebrates America
Thousands of patriotic souls fill Tom
Brown Park each Fourth of July for a free
concert and fireworks. www.talgov.com/
parks.
Tallahassee Greek Food Festival:
Offer an Opa! toast on the grounds of
Holy Mother of God Greek Orthodox
Church on Oct. 24 and 25.
www.hmog.org/festival.
Tallahassee Jewish Food and Cultur-
al Festival: Homemade and N.Y. deli
food, art and entertainment for adults
and children alike on the grounds of
Temple Israel each March. www.Tallahas-
seejewishfoodfestival.com.
Tallahassee PrideFest: The citys gay,
lesbian, bisexual and transgendered
community celebrates each spring with
PrideFest, a cornucopia of art openings,
performances, theater and a day of fun at
Kleman Plaza on April 18, 2015. www.tal-
lahasseepride.com.
Winter Festival: The city throws its
holiday party with a nighttime parade, the
Jingle Bell Run, a street festival and 10
gazillion white lights downtown. This
years festival is Dec. 7. www.talgov.com.
Festivals &
big events
LeMoyne Chain of Parks art festival is in April. KELLY
DOZIER/DEMOCRAT FILES
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 95
Arts & Entertainment Mark your calendar
96 Living Here | 2014-2015
Arts & Entertainment What to do
FAMILY ADVENTURES
Challenger Learning Center IMAX
Theater and Downtown Digital
Dome: A 32,000-square-foot facility in
downtown Tallahassee featuring Space
Mission Simulator, IMAX Theater and a
digital, domed, high-definition planetarium
and theater. 200 S. Duval St., Kleman
Plaza. 645-7827, www.challengertlh.com.
Tallahassee Museum: An award-
winning living museum where nature,
wildlife and history meet. The museum is
also home to Tallahassee Tree-To-Tree
Adventures. Museum Hours are 9 a.m.-5
p.m. Mon.-Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun. 3945
Museum Drive, 575-8684, tallahasseemu-
seum.org.
Wild Adventures: Theme park and zoo
in Valdosta, Ga. Highlights include more
than 50 rides and rollercoasters, the
Splash Island water park and concerts.
Hours of operation vary; call or check
online for details and prices. 229-219-
7080, www.wildadventures.com.
NATURAL
ATTRACTIONS
Alfred B. Maclay Gardens State Park:
On the hills overlooking Lake Hall, New
York financier Alfred B. Maclay created a
masterpiece of floral architecture. The
28-acre ornamental gardens contain the
historic Maclay home, picnic/recreation
area, boat ramp, fishing dock and hiking/
bicycle/equestrian trails. $6 per car;
walk-ins and bicyclists $2. Open 8 a.m.-
sunset daily. High bloom season is Jan.
1-April 30. 3540 Thomasville Road,
487-4556, www.floridastateparks.org.
Birdsong Nature Center: Featuring 565
acres of lush fields, wooded forests and
swampland offering a pristine haven for
birds and other native wildlife and 12
miles of nature trails well-suited for casual
hiking. $5, $2.50, kids age 4-12. 9 a.m.-5
p.m. Wed., Fri., Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun., 2106
Meridian Road, Thomasville, Ga., 229-
377-4408, www.birdsongnaturecente-
r.org.
Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratories
Aquarium: View hundreds of living
animals from the Gulf of Mexico, from
invertebrates such as sponges, anemones,
starfish, crabs and tunicates to fish such
as sharks, sting rays, moray eels and black
sea bass. Cost $9.50, ages 12 and up;
$8.50 65+; $7.50, ages 3-11; free, 2 and
under. 9 a.m.-5 .m. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-4
p.m. Sat., noon-4 p.m. Sun. 222 Clark
Drive off Highway 98, Panacea. 984-5297,
www.gulfspecimen.org.
The Parks of Park Avenue: Seven
downtown parks date to the 1880s. The
parks include Cherokee Park, E. Peck
Green Park, McCarty Park and Ponce de
Leon Park, which hosts the Downtown
Marketplace, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays
March-November. 224-3252, tallahassee-
downtown.com.
Attractions
About once a year, some-
one decides that Tallahassee
has a branding problem.
We despair of ever becoming
a major tourist destination
because we dont know who
we are or were trying to be
all things to all
people.
True
enough, I
suppose. Talla-
hassee isnt
just trees or
government or
music or foot-
ball. Tallahas-
see is a won-
derfully di-
verse, funky, stuffy, tree-
hugging, Republican, hippie,
sports-fanatical, family-
friendly, artsy place. The fact
that we cant define it is one
of the reasons I love it.
Here are a few cultural
things to check out if youre
new to town, or if youve
lived here awhile but have
never been. I grew up in New
York and have traveled to lots
of places and these are
things I havent seen any-
where else. At least, not quite
like this.
22nd floor of the Capitol:
Take the elevator up to the
top of our highest building
and check out the gor-
geous, 360-degree view of
the city. Its our version of
the Washington Monu-
ment. Oh, and theres a
gallery featuring some of
the states best artists up
there, too.
All Saints Cinema: Though
longtime film aficionados
are still mourning the loss of
the Miracle 5 Theater, you
can still see avant garde,
indie and foreign films
shown by the Tallahassee
Film Society at the All Saints
Cinema, which just happens
to be the lobby of the for-
mer Amtrak Station on
Railroad Avenue. Seating
about 70, its charming a
big screen but an intimate
experience, complete with
popcorn.
Mag Lab open house: You
cant live here long before
you know that Tallahassee
has the biggest, most pow-
erful magnet in the world at
the National High Magnetic
Field Laboratory. Once a
year, usually in February, the
lab opens its doors to the
public for a giant free sci-
ence party, with displays of
cryogenics, levitation, rock-
ets and tubs of goo for kids
to play in.
A Tallahassee Bach Parley
concert: This group of pro-
fessional musicians performs
music of the Baroque era
(1600-1750ish) using period
instruments. If youd think
that sounds boring, youd
be wrong. The music direc-
tor helps out with entertain-
ing commentary before
each piece, telling the audi-
ence what to listen for,
making even the most low-
brow among us feel com-
fortable. Plus they offer free
child care during concerts.
A Mickee Faust Club
cabaret: This group, oper-
ating out of a converted
warehouse in Railroad
Square, calls itself commu-
nity theater for the weird
community with good
reason. The shows are
campy, left-wing, gay-
themed, gut-busting fun.
The Florida African Dance
Festival: African dancers
and drummers from around
the world converge on
Tallahassee every June to
network, teach and per-
form, culminating in a
Saturday-night dance con-
cert that sometimes feels
like choreographed chaos.
If you can stay in your seat
and quiet, you may not
have a pulse.
The FSU Flying High Circus:
Really, how many uni-
versities have their own
circus? And they dont use
animals, so your ethics can
relax. There are on-campus
shows every spring in the
big tent near the baseball
stadium.
Tallahassee Museum: We
have a number of great
museums, but this combina-
tion museum/zoo/nature
preserve has it all native
Florida animals like black
bears and bald eagles (I
never get tired of watching
the otters chase each other
around), a zipline course
that takes you over a cy-
press swamp, a dinosaur
exhibit and history galore.
Randi Atwood came to Tallahassee
intending to stay for two years and
has lived here for 17. Her favorite
thing about Tallahassee is how it can
feel both big and small, depending on
where you are and whom youre with.
Here are five
(OK, eight) things
you shouldnt miss
Randi
Atwood
Entertainment
and features
editor
Artranise Sawyer pulls
herself up after riding a
zip-line at the Tallahassee
Museum. MICHAEL
SCHWARZ/DEMOCRAT FILES
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 97
Arts & Entertainment Attractions
St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge:
Its 70,000 acres include coastal marshes,
islands, tidal creeks and estuaries of seven
North Florida rivers, and are home to a
diverse community of plant and animal
life. The Visitor Center presents a general
overview of the refuge, displays and gift
shop. $5 per car, dawn to dusk. Three
miles south of U.S. 98 on County Road 59.
925-6121, www.fws.gov/saintmarks.
HISTORICAL SITES
Bradleys Country Store: The modest
shop in northeastern Leon County stands
today as it did when it was built in 1927.
The store is also known for its sausage,
coarse ground country milled grits and
corn meal. 10655 Centerville Road.
893-4742, www.bradleyscountrystore-
.com.
Brokaw-McDougall House: Classical
Revival plantation home, built in 1856. The
formal gardens were laid out in the 1850s.
Today the house is used as a conference
and event site. 329 N. Meridian St.,
891-3900, www.florida-arts.org.
The Columns: The one-time home of
William Money Williams, a wealthy
banker, this 1830s two-story is considered
one of Floridas finest remaining examples
of Greek Revival architecture. 100 N. Duval
St.
First Presbyterian Church: This Greek
Revival church, completed in 1838, is one
of the oldest buildings in Tallahassee. The
Territorial government designated the
sanctuary as an official refuge during the
Seminole Indian Wars. 110 N. Adams St.,
222-4587.
Florida Governors Mansion: This
1950s building is furnished with antiques
and antique reproductions. Tours available
during legislative sessions and the holiday
season or year-round by appointment.
700 N. Adams St., 488-4661, www.flori-
dagovernorsmansion.com.
Gallies Hall: Grocer Alexander Gallie
brought culture to the 1870s capital city
with this performance hall and its two-
story iron gallery. Contained the first
theater and only public hall in the city
from the late 1800s into the 1900s.
Northeast corner, Jefferson and Adams
streets.
Goodwood Museum & Gardens: The
antebellum plantation house features the
oldest fresco ceilings in Florida, a Belgian
crystal chandelier, Italian marble fireplaces
and artifacts original to the estate and
dating back to the mid-19th century. $6,
adults, $5, senior citizens; $3, children
3-12, under 3 free. 1600 Miccosukee
Road, 877-4202, www.goodwood-
museum.org.
Hernando DeSoto State Historic
Site: The only confirmed DeSoto site in
North America was discovered by state
archaeologist Calvin Jones in 1987.
Copper coins, links of chainmail armor and
glass trade beads dating to DeSotos visit
were among some 40,000 artifacts found
at the 1539-40 winter camp site. 1001
DeSoto Park Drive, 245-6340.
Historic Monticello Driving and
Walking Tour: Takes you through the
oak-lined streets of this charming town
with over 600 buildings built before 1920.
997-5552, www.visitjeffersoncountyflori-
da.com.
Lapham-Patterson House: Fishscale
shingles, oriental-style porch decorations,
longleaf pine inlaid floors and walk-
through stairway with cantilevered
balcony make this an outstanding ex-
ample of Victorian craftsmanship. $5
adults, $1 children age 18 and under. 626
N. Dawson St., Thomasville, Ga., 229-226-
7664.
Lichgate on High Road: Step through
the Lichgate and enter the realm of a
fairy-tale creation, a curiosity out of time
and place. This English Tudor-style cottage
has a labyrinth and beautiful vegetable,
perennial and Childrens Shakespeare
gardens over which a majestic live oak
presides. 1401 High Road, 383-6556,
www.lichgate.com.
Mission San Luis: A living history
museum on the site of a 17th-century
Apalachee Indian and Spanish settlement.
Reconstructions of the fort, Apalachee
council house, church, friary and a Spanish
house show what historical archaeology
has taught us about the people and their
structures. $5, $3 seniors, $2 children
6-17, free for children under 6 and active
military. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tues. through Sun.
2100 W. Tennessee St., 245-6406,
www.missionsanluis.org.
Old City Cemetery: Opened in 1829,
this cemetery became the final resting
place for pioneers, slaves and members of
both the Union and Confederate armies,
plus several Florida governors. Self-guided
walking tour brochure at entrance kiosk.
Open sunrise to sunset. Park Avenue and
Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Adjoining is St.
Johns Episcopal Cemetery, founded in
1840 and the final resting place for Prince
Achille Murat, nephew of Napoleon
Bonaparte.
Pebble Hill Plantation: A tribute to the
sporting life of the Deep South and home
to extensive fine art, crystal and other
collections. Tours available. Grounds
admission $5 adults, $2 children 2-12,
under 2 free. Main house $15 adults, $6
children in grades 1-6, younger children
not admitted. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat.,
noon-5 p.m. Sun. South of Thomasville,
Ga., on Highway 319. 229-226-2344,
www.pebblehill.com.
State and Historic Capitols: A contrast
of Floridas old and new. The Historic State
Capitol, built in 1845 and restored to its
1902 appearance including its red-and-
white-striped awnings, is a Classical
Revival jewel. Surrounding it is the starkly
modern New Capitol and satellite office
buildings, built in the 1970s. 400 Monroe
St. at Apalachee Parkway. Historic Capitol,
487-1902. New Capitol, 488-6167.
Supreme Court Building: An elegant
neoclassic structure with Doric columns
dating to 1948, the states highest court
was designed by James Gamble Rogers II
of Yonge and Hart in Pensacola. To
schedule a tour, call 488-8845. 500 S.
Duval St., www.floridasupremecourt.org.
98 Living Here | 2014-2015
The Artist Series: Promotes and encour-
ages classical music in Tallahassee by
presenting five concerts featuring ac-
claimed classical ensembles and emerging
soloists. 224-9934, www.theartist-
series.org.
The Arts at Good Samaritan: Offers
music, dance, theater and visual arts
classes for all ages. 3720 Capital Circle
SE, 325-6753, www.GoodSamaritanArt-
sTallahassee.org.
Big Bend Community Orchestra: An
all-volunteer symphony orchestra open to
capable musicians on a space-available
basis. Rehearsals on Thursday evenings.
893-4567, www.bbcorch.org.
The Boys Choir of Tallahassee: Helps
young males realize their full potential by
proactively building character, restoring
self-esteem, reducing risky behavior and
promoting academic success. 224-9934,
www.theboyschoir.org.
Capital Chordsmen: Four-part barber-
shop harmony chorus open to men who
like to sing, from high school through
senior citizens. Scholarships available to
student members. No formal musical
training necessary. 224-7729,
www.capitalchordsmen.org.
Capital City Band of Tallahassee
Community College: A non-auditioned
band of capable community members and
TCC students (credit available). 201-6070,
peregoc@tcc.fl.edu.
Classical Guitar Society of
Tallahassee: A nonprofit organization
that brings world class guitarists to
perform in Tallahassee through its Seven
Hills Guitar Series. 521-0700.
Florida A&M University Department
of Music: Prepares musicians for training
positions. 599-3024, www.famu.edu.
FSU Capital Childrens Choir: A
community outreach program for K-9
children, sponsored by the College of
Music at FSU. No auditions or music
reading skills needed. 644-3424,
www.music.fsu.edu/Ensembles/Music-in-
the-Community.
FSU College of Music: Performs more
than 450 concerts and recitals throughout
the year. Most performances are free.
www.music.fsu.edu.
Florida State Opera: Part of the FSU
School of Music. 644-6500, music.fsu.edu/
Ensembles/Opera.
Jingle Jam, Inc.: A music educational
program created for children ages 6
months to 5 years of age. Available at
most pre-schools and at Stubbs Music
Center. 321-5656, www.jinglejam.net.
Northside Stage at Wildwood
Church: Connects artists and audiences
with Mainstage Concerts and Coffee-
houses presented free of charge. 894-
1400, Facebook.com/TheNorthsideStage.
Repasky Piano Studio: Private piano
lessons and theory for students ages 5
through adult. 3744 Tom John Lane,
668-4599, repaskypianostudio.blog-
spot.com.
RM Piano & Keyboard Studio: Private
studio offering affordable piano lessons
for all ages and levels. 894-1298,
www.rmpiano.com.
Seven Hills Guitar Series: Provides
concerts and recitals that feature guitar
including classical, jazz, Latin American,
Flamenco and world music. Most concerts
hosted by St. Johns Episcopal Church.
www.sevenhillsconcerts.com
Sopchoppy Opry: Down home country
music. Held at 7 p.m. the last Saturday,
January through November, at Historic
Sopchoppy High School Auditorium.
962-3711.
Stubbs Educational Foundation:
Provides an avenue for local music
teachers to offer their instruction pro-
grams to K-12 grade scholarship students.
1260 Timberlane Road, 893-8782,
www.stubbsfoundation.org.
Stubbs Music Center, Inc.: Provides
music instruction for all instruments, all
ages and all levels. Private and group
instruction are available. 893-8754,
www.stubbs.org.
The Tallahassee Bach Parley: Presents
a three-concert season of Baroque music,
with special sensitivity to historical style
using period instruments as well as
commentary before each piece. 224-8025,
www.tallahasseebachparley.org.
Tallahassee Brass Quintet: Ceremonial
or festive music for every occasion.
668-4505, www.tbq5.net.
Tallahassee Civic Chorale: A nonprofit,
non-audition community chorus consisting
of 50-60 singers who perform at least
three major concerts in Turner Auditorium
on the TCC campus. 942-1893, www.civ-
icchorale.org.
Tallahassee Community Chorus: 200
voice non-auditioned mixed chorus.
Rehearses on Monday evenings present-
ing three concerts per year. 597-0603,
www.tcchorus.org.
Tallahassee Community College Jazz
Band: A
non-auditioned music class that
offers an outlet to learn and perform a
wide variety of stage band music. Com-
munity members, TCC students and high
school seniors capable of playing appro-
priate instrument and reading music are
eligible. 201-6070, peregoc@tcc.fl.edu.
Tallahassee Girls Choir of CHOICE
:
Open to girls ages 8-18. The girls meet at
Bethel AME Church, 501 W. Orange Ave.
574-0942, drhilltgcoc@gmail.com.
Tallahassee Music Teachers
Association: Unites qualified music
teachers, to raise the standards of music
teaching, sponsor meetings for study and
discussion, stimulate musical interest
among the public and provide enriching
student activities. www.tallahasseem-
ta.org.
Tallahassee Symphony Orchestra:
The TSO, led by Maestro Darko Butorac,
enriches lives through music. The TSO
offers live performances in Ruby Diamond
Concert Hall, a popular Pops in the Park
event at Southwood, an annual Young
Peoples Concert and many outreach/
education initiatives. 224-0461,
www.tallahasseesymphony.org.
Tallahassee Symphony Society: A
support group for the Tallahassee Sym-
phony Orchestra. Raises funds through an
annual Holiday Tour of Homes as well as
soirees. 224-0461, www.tallahassee-
symphony.org/volunteer.
Tallahassee Youth Orchestras:
Provides music education programs that
cultivate the next generation of musicians
and patrons of the arts. Offers five orches-
tras designed for various levels of ability.
224-8966, www.tallahasseeyouthorches-
tras.com.
Tallahassee Winds: An adult symphonic
band that plays challenging wind band
literature. www.music.fsu.edu/ensembles/
music-in-the-community/tallahassee-
winds.
Tallahassee Uke Jammers: Ukulele
players and enthusiasts who meet every
Sunday 4-6 p.m. at Finnegans Wake in
Midtown. 933-8657, ret380@gmail.com.
Thomasville Entertainment
Foundation (TEF): Brings internationally
acclaimed artists and ensembles to the
South Georgia/North Florida region in an
annual series of six concerts. 229-226-
7404, www.tefconcerts.com.
University Musical Associates: The
community patrons group for the FSU
College of Music, providing financial
assistance for students and support for
special performers and scholars. 644-
4744, www.music.fsu.edu/Quicklinks/
University-Musical-Associates.
Voces Angelorum: Voices of Angels,
a volunteer womens community chamber
choir dedicated to classical music. Sings
about 10 concerts a year. Auditions held
annually. www.vocestally.org.
Music organizations
Tallahassee Symphony director
Darko Butorac. NADA PLESKONJIC/
SPECIAL TO THE DEMOCRAT
Tallahassee is such a mellifluous, four-syllabylled
word that it appears in the title and lyrics of innu-
merable songs. The classic mentions include Fred-
dy Cannons Tallahassee Lassie (covered by the
Rolling Stones in the 2011 reissue of the Some
Girls album), Bing Crosbys Tallahassee (with
the line, Sit down and rest your chassis, youre in
Tallahassee) and Aerosmiths lyric in Last Child:
Take me back to a south Tallahassee.
Arts & Entertainment Music
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 99
Arts & Entertainment Poetry in motion
African Caribbean Dance Theater: A
nonprofit youth and adult cultural educa-
tion organization based in Tallahassee.
ACDT offers year-round classes, work-
shops and performances and is the
presenter of the annual Florida African
Dance Festival. 539-4087, www.fadf.org.
The Argentine Tango Society of
Tallahassee: A nonprofit educational
organization dedicated to the cultural
experience of the Argentine Tango and to
its study, preservation and promotion.
322-0194, www.tangotallahassee.com.
The Azucar! Dance Company: A
nonprofit student organization at Florida
State University with a mission to promote
the beauty and richness of the Latin
culture and its traditions. info@azucarf-
su.com.
Ballet Arts Conservatory of
Tallahassee : The American Ballet
Theatres national training curriculum is
the basis for the centers programs.
Classes offered for children, teens and
adults in ballet, pointe, pre-ballet, contem-
porary and jazz. Home of the Company
Etudes Youth Ensemble Ballet. 2028 North
Point Blvd., 562-1430, www.bactdance-
.com.
Dance Electric Dance Academy:
Classes for ages 2 through adult including
ballet, pointe, jazz, tap, modern, hip-hop
and Pilates. 2957-1 Capital Park Circle,
322-2360, www.danceelectricdance.com.
FSU Ballroom Dance Club: Group
offers the opportunity to learn ballroom,
popular and Latin dances. Classes are
usually Sunday nights in the FSU Union
Ballrooms. Partners not required. in-
fo@ballroomfsu.com.
Florida State University School of
Dance: Degree granting program dedicat-
ed to providing the highest caliber of
dance training, practice and scholarship.
644-1023, www.dance.fsu.edu.
In Step Studio Inc.: Multicultural studio
featuring dance, music and costuming.
Dance instruction includes flamenco,
Middle Eastern and Polynesian. 2609
Glover Road, 421-5151,
www.instepstudio.com.
Journey To Dance: A nonprofit perform-
ing arts organization creating dance that
moves the spirit and touches the soul.
545-9835, www.journeytodance.com.
Killearn Kids Dance Troupe: Childrens
dance performing troupe for pre-school
through 5th grade with classes in ballet,
tap, lyrical, hip-hop and musical theater.
668-1162, www.killearnkidsdance.com.
Maggie Allessee National Center for
Choreography (MANCC): The only
national center for choreography in the
world located in a major research in-
stitution, embedded within the FSU School
of Dance. 645-2894, www.mancc.org.
Pas de Vie Ballet: This local company's
season offers three vibrant productions:
"The Nutcracker" on Thanksgiving
weekend, Dance at the Dixie and
Spotlight on Dance in the spring.
290-2247, www.pasdevieballet.com.
Southern Academy of Ballet Arts:
Classes include ballet technique, pointe,
pas de deux (partnering), boys classes
adult ballet and modern, tap and creative
movement. Age 3 and up. 1704-C Capital
Circle NE, 222-0174, sababallet.com.
Ta-Da: Provides instruction in princess
pre-ballet, tap, ballet, lyrical, jazz, flag
team, dance team, Irish dance for ages 4
to adults. 528-3161, www.stubbs.org
The Tallahassee Ballet: A regional,
nonprofit dance company featuring a
diverse repertoire of classical and contem-
porary ballet performed by both profes-
sional and emerging dancers. 224-6917,
www.tallahasseeballet.org.
Tallahassee Community Friends of
Old Time Dance: Contra dances featur-
ing a live band and caller. Each dance is
taught before music begins. No experience
or partner required. Wear soft-soled shoes.
878-6280, www.tallydancer.com.
Tallahassee Irish Step Dancers:
Sponsored by Killearn Performing Arts,
promotes Irish dance. 443-7512,
www.kpadance.com.
Tallahassee Senior Center Dance
Classes: The center hosts several dance
classes, such as contra, line dance, ball-
room-swing and more. 1400 N. Monroe
St. 891-4000.
USA Ballroom Dance Association:
This local chapter of a national organiza-
tion promotes ballroom dancing. Member-
ship not required for participation. Dances
held third Saturday. Tallahassee Senior
Center, 1400 N. Monroe St., www.usa-
dance6010.org.
Womens Bellydance Center: Oriental
dance studio where women learn to
express themselves through the art of
Middle Eastern dance, also known as belly
dance. 1541 S. Monroe St., 590-8387,
www.thewbcenter.com.
World Ballet: A nonprofit studio offering
ballet, pointe, jazz, contemporary, boys'
class, adult class, private ballet lessons,
summer camps and productions through-
out the year. 2518 Cathay Court, 553-
3315, www.worldballetinc.org.
Dance
Grant Nolder and Seah Hagan in a pas de deux class for young
dancers at the Southern Academy of Ballet Arts. NATALIA
BOTHA/SPECIAL TO THE DEMOCRAT
Welcome to Happy Trails Ranch!
Birthday Parties
Summer Camps
Field Trips
Riding Lessons
Horse Boarding
6776 Quail Valley Rd.
(corner, Bradfordville Rd.
& Quail Valley Rd.)
Tallahassee, FL 32309
Call Miss Nicki at
893-0771
email: nicki@happytrailsranch.com
or visit
www.happytrailsranch.com
(&%''''"!"#$$
'%$&&&&"!"(#!
100 Living Here | 2014-2015
Broadway Series: Local audiences can
get a bite of the Big Apple during the
Civic Centers Broadway series. 505 W.
Pensacola St. 487-1691, www.tlccc.org.
Canopy Roads Theater: Dedicated to
producing literary classics and challenging
new plays. www.canopyroadstheater.org.
Capital City Shakespeare: Performimg
the works of William Shakespeare for the
enrichment of the Tallahassee community.
386-6476, www.ccshakespeare.webs.com.
Dixie Theatre: Produces live professional
theater and musical events January
through March, with special events in
October through December. 653-3200,
www.dixietheatre.com.
FAMU Essential Theatre: Produces a
variety of plays, from classical to contem-
porary, with an emphasis on African-
American culture. Performances in the
Charles Winter Wood Theatre at Tucker
Hall on the FAMU campus. 561-3394,
www.famu.edu/essentialtheatre.
Irish Repertory Theater: Features Irish
playwrights and Irish themes. www.talla-
hasseeirishrep.com.
The Laughing Stock: Political cabaret at
its funniest! This local troupe immortalizes
and scandalizes local celebrities in song.
www.laughingstockcabaret.com.
The Mickee Faust Club: Weird theater
for the weird community. Cabarets,
Shakespeare, original video and audio
productions, and a Queer As Faust festival
in June. 607 McDonnell Drive, 562-RATS
(7287), www.mickeefaust.com.
Monticello Opera House: Built in 1890,
Monticello Opera House offers a full
performing season in its historic second-
floor theater. Elevator access available.
Dinner option precedes most theatrical
presentations. 185 W. Washington St.,
Monticello, 997-4242, www.monticelloop-
erahouse.org.
Panhandle Players: Nonprofit commu-
nity theater dedicated to bringing quality
theatrical entertainment to Franklin
County and the Panhandle region since
1987. 370-5281, www.panhandleplayer-
s.com.
Quincy Music Theatre: The region's
only all-musical community theater
welcomes all ages, talents and abilities
both on stage and backstage. The Leaf
Theatre, 118 E. Washington St., Quincy, 20
minutes from Tallahassee. 875-9444,
www.qmt.org.
The School of Theatre at FSU: Pre-
sents productions in two venues: the
Mainstage Theatre in the Fine Arts
Building on the corner of Copeland and
Tennessee streets and the Lab Theatre at
the corner of Copeland and Pensacola
streets. Season ticket packages available.
239 Fine Arts Building, 644-6500,
theatre.fsu.edu.
Southern Shakespeare Festival:
Devoted to all things Shakespeare,
culminating in performances in Cascades
Park. 321-0437, www.southernshakespea-
refestival.org.
Swamp Gravy: A unique folklife play
produced annually by the Colquitt/Miller
Arts Council. Cotton Hall, Colquitt, Ga.
Tickets sell out months in advance.
229-758-5450, info@swampgravy.com.
Theatre Tallahassee: A true community
theater where novice actors tread the
boards with seasoned veterans. Offers a
variety of productions. Volunteers wel-
come. 1861 Thomasville Road, 224-8474,
www.theatretallahassee.org.
Theater with a Mission: Based at
Mission San Luis, making Florida history
come alive through live theater.
www.theaterwithamission.com.
TheatreTCC!: With a state-of-the-art
auditorium and stage, each TheatreTCC!
production features a group of talented
students. 201-9882, www.tcc.fl.edu/
theatretcc.
Thomasville On Stage and Company:
TOSAC is open to community involvement
and produces four shows annually. 117 S.
Broad St., Thomasville, Ga., 229-226-
0863, www.tosac.com.
Young Actors Theatre (YAT): Cele-
brating its 39th year of training and
production. Its mission is to expose,
educate and enlighten through live
theatre. 609 Glenview Drive, 386-6602,
www.youngactorstheatre.com.
Theater
MOVIE THEATERS
All Saints Cinema: 918 Railroad
Ave., Tallahassee Film Society,
386-4404, www.tallahasseefilm-
s.com.
AMC Tallahassee Mall 20: 2415 N.
Monroe St., 386-7873.
IMAX Theatre at the Challenger
Learning Center: 200 S. Duval St.,
645-7777, www.challengertlh-
.com.
Movies 8: 2810 Sharer Road,
671-8080, www.movies8tallahas-
see.com.
Regal Governors Square Stadium
12: 1501 Governors Square Blvd.,
878-7211.
Quincy Music Theatre production of Shrek. KAREN
MESTERTON-GIBBONS/DEMOCRAT FILES
Melanie Griffith and filmmakers during
filming of Something Wild in
Tallahassee. DEMOCRAT FILES
Numerous movies have been filmed in
Tallahassee or mentioned Tallahassee. Our
three favorites: Parts of the Jonathan
Demme cult hit, Something Wild (1986)
was filmed in Tallahassee and Quincy. In
the 2009 movie Zombieland, characters
are named for the cities they are trying to
reach and Woody Harrelsons character is
named Tallahassee. In Green Mile
(1999), a prisoner about to be executed is
assured his pet mouse will have a new
home in a Tallahassee tourist attraction
called Mouseville.
Innumerable movie and televi-
sion actors grew up in Tallahas-
see or attended
Florida State Uni-
versity or Florida
A&M University.
But our two favor-
ite Tallahassee
connections in
todays Hollywood
are owned by
actress Cheryl
Hines (Curb Your
Enthusiasm, Sub-
urgatory) and
Tony Hale
(Veep), who both
started with Tallahassees Young
Actors Studio.
Hines
Hale
Arts & Entertainment Stage & screen
COCAS ONLINE GUIDE TO OUTDOOR ART
www.cocanet.org/outdoorart
This guide offers a view of the iconic, historic and quirky works of art
that enhance Tallahassees natural beauty. It highlights more than
160 public sculptures, murals, windows, memorials and monuments
in our community. It includes public art from city, county and state/
university collections as well as corporate and community artworks.
All of the outdoor artworks can be viewed from the street, sidewalk
or other public locations. The map feature can be used to search for
art and create tours of favorite artworks in any area of town.
Arts & Entertainment From the easel
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 101
Art Alleys: A community of volunteers
and students who have cleaned and
greened two formerly blighted alleys off
Gaines Street. 559-3819, alleyvolun-
teer@gmail.com.
Artists League of FSU Museum of
Fine Arts: Promotes regional artists by
creating exhibition opportunities, seminars
and networking opportunities.
www.artistsleaguefsu.org.
COCA (Council on Culture & Arts): A
nonprofit organization that serves as the
facilitator and voice for the arts and
cultural industry in Floridas capital area.
COCA serves a dual role: providing in-
formation and promoting the arts and
culture. 816 S. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.,
224-2500, www.cocanet.org.
Plein Air Tallahassee: A collective of fine
art artists who enjoy painting outdoors.
Monthly planned outings. 878-3278,
clarkm32311@comcast.net.
The Sharing Tree: A reusable resource
center that collects and redistributes
materials while educating the community
on the art of creative reuse. 617 Industrial
Drive, 264-4035, www.thesharingtreefl.org.
Tallahassee Watercolor Society:
Advances the art of watercolor through
workshops, critiques, exhibits, plein air and
program presentations.
www.tallahasseewatercolorsociety.com.
Thomasville Center for the Arts:
Enriches the artistic life of South Georgia
through opportunities in the visual, per-
forming and literary arts. 600 E. Washing-
ton St., Thomasville, Ga. 229-226-0588,
www.thomasvillearts.org.
Arts groups
GALLERIES
1020Art: 1020 E. Lafayette St. 383-1020,
www.1020art.com.
621 Gallery: Railroad Square Art Park,
621 Industrial Drive, 224-6163,
www.621gallery.org.
Anitas Funky Emporium: 3686
Woodville Highway, 443-4466.
ArtPort Gallery: Tallahassee Regional
Airport, 224-2500, www.cocanet.org/
artport-gallery.
Black Archives Union Bank: 219
Apalachee Parkway, 599-3020.
Brienenart: 2209 Mulberry Blvd.,
524-0873, www.brienenart.com.
City Hall Art Gallery: Second floor, 300
S. Adams St., 224-2500, www.coca-
net.org/city-hall.
A Different Drummer Antiques &
Art: 206 S. Broad St., Thomasville, Ga,
229-227-6060.
Division of Cultural Affairs 22nd
Floor Capitol Gallery: 400 S. Monroe
St., 245-6470.
Elisabeth Ireland Poe Gallery of
Sporting Art: Pebble Hill Plantation,
Highway 319, Thomasville, Ga., 229-226-
2344.
Exotica Gallery: Railroad Square Art
Park, 1031 Commercial Drive, 459-1300,
exoticagallery@yahoo.com.
FAMU Foster Tanner Art Gallery:
1630 Pinder St., 599-3161.
Frontier Trading Company: 3686
Woodville Highway, 656-2113.
Gadsden Arts Center: 13 N. Madison
St., Quincy, 875-4866, www.gadsdenart-
s.org.
George Griffin Pottery Gallery:
Highway 319, Sopchoppy, 962-9311.
Jefferson Arts: 575 Washington St.,
Monticello, 997-3311, www.jeffersonarts-
gallery.com.
LeMoyne Center for the Visual
Arts:
125 N. Gadsden St., 222-8800, www.le-
moyne.org.
Galleries &
Museums
(&%''''"!"$!#
102 Living Here | 2014-2015
Arts & Entertainment From the easel
Nomads Art Gallery: 1318 N. Monroe
St., 681-3222, www.nomadsartgallery-
.com.
Oglesby Gallery: 104 Oglesby Union,
Florida State University, 644-6860,
union.fsu.edu/artcenter/gallery.
Outpost: 777 Miccosukee Road, 577-
1003.
Pelican Place: 1357 Martin Luther King
Road, Crawfordville, 926-6058, www.pel-
icanplace.net.
Photographers Group Network
Studio: 1720 S. Gadsden St., Suite 222,
216-1400.
Picture Frames Unlimited: 2774
Capital Circle NE, 422-0088, www.pictu-
reframesunlimited.com.
Pyramid Studios: 2645 W. Tennessee
St., 513-1733, www.pyramidinc.org.
Quincie Hamby Art Jewelry: 1325
Thomasville Road, 222-8411, www.quin-
ciehamby.com.
Railroad Square Art Park: 567 Indus-
trial Drive, 222-6889, www.railroad-
square.us.
Signature Art Gallery: 2782 Capital
Circle NE, 297-2422, www.signatureart-
gallery.com.
South of Soho Co-Op Art Gallery:
Railroad Square Art Park, 629-C Industrial
Drive, 321-5875,
www.southofsoho.wordpress.com.
Southside Arts Complex: 2525 S.
Monroe St., 597-9726, southsideart-
scomplex.org.
Tallahassee Senior Center: Old Armory
Gallery, 1400 N. Monroe St. 891-4016.
TCC Fine Art Galleries: Fine and
Performing Arts Center, 444 Appleyard
Drive, 201-6200.
Thomasville Center for the Arts: 600
E. Washington St., Thomasville, Ga.,
229-226-0588, www.thomasvillearts.org.
Yrabedra Studio: Railroad Square Art
Park, 626 McDonnell Drive, 222-0121,
www.yrabedra.net.
MUSEUMS
FAMU Meek-Eaton Black Archives
and Museum: Features exhibits detailing
the African-American experience in North
Florida and beyond. Carnegie Center,
Florida A&M University, 445 Gamble St.,
599-3020.
FSU Museum of Fine Arts: MoFA has a
history of exciting projectsfrom lush
painting to dynamic sculpture exhibitions,
from challenging installations to provoca-
tive photography shows. 530 W. Call St.,
644-6836, www.mofa.fsu.edu.
Goodwood Museum & Gardens: This
gracious antebellum plantation house and
its gardens are open to the public for
tours and special events. 1600 Miccosukee
Road, 877-4202, www.goodwood-
museum.org.
Museum of Florida History: Highlights
significant periods in Floridas social
history. Over a dozen exhibits explore
some of the most important people and
events from Floridas past. Admission and
parking are free. R.A. Gray Building, 500
S. Bronough St., 245-6400. www.museu-
moffloridahistory.com.
Knott House Museum: Built in 1843,
the house served as temporary Union
Headquarters in 1865. The house is
decorated in Victorian splendor with all of
the furnishings original to the house when
the Knott family lived there. 301 E. Park
Ave., 922-2459, www.museumofflorida-
history.com/about/sites.
Riley House Museum: Constructed circa
1890 on the fringe of a community called
Smokey Hollow. In addition to a vivid
display of Tallahassees post-Civil War
history, the Riley Museum offers visitors a
chance to learn about the legacy of John
Gilmore Riley and others. 419 E. Jefferson
St., 681-7881, www.rileymuseum.org.
Tallahassee Museum: Features animal
and nature exhibits, along with historic
buildings. 3945 Museum Drive, 575-8684,
www.tallahasseemuseum.org.
Tallahassee Automobile Museum:
One of the Southeasts best collections of
rare automobiles and collectibles. 6800
Mahan Drive, 942-0137, www.tacm.com.
Taylor House Museum of Historic
Frenchtown: The birth home of the
legendary Leon County educator Aquilina
Howell, and includes exhibitions such as a
Frenchtown Room and a Civil Rights
Room. 442 W. Georgia St., 222-6111,
www.tallahasseeurbanleague.org.
Two art teachers admire student work at the FSU Museum of Fine Arts. JORDAN CULVER/DEMOCRAT FILES
Mark Heindorn checks out some Christmas ornaments during the holiday show at LeMoyne Center
for the Visual Arts. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
Patrons pack the Fermentation Lounge during a pour for their special brews. GLENN BEIL/DEMOCRAT
FILES
A.J.s Sports Bar: A popular spot to
watch college and professional sports.
1800 W. Tennessee St. 681-0731.
www.ajssportsbar.net.
Alchemy Spirits & Concoctions: 1122
Thomasville Road (enter through Midtown
Filling Station), 727-8803. www.alchemy-
midtown.com.
American Legion Hall Post 13: Fea-
tures dance lessons, live music and more.
Available for private parties. 229 Lake Ella
Drive. 222-3382.
Andrews Capital Bar & Grill: During
fall and winter, the ideal spot for pre- and
post-game festivities. During spring, its
the place to watch the politics behind the
politics. 228 S. Adams St. 222-3444.
www.andrewsdowntown.com.
B Sharps Jazz Club: Listening room
seating about 75 for an intimate musical
experience. 648 W. Brevard St. 577-0748.
www.b-sharps.com.
Backwoods Bistro: 401 E. Tennessee
St., 320-6345.
Bajas Beach Club: Dance, hip-hop and
R&B. 2020 W. Pensacola St. 574-2020.
Big Daddys Import Drafthouse: Live
bands. Open every night. 654 W. Ten-
nessee St. 561-6449. www.drinkfreebeer-
.com.
Big Guns BBQ: Blues, rock, DJs, jam
sessions. 2249 Highway 319 South,
Beachton, Ga. (between Thomasville and
Tallahassee). 229-364-7129.
Birds Aphrodisiac Oyster Shack: 325
N. Bronough St. 222-1075. www.bird-
soystershack.com.
Boxers Pub: Smoker-friendly pub with
music, pool, drink specials. 1715 Apalach-
ee Parkway. 329-6255.
Bradfordville Blues Club: Live blues
bands on weekends. 7152 Moses Lane.
906-0766. www.bradfordvilleblues.com.
Bullwinkles Saloon: Features indoor
dance club with DJ, live music in beer
garden. 620 W. Tennessee St. 224-0651.
www.bullwinklessaloon.com.
Cafe Shisha Hookah Bar: Coffee shop
and shisha lounge, 1416 W. Tennessee St.,
222-0405, www.cafeshisha.us.
Calico Jacks Seafood House &
Oyster Bar: Draws an eclectic crowd of
older regulars and college students. 2738
Capital Circle NE. 385-6653. www.cal-
icojacks.com.
Cabells American Bar & Grill: Acous-
tic music, karaoke. 2915 Kerry Forest
Parkway. 893-8888.
Capt. SeaNiles Pool & Pub: Live rock
and country music on weekends. 4360
Crawfordville Highway. 745-8462.
Club Downunder: Offering perfor-
mances throughout the week with
nationally recognized bands, comedians.
75 N. Woodward Ave. 644-6673. up.u-
nion.fsu.edu.
Clusters & Hops: Restaurant and retail
shop. 707 N. Monroe St. 222-
2669.www.winencheese.com.
Clydes & Costellos: Near the Capitol, it
draws movers and shakers daily and a
younger crowd weeknights and weekends.
210 S. Adams St., 224-2173.
Coliseum Tallahassee: 1833 W. Ten-
nessee St. 222-7662. www.coliseum-
tallahassee.com.
Corner Pocket Bar & Grill: 2475
Apalachee Parkway. 574-2724. corner-
pocketsportsbar.com.
Down Below/Barnacle Bills Seafood
Restaurant: Nautical themed bar that
features karaoke nights plus pool, darts,
foosball, live music. 1830 N. Monroe St.
385-8734. www.barnaclebills.com.
Fermentation Lounge: Beer and wine,
film screenings, live music on Tuesdays
and Pirate Night on the last Sunday of the
month. 113 All Saints St. 727-4033.
www.fermentationlounge.com.
5th Avenue Tap Room: Live music in
the Manor at Midtown. 1122 Thomasville
Road. 222-4225.
La Fiesta Mexican Restaurant: Home
of Atlantis Sin Fin Latin Night every
Saturday. 2329 Apalachee Parkway.
656-3392.
Finnegans Wake: Bluegrass, Irish music.
7-10 p.m. Sunday. 1122 Thomasville Road.
222-4225.
Hamaknockers Oasis BBQ & Sports
Bar: Live music. 460 Coastal Highway,
Ochlockonee Bay. 298-8092.
Nightlife
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 103
Arts & Entertainment Hitting the town
www.flhistoriccapitol.gov
F
R
E
E

A
D
M
I
S
S
I
O
N
(850) 487-1902
400 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL
OPEN DAILY: Mon. to Fri.9:00a.m. to 4:30p.m.
Sat.10a.m. to 4:30p.m., Sun.Noon to 4:30p.m.
Visit the
Fioviu: His1ovic C:vi1oi MUsiUm
104 Living Here | 2014-2015
Arts & Entertainment Nightlife
Hi Fi Jazz Cafe: Live jazz Friday nights.
1617 S. Adams St. 298-8092.
Hobbit American Grill: Live music on
weekends. 5032 Capital Circle SW.
942-4505. www.myhobbitonline.com.
Jakes Tavern: Live music. 460 W.
Tennessee St. 681-2700. www.jak-
estavern.net.
Joanies Gourmet Market &
Fabulous Cafe: Live acoustic music on
weekends. 102 W. Eighth Ave., Havana.
539-4433.
Krewe de Gras Midtown Tavern: Live
music. 1304 N. Monroe St. 222-0378.
Level 8: Hotel Duval, 415 N. Monroe St.
224-6000.
Liberty Bar: 1307 N. Monroe St.,
284-7966, www.libertytlh.com.
Midtown Filling Station: Drinks and
live music in an Indie-punk atmosphere.
1122 Thomasville Road. 329-7981.
Mint Martini Bar: 215 W. College Ave.,
Unit 102. 577-0222. www.101tally.com.
The Moon: A venue for a variety of live
music, including national acts. 1105 E.
Lafayette St. 878-6900. tallahassee.moo-
nevents.com.
Parlay Sports Bar: 1216 N Monroe St.,
329-6385. parlaysportsbar.com.
Potbellys: Features national, regional
and local live music and DJs. 459 W.
College Ave. 224-2233.
Pockets Pool & the Grill Restaurant:
Pool, live music and karaoke. 2810 Sharer
Road. 385-7665. www.pocketspooland-
pub.com
Proof: Beer and liquor tastings, drink
specials, big screen. 1717 W. Tennessee St.
and 644 McDonnell Drive in Railroad
Square. 894-5638,
www.proofbrewingco.com.
Pug Mahones: 926 W. Tharpe St.
Riverside Cafe: Live music on weekends.
69 Riverside Drive, St. Marks. 925-5668.
Rummys Italian Grill & Sports Bar:
Live acoustic music. 2887 Kerry Forest
Parkway. 878-8669.
Salty Dawg Pub & Deli: Live rock and
acoustic music. Home of the Famous
Acoustic Jam the first Sunday of every
month. 3813 N. Monroe St. 562-6500.
The Side Bar: 809 Railroad Ave. 224-
2233. www.sidebartheatre.com.
Sids Pub: Live entertainment, karaoke.
3839 N. Monroe St. 562-7437.
Top Flite Club: Weekend R&B and Top
40, dancing. 623 Osceola St. 575-7365.
The Warehouse: Seven regulation sized
pool tables in an old warehouse setting.
Live music and special events. 706 W.
Gaines St. 222-6188.
Waterworks: Hawaiian-themed tropical
lounge with DJs playing a variety of
genres. 1133 Thomasville Road. 224-1887.
The Wine Loft: Upscale winery. 1240
Thomasville Road. 222-9914. www.thewi-
nelofttallahassee.net
WXYZ Bar: Located in the lobby of Aloft
downtown. 200 N. Monroe St. 513-0313.
www.alofttallahassee.com/tallahassee-bar.
Zingales Billiards & Sports Bar:
Upscale billiards & sports bar. 1861 W.
Tennessee St. 224-8644.
Bartender Kenny pours a drink at the bar of the Fifth Avenue Tap Room in the Manor at Midtown. MICHAEL SCHWARZ/DEMOCRAT FILES
From left, Barbara Kephart and Adam Hume react to a play while
watching World Cup Soccer at Finnegans Wake in June. MICHAEL
SCHWARZ/SPECIAL TO THE DEMOCRAT
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 105
IN THIS SECTION
Introduction
Restaurants
Food trucks
Even a basic burger has
great taste and
eye-appeal at the Sage
Restaurant. MIKE
EWEN/DEMOCRAT
Eat & Drink
ONLINE
See dining video at
TLHlivinghere.com
106 Living Here | 2014-2015
Eat & Drink Taste of Tallahassee
I liken Tallahassees restaurant scene to a kaleido-
scope.
Take a look at whats available, wait a month, take
another look and presto its changed.
Which leads me to my first cant-argue-with-this
observation about our towns restaurant scene, after
probing it from every conceivable angle for the past
eight years: Tallahassee loves a new restaurant.
A new restaurant be it a chain, a pizza joint, a
sub shop or a white-linen bistro is
going to draw crowds. The trick, as
every chef and every restaurant owner
knows, is to keep those patrons coming
back.
As of the first week in June, there
were 615 licensed restaurants in Leon
County. This statistic comes by way of
the state Department of Business and
Professional Regulation. If you know
what you want, its here.
Lets start at the top. There are a
handful of high-end, independent restaurants that, for
me, partly define what Tallahassee is all about. Sage
(I vote it the best kitchen in town), Cypress, Kool
Beanz, Clusters & Hops and The Front Porch rule the
four-star dining roost in Tallahassee. A couple should
expect to spend $100 or more for two appetizers, two
entrees and a bottle of wine at these restaurants.
As for chains, Tallahassee fits the bill for mid-tier.
There is no shortage of national companies with
restaurants here from Olive Garden to Ruby Tues-
day to Macaroni Grill but the premium chains (save
a scaled down version of Shulas at Hotel Duval) have
yet to set up shop here.
The number of ethnic restaurants has grown by
leaps and bounds. The number of Indian and Thai
eateries is five-fold what is was six years ago. If
youre looking for a recommendation, start with Siam
Sushi at the Lake Ella Publix Plaza. And there may be
more sushi restaurants than Thai and Indian com-
bined. If you havent been to Sakura (1318 N. Monroe)
and you love Japanese fare, you owe to yourself to
give it a try.
We are also in the midst of a food truck explosion.
DBPR reports 63 licensed food trucks as of the first
week in June. You can find them at Lake Ella on
Thursdays and other locations. The food trucks are a
microcosm of Tallahassees dining scene in many
ways. They range from hot dogs to empanadas, from
the pedestrian to the sublime.
Senior writer Doug Blackburn was a food writer and restaurant critic
in Albany, N.Y. for 12 years.
Dining out: Something for everyone
Keith Baxter, owner of Kool Beanz, prepares linguini with crawfish, tasso
ham, mushrooms and asiago cheese. GLENN BEIL/DEMOCRAT
Doug
Blackburn
Democrat
senior writer
Hollandaise sauce is poured on a dish at the Sage Restaurant. MIKE
EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 107
Eat & Drink Have a bite!
AMERICAN
Andrews 228: 228 S. Adams St. 222-
3444.
Andrews Capital Bar and Grill: 228 S.
Adams St. 222-3444.
Another Broken Egg Cafe: 3740 Austin
Davis Ave., Building No. 1. 765-0703.
Avenue Eat and Drink: 115 E. Park Ave.,
224-0115.
Boston Market: 2329 N. Monroe St.
297-2178.
Chicken Salad Chick: 1410 Market St.,
Unit D-3. 94-2502.
Clusters and Hops: 707 N. Monroe St.
222-2669.
Crispers: 1241 Apalachee Parkway.
656-4222.
Cypress Restaurant: 320 E. Tennessee
St. 513-1100.
Decent Pizza: 1026 N. Monroe St.
222-6400.
Dog Et Al: 1456 S. Monroe St. 222-4099.
Fannys Garden Cafe: Goodwood
Museum and Gardens, 1600 Miccosukee
Road, 942-0087.
Food Glorious Food: Betton Place,
1950-C Thomasville Road. 224-7279.
Georgios: 2971 Apalachee Parkway.
877-3211.
Hopkins Eatery: 1660 N. Monroe St.,
386-4258; 1415 Market St., 668-0311;
1208 Capital Circle SE, 325-6422.
Jacobs on the Plaza: DoubleTree Hotel,
101 S. Adams St. $$$; A, C.
Kool Beanz Cafe: 921 Thomasville Road.
224-2466.
LeRoc Bistro: 415 N. Monroe St. 224-
6000.
The Lunchbox: 295 N. Magnolia Drive.
942-9766.
Marcos Pizza: 6668-11 Thomasville Road,
422-3200; 209 N. Magnolia Drive, 577-
3200.
Midtown Caboose: 1406 N. Meridian
Road, 521-1933.
Momos Pizza and Brewpub: 1410
Market St., 224-9808.
Mozaik: The Pavilions, 1410-D Market St.
893-7668.
Old Town Cafe: Market Square, 1415
Timberlane Road. 893-5741.
101 Restaurant & Lounge: Kleman
Plaza, 215 W. College Ave. 391-1309.
The Renegade Grill: 2550 Pottsdamer
St., 644-5388.
Sage, a Restaurant: 3534 Maclay Blvd.
270-9396.
TGI Fridays: 3390 Capital Circle NE.
422-8443.
St. Johns Cafe: 211 N. Monroe St.
(St.
Johns Episcopal Church). 222-2636, ext.
19.
Uptown Cafe and Catering: 1325
Miccosukee Road. 219-9800.
Vertigo Burger: 1395 E. Lafayette St.,
878-2020.
Dining
A couple snack on crispy French fries at the Hurricane Grill and
Wings. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
TD-0000252517
The Best Hamburger -
All-Natural Angus, Humanely
Raised & Handled, Vegetarian
Fed, No Steroids, Antibiotics
or Growth Hormones Ever,
Age Certifed Great Fries and
Outrageous Onion Rings- Hand
cut Awesome Dogs- Chicago
Style, NY Style or Texas Style
Frozen Custard Concretes Craft
Beers and Wines Natural Sugar
Cane Sodas
1817 Thomasville Road
850-629-4333
NATURAL
LOCAL
ATTRACTION
108 Living Here | 2014-2015
Eat & Drink Have a bite!
Voodoo Dog: 805 S. Macomb St.
224-0005.
Wells Brothers Bar & Grill: 1710 W.
Tharpe St. 942-6665.
STEAKS
Logans Roadhouse: 750 Apalachee
Parkway. 656-5756.
LongHorn Steakhouse: 2400 N.
Monroe St. 385-4028.
Marie Livingstons Steakhouse:
2705 Apalachee Parkway. 562-2525.
Outback Steakhouse: 1820 Ray-
mond Diehl Road. 385-1998.
Shulas 347 Grill: 415 N. Monroe St.
224-6005.
Teds Montana Grill: 1954 Village
Green Way. 561-8337.
SEAFOOD
Barnacle Bills: 1830 N. Monroe St.
385-8734.
Bonefish Grill: 3491-6 Thomasville
Road. 297-0460.
Calico Jacks Seafood House and
Oyster Bar: 2738 Capital Circle NE.
385-6653.
Catfish Pad: 4229 W. Pensacola St.
575-0053.
Crystal River Seafood: 2721 N.
Monroe St. 383-1530.
Harrys Seafood, Bar and Grille:
Kleman Plaza, 301 S. Bronough St. 222-
3976.
The Other Seineyard: 1660-6 N
Monroe St., 386-9191.
Shell Oyster Bar: 114 Oakland Ave.
224-9919.
The Wharf Express: 3111 Mahan
Drive, 668-1966; 745 Apalachee Parkway,
656-1688; 3813 N. Monroe St, 329-7491.
SOUTHERN &
BARBECUE
Cooshs Bayou Rouge Market &
Eatery: 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite
101. 894-4110.
The Country Kitchen: 5810 N.
Monroe St., Oak Valley Center. 562-3293.
Cracker Barrel Country Store:
2930 Hospitality St. 385-9249.
Jim and Milts Bar-B-Q: 1923 W.
Pensacola St. 576-3998.
Kaceys Home Cooking Buffet:
2545 N. Monroe St. 727-0854.
Lazy Bonz BBQ: Corner of Railroad
Avenue and Gaines Street. 519-6955.
Po Boys Creole Cafe: 1944 W.
Pensacola St. 574-4144.
Sonnys Bar-B-Q: 1460 Timberlane
Road, 906-9996, 2707 N. Monroe St.,
385-2167, and 3101 Dick Wilson Blvd.,
878-1185.
Up in Smoke Pit BBQ: 402 Tennessee
St.597-7964.
FAMILY AND DELI
Barnabys Family Inn: 2331 Apa-
lachee Parkway. 878-8700.
Decent Pizza: 1026 N. Monroe St.,
222-6400.
Flying Bear Great American
Grill: 6265 Old Water Oak Road, 320-
6132.
The Gathering Place: 3655 N.
Monroe St., 591-8470.
Mikes Stone Baked Pizza: 1313
Jackson Bluff Road, 575-3000.
Momos Pizza: 1416 W Tennessee St.,
224-9808; 1410 Market St, 412-0222.
Panera Bread: 101 N. Blair Stone Road.
216-1595; 800 Ocala Road, 580-8918;
3523 Thomasville Road, 297-0171.
Red Elephant Pizza and Grill:
Capital Plaza, 1872 Thomasville Road,
222-7492; 2910 Kerry Forest Parkway,
668-7492.
Rummys Pizza, Italian Grill &
Sports Bar: 2887-1 Kerry Forest Park-
way. 878-8669.
The Salty Dawg Pub and Deli:
3813 N. Monroe St. 562-6500.
Tallys Grille: Market Square, 1415
Timberlane Road. 893-9595.
Village Inn Restaurant: 2531
Apalachee Parkway, 877-8471; 3392
Lonnbladh Road, 297-0053.
BRASS AND
BEVERAGE
Applebees Neighborhood Grill
& Bar: 1400 Village Square Blvd. 893-
2800, 1355 Apalachee Parkway, 222-1254
and 1388 Capital Circle NW 574-1444.
Backwoods Bistro: 401 E. Tennessee
St., 320-6345.
Beef OBradys Family Sports
The dining room at Azu restaurant in Tallahassee. MICHAEL SCHWARZ/DEMOCRAT FILES
Local restaurant The Red
Elephant is big on pizza and
families. GLENN BEIL/DEMOCRAT
FILES
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 109
Eat & Drink Have a bite!
Pub: 1830-A Thomasville Road, 222-2157;
2910 Kerry Forest Parkway, 668-8580;
1208 Capital Circle SE., 504-2333.
Chilis Grill and Bar: 719 Apalachee
Parkway, 877-2148; FSU Oglesby Union,
196 Academic Way, 645-8466; 5730
Thomasville Road, 668-2070.
Cluster and Hops: 707 N. Monroe St.,
222-2669.
The Fourth Quarter Bar and
Grill: 2033 N. Monroe St. 385-0017.
Millers Ale House and Raw Bar:
722 Apalachee Parkway. 222-0364.
Ruby Tuesday: 2491 Care Drive.
219-7829.
INTERNATIONAL
A la Provence: 1415 Timberlane Road,
329-6870.
AZU Lucy Hos: 3220 Apalachee
Parkway. 893-4112.
Bahn Thai Restaurant: 1319 S.
Monroe St. 224-4765.
Bianca Pizza and Pasta: 1833 W.
Tennessee St., 580-5588; at TCC, 444
Appleyard Drive, 580-5020.
Bella Bella: 123 E. Fifth Ave. 412-1114.
Black Bean: 2205 Apalachee Parkway.
656-7848.
Cabos Island Grill and Bar: 1221
E. Lafayette St. 878-7707.
Carrabbas Italian Grill: 2779
Capital Circle NE. 297-1100.
China Delight: 220 W. Tennessee St.
222-8898.
China First: 400 Capital Circle SE.
656-2882.
China Super Buffet: 2698 N. Monroe
St. 553-9292.
The Curry Pot: 1950 Thomasville Road.
222-2879
Essence of India: Parkway Center,
1105-A Apalachee Parkway. 656-7200.
Far East Cuisine: Carriage Gate
Center, 3425 Thomasville Road. 907-9400.
Genghis Grill : 830 E. Lafayette St.,
656-4444; 1400 Village Square Blvd.,
422-4444.
La Fiesta : 2329 Apalachee Parkway.
656-3392.
Gordos Authentic Cuban Cui-
sine: 1907 W. Pensacola St., 576-5767;
1415 Timberlane Road, 727-5914.
Habanas Boardwalk : Mahan
Commons, 2819 Mahan Drive. 391-9111.
La Hacienda II: 2207 Bannerman
Road. 894-8655.
Happy Wok: 3813 N. Monroe St.,
Winn-Dixie Shopping Center. 514-3632.
International House of Food:
2013 N. Monroe St. 386-3433.
El Jalisco: 2022 N. Monroe St., 878-
0800; 2915 Kerry Forrest Pkwy, 668-1002.
Japanica Steakhouse & Sushi
Bar: Lafayette Place, 3111 Mahan Drive.
656-9888.
Jasmine Cafe: 109 E. College Ave.
681-6868.
Kiku Japanese Fusion: 3491 Thom-
asville Road. 222-5458.
King House Chinese Restaurant:
1415 Timberlane Road. 893-6969.
Kitcho : Market Square, 1415 Timberlane
Road, #121. 893-7686.
Little Athens Gyros: 666-5 W.
Tennessee St. 222-2231.
Little Italy Pizzeria and Restau-
rant: Magnolia Park Courtyard, 111-17 S.
Magnolia Drive. 878-7781 and 878-7651.
Los Amigos Mexican Restau-
rant: 2736 Capital Circle NE. 385-9992.
Lunas Italian Food:1122 Thomasville
Road.421-5862.
MASA: 1001 N. Monroe St. 847-0003.
Mellow Mushroom: 1641 W. Pensa-
cola St.575-0050.
The Melting Pot : 2727 N. Monroe St.
386-7440.
Miccosukee Root Cellar: 1311
Miccosukee Road. 597-7419.
Mom & Dads Italian Restaurant:
4175 Apalachee Parkway. 877-4518.
Morelias Mexican Dining: 1355
Market St. 907-9173.
Mori Japanese Steak House and
Sushi Bar: 2810-8 Sharer Road. 386-
8449.
Mr. Robotos Tokyo Grill: 2043 W.
Pensacola St. 574-4126.
New Stars : 777 Capital Circle SW.656-
3311.
The Olive Garden : 1103 Apalachee
Parkway. 878-2949.
1 Fresh Stir Fry: 1820 N. Monroe St.,
422-2111; 1176 Capital Circle SE, 580-2111.
Osaka Japanese Steak House
and Sushi Bar: 1690 Raymond Diehl
Road. 531-0222.
Peppers Grill and Cantina: 1140
Capital Circle SE. 877-2020.
Pitaria Mediterranean Grill: 631
W. Tennessee St. 412-7482.
A La Provence: 1415 Timberlane Road,
Market Square. 329-6870.
Reangthai : 2740 Capital Circle NE.
386-7898.
Riccardos Restaurant : 3305
Capital Circle NE. 386-3988.
Romanos Macaroni Grill : 1498
Apalachee Parkway. 877-1706.
Sahara Greek & Lebanese Cafe:
1241 E. Lafayette St. 656-1800.
Sakura Japanese Restaurant:1318
N. Monroe St. 222-9991.
Samrat Indian Restaurant: 2529
Apalachee Parkway. 942-1993.
San Miguel : 200 W. Tharpe St. 385-
3346.
Siam Sushi: 1700 N. Monroe St.
391-9021.
Super Perros : 2010 W. Tennessee St.
421-2378.
Village Pizza & Pasta : 1400-33
Village Square Blvd., Village Commons.
893- 9001.
Tijuana Flats : Lafayette Place, 3111
Mahan Drive, 597-7001; 2020 W. Pensaco-
la St., 574-4869.
Z. Bardhis : 3596 Kinhega Drive.
894-9919.
OUT-OF-TOWN
RESTAURANTS
Angelos & Sons Seafood Res-
taurant: 5 Mashes Sands Road, at the
Ochlockonee Bay Bridge, Panacea. 984-
5168 .
Blue Parrot Cafe: 68 W. Gorrie Drive,
St. George Island. 927-2987.
The Coastal Restaurant: U.S.
Highway 98, Panacea.984-2933, 984-
4986.
Joanies Gourmet Market : 102 W.
8th St., Havana. 539-4433.
Liams Restaurant: 113 E. Jackson St.
Thomasville, Ga (229) 226-9944.
The Owl Cafe: 15 Avenue D, Apalachi-
cola.653-9888.
Riverside Cafe: 69 Riverside Drive, St.
Marks. 925-5668.
The Seineyard Seafood Restau-
rant: 8159 Woodville Highway, Woodville,
421-9191.
Spring Creek Restaurant: 33 Ben
Willis Road (State Road 365), Spring Creek.
926-3751.
Three Sisters Restaurant: 370 S.
Jefferson St., Monticello.321-7102.
Uptown Cafe on Miccosukee serves sandwiches and salads.
PERFECTING LIFES CELEBRATIONS
WEDDINGS, SPECIAL EVENTS, PARTIES,
CORPORATE CATERING, & MORE
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www.cateringcapers.com
Tallahassee, Floridas Premier Catering Company
850-385-5953
TD-0000252899
1456 S Monroe Street (850)222-4099
World Class Hot Dogs
Serving Tallahassee for over 30 years
1
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110 Living Here | 2014-2015
Eat & Drink Grub on the go
Though food trucks mobile restau-
rants that abide by the same health codes
as permanent establishments are
nothing new, over the past dozen or so
years their popularity has taken off across
the country. Cities like Portland, Austin
and even Orlando rally around the minia-
ture kitchens during lunch breaks, com-
munity gatherings and festivals.
Along with craft beer and throwback
mustaches, food trucks lie at the van-
guard of hip culture and youll find all
three in Tallahassee at the newly relo-
cated Food Truck Thursday at Lake Ella.
Between the cottages and the water,
beneath a high canopy of oaks, pines and
magnolias, a cheery mass of patrons
lounge on blankets and in folding chairs
while listening to live, local music in the
early evening. They munch on specialty
sandwiches, tacos, pizzas, cupcakes and
more. The sense of community is pal-
pable: children dance to folk and blue-
grass standards, pets sniff and beg for a
bite of their owners food and strangers
chat with each other while waiting in line
at any of the half-dozen food trucks on
hand.
The correlation between food trucks
and the community can best be summa-
rized at the weekly Food Truck Thursday
event, said Beverly Rich, vice president
of the Tallahassee Food Truck Associa-
tion (TFTA) and owner of the Valhalla
Grill food truck. (The event) draws hun-
dreds of people, all of whom are there to
enjoy dinner, do some shopping and
enjoy great, live, local music.
Valhalla Grill features a Viking motif,
with a bearded, helmeted warrior on the
side of its cream-colored truck. Rich and
her crew serve up menu items such as
the Blue Ox Burger delivered on a Kaiser
roll and topped with blue cheese and
horseradish mayo and the Curried Phoe-
nix, which is marinated chicken wrapped
in naan bread and topped with a Thai
chili cream sauce.
A few steps in either direction, the
culinary vibe differs wildly. Next door at
Foodz Traveler, the motto is, Some of
thissome of that. Owner Jose Ferrer
dishes up an eclectic array of sand-
wiches, including the Memphis Traveler,
featuring a tender pork cutlet pounded
out wider than your head.
It doesnt get any better than (Food
Truck Thursday), Ferrer said. Everyone
is sitting around on blankets eating from
their favorite food truck, laughing, drink-
ing their favorite beverage, listening to
the band.
In one of the smaller tucks, MoBi
(short for Mobile Bistro), owner Viet Vu
hands tacos and sliders, wings and wraps
through a sliding glass window. Vu and
his brother have created a fusion cuisine
from their vast knowledge of Asian
street food, he said. We design our
menu around whatever inspires us: a
craving, a travel show, the market, an
event. It helps keep things fun, interesting
and challenging.
Alejandro Scougall, owner of Fired Up
Pizza a food truck with a wood-fire
oven spoke to the difficulty of finding
consistent business. The challenge is
finding a place where people will come
out and find us, he said. As well, the
area we work in is smaller than a restau-
rant, so were limited in how much food
we can make or prep.
Though Food Truck Thursday is an
undeniable success, the location only
allows for a limited number of trucks,
and owners still have six other days of
the week to find a home. The city has
created the Food Truck Court in an emp-
ty lot downtown, but since the business
has been spotty, the trucks only gather
there for lunch on Wednesdays. Other-
wise, owners find office complexes, col-
lege campuses and late-night hotspots,
and they set up at big events around
town.
Despite the challenges, owners of
roving food trucks have the satisfaction of
bringing community members together to
eat and converse outdoors. These busi-
nesses are as small and as local as it gets,
so next time you see one parked and
open for business, walk up and try a bite.
And incidentally no cash, no prob-
lem. Virtually every truck now takes
plastic.
Tallahassee food truck culture is growing
Paul Haney
Special to the Democrat
The Food Court serves lunch downtown on Wednesdays. Trucks also gather at Lake Ella
on Thursdays. MIKE EWEN/DEMOCRAT FILES
Your Guide to Living in the Tallahassee Area 111
Advertising index
Alan Weekly Homes ........................................................... 17
Alzheimers Project ............................................................. 45
Ang, Josephine ................................................................... 20
Answer One Motors ........................................................... 75
Audiology Associates ......................................................... 43
Bartlett, Gary ...................................................................... 28
Betton Hills Preparatory .................................................... 55
Bill Kimberl Construction ................................................... 17
Brush N Palette .................................................................. 74
Burger Fi ........................................................................... 107
Capital City Bank ................................................................ 77
Capital City Builders ........................................................... 17
Capital Regional Medical Center ..................................... 4, 5
Catering Capers ................................................................ 109
CenturyLink ........................................................................ 31
Challenger Learning Center .............................................. 97
Chapin, Leah ....................................................................... 20
Coldwell Banker Hartung Realty ........................... 22, 23, 24
Community Christian School ............................................. 55
Cox, Maren ......................................................................... 20
Dale Earnhardt Jr. Chevrolet ............................................... 7
Dog Et Al ........................................................................... 109
Early Learning Coalition .................................................... 51
Eden, Sarah ......................................................................... 20
First Baptist Church ............................................................ 65
First Church Of Nazarene ................................................... 62
First Commerce Credit Union ............................................ 78
Fletcher & Company Realty ............................................... 20
Florida Historic Capital Museum ..................................... 103
Frames Plus ......................................................................... 75
Gem Collection ................................................................... 30
Godwin, Donna .................................................................. 28
Growing Room ................................................................... 57
H & H Furniture and Design ........................................ 26, 27
Hancock Bank ....................................................................... 8
Happy Trails Ranch ............................................................. 99
Harborchase Assisted Living and Memory Care ............... 71
Havana Merchants Association ......................................... 94
Helm, Nancy ........................................................................ 20
Holy Comforter Episcopal Church ..................................... 62
Immanuel Baptist Church .................................................. 63
Jay Walker Enterprises ....................................................... 29
John Paul II Catholic High School ...................................... 53
Killearn United Methodist ................................................. 62
Kingdom First Realty .......................................................... 29
Kirkland, Debbie ................................................................ 20
Leon County Board of County Commissioners ............. 6, 36
Leon County Supervisor of Elections ................................. 39
Mattice & Mattice Real Estate ........................................... 20
Millers Carpet Cleaning ..................................................... 29
Mission San Luis .................................................................. 97
Narcissus .............................................................................. 74
Naturally Healthy Pet ......................................................... 74
New Leaf Food Coop .......................................................... 15
Opening Nights Peforming Arts ........................................ 92
Patty, Jennifer .................................................................... 21
Peel, Justin .......................................................................... 21
Perez, Betty ......................................................................... 21
Pink Narcissus ..................................................................... 74
Primesouth Properties ........................................................ 25
Red Hills Arms ..................................................................... 75
Retriever Property Enterprises ........................................... 21
Roberts Jewelry & Design ................................................. 75
Seiler, Lena .......................................................................... 21
Southeast Plastic Surgery ................................................... 44
St. Johns Episcopal Church ................................................ 63
St. Peter Anglican Church .................................................. 60
Steffen, Gay ........................................................................ 21
Sunshine Savings Bank ..................................................... 112
Sweat Therapy .................................................................... 74
Tallahassee Builders Association ....................................... 17
Tallahassee Ford Lincoln .................................................... 81
Tallahassee Kitchen Center ................................................ 30
Tallahassee Little Theatre ................................................ 101
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital ............................................ 2
Tallahassee Museum Of History & Natural Science ............ 3
Tallahassee Nurseries ......................................................... 85
Tallahassee Senior Center .................................................. 67
Tallahassee Symphony Orchestra ...................................... 99
Teem, Cindy ........................................................................ 21
The Louver Shop ................................................................. 19
Thomas University .............................................................. 48
TMH Federal Credit Union ................................................. 76
Trail & Ski ............................................................................ 75
Trinity Methodist Church ................................................... 62
Wakulla County Tourist Development .............................. 87
Walking Shoe Shop ............................................................ 74
Warner Soccer .................................................................... 89
Westminster Oaks .............................................................. 69
Whole Foods Market .......................................................... 19
Wild Birds Unlimited .......................................................... 89
Worley Construction .......................................................... 17
Living Here Advertiser Index
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focusing all our efforts in Tallahassee and have added 2 new locations in order to meet the needs of our customers.
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Meeting the Financial Needs of the Tallahassee
Community for Over 60 years!
Meeting the Financial Needs of the Tallahassee
Community for Over 60 years!
1400 E. Park Ave. | 3266 Mahan Dr. | 1700 N. Monroe St. | 3534 Thomasville Rd. | 503 Appleyard Dr. | 3641 Coolidge Ct.
www.SunshineSavingsBank.com
850-219-7200